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UNIVERSITY OP

CALIFORNIA
SANTA CRUZ



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STATISTICAL REPORT






California
State Board of Agriculture



For the Year 1917



CALIFORNIA STATE FRINTIMO OFFICB
SACRAMENTO

1918



lA— 37910



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STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, 1917-1918.



DIRECTORS.
H. A. JASTRO BakersfielJ

THEO. GIER . Oakland

CHAS. J. CHENU Sacramento

T. IL RAMSAY Red Bluff

E. F. MITCHELL Belvedere

I. L. BORDEX _ San Francisco

JOHN M. PERRY Stockton

E. FRANKLIN Colfax

E. J. DELOREY Los Angeles

GEO. C. ROEDING Fresno

T. H. DUDLEY Santa Monica

RALPH W. BULL Areata

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD.
GEO. C. ROEDING President

E. FRANKLIN Vice President

CHAS. W. PAINE Secretary

ALFRED CLARK Assistant Secretary

GEORGE ROBERTSON Statistician



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William D. Stephens, Grovernor of California.



In contributing foodstuffs California stands in the very fore-
front of the states of the Union. We must all join in praise of
the response the farmers of California have given to the call of
duty. The appeals that have been made to increase production
have had most gratifying results. We must continue to make
those appeals and we must help the farmers to surmount the
difficulties which they encounter. * * * Our purpose must be to
encourage the agriculturist and to help him in order that a maximum
of production can be brought about in this State.



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CONTENTS.



PAGK.

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 111

FINANCIAL STATEMENT X



SPECIAL ARTICLES BY DIRECTORS.

CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR — ^\'OCATIONAL DEPARTMENT. By Vice

President E. Franklin xil

THE MEAT INDUSTRY UNDER MODERN CONDITIONS. By H. A.

Jastro XV

GRAPE GROWING IN CALIFORNIA. By Thbo. Gier xvtl

THE STATE FAIR GROUNDS AND THE STATE FAIR By Chas.

J. Chbnu XX

SHEEP AND GOAT INDUSTRY IN CALIFORNIA. By T. H. Ramsat__ xxlv
THE FUTURE OF THE POULTRY INDUSTRY IN CALIFORNIA.

By E. F. MrrCHBLL xxviil

OUR MAGNIFICENT DELTA LANDS. By L L. BoRDEN xxx

GRAIN RAISING IN CALIFORNIA. By John M. Perry xxxlil

CO-OPERATION OF COUNTY AUTHORITIES WITH THE STATE BOARD

OP AGRICULTURE. By B. J. Deixjrey xxxvl

DEVELOPMENT OF THE LIGHT HORSE— PLEASURE AND DRIVING.

By T. H. Dudley , xxxvli

THE DAIRY INDUSTRY IN CALIFORNIA. By Ralph W. Bull xxxlx

THE DRAFT HORSE. By Chas. W. Paine, Secretary xli

STATISTICAL REPORT. By George Robertson, Statistician xlv



ILLUSTRATIONS.

Portraits.

HON. WILLIAM D. STEPHENS, Governor of California Frontispiece

BOARD OF DIREiCTORS — George C. Roedinq, President, Fresno. E.
Franklin, Vice President, Colfax. Chas. W. Paine, Secretary,

Sacramento vl

H. A. Jastro, Bakersfield. R. W. Bull, Areata. C. J. Chenu, Sacramento.

E. P. Mitchell, Belvedere. T. H. Dudley, Santa Monica vlll

J. M. I*ERRY, Stockton. I, L. Borden, San Francisco. T. H. Ramsay, Red

Bluff. Thbo. Gier, Oakland. E. J. Dblorey, Los Angeles ix



Views of the Fair Grounds.

SCHOOL EXHIBIT xil

RED CROSS EXHIBIT — Sacramento Schools xlv

VIEW FROM MAIN ENTRANCE:— State Fair Grounds xvlll

ONE OF THE PARKING SPACES— State Fair Grounds xx

FRONT ELEVATION — New Agricultural and Horticultural Building xUv

INSIDE VIEW OF STEEL DOME — New Agricultural and Horticultural

Building Iv

Horses.

BLACKHAWK CHESSIE, No. 15965— First and Champion Shire Mare.

California State Fair, 1916-1917 xl

ITHOS, No. 90754 — Grand Champion Percheron Stallion, California State

Fair, 1917. Owned by M. Bassett, Hanford, California xlll

STEVENOT, No. 9260— Champion Belgian Stallion, State Fair, 1917.

