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Narrative of a journey to the falls of the Cavery, with an historical and descriptive account of the Neilgherry Hills online

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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES




z<5 < fy W Farmer.



NARRATIVE OF A JOURNEY



FALLS OF THE CAVERY;



Historical antJ SHJcripttbe Account



BY LIEUTENANT H. JERVIS,
H. M. 62 nd REGT.



3KImrtte& tottfl plates.



My humble pen, in unambitious strains,
Paints the blue mountains and the yerdant plains ;
Where health, on bilious cheeks bids roses spring,
And scatters blessings from her radiant wing.



SECOND EDITION.

LONDON :

SMITH, ELDER AND CO., CORNHILL.
1834.



LONDON t

PRINTED BY STEWART AND CO.
OLD BAILEY.



TO

THE RIGHT HONORABLE
STEPHEN RUMBOLD LUSHINGTON,

LATE GOVERNOR OF MADRAS,



SIR,

THE work published by Captain

fau*
Harkness, containing a description of a singular

aboriginal race, inhabiting the summit of the
Neilgherry Hills, was fitly dedicated to you,
by whom so much has been done for the pros-
perity of the European settlement established
there.

A similar reason would have pointed you
out to me as the desired patron of my sketches
and description of the Falls of the Cavery,
because there also the difficulties of the Tra-



513818

I IR SFTS



DEDICATION.



veller have been removed, as 1 have had the
gratification of experiencing, by the prudent
acts of the Government of Fort St. George
during the time when you presided over it.
But I have a strong additional reason for dedi-
cating this little work to you, because I owe
it to your kindness, and that of Mr. ROBERT
HERBERT CLIVE, that I have had the means
of making this publication a Guide to the
Neilgherries as well as to the Falls.

If the Indian or English reader shall expe-
Y / rience but a small portion of the pleasure
which I have had in completing these sketches,
^during the tasdium of a long voyage from

&~J&



/
India, I shall be excused for the presumption




of this my first intrusion on the public atten-
tion.

I beg to remain,

Right Honourable Sir,
With much respect,

Your most obedient and humble servant,

H. JERVIS.



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS.



His Grace the Duke of Northumberland, K.G. 2 copies.

Her Grace the Duchess of Northumberland 2

Most Hon. the Marquis of Queensberry, K.T. 1

Right Hon. Earl of Clancarty 1

Right Hon. Lord Panmure 5

Right Hon. Lady Panmure 5

Right Hon. Earl Powis 5

Right Hon. Lord Clive 2

The Hon. Robert Clive 2

The Right Hon. Lady Harris 1

The Hon. Miss Harris 1

The Hon. Musgrave Harris 1 '

Right Hon. Sir Samuel Hulse, G.C.H. 1 ,

Right Hon. Lady Hulse 1

Sir Henry I. W. Jervis, Bart. 3

Lady White Jervis 1

Sir John Kingsmill, Bart. 1

The Right Hon. S. R. Lushington 5

The Hon. Mrs. Lushington 3

Hon. Lauderdale Maule, 39th Regiment 2 ,,

Hon. William Maule Maule 2

Sir William Rumbold, Bart. 2

The Hon. Lady Harriet Williams Wynn 2

Lieut. J. G. Bawstorne, 62d Regiment 1

D. Baynes, Esq. 1

Lieut. W. G. Beare, 46th Regiment 1

Peter Bell, Esq. 1



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS.

Lieut. J. J. Best, 34th Regiment 2 copies.

