H. Franklin (Henry Franklin) Andrews.

Company D, 16 Maine vols. A brief history of the individual services of its members, 1862-1865 online

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'eenth Maine



COMPANY D
16 MAINE VOLS



A Brief History of IKe Individual

•Services of its Members

1862— 1805



By



H. F. Andrews

General Cotninandiii^ Western Io\ira

Veteran Association

£lx-State Senator



Exira Printing Co.

f^xira loM^a

I900



i-L





Introduction



Eespect for the memories of my comrades and pride for their
acheivements in arms has induced me to record a brief account of the
services of Company D, 16th Maine Infantry Vols., which served In
the First Brigade, Robinson's Second Division, First Army Corps,
and later in the Fifth Corps, Army of Potomac, in the War of the
Rebelion; to be used as occasion may require and preserved in the
archives of the Regimental Association under care of its historian.

Some records of this kind have been compiled, for which the
authors are entitled to the gratitude of all concerned. All such works
that I have seen pertaining to Company D are meagre in details and
contain more or less errors, no doubt attributable to want of exact
information. Our company commissioned officers are dead, except
Lieut. Parlin, who knew but little about our men, not being one of
our original members and never served with the company until the
close of the war. Sergeants Lombard, Hamilton, Dunnels and Twitch-
el and Corporals Bailey, Couture, Lane, Townsend and others of
the original members of the company can undoubtedly add to what
is herein compiled. I earnestly hope they will do so and preserve every
important fact relative to our particular service, before it is forever
lost. I have no knowledge of any one who has preserved so much of
the individual history of the members of the company as myself, and
regret that I have so little. It was my fortune to have been an orig-
inal member of the company and to have become familiar with every
member until about the middle of May, 1864, at the close of the battle
of Spottsylvania, when I ceased to serve with the company. I was
company clerk for Capt. Plummer from the fall of 1863 until I left the
company. At Mitchell Station in the winter of 1863-4, I assisted in
compiling a careful, complete roster of the company and brief history
of each member up to that time, having access to the company records
and papers for that purpose. Capt. Plummer had been the First
Sergeant of the company, originally, had served with us almost con-
tinually up to that time, and was well qualified to make the record:
besides, many of the old members were then with us, from whom
almost any fact relative to any member of the company could be ob-
tained. A copy of that record is in my possession and is the basis of
this record. 1 have not hesitated to consult any record or to use any
information found on the subject.

It is intended to give a fuller and more complete account of the
enlisted men than has heretofore appeared; to record exact facts and
especially to perpetuate the services of those who have answered the
Last Roll Call and at this late date, in a limited measure preserve an
individual sketch of each member, where it may be found by descend-
ants and others in the future, if desired.



As time sepai'iates us more distantly from lliat unhappy period, we
are sensible tliat the proportion of patriots in that struggle, found
under the private's blouse was equal to that displayed upon the
shoulder strap; that our successes were attained measurably by the
stubborn courage, fidelity, patient suffering and fighting, in camp and
field of the rank and file; that credit is too often attributed to the one
and forgotten in the otlier, individually, if not en masse — not so much
by design as from difficulty in naming even, tlie individual service of
each enlisted man. An unfair discrimination between the services of
officers and enlisted men is not contemplated, where most performed
so well and nobly their duties. We are proud of the services and
of the records made by our officers, recognizing their ability, bravery,
causalities and services well performed; but call to mind the advan-
tages under which their duties were rendered — their positions, skill,
intelligence, food, comparative comforts and hardships. One who has
not served in actual war as a private soldier cannot fully measure the
hardships and suffering incident to soldier life. The man killed early
suffered least: but he who languished from wounds or disease or who
tortured himself to perfoi'm duty with hardly strength to carry him-
self along, wanting proper clothes, food and shelter, through storms,
frost, heat, dust, rain, snow and mud realized the height, breadth and
depth of physical misery. The rank and file were the bone and sinew
of the army; its officers, the brains and leaders. It was the former
who by their courage and valor placed the Stars and Eagles upon the
shoulders of their commanders. We refer with pride to the men who
served for $16 a month and imagine whether our officers could have
done as well. Our officers were undoubtedly proud to have command-
ed such a body of men. These events occured long ago but the recol-
loction of many of them is vivid in my memory. And a large number
of our comrades are at rest in their last bivouac.

