H. B. (Henry Brougham) Guppy.

Homes of family names in Great Britain online

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Mare)

Pot ten gee



Pow (Bath)

Puddy (Bridgewater)

Kawle

Eeakes

Rood

Rugg

Say
J Sealey "I (Wells and
ISealy j Bridgewater)

Singer (Frome)

Speed

Sperrihg

Spratt

Stallard

Steeds (Bath)

Stuckey

Sully

Summerhayes

S wanton

Sweet

Tarr

TatchelL

Tazewell (Bridgewater)

Teek

Tilley (Bridgewater)

Toogood

Treasure (Bath)

Tyley
r Vigar
\ Vigors

Vowles (Bristol and
Bridgewater)

Walrond

Wescott (Dulverton)

Winslade (Bridgewater)

Winstone
J Withey
1 Withy

Wookey

Yeandle



SOMERSETSHIRE. 347

NOTES ON SOME OF THE CHARACTERISTIC SOMERSETSHIRE

NAMES.

(The names are arranged in alphabetical groups, but not necessarily in alpha-
betical order in each group.)



Authorities indicated hy the following abbreviations :■
B. indicates Barrett's "Bristol."



c. „


Collinson's "Somerset."


H. „


Hotten's "American Emigrants."


H.R. „


Hundred Rolls.


L. „


Lower's " Patronymica Britannica."


P- „


Phelps' Somersetshire."


Sp. „


Contributors to National Defence Fund in 1588 (Brit. Mus.




B. 474).


T.


Toulmin's " Taunton."


w. „


" The Western Martyrology."



A— B.

The Amesburys, who are mostly represented in theBridgewater
district, Have taken the name of a town in the neighbouring

county of Wilts The Aplins, who are now well established in

the Chard district, were represented in Glastonbury and other
parts of the county 200 years ago. John Aplin was mayor of
Glastonbury in 1706 (P.), and William Aplin was high sheriff
of Somerset in 1721 (C). A gentle family of the name resided
in Taunton last century (T.). There were also Aplins in Sutton
Walrond and Ewern Minster, in Dorset, during the 18th century

(Hutchins' "Dorset.") The Babers, who have now their home

in the Bristol district, have long been represented in that part
of the county. Benjamin Baber was mayor of Bath in 1677, 1687,
and 1700 (C). Francis Baber was an eminent physician of Chew
Magna, Somerset, about 200 years ago (Hoare's " Wiltshire ").
In Gloucester Cathedral there is an epitaph referring to " Francis
Baber, armiger, of the ancient family of Baber, in the county of
Somerset, who died in 1669 " (Bigland's " Gloucestershire "j.
There was a Baber married in 1628 in Oddington Church, Oxford-
shire (Dunkin's "Oxfordshire"). Francis Baber, chandler,
evidently of this Somerset family, embarked at Weymouth, in



348 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES.

1635, for New England (H.). Since the Babers were considered
an ancient family in the county in 1669, they must rank amongst

the oldest of Somersetshire families The Baggs are now

established in the Bridgewater district. John Bagg, of Thorn-
comb, on the Devonshire border, was transported to Barbadoes,
for participating in the Monmouth rebellion in 1685 (H.). He

suffered in a cause which has since prevailed The nam.e of

Balch is now established in the Bath district. Probably the
Wiltshire branch of this family dates from Robert Everard Balch,
Esq., of St. Audries, Somerset, who, about a century since, came,
by marriage, into possession of the ancient estate of the Topp

family of Stockton, Wilts (Hoare's " Wiltshire ") The

Banwells take their name from a parish in the county, and the
BiCKNELLS from either Biekenhall or Bicknoller, two Somerset-
shire parishes Bere is not a very common Somerset name.