Lieut. Colonel Best 1

Miss Best 1

W. Binny, Esq. 2

Thomas Binny, Esq. 4

John Binny, Esq. 2

Alexander Binny, Esq. 2

W. Blackie, Esq. 1

John Bolingbroke, Esq. 1

Richard Bosanquet, Esq. 1

Peter Bourke, M.D. 1

Thomas Bower, Esq. 1

James Bower, Esq. 1

F. Bradley, Esq. 1

Mark Browne, Esq. 1

James Bumes, Esq. T.C. 2

Capt. W. Campbell, 62d Regiment 1

H. Chamier, Esq. 2

Lieut. C. Clarke, 62d Regiment 1

Clementson, Esq. 2

R. Clerk, Esq. 2

R. H. Clive, Esq. 4

Captain Clive 2

Rev. W. Clive 2

Rev. George Clive 1

John Coleman, P. P. 1

John Collier, Esq. 1

Peter Cooke, P.P. 1

Lieut. D. S. Cooper, 1st Royals 1

Lieut. F. Corfield, 62d Regiment 1 ' *

Rev. R. CorHeld 1

Rev. Thomas Corfield 1

C. Cotton, Esq. 4

Benjamin Cotton, Esq. 1

Captain Cramer, 4th Regiment M.N.I. 2

Mrs. Crampton 1

Major Crewe 2

Captain Crossley, 13th Light Dragoons 1



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS.

Mrs. Parry 1 copies.

G. Pendergast, Esq. 2

W. C. Peters, Esq. 1

Mrs. A. M. Peters 2

Robert Pilkington, Esq. 2

Rev. P. Pounden 1

Lieut. Raitt, 1st Regiment Bombay N.I. 1

Lieut. R. Williamson Ramsay, 42d Regiment 1

Lieut. Rawstorne, 62d Regiment 1

Lieut. Col. J. Reed, K.H. 62d Regiment 1

J. H. Ridge, Esq. 1

Mrs. Ruthven 1

John Sanderman, Es .

Captain Scott, R.N 1

James Scott, Esq. 5 f)

J. Scott, Esq. 1 })

W. B. Scott, Esq. 1

Lieut. Shaw, Madras Engineers 1

John Shaw, C.C.P. 1

Captain W. T. Shortt, 62d Regiment 1 '

J. Sheffield, Esq. 2

E. Smith, Esq. 2

Provost Spied 2

Joseph Stone, Esq. 1 }t

D. Stone, Esq. 1

Ensign Stowell, 38th Regiment i

P. Sweeny, Esq. 1 )?

J. Taileure, Esq. 1

Captain F. Thornbury, 54th Regiment 1

The Rev. J. F. Trenow i

Captain Underwood, Madras Engineers 2

Lieut. Watts, Madras Engineers l

John James Watts, Esq. 1.

G. Webster, Esq. 1



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS.

Lieut. J. J. Best, 34th Regiment 2 copies.

Lieut. Colonel Best 1

Miss Best 1

W. Binny, Esq. 2

Thomas Binny, Esq. 4

John Binny, Esq. 2

Alexander Binny, Esq. 2

W. Blackie, Esq. 1

John Bolingbroke, Esq. 1

Richard Bosanquet, Esq. 1

Peter Bourke, M.D. 1

Thomas Bower, Esq. 1 ,,

James Bower, Esq. 1

F. Bradley, Esq. 1

Mark Browne, Esq. 1

James Burnes, Esq. T. C. 2

Capt. W. Campbell, 62d Regiment 1

H. Chamier, Esq. 2

Lieut. C. Clarke, 62d Regiment 1

- Clementson, Esq. 2

R. Clerk, Esq. 2

R. H. Clive, Esq. 4

Captain Clive 2

Rev. W. Clive 2

Rev. George Clive 1

John Coleman, P. P. 1

John Collier, Esq. 1

Peter Cooke, P.P. 1

Lieut. D. S. Cooper, 1st Royals 1

Lieut. F. Corfield, 62d Regiment 1 ' *

Rev. R. Corfield 1

Rev. Thomas Corfield 1

C. Cotton, Esq. 4

Benjamin Cotton, Esq. 1

Captain Cramer, 4th Regiment M.N.I. 2

Mrs. Crampton 1

Major Crewe 2

Captain Crossley, 13th Light Dragoons 1



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS.

Mrs. Parry 1 copies.