If in any manner errors have occured in recording these sketches
pardon is craved.

Organization

The company was organized and mustered into the service at
Augusta, Maine, August 14, 1862. The company officers appeared to
have received their commissions in proportion to the number of fol-
lowers enrolled. Capt. Rand produced the largest number, recruited
from Waterford, Lovell, Bethel and neighboring towns. Fifteen men
went from Lovell, several of whom were promised appointments as
non-commissioned officers. When the company was organized not one
of them received the promised appointments; but four sergeants, two
corporals and the wagoner were appointed from the Waterford con-
tingent, the home of Capt. Rand. It was humiliating to learn that a
gentleman (?) would resort to such duplicity with mere boys; but
these are the cold facts and the Captain is entitled to the benefit of
his record. It is almost needless to add that the respect and admi-
ration for the honor of our commander fell to a low ebb. Lieutenant
Eustis brought in the next largest squad. The military careers of
Captain Rand and Lieut. Eustis were of short duration; and while
handicapped at the start we afterwards secured competent officers.



Officers



MOSES W. RAND, of Waterford, First Captain; commissioned
Aug. 16, 1862. He had seen service earlier in tlie war. Before enter-
ing the service 1 am informed he was employed by the Railways and
was evidently experienced in commanding men. He was a splendid
specimen of humanity, physically, and if spared would probably have
been a good soldier. He sickened in his early service on the Mary-
alnd Campaign, and d. Portland, Me., Dec. 8, 1862.

OLIVER W. LOWELL, of Gorham, Maine, Second Captain;
commissioned 1st Lieut. Co. F, Aug. 16, 1862. At the battle of

Fridericksburg the company was left without a commissioned officer;
and Lowell was commissioned Captain, with Samuel H. Plummer,
1st Lieut, and William H Broughton, 2d Lieut., all on Dec. 31, 1862.

I am informed that Capt. Lowell was an instructer in school work
before the war. He was a kind, good tempered man, a gentleman, a
good disciplinarian, a brave officer, who looked well to the care and
welfare of his men, who loved and respected him and were ever ready
to obey his commands. He commanded the company from his ap-
pointment until his death; served on Burnside's Mud March, Chan-
cellorsville, and was killed at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863,

SAMUEL HARRISON PLUMMER, of Waterford, 3d Captain;
mustered as First Sergeant, Aug. 14, 1862, and so served until after
the battle of Fredericksburg in which he participated and commanded
the company after Lieut. Herrick was killed; commissioned 1st Lieut.
Dec. 31, 1863. He was absent sick once or more; wounded and prisoner
at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863, paroled and joined the company about
September, 1863; commissioned Captain, with William H. Broughton
1st Lieut, and Atwood Fitch, 2d Lieut., Dec. 1, 1863. He commanded
the company from about September, 1863, until after the battle of
Spottsylvania, perhaps as late as June, 1864. I met him at home in
Waterford. sick, in September, 1864. He participated in the battles
of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run, Wilder-
mess, Spottsylvania and perhaps others. Before the war he was a
school teacher. I attended school under his instruction and was his
company clerk in the fall and winter of 1863-4. He was a strict disci-
plinarian, a stern officer, but not popular with the men. He was dis-
charged Oct. 20, 1864, and died from disease contracted in the army,
Waterford, February, 1865.