It is also found in Devon, together with Beere. Beer is a
Somerset tithing. In the 14th and 15th centuries the De Beres,
or De la Beres, were important families in the west of England,
the De Beres of Somerset serving as knights of the shire (P.).
The De la Beres of Dorset held large properties in that county
in the reign of Edward III. (Hutchins' " Dorset "), and in the
reign of Henry YI. the De la Beres were knights of Herefordshire
(Duncumb's "Herefordshire"). Richard Beere was abbot of
Glastonbury in the reigns of Henry VII. and Henry YIII. (P.).
In the 13th century this name, in the form of Le Bere and
occasionally of De Bere, was commonly represented in Cam-
bridgeshire, Norfolk, Hunts, Oxfordshire, etc. (H. R.) The

Barringtons take the name of a parish in the county. They

are best represented in the Taunton district Body has been

a west of England name for six centuries or more. In the 13th
century it was represented in Devonshire by William Body of
Aspton (H. R.), and now it is still established in the neighbouring
counties of Cornwall and Somerset. Amongst the martyrs of the
Monmouth rebellion none behaved more courageously on the
scaffold than Henry Body, a native of Lyme Regis, Dorset, who
had fought as a seaman in the naval battles of the time of
Charles II. (W.). In Cornwall the name has long been known.
Last century there was a Mr. Michael Body at St. Agnes : Body
was the name of the commissioner for the destruction of images
in the Cornish churches who was murdered, whilst thus employed,
at Helston, in 1549 (Polwhele's "Cornwall") The Bonds



SOMERSETSHIRE. 349

have their principal homes in the west of England in Devon
and Somerset, and in the east of England in Norfolk and Suffolk ;
they are also established in Lancashire and Staffordshire. Six
centuries ago the name was still to be found in numbers in Norfolk
and Suffolk, as well as in the neighbouring counties of Lincoln,
Hunts, and Cambridge, and also in Oxfordshire, in the forms of
Bond and Bonde, often preceded by " Le " (H. R.). The Bonds
of Somerset are numerous in the Taunton district. {See under

"Norfolk.") The Burstons are now represented in the

Bridgewater district. John Buston, of Milverton, was transported
to Barbadoes for participating in the Monmouth rebellion in 1685

(H.) BusHELL is a name now scantily represented in the

county. Two hundred years ago there was a Bath family of this
name, members of which, on various occasions, filled the office of
mayor (Warner's " Bath "). The name is still in that city.

C— D.

The ancient and distinguished Somersetshire and Devonshire
families of Gary apparently, in most cases, hailed from the Carys
of Castle Cary, a knightly Somersetshire family of the 14th
century (Westcote's "Devonshire"). In the reign of Edward L
De Cari and De Cary were still Somersetshire names (H. R.),
and evidently their first representatives took the names of places

in the county The Chards take their name from a town in

the county Churches is a name established in the Wells

district ; it is on the face of it a corruption of Churchhouse, a
rare Somersetshire name, Churchus being an occasional inter-
mediate form CoGAN or Coggan is an ancient west of England

name. There was a John de Cogan, of Hunispull, Somerset, in
the reign of Edward I. (H. B.) ; and in the reign of Richard II.,
William Cogan was sheriff" of the county (C). De Cogan was
a name found also in different parts of Devonshire in the time
of Edward I. (H. R.), and it has long been an old Tiverton
name, Humphry Cogan being a Tiverton mercer in the time of
Elizabeth (Harding's " Tiverton "). John Cogan, of Somerset,

contributed £25 to the Spanish Armada fund in 1583 (Sp.)

CoLLARD is a name which has long been known in Taunton and
the neighbouring district. John Collard was a Taunton clothier

in the reign of James I. (T.) Edward Counsell, of Allerton,

was transported to Barbadoes for participating in the Monmouth



350 HO:\IES OF FAMILY NAMES.

rebellion of 1685 (H.), a punislinient prononnced by history to be
no disgrace. Mr. John Counsel, of Mark, gave, in 1730, a sum
of £10, the interest to be distributed amongst tbe " second poor "
on Christmas Bay for ever (C). A family of Counsel lived at
Stoughton, in Wedmore parisb, last century (C). The name is

still represented in the parish of Mark The Creeds now have

their home in the Grlastonbury district. A family of this name
resided at Castle Cary last century: John Creed, who died in
1740, was vicar of that parish for fifty years ; Cary Creed, gent.,
died there in 1751, at the age of 88 (P.)- The name is still in
Castle Cary. The Creeds are also established in Dorsetshire, and
they were numerous in Gloucestershire. Creed is a parish in

Cornwall The name of Crees is well represented in the district

of Frome. As Crees and Creese it is also numerous in Wiltshire,
and Creese similarly occurs in Worcestershire. In the 17th
century there was a gentle family of Crees in the town of Derby

(Glover's "Derbyshire") The Ceoomes take their name from

parishes in Worcestershire A family of Grossman resided in

Lympsham last century (C). {See under " Lobb " in " Cornwall.")