G. Pendergast, Esq. 2

W. C. Peters, Esq. 1

Mrs. A. M. Peters 2

Robert Pilkington, Esq. 2

Rev. P. Pounden 1

Lieut. Raitt, 1st Regiment Bombay N.I. 1

Lieut. R. Williamson Ramsay, 42d Regiment 1

Lieut. Rawstorne, 62d Regiment 1

Lieut. Col. J. Reed, K.H. 62d Regiment 1

J. H. Ridge, Esq. 1

Mrs. Ruthven 1

John Sanderman, Es .

Captain Scott, R.N 1

James Scott, Esq. 5

J. Scott, Esq. 1 }>

W. B. Scott, Esq. 1

Lieut. Shaw, Madras Engineers 1

John Shaw, C.C.P. 1

Captain W. T. Shortt, 62d Regiment 1 /

J. Sheffield, Esq. 2

E. Smith, Esq. 2

Provost Spied 2

Joseph Stone, Esq. 1

D. Stone, Esq. 1

Ensign Stowell, 38th Regiment l

P. Sweeny, Esq. 1 )}

J. Taileure, Esq. \

Captain F. Thornbury, 54th Regiment l

The Rev. J. F. Trenow \

Captain Underwood, Madras Engineers 2

Lieut. Watts, Madras Engineers l

John James Watts, Esq. 1.

G. Webster, Esq. j



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS.



James Webster, Esq.

Mrs. Webster

John Webster, Esq.

Thomas Webster, Esq.

Ensign H. Wells, 62 Regiment

T. R. Wheally, Esq.

Captain H. Jervis White, 50th Regiment, B.N.I. 1

J.Jervis White, Esq.

Mrs. Jervis White

J.B. Wildman,Esq.

Mrs. Willcock 2



LIST OF EMBELLISHMENTS.



I. .Fort of Soosily on the Caver y ...... Frontispiece

II. Fall of Gungan Chuckee 8

III. Fall of Bir Chuckee 10

IV. A Toda Village 33

V. View at Oatacamund 46

VI. Lake at Oatacamund 60

VII. Officers' Quarters Poonamallee 82 '

VIII. Situation and Hills of Vellore 84

IX. Mausoleum of Laulpett 86

X. Olsoor Tank, Bangalore 89

XI. Officers' Burial Ground, Bangalore ... 90

XII. Town of Closepett 92



CHAPTER I.



Hail noble Cavery ! Of thee I sing.
Thy rolling waters to the vallies bring
A welcome succour ; with a liberal hand
Bestowing plenty to a burning land.

" Oh, could I flow like thee, and make thy stream
" My great example, as it is my theme ! "

DENHAM.



THE Cavery rises in the mountains which divide
the Southern Peninsula of India, and after flow-
ing for about three hundred miles through
Mysore, is first seen in its beauty and utility
at Seringapatam. Rushing rapidly over the
iron-coloured rocks scattered in its bed, it en- .
circles the Fortress and Island of Seringapatam,
and by an ingenious native aqueduct, a part of
its waters which flow near the spot where Lord
Harris's camp and breaching batteries were
established, are used in cultivating the land,

B



2 FALLS OF THE CAVERY

leading to the city of Mysore, the classic ground
of British heroism and generosity in 1799.

The works and the neighbourhood of Serin-
gapatam have been so often and so well detailed,
that nothing remains for me to add, but that
I could not survey these scenes without rever-
ence for the statesman, Marquis Wellesley, by
whose counsels the British Army was directed
against this capital ; and for the commander-in-
chief, Lord Harris, by whose skilful conduct of
the campaign and the siege, the British colours
first floated in triumph upon the battlements.
Cold too must that heart be which can con-
template without some feelings of pious awe,
the monuments of fallen greatness which sur-
round him. But it is an awe mixed with the
honest pride of an Englishman.