WILLIAM H. BROUGHTON, of Portland, Fourth Captain;
mustered as private, Aug. 14, 1862. He has been called "Sergeant
Broughton," for which there is absolutely no authority. He had the
instinct and was a fair tactician when he joined the company, and
may have been one of those promised an appoinument as sergeant.
He was a bright, active man and kept an eye on the chances; becoming
one of the best drill masters in the regiment. Possibly he had served
with some military organization about Portland before joining our
company. He served as clerk for Lieutenants Eustis and Herrick and
perhaps for others. He was a fine penman and kept a neat record.
At the battle of Fredericksburg he had the singular good fortune to
rescue the regimental colors of tlie 94th New York Vols., which had



been lost, and to bring it in triumph from the field. This acheivment
gave him prominent notice, as Col. Root of that regiment was then
brigade commander, under whom the IfJth Maine served. When Lt.
Herrick was killed, Brougliton secured liis sword, brought it from the
field and assisted Sergeant Plummer in commanding what was left of
the company. These circumstances with his soldierly conduct and
qualifications secured him a commission as Second Lieutenant, on
December 31, 1862. He was in frequent demand to command other
companies, left without officers, particularly companies B and I, and
perhaps others; and he sometimes acted as Adjutant. In fact he was
not much with our company while serving as Lieutenant. He was
one of the few officers left with the regiment after the battle of
Gettysburg. He was commissioned 1st Lieut., Dec. 1, 1863. I saw him
in command of Co. I at the battle of Wilderness, May 5, 1864. He was
commissioned Captain with Atwood PMtch, 1st Lieut, and Charles
Parlin, 2d Lieut. A brave, efficient officer and a good disciplinarian;
captured at Weldon Railroad, Aug. 19, 1864; exchanged and rejoined
the company. I believe he participated in every battle in which the
regiment was engaged; mustered out, June 5, 1895. He died Portland
Jan. 27, 1882.

HUMPHREY EATON EUSTIS, of Dixfield; was commissioned
First Lieutenant. Aug. 16, 1862. He had served in Companies B and A
5th Mass. Inf. Vols., and participated in the first battle of Bull Run.
Resigned on account of sickness, Dec. 8, 1862. He has since lived in
Boston, Mass., and Wyoming; built the first house in Fargo, Dacota;
and is now doing business in Minneapolis, Minn.

ATWOOD FITCH, of Bristol; mustered as Sergeant of Co. K,
Aug. 14, 1862; commissioned 2d Lieut, of Co. D, Dec. 1, 1863; 1st Lieut,
Nov. 9, 1864. My information is that he was a mariner before the war.
He was a courageous man and a good tighter; but illiterate and savage
on the men at times. In the winrer of 1863-4, at Mitchell's Station,
he punished William Bodson by putting a gag in his mouth until he
was black in the face and nearly suffocated. It nearly raised a mutiny
in the regiment, a large number of men gathered and demanded his
release, and it required the interferance of Colonel Farnham and other
officers to call the men off and send them to quarters. I believe that
Fitch received a private reprimand for his conduct. On one occasion
he was in command of the company a few days during the absence of
the Captain and it became necessary to muster for pay. He had no
knowledge or skill about making the muster rolls, and the duty was
entrusted to myseif. When ready for muster Fitch grandly stuck the
roll in his pocket and I fell into the ranks. I think he participated in
the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. He
was at Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania and probably other en-
gagements; captured Aug. 19, 1864; exchanged and rejoined the com-
pany; mustered out June 5, 1864. He d. 1895-6.

HENRY P. HERRICK, of North Yarmouth: commissioned
Second Lieutenant, Aug. 16, 1862. He was the first officer to lead the
company in battle. He was shot through the head and killed at
Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862, sealing his patriotism and courage with
his life.

CHARLES H. PARLIN, of Skowhegan; mustered as Commis-
sary Sergeant of the Regiment, Aug. 14, 1862 and served as such until



commissioned 2d Lieut, of Co. D, Nov. 9, 1864. He saw but little ser-
vice with the company; mustered out June 5, 1865; residence, Carra-
belle, Florida. A faithful officer.

Sergeants

WILLIAM B. ETTER, of Waterford; mustered as 2d Sergeant,
Aug. 14, 1862; wounded in the head at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862;
died Washington, D. C. Jan. 23, 1863.