The name of Curry occurred as Curri in Oxfordshire in the

reign of Edward 1. (H. U.) The Dampiers are said to have

hailed originally from Dampierre in Normandy. Dam pier, the
famous navigator, was born in 1652, the son of a tenant-farmer
of East Coker, near Yeovil, Somerset ; and the name is still to be
found in the district of Chard. Henry Dampier was mayor of
Bristol in 1755 (B.). At the end of last century Mr. John
Dampier, of Wareham, Dorset, owned the greater part of the prin-
cipal manor of Swanwich in that county (Hutchins' " Dorset ").
There was a Richard de Damper in Lincolnshire in the 13th

century (H. R.) The name of Derrick was represented in

the 13th century by Derk, in Cambridgeshire (H. R.) The

name of Dibble is now represented in the Bridgewater district.
Thomas Dible, husbandman, embarked at Weymouth in 1635 for
New England (H.). There was a William Dibel in London six

centuries ago (H. R.) The Somersetshire Ducketts have their

home in Weston-super-Mare. William Duckett, Esq., lived at
Hartham, Wilts, in the reign of Charles II. (C). The name of
Duket occurred in Oxfordshire and in London in the 13th century
(H. R.). The name of Duckett or Duckitt is also established

around Doncaster, in the West Riding The Durstons, who

take their name from a parish in the county, are numerous in the



SOMERSETSHIRE. 351

Bridgewater district. Amongst the martyrs of the Monmouth
rebellion in 1685 were Thomas and William Durston, who were
executed at Wells (W.).

E— J.

Jonathan England, one of the martyrs of the Monmouth
rebellion in 1685, was executed at Taunton (W.). (See under

the "West Riding.") In 1808, Mrs. Jane Faething died at

Taunton, aged 62 (T.) The Erosts are now numerous in the

Bridgewater district. (See undev "Norfolk.") Although the

Frys have their great home in Wiltshire, they are numerous in

Somersetshire Flower was the name of a gentle family at

Nunney early last century (C.) Amongst the old Somerset

names is that of Gapper of Wincanton, now scantily represented
in the county The Gibletts are still established in the Glas-
tonbury district. In the first half of last century a gentle family
of Giblet resided in the parish of Mark in the same neighbour-
hood (C). Gibelot was a Cambridgeshire name in the 13th

century (H. R.) The name of Gifford is now established in

Cambridgeshire, Hunts, Dorset, and Somerset. In the form of
Giffard it was common in the 13th century in Cambridgeshire,
I^orfolk, Suffolk, and Oxfordshire (H. R.). The early Giffards
were descended from the Giffards of Normandy, their first ancestor
in this country having received from William the Conqueror over
a hundred manors in different parts of England : there were four
principal families last century, those of Devon, Hants, Bucks, and
Staffordshire, the last named only now existing (L.). In the 17th
century there were old established gentle families of the name in
Devonshire, residing at Brightlegh, Weare, and Tiverton (West-
cote's "Devonshire.") One of the oldest families of Gooden in

this part of England is that of the Gooddens of Compton, just
over the Dorset border of Somerset, who are descended from John
Goodwyn of the time of Edward YI. (L,). Mr. John Goodden of
Bowerh6aton, in the beginning of last century, belonged to the

same stock (C.) Edward Hallett was high sheriff of the

county in 1741 (C.) John Hannam, Esq., held the manor of

Goathill in the time of Elizabeth (P.). Hanham is a hamlet in

the adjoining county of Gloucester The Hardwicks are

established in various parts of England, and in most cases they

have taken the name of a place in the county The surname

of De Hembury occurred in the adjoining county of Gloucester



352 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES.

in the 13tli century (H. R.). Broad-Hembury is a Devonshire
parish, and perhaps the Somerset name of Hembeow is thus

derived Amongst the characteristic west of England names is

that of HoDDTNOTT, which has its principal home in Somerset, but
is also found in Worcestershire, Wilts, Dorset, Hants, etc., and
in the form of Hodnett in Shropshire. In Somerset it is an old
Nunney name : last century, there were graves belonging to the
family in the churchyard (C), and the name is still in the parish

House is a very common name in the Bridge water district.

