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Imperial gazetteer of India .. (Volume 17) online

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a height of nearly 4,500 feet. The Mlkirs, the tribe inhabiting these
hills, speak a language which occupies an intermediate position between
Bodo or Kachari and the various forms of Naga speech. In character
and habits they differ entirely from the savage hillmen to the south,
and are quieter and more timid than any other tribe in Assam. Dalton
states ' that they were originally driven from the hills of North Cachar
to the Jaintia Hills, where they are still to be found in considerable
numbers ; but the majority of the tribe were displeased with the
treatment they received, and moved to the locality which has since
borne their name. Similar migrations were undertaken by the Lalungs,
a kindred neighbouring tribe, who according to their traditions went to
the Jaintia Hills to escape the necessity of providing the Kachari Raja
with a daily ration of six seers of human milk, and left because
they did not like the matriarchal theory of inheritance there in force.
The Mikirs are said to have been compelled to forswear the use of
arms by the Ahom government, and this is offered as an explanation
of their present peaceful disposition. They live in small hamlets near
the crops of rice, cotton, and chillies which they raise on the hill-side.
Their houses are large and strongly built, and are raised on platforms
above the ground. Rice is their staple food, but they eat fowls and
pork and consume large quantities of fermented liquor.

Milak. — South-eastern talisll in the State of Rampur, United
Provinces, lying between 28° 34' and 28° 51' N. and 79° 5' and
^ Ethnology of Bengal, p. 54.



342



MIT.AK



79° 1 8' E., with an area of 156 square miles. Population (1901), 94,046.
There are 201 villages and one town, Milak (population, 2,615),
the tahsil head-quarters. The demand for land revenue in 1903-4
was Rs. 3,83,000, and for cesses Rs. 46,000. The density of popu-
lation, 603 persons per square mile, is slightly above the State average.
The iahsil lies in the fertile central tract. In 1903-4 the area under
cultivation was 115 square miles, of which 24 were irrigated, chiefly
from canals.

Milam. — Village in the District and tahstl of Almora, United
Provinces, situated in 30° 26' N. and 80° 9' E. Populaticni (1900),
1,733. The village is inhabited only in the summer, when it is the
residence of the lihotia traders with Tibet. It lies at an altitude of
11,400 feet, 13 miles south of the Anta Dhura pass, to which access
is obtained by a difficult and trying ascent. Below the village, near
the Gorl stream, is a considerable stretch of alluvial land, which in
summer produces buckwheat and barley. The surrounding country
is bleak and desolate, but presents a scene of peculiar grandeur. Lofty
snow mountains shut in the valley, and waterfalls are numerous and
often of considerable beauty. The London Mission has a station
here, and there is a school with about 50 pupils.

Milur. — Subdivision, tdh(k, and town in Madura District, Madras.
.SV^ Mp:i.lr.

Minbu Division. — South-western Division of Upper Burma, lying
entirely in the Irrawaddy basin, between 18° 52' and 22° 50' N. and
93° 59' ^"


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