JOHN M. WEBSTER, of Waterford; mustered as 3d Sergeant,
Aug. 14, 1862. He was absent sick much of his time; prisoner at Get-
tysburg, July 1, 1863, confined at Belle Island, Va.; released and re-
turned to duty: promoted 1st Sergeant; died Petersburg, July 11, 1864.

JESSE A. CROSS, of Bethel; mustered as 4th Sergeant, Aug. 14,
1862. He had served 3 months in 1st Maine Inf. Vols; discharged for
disability Nov. 25, 1862.

CHARLES A. LOCKE, of Bethel; mustered as 5th Sergeant,
Aug. 14, 1862. He was a corpulent man and wore a silk hat and kid
gloves when he joined the company. On the march to Chancellors-
ville it was a hot day; when we got near enough to hear the tiring and
sound of battle he told Capt. Lowell that he could not march any
longer and must fall out. The captain pointed to a lot of youngsters
in the company and replied: "Sergeant, 1 can't excuse you! Look at
those little boys, who are keeping up, and you must do so .^" He promis-
ed to do the best he could, but leaked; he was missing In a short time
and did not put in an appearance until after the battle; when he
turned up in appearant good order. Soon after he was reduced to the
ranks at his own request, and became a member of the regimental
band. He was a genial gentleman and a good musician, but preferred
the symphony of the cornet to that of the bullet. He was not born a
true son of Mars and his legs could not get him into battle; mustered
out June 5, 1865. He lived in the West after the war.

WILLIAM F. LOMBARD, of Peru; mu.stered as Corporal, Aug.
14, 1862. At Fredericksburg our regiment captured some of the enemy,
one of whom escaped, climbed a bank and as a parting salute pitched
his gun, bayonet first, into a .squad of our men, striking Lombard in
the top of the shoulder inflicting a painful wound. It was tne wrong
thing for the rebel to do, as he fell riddled with bullets. Lombard
was plucky, stayed with the company, soon recovered and was promot-
ed Sergeant; prisoner at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863, escaped, joined the
company and acted 1st Sergeant during the fall and winter of 1863-4,
and until after the battle of Spottsylvania, probably longer. He was
a small man, an excellent soldier and a good drill master; participated
in battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run,
Wilderness, Spottsylvania, and probably others. Transferred to the
Veteran Reserve Corps, Mar. 28, 1865: residence. Limestone, Me.

JOSEPH H. HAMILTON, of North Yarmouth; mustered as
private, Aug. 14, 1862; promoted Corporal, about December, 1862, the
first promotion in the company. Sergeant, 1863; prisoner at Gettys-
burg, July 1, 1863; escaped and joined the company; wounded Alsop's
Farm, May 8, 1864; AVeldon Railroad, Feb. 6, 1865. He participated



in most if not all battles in which the regiment was engaged. A brave,
honest, faithful man and soldier; and very popular with the boys;
mustered out June 5, 1865: residence, North Yarmouth.

WALTER E. STONE, of Waterford; mustered as Corporal,
Aug. 14, 1862. He sickened about October, 18H2, was sent to hospital
and died at Alexandria, Va., June, 1863.

JOSEPH H. DUNNELS, of Newfield; mustered as Private,
Aug. 14, 1832; promoted Sergeant, winter of 1862-3; reduced to ranks,
June, 1863; promoted Sergeant again, December, 1863. After the
battle of Gettysburg he went to Maine on recruiting service, and
returned Nov. 10, 1863. He participated in all battles in which the
regiment was engaged until after Spottsylvania and probably others.
A good soldier and popular in the company; mustered out June 5, 1865.
Lived in Pocahontas county, Iowa, in 1885; moved to the Paciflc coast:
residence, Silverton, Oregon,

EDWIN R. BOWIE, Of Portland; mustered as Private, Aug. 14,
1862; promoted Corporal, 1862-3; Sergeant, 1864; participated in most
if not all battles in which the regiment engaged. An excellent soldier;
mustered out June 5, 1865. He d. New Bedford, Mass., Feb. 7, 1905.