Howse is the Wiltshire form of the name, and reference to its

origin will be found under that county Husset is an ancient

name in Somerset and Wilts, and further particulars concerning
its origin will be found under " Wilts kire." Laurance Hussey of
Wellington was one of the sufferers in the Monmouth rebellion of
1685 : he was .transported for ten years to Barbadoes (H.), and
let us hope tbat he returned to witness the triumph of the Pro-
testant cause Thomas Hurpord, one of the martyrs of the

Monmouth rebellion in 1686, was executed at Yeovil (W.)

The Rev. James Hurly, master of Taunton grammar school, and
incumbent-curate of Taunton St. James, died in 1783, at <he age
of 70, leaving six surviving children : he was born at Crowcombe

(T.) HosEGOOD is an ancient west of England name. At

present it occurs in Somerset and Devon. Six centuries ago it
was represented by Hosgod, Hosegod, and Osegod, in Gloucester-
shire, Wilts, and Oxfordshire, and in the eastern counties of

Norfolk and Essex (H. R.) Hutchings is a west of England

name, best represented in Somerset and Devon. A Wiveliscorabe
gentleman bore this name three centuries ago (C). It is now at

home in the Bridgewater district Jacob and Jacobs are now

Somersetshire names ; but these names have long been known in
the west of England. John Jacob, gent., was churchwarden of
Tavistock in 1662 (Worth's " Tavistock "), Two vicars of
Collingbourne-Kingston, Wilts, between 1675 and 1703, bore the
name of Jacobs (Coll. Top. et Gen.), and as Jacob it was
represented in Oxfordshire in the 13th century (H. R.). {See
under " Norfolk.")

K— P.

Keel and Keirl are Somersetshire names, the Keirls being at
home in the Bridgewater district. Amongst those who took up
the cause of their religion in the Monmouth rebellion of 1685



SOMERSETSHIRE. 353

were Jolin and George Keele of Chilton, who were transported to

Barbadoes, the first named not surviving the voyage (H.) The

Lavers bear an ancient name, and are now established in Somerset
and Dorset. In the 18th century Le Laverd was an Oxfordshire

name, and Laver occurred in Cambridgeshire (H. R.) The

LoxTONS take their name from a village in the county. John
Lockstone, one of the martyrs of the Monmouth rebellion in 1685,

was executed at Stogumber (W.) Lutley is a township in

Worcestershire. The De Luttleys of Luttley, Staffordshire,
flourished in the time of Edward I. : from them sprang the

Luttleys of Shropshire and Herefordshire (L.) From the time

of Cromwell to the reign of George I. several of the mayors of

Bath bore the name of Masters (C.) Moggeridgb is a rare old

Somerset name. William Moggeridge, one of the martyrs of the
Monmouth rebellion in 1685, was executed at Bridgewater (W.).

The name of Moody was represented by Mody or Modi in the

neighbouring county of Wiltshire 600 years ago (H. R.). (See

under "Lincolnshire.") Moon is a corruption of De Mohun,

a distinguished Norman name, occurring in Somerset, Wilts, and
Devon, in the 13th century (H. R.). The De Mohuns were great

landed families in the west of England (L.) George Mullins

of Taunton, and Robert Mullins of this county, were transported
to Barbadoes, for taking part in the Monmouth, rebellion in 1685

(H.). (See under "Dorset.") Several of the Somersetshire

Pauls were implicated in the Monmouth rebellion of 1685, and
were transported to Barbadoes ; one of them was Robert Paul of

Ilton (H.) Perham is an ancient name in the south of England.