It is impossible to see the splendid tombs and
religious establishments of Hyder Ally and
Tippoo Sultan, and their wives and relations,
so carefully preserved and protected by the
British government, or to look at the munificent
provision made for their adherents, without re-
membering the English sentiment, which the
progress of the war in 1791 called forth from



AND NEILGHERRY HILLS. 3

Sir W. Meadows, as brave and honourable
an officer as ever lived, that " an enemy con-
quered is an enemy no more." In this spirit
not only the government, but individuals seem
to have acted ; for Tippoo's vindictive picture of
his fathers triumph over Colonel Baillie's de-
tachment remains upon the walls of the Dowlut
Baug, as visible as when the great Captain of
Waterloo commanded the place more than thirty
years ago. But the heart sinks in contemplating
the crowded memorials of those of our fellow
countrymen who have since fallen under its
pestilent climate, especially if the traveller has
ever felt the sting of a Mysore Fever as I have
done. Nor is this feeling abated by remember-
ing the still greater number of victims to disease,
during the governments of Hyder and Tippoo.
At one period they were so appalling as to have
led the Sultan to serious thoughts of abandoning
it, as the seat of his administration.

Out of many thousand natives who were com-
pulsorily brought from the Malabar Coast and
made Musselmans, only five hundred survived at
the end often years to relate their tragic expulsion
from their own habitations, and out of five hun-

B 2



4 FALLS OF THE CAVERY

dred Europeans and artificers brought from the
Isle of France, only twenty-five outlived five
years' residence on this Island. It had been hap-
py for the dynasty of Tippoo if he had listened,
in this single instance, to the united dictates of
humanity and self-preservation ; for the posses-
sion of this formidable military position fostered
that towering ambition, which did not cease
until it had prostrated him under the dust of its
battlements.

After passing the limits of this fertile and
beautiful, but mournful Island, the Cavery de-
scends in one stream towards Soosily. Here the
army under Lord Harris crossed by a masterly
and unexpected movement ; and by securing for
the use of the British troops those supplies
which Tippoo had collected for his own, has-
tened the downfall of his empire and the entire
conquest of his dominions.

At this place the Cavery receives its first great
auxiliary stream, the Cubhany, which, flowing
past Nunjengoc[e, the favored residence of Mr.
Cole and Mr. Casamajor (the two last honorable
Agents of the British Government in Mysore)
brings into its course the alluvial treasures of



AND NEILGHERRY HILLS. 5

Wynaud, a country teeming with the richest
productions of Nature. Farther on, the Mud-
door river falls into it, fraught with the soil of
the country, through which it impetuously
passes ; and the Cavery, now greatly enlarged in
its limits, occupies a bed of nearly a mile broad,
varying from fifteen to twenty feet deep, before
it reaches the western point of Sivasamoodrum.
Here the river is divided by the rocks which op-
pose its course, and the two streams, after en-
circling the Island, again unite at the southern
extremity. But in their passage they descend
by two separate falls, not exceeded in magnifi-
cence and beauty by any yet discovered in any
part of India. Even the Fall of Niagara as de-
scribed by Capt. Hall and Mrs. Trollope does not
exceed in height one hundred and sixty feet.

The Northern Fall of the Cavery is about
three-hundred feet ; the Southern Branch about
two-hundred. The cheering sounds of these
great streams, in their descent, are fit heralds of
the gladness which they convey to the plains
below, where all nature languishes in the month
of June with heat and drought. Without any
previous notice, in the midst sometimes of a ra-



Q FALLS OF THE CAVERY

diant sun, or in the stillness of the night, it comes
sweeping down with plenty and with healing
in its course.

Those only who have seen the haggard eyes
and emaciated forms of the people, when its
descent has been delayed by a late season, and
who have also witnessed the joyful countenances
which proclaim its timely arrival, can form an
adequate notion of its value. It seems indeed
to be one universal jubilee. Men, women and
children, herds and flocks, and birds, and every
living thing, within reach of its shores, crowd
upon its banks, and do homage to the God of
nature, through whose bounty, the plentiful har-
vests of Trichinopoly and Tanjore are dis-
pensed in due season through half the southern
peninsula.

The scenery and manner of the descent of the
Cavery at Sivasamoodrum are in harmony with
its greatness and goodness. All pictorial repre-
sentations must however convey so feeble an
outline, that to be adequately understood, it
must be seen ; and all I propose to myself is, to
increase the temptation to others to visit it, as
I have done.