WILLIAM H. SMALL, of Dixfield; mustered as Private, Aug.
14, 1862; promoted Sergeant, 1864; a good soldier; participated in most
battles in which the regiment engaged; mustered out June 5, 1865.
He is reported as dead.

FORDYCE P. TWITCHEL, of Bethel; mustered as Private,
Aug. 14, 1862; promoted Sergeant, April or May, 1865; prisoner at Get-
tysburg, July 1, 1863; escaped and joined the company; a very intellig-
ent man and an excellent soldier; participated in most battles in which
the regiment engaged; mustered out, June 5, 1865: residence, Apple-
ton, Minn.

JAMES PARSONS, of Lexington; mustered as Sergt. of Co. A,
Aug. 14, 1862: transferred to Co. D, but never joined the company; cap-
tured at Weldon Railroad, Aug. 19, 1864; d. Dec. 21, 1864.



Corporals



BENJAMIN F. WALTON, of Peru: mustered as First Corporal,
Aug. 14, 1862. He had served 3 months in Co. E, 1st Me. Inf. Vols.
He was not a strong man, and was but a short time with the company;
discharged for disability. Mar. 23, 1863. Died 1891-2.

DAVID J. PARSONS, of Mexico: mustered as Corporal, Aug. 14,
1862. He served with the color guard. At Fredericksburg he stayed
on the battlefield with his brother Josepli, who was mortally wounded
and was captured, Dec. 13, 1862; exchanged, and is supposed to have
been transfered to the Veteran Reserve Corps, Feb. 11, "863, and dis-
charged while absent from the company. He was well educated and
of good ability. Lived in Michigan after the war. Died at Muskegon.

EDWIN E. FARRAR, of Bethel: mustered as Corporal, Aug. 14,
1862; the tallest man in the regiment, 6 feet, 7 inches: wounded in the
chest at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862, from which he d. Washington,
Dec. 26, 1862; buried at the Soldiers Home.



ISAAC F. JEWETT, of Waterford; mustered as Corporal, Aug.
14, 1862; severely wounded at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862, and never
rejoined the company; transferred to the V. R. C, Sept. 12, 1863; resi-
dence, Waterford.

CHELSEA C. ABBOTT, of Dixfleld; mustered as Corporal, Aug.
14, 1862. At Fredericksburg, Dec. 1.3, 1962, he received a severe contus-
ion of the abdomen from a bullet striking the buckle of his waist-belt.
He was with the company but little afterwards. Supposed to have
died since the war.

LA FOREST KIMBALL, of Waterford; mustered as Private,
Aug. 14, 1862; promoted Corporal; wounded at Fredericksburg, Dec.

13, 1862, and at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863; absent from the company
considerable; discharged for disability. Mar. 28, 1864; residence, Wal-
tham, Mass.

SANFORD M. READ, of Mexico; mustered as private, Aug. 14,
1862; promoted Corporal and served with the Color Guard; missing at
Gettysburg and never rejoined tlie company. Died Portland, Maine,
about February, 1899.

BENJAMIN F. FULLER, of Brunswick; mustered as Private,
Aug. 14, 1862; promoted Corporal, 1862-3; participated in battle of
Chancellorsville; wounded at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863, and never re-
joined the company; residence, Brunswick.

CHARLES H. PUTNAM, of Bethel; mustered as private, Aug.

14, 1862; promoted Corporal, 1862-3; participated in battles of Freder-
icksburg and Chancellorsville; captured at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863 and
died in prison at Richmond, Va., Nov. 22, 1863. A good soldier.

EDWIN E. BAILEY, of Lovell; mustered as Private, Aug. 14,
1862; promoted Corporal the last of the war; participated in most, if
not all battles in which tiie regiment engaged; an excellant soldier.
One warm day he captured a big fat duck, which he carried with diffi-
culty several hours, it being burdensome. After getting into camp he
went aside to pluck his prize and was noticed by Gen. Tyler, who ap-
proached him unnoticed. "Hello! young man, where did you get that
duck, steal it?" said the general sternly. Ed. was taken by surprise
and confused, but being a truthful youth, free from guile, promptly
answered: "Yes sir!" "Give it to me!" commanded the general,
which was accordingly done. The bird without doubt augmented the
general's larder, but poor Ed. returned a sadder, wiser boy. Such acts
did not advance the respect of men for their commanders. Mustered
out June 5, 1865. He is said to have re-enlisted in the 2d U. S. Art.