The De Perhams were represented in Wilts and Sussex in the
3 3th century (H. R.). John Periam, gent., of Milverton, died in
1 711, and John Periam was high sheriff of the county in 1737
(C). Several of the mayors of Exeter in the 16th century bore
the name of Perriam ; a member of this Exeter family was chief
baron of the Exchequer in the reign of Elizabeth (Westcote's

" Devonshire.") In the reign of Anne, John Penny, Esq., lived

at Charlton Musgrove, and at the same time a burgess of Glaston-
bury bore this name (P.) The Perretts and Perrotts are

most numerous in Somerset, and are also well established in the
surrounding counties of Dorset, Wilts, and Monmouth. They
take their name for the most part, as their distribution shows,
from the parishes of North and South Perrott, which lie on
the banks of the river Parret on either side of the boundary

2a



354 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES.

between Somerset and Dorset. Robert Perrot, one of the martyrs
of the Monmouth rebellion in 1685, lost his life on the scaffold at
Taunton (W.). The name is now numerous in the Bridgewater
district. An ancient Pembrokeshire family of Perrot, to whom
belonged a lord-deputy of Ireland in the reign of Elizabeth,
derived their name from a place in Normandy, whence their
ancestor, as they believe, originally hailed (Fenton's " Pembroke-
shire"). However, I feel doubtful about this descent, as I have
already pointed out the home of this name in the west of England.
The Parrotts of Oxfordshire and Bucks, who are referred to under
those counties, probably also hail, in the first place, from the same

home on the borders of Somerset and Dorset The name of

Phelps is now numerous in the Wells district. It is also an old

Porlock name (Savage's " Carhampton.") The Phippens were

represented in Wedmore last century (C). William Phippen of
High Church, was transported to Barbadoes for participating in

the Monmouth rebellion of 1685 (H.) Pitman is a Somerset and

a Dorset name. Amongst the Somerset and Dorset men who were
transported to Barbadoes for espousing the cause of Monmouth
and the Protestant religion in 1685 were Henry and William
Pitman (H.).

R— S.

Rich is a characteristic west of England name, being most
frequent in Somerset and Wilts. Those of Somerset are most
numerous in the Bridgewater district, whilst those of Wilts are
most frequent in the Malmesbury district. Le Rich was the name

of a Hampshire family of the 14th century (L.) The name of

Rood was represented by De Rude in the adjacent county of Wilts
in the 13th century and by Rude at the same time in Shropshire

(H. R.) The name of RuGG was represented six centuries ago

by Le Rug and Le Rugge in Oxfordshire and Kent (H. R.).

Ruegg is an occasional form of the name The Sages were

established in Pensford last century (C.) The Says bear a

very ancient name. There flourished in Shropshire from the 11th
to the 14th century a powerful and ennobled family of De Say
(Eyton's "Shropshire"). Le Say and De Say were common
names in Cambridge, Suffolk, Kent, and London in the 13th

century (H. R.) The old family of Skrine of Bath-Ford is

now rarely represented in the county The Slades of Somerset



SOMERSETSHIRE. 355

take tlie name of a hamlet in the county In " The Western

Martyrology " we learn that Mr. Joseph Speed of CuUiton
(Colyton in East Devon), one of the martyrs of the Monmouth
rebellion of 1685, met his death on the scaffold with Christian

fortitude The Sperkings have probably an ancestor in William

Spearing, who owned land in South Brent 200 years ago (C.)

Spiller was the name of a Taunton family last century (T.), and

the name is still represented in the town and district Amongst

the old Somerset names now scantily represented in the county is
that of Strode. The Strodes were numerous in the parishes of
Shepton Mallet and Pilton in the 17th and 18th centuries (C).