Exhibited Dy Ruby & Bowers, Davis, California, and Portland, Oregon xlll



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IV CONTENTS.

CattI*- PAQB.

KING SEGIS ALCARTRA PRILLY, No. 192705— Junior and Grand
Champion Holstein Bull, California State Fair, 1917. Exhibited by
Bridgeford Co., Knightsen, California xvl

HOPLAND LASSIE, No. 179452 — Grand Champion Shorthorn Cow, Cal-
ifornia State Fair, 1917. Exhibited by Hopland Stock Farm, Hopland,
California xvl

RAPHABL.LA JOHANNA AAGGIE III.. No. 185124— Property of Napa

State Hospital xxxvlil



Hogs.

RIVERINA PIONEER, No. 25957 — Grand Champion Yorkshire Boar, Cali-
fornia State Fair, 1917. Exhibited by Riverina Farms, Modesto,
California xxx

BILLIKEN, No. 37567 — Grand Champion Chester White Boar, California

State Fair, 1917. Exhibited by Chas. B. Cunningham, Mills, California xxx

CRIMSON MONARCH II, No. 179243 — Grand Champion Duroc Jersey Boar,
California State Fair, 1917. Exhibited by J. M. De Vilblss, Patterson,
California xxxil

MAYFIELD LAURELL XVI, No. 238173, Grand Champion Berkshire Sow,
California State Fair, 1917. Exhibited by Carruthers Farm, Mayfleld
and Live Oak, California xxxil



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REPORT



OF THE



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE.



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL.

July 1, 1918.
To Honorable Wit.liam D. Stephens,

Governor of the State of California.

Dear Sm: We have the honor to submit herewith the sixty-fourth
annual report of the State Board of Agriculture.

Little did the early settlers Avho came here during the days of '49
realize what magnificent opportunities w^re hidden away in the surface
of the soil, requiring only to be tickled by the thrify husbandman
to bring forth resources which w^ould develop into proportions far
exceeding in annual production the most sanguine expectations of the
miners who delved into the bowels of the earth and the rocky beds of
streams and rivers for gold.

The possibilities of agricultural and horticultural pursuits were not
fully appreciated until fully twenty years after the discovery of gold,
and then only in a moderate way.

Facts can not be contradicted, and to say that California is a veritable
empire, with a greater diversity of soils and climate than may be found
in any other country in the world, is iio exaggeration. This is a broad
statement, but it is substantiated by the great variety of our agricul-
tural and horticultural products, none of which would have developed
to the extent they have had not soil and climatic conditions been as
favorable as they are.

To secure a better and more comprehensive understanding of what
California is, a few figures will l)c interestinjr: The coast line, washed
by the warm waters of the great Pacific Ocean, is upwards of 1,000
miles long, wuth an average width of 200 miles, bounded on the east
by the snow-capped Sierra Nevada ^Mountains ranging in height from
10,000 to 14,000 feet, being covered the year round in the higher eleva-
tions with snow, ice and ancient glaciers, supplying the fertile valley



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VI CALIFORNIA STATE BOARD OP AGRICULTURE,

lands below with an abundant supply of water for irrigation purposes
as well as furnishing water for the development of hydroelectric power
for turning the wheels of industry.

Aligning the coast is a lesser range of mountains known as the Coast
Range, uniting with the Sierras in the north at the high peak of Shasta,
and in the south with the Tehachapi, forming a mountain wall around
the great Sacramento and the San Joaquin valleys, which have an
average length of 450 miles and a width varying from 40 to 100 miles.
In the Coast Range Mountains there are numerous small valleys, all of
which bear an important share in the development of the state.

Approximately the state contains 160,000 square miles of territory,
or 100,000,000 acres. The mountains and deserts cover some 60,000,000
acres of land not subject to cultivation and there are 40,000,000 acres
adapted to intensive cultivation. Of this vast tract a comparatively
small area h cultivated.

Bearing in mind that our state is larger than all the New England
states combined, including Ohio, that it contains nearly 50,000 more
square miles than Italy, and is only 36,000 square miles less than
Spain, one becomes deeply impressed with the grand opportunity for
development and exploitation we have open to us.

The California State Board of Agriculture is very vitally interested
in doing everything w-ithin its powder to promote the material develop-
ment of every resource this state possesses along the most progressive
lines. Since coming into existence in 1854 it has been deeply interested
in the advancement of all industries of every character and description.

Many of our prominent men have been and still are actively con-
nected with the State Agricultural Society and have given their time
and their services without recompense, because they considered it an
honor to be connected with an institution which has one predom-
inating idea in view, and that has been the advancing of the resources
of the state to the best of their ability.