PETER T. BEAN, of Bethel; mustered as Private, Aug. 14, 1862;
wounded at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862; prisoner at Gettysburg,
July 1, 1863; returned to duty; promoted Corporal; absent considerable
from the company; mustered out June 5, 1865. Died Schuyler, Neb.,
Sept. 12, 1883.

CHARLES COUTRUE, came from Quebec, Canada: mustered as
Private, Aug. 14, 1862; a Canadian French-Indian; captured at Weldon
Railroad, Aug. 19, 1864; returned to duty; participated in most if not
all battles in which the regiment engaged; a brave man, of good edu-
cation and an excellent soldier; mustered out June 5, 1865.

NELSON A. LANE, of Poland; mustered as Private, Aug. 14, 1862:
promoted Corporal: participated in most if not all battles in which



the regiraent engaged; an excellent soldier; mastered out June 5, 1805:
residence, Long Island, Boston Harbor, Mass.

CHARLES D. RIDER, of North Yarmouth; mustered as Private,
Aug. 14, 1863; promoted Corporal the last of the war; wounded at Fred-
ericksburg, Dec. 13, 1802, at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863 and at Hatcher's
Run, Feb. 7, 1895: participated in most if not all battles in which the
regiment engaged; an excellent soldier; mustered out June 5, 1865.
Died about 1889.

HORATIO G. TOWNSEND, of Newtield; mustered as Private,
Aug. 14, 1862; promoted Corporal July 1, 1864. A typical campaign
soldier; no ruffles or red tape about him but always ready for duty.
He was a clergyman's son, ran away to enlist before sixteen years old,
and small of his age, called "Pony" in the company; never missed
a battle, roll-call, detail, or was off duty, until sent to the hospital
sick, in April, 1865 — a remarkable record considering his age and the
hard service. He probably performed the longest, continuous duty
of any man in the regiment and for which he received a furlough of
honor under General Order No. 4, Headquarters Army of Potomac,
Feb. 11, 1865. Discharged June 28, 1865. Lived at David City, Neb.
after the war; residence. University Place, Neb.



GEORGE P. HALL, of Bethel; mustered as Musician, Aug. 14,
1862; mustered out June 5, 1865; residence, Newtonville, Mass.

CYRUS L. COOK, of Freeman; mustered as Private of Co. C,
Aug. 14, 1862; transferred to Co. D, as Musician. Deserted Jan. 4, 1863.

OLIVER H. McKEEN, of Waterford; mustered as Wagoner,
Aug. 14, 1862; mustered out June 5, 1865. Lived at Gorham, N. H.,
after the war, where he died, Aug. 6, 1904.



Privates



Original members— mustered Aug. 14, 1862.

HOSEA ADAMS, of Stoneham; wounded at Fredericksburg,
Dec. 13, 1863; captured at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863 and died in prison
at Richmond, Va., Nov. 5, 1863.

MOSES D. ADKINS, of Cumberland; deserted before muster.

HENRY FRANKLIN ANDREWS, of Lovell. His service with
the company was seriously impaired by frequent attacks of fever and
other illness. He was sent to Harewood Hospital, Washington, sick
with fever, Sept. 8, 1862; returned to duty, Oct. 20; served on the
march from Sharpsburg to the Rappannock; detailed for cattle guard
about Dec. 1; present on the battlefield of Fredericksburg as a non-
combatant, Dec. 14; participated in the Burnside Mud March, Jan.
19-22, 1863: returned to the company about February; participated in


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Online LibraryH. Franklin (Henry Franklin) AndrewsCompany D, 16 Maine vols. A brief history of the individual services of its members, 1862-1865 → online text (page 1 of 3)