James II. granted the rectory and church of Dunkeswell,

Devon, to William Stuckt : a gentle family of Stuckey resided
at Abbot's Kerswell in East Devon early in the 17th century
(Polwhele's "Devonshire.")... Sully is an ancient west of England
name. In the 13th centurj^ it occurred as De Sully in Devon-
shire and as De Sulleye in Wilts, Gloucestershire, and Worcester-
shire (H. R.). Sir Raymond de Sully had lands in Huntspill,
Somerset, in the 14th century (C). William Sully, one of the
martyrs of the Monmouth rebellion of 1685, met his death on the

scaffold at Dunster (W.) Richard Sweet, another martyr of

the Monmouth rebellion of 1685, was executed at Minehead (W.).
Swete was the name of an ancient gentle family of Trayne,
Modbury (Devon), from the 16th to the 18th century (Polwhele's
" Devonshire "). In the 16th and 17th centuries there was an
Exeter family of Sweet, members of which frequently served as
mayors and bailiffs of the city (Izacke's " Exeter").

T— Z.

The Talbots are now chiefly established in Somerset, Dorset,
Lancashire, and N'otts. The ancient and illustrious family of the
Talbots, dating back to Domesday times, were originally settled
in the Welsh Marches, and afterwards in Shropshire and Stafford-
shire, and then in Yorkshire (L.) The Tilleys or Tillys have

been established in the county ever since the reign of Richard I.
From the 12th to the 15th century the Tyllys or Tillys of Harptree
owned the manor of West Harptree, and in the reign of Henry VI.
they owned also the manor of Salty or Salthay (C). In 1688,
George Tilly of Pointingdon, gent., contributed £25 to the national
fund for the defence of the country at the time of the expected

2 A 2



o56 HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES.

invasion of the Spanish Armada (Sp.). Tilly was the name of a
family of Bristol merchants at the close of the 17th century (B.).
At present the Tilleys are most numerous in the Bridgewater
district. Since Tylly was an ancient form of the name, it is
probable that the Tyleys of Somerset hail from the same stock.
Harptree Tilly is an ancient Somerset tithing : Tilly is also the
name of a town in Normandy. The name has also long been
represented in Cornwall, where it may have had an independent
origin. James Tilly or Tillie of Pentilly or Pentillie was high
sheriff of Cornwall in 1734 (Polwhele's "Cornwall"), and the

name still occurs in Falmouth and its vicinity The name of

Treasure has its present home in the Bath district. In the 13th

century Tresor was a Wiltshire name Tripp is an old Somerset

name now rarely represented in the county. Isaac Tripp was one
of the martyrs of the Monmouth rebellion of 1685 (W.). There
was a family of Tripp at Dilton last century (Hoare's "Wilts").

John Trickey, another martyr of the Monmouth rebellion in

1G85, met his death on the scaffold at Taunton (W.) The

Somerset names of Vigar and Yigars or Vigors were represented
in Oxfordshire in the 13th century by that of William Vigerus

(H. R.) Walrond is an ancient and notable name in the south

and west of England. In the 13th century it was common, in the
forms of Walrand, Walraund, Walerond, etc., in Wilts, and was
also represented in Somerset, Oxfordshire, Dorset, Devon, and
other counties (H. R.). Henry Walrond was high sheriff of
Somerset in 1594 (C). William Walrond, Esq., was buried in
Wells Cathedral in 1662 (P.). James Walrand, one of the martyrs
of the Monmouth rebellion in 1685, was executed at Ilchester
(W.). An ancient gentle family of Walrond resided at Childrey,
Berks, from the 14th to the 16th century (Ashmole's " Berk-
shire"). The Walronds of Bradfield in Ufl'culm, Devon, from
the 13th to the 17th century, and probably later, were a powerful
baronial family in the reign of Henry III. : from them sprang the

Walronds of Bovey (Westcote's "Devonshire.") Warry is a

name scantily to be found in the county. Thomas Warry was
vicar of Littleham, Exmouth, in the county of Devon, during the
reign of Anne (Webb's "Exmouth").



STAFFORDSHIRE.



357



STAFFORDSHIRE.

Note. — The asterisk indicates tliat a name, thougli characteristic
of the county, is more numeroas elsewhere-



Alien
Brown
»HaU



GrKNBBAL N^AMES (30-40 COUntics).



*Johnaon.
♦Robinson
Smith



*Taylor
♦Turner



CoMJCON IS" AMES (20-29 counties).



Adams


Hill


♦Thompson


Bailey