Until recent years this work of promotion has been carried on largely
through the annual state fairs held in the fall of each year. That the
exhibits of all classes of livestock, agricultural, horticultural and other
products have had a very beneficial influence, no one will deny.

For a number of years the Board of Directors were very seriously
hampered in their efforts toward holding a satisfactory state fair
because the pavilion for housing displays was located on the State
Capitol grounds and the track and livestock exhibits were held at
another point.



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—Photo by HarUook.



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CALIFORNIA STATE BOARD OP AGRICULTURB. Vll

In the year 1906 a decided change in the life history of the society
commenced, for it was in that year that the grounds now used by the
organization, consisting of 89 acres, since increased to 105 acres, be-
came the permanent home for the annual state fairs.

It would be out of place and not in keeping with the purposes of
this address to criticise the work of those who preceded this board in
conducting the affairs of this institution. Nevertheless, in the earlier
days of this society there was a tendency on the part of the directors
to give more attention to horse racing to the exclusion of the displays
necessary for the upbuilding of the marvelous resources of the state.

All this has now been changed, for the directors feel the great respon-
sibility which devolves on them and they are bending all their energies
toward the creation of an institution which will stand out as a living
monument to the high-minded purposes which have always dominated
them in their laudable efforts to have the State Board of Agriculture
identified proijiinently with every issue which would add to the develop-
ment of the state. If there is any tendency to criticise, let us not
forget that it required the hardy pioneer of the early days, the men
who regard(»d the many obstacles they had to contend with as mere
trifles, and that Ave w^ould be very disloyal to those who preceded us
if we did not give them credit for paving the way over the rough
places and placing the beacon light for us to go on building and
perfecting this institution along the most modern and up-to-date lines.

The ground work has been prepared for us. Have Ave any other duties
besides holding state fairs every year? A glance at the constitution
under which we have been created is suflficient to convince us that if we
had no other thought in view, we certainly would not be realizing our
responsibilities.

The men connected with the State Board of Agriculture know only
too well that they must respond to the call that has been made on
them, putting forth all the energy-, knowledge, and ability they possess,
if they are going to maintain their place as one of the factors in the
building up of this great and wonderful empire of ours.

The State Fair Grounds must not only have buildings which will
be a credit to the state, but they must be along modern lines, making
the structures striking architectural features, and at the same time
have them as a model of efficiency for other fairs and institutions to
follow in buildings which they may want to erect for specific purposes.
As an example : A cow barn, a dairy building, a hog barn, and other
buildings which it is not necessary to mention here, must serve a
purpose of education, and be of such a character and design that



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Vm CALIFORNIA STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE.

interested parties will obtain ideas from the example set before them
which they will be proud to follow.

We realize fully that we have not had sufficient funds to carry out
these ideas. A great state like ours, with its rapid development, is
constantly demanding funds for its many institutions.

If the legislators have failed in many cases to recognize the legit-
imacy of our claims, possibly we are to blame because our plans have
not been definitely formulated.

In 1915 we succeeded in securing an appropriation of $30,000.00 for
a Woman's Building and in 1917 another appropriation of $300,000.00
for an improved and permanent Agricultural and Horticultural Build-
ing to replace one destroyed by fire in September, 1916, which is
now in the course of erection.

It is safe to say that a new era has commenced in the history of the
State Board of Agriculture and it is incumbent upon us now that
we have made a good start to see that this work is continued. We
should prepare without delay a series of plans and a model of our
grounds, and the buildings we propose to erect, so as to have this
ready for presentation to the next legislature, with a view of securing
an appropriation for more buildings for housing our diversified exhibits
of livestock, agricultural and horticultural products.

Our Statistical Report is a most valuable adjunct to our association.
It is the index of the progress the state is making in every branch of
industry. It most effectively disseminates information to the outside
world what is being accomplished and reflects like a mirror the activity
of this Board of Directors in enliglitening those engaged in similar
undertakings as to the progress our state is making.

It is up to us not only to take a personal interest in the improve-
ment and the development of this report, but also to use our best
efforts in securing financial assistance from the next legislature in
order to permit us to enlarge it and secure much valuable data which
is now omitted because of the lack of funds. During the last two
years much time and money was expended in an effort to obtain at
short notice reliable statistics regarding the production of crops and
other information of importance which could have been immediately
available had the appropriation for statistics permitted such work.
The results obtained were unsatisfactory and in some causes a total
failure. .

We have still another duty to perform and that is to act in a
supervisorial capacity over all district and county fairs, and aid them
in every possible manner by advice and example in promoting their
welfare.



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-Photo by Hartsook.



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CALIFORNIA STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. IX

In conclusion, allow me to say that at no time in the history of the
world is the producer of articles of food so necessary to the well being
of the nation as at this time.

As representatives of the great producing interests of California,
let us cheerfully do our share and give our aid in promoting the
wonderful resources with which this grand state of ours has been
so magnificently endowed.

Respectfully submitted.

GEO. C. ROEDING,
President.
CHAS. W. PAINE, Secretary.



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CALIFORNIA STATE BOARD OP AQRICIILTURE.






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Xll CALIFORNIA STATE BOARD OP AGRICULTURE.

THE CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR— VOCATIONAL
DEPARTMENT.

Bj' E. Franklin, Vice President State Board of Agriculture. Chairman
Vocational Committee.

Broadly viewed, the California State Fair is an educational insti-
tion. Perhaps it may not have always been regarded in this light,
but the fact remains, nevertheless, that fundamentally its purpose is
to instruct. At this great annual exposition the directors of the State
Board of Agriculture endeavor to bring together in attractive display,
specimens of the best products that the state produces in our varied
industries, such as livestock, horticulture, agriculture, viticulture, nian-
factures, mining, useful and fine arts, etc. By directing attention
to the excellence of the prize-winning articles in each field of endeavor,
we strive to encourage and to stimulate producers to follow approved
ideas and to attempt to excel the high standards that have been
attained.

The scope of the State Fair along educational lines is broadening ea^h
year. We have long since broken aw^ay from the narrow limits of the
past, and we are now^ reaching out in every direction in matters that
concern the welfare of the state in an endeavor to enlighten and to
instruct for the benefit of the people as a whole. It may seem somewhat
paradoxical, but it is the truth, that one of the departments of the
state government that we are now exploiting to the great benefit of
all, is the state's educational system. I refer particularly to the
vocational department exhibits, the growth of w^hich has been nothing
leSvS than phenomenal.

A small beginning in this work was made two years ago. The dis-
play, however, was a pronounced success. Last year a much larger
and more varied exhibit was made, representing the work of thou-
sands of students in different schools in many counties in the state.
So succe.ssful was the exhibit in 1917 that still more space and larger
premiums have been set aside for the 1918 exhibit, which will not
only be one of the largest ever made in the state, but it will also be
one of the most interesting at the state fair grounds.

Just as the State Fair has broadened its scope of usefulness in
recent years, so has the state's educational system widened its field
of effort. The modem schools no longer instruct from the book alone,
but they train the hand as well as the mind ; they do not force knowl-
edge upon the young mind at the expense of health, but they endeavor
to build stronger and more vigorous bodies at the same time that they
are directing thought along lines that make for useful citizenship. In
short, the schools of today teach the useful mechanical arts, as well



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CALIFORNIA STATE BOARD OP AGRICULTURE. Xlll

as lay the foundations for the professions; they coordinate healthful
recreation with necessary study. How appropriate it is then, that the
State Fair, fundamentally educational, and the state school system
should cooperate in an endeavor to show to the people of the state
just what our schools are doing in this important vocational work.

It is, indeed, a sight that can not but impress itself upon the minds
of the visitors, as they walk through the exhibit building and see the
handiwork of school children, ranging from the kindergarten classes
to those of the high schools. As one inspects the exhibit even casually,
and traces the work of the child through the various gradations, from
the little toy made by the youthful beginner probably not yet five years
of age, to the wireless telegraph instrument operated with skill by the
high school student, the impression made upon the mind emphasizes
the wonderful advance made in modem educational methods over the
days when our parents received their instruction in the village schools.

In the exhibit at the California State Fair the full scope of vocational
education is demonstrated. Girls are shown working in every branch
of domestic science, including cooking, dressmaking, millinery and other
useful arts that our mothers learned at home, while the boys are
taught ever^^thing in the mechanical line from the driving of a nail
to the assembling of an aeroplane. It is interesting to trace the
gradual steps of the work and to note the development of the child's
mind, as the visitor passes successively from the displays of the lower
grades to those of the higher. The crude little doll dress that some
little -miss has proudly cut and sewed to a pattern is first seen, then
a frock that is just a degree better, then one more finished still, and so
on until the display brings one to a fashionable costume and bonnet
skillfully made by a girl in her teens after much thought and study;
and in the display of boys' work, one sees the crude toy boat whittled
by some little boy, then more useful articles, then ornamental lamps,
furniture, etc., and finally the skillful repair work on an automobile



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