AND NEILGHERRY HILLS. 7

There was a time when the passage of the
Cavery, before it reaches Sivasamoodrum, and
the residence upon the Island, was full of diffi-
culty and danger ; but these both are now at
an end. The Jagheerdar of the Island, Rama-
samy Moodliar, under the encouragement of the
government, has erected two stone bridges over
the two branches of the river ; and upon the
Island he has built bungalows and choultries
for the comfort of Europeans and natives ; both
are so well supplied and kept by him, that the
traveller has now no inconvenience or trouble,
if he takes care to go at the proper season, which
does not commence till the Cavery descends in
July, and ceases about November when it begins
to be empty. These are splendid works, raised
as they have been by the piety and munificence
of a single Hindoo. The expence incurred in
their execution has exceeded two lacs of ru-
pees; and they afford a memorable example of
what may be achieved by individual exertion,
when encouraged by kindly intercourse, and
fairly supported by the fostering hand of the
Government.

Of the traditionary account of these Falls,



8 FALLS OF THE CAVERY

which is generally told to persons visiting them,
it is not for me to decide how much may be fa-
bulous ; I shall only endeavour to describe the
Falls as I saw them, of which a general view is
given in the annexed sketches.

The northern branch of the river passes under
the bridge recently completed by Ramasamy the
the Jagheerdar. During the last season, the ri-
ver, which is here seventeen hundred feet broad,
was unusually full, but still there were three feet
of space above it.

Thence it winds along the southern side of a
mountain until it reaches the high land forming
the Island on the eastern side. Here it begins
to descend with considerable rapidity, till it ar-
rives at the head of the great cataract Gungan
Chuckee, so called in consequence of a Rajah of
the Island, whose name was Gungan, having
about seven hundred years ago leapt his horse
down at this place, at the command of the di-
vinity of the island, in order to cleanse himself
from a pollution he had unknowingly received.
Such is the legend related by an inhabitant of
this lovely spot, remarkable as the site of the



AND NEILGHERRY HILLS. 9

ancient Hindoo city of Gungan Para ; of which
some part may still be traced.

A little above this cataract, this branch of the
river is divided into two, encircling a smaller
island, which swarms with tigers ; but in the
rainy season there is no communication with
the larger island, from the velocity of the cur-
rent ; however, the latter has its share of these
ferocious beasts. The cataract nearest this latter
island is by far the largest, and has worn its
channel deeper than the other. About half
way down, there is a confluence, when the river
is not quite full, of two separate streams, dash-
ing upon huge masses of rock, and thence
plunging together into the chasm below. The
second branch flows along a higher part of the
rock, whence at right angles to the greater ca-
taract it rushes into the middle of the river in
two columns.

" And from the loud resounding rocks below,
" Dashed in a cloud of foam, it sends aloft
" A hoary mist, and forms a ceaseless shower.''

THOMPSON.

Here flights of birds are frequently hovering
and feeding upon the sides of the mountain,



]0 FALLS OF THE CAVER Y

probably upon the smaller fish precipitated
down the stream. When the river is quite full,
it falls in one unbroken cataract to the vale
below, and its sudden violence, as it rushes
down this deep descent, is beautifully contrast-
ed with the calmness of its subsequent gliding
through a valley, formed by the steep banks of
two mountains overhung with trees of great
variety, whilst the brushwood and long grass of
the bottom afford shelter to tigers, elks, hogs,
and all the feathered tribe of game. Here I am
told our worthy commander in chief Sir R.
O'Callagan had, last season, the satisfaction of
shooting a fine elk.

The fall on the southern branch of the river
is called Bir Chuckee, and is about two miles
from Gungan Chuckee ; a good road connecting
the two. The channel of the river here is
spread out to a magnificent expanse, -and its
stream, which is divided into seven distinct ca-
taracts of nearly the same height of two hun-
dred feet, cannot be advantageously seen without
descending a long flight of steps, that lead down
to the abyss, into which they fall. The eye is
then delighted with the descent of these differ-



AND NEILGHERRY HILLS. 1 1

ent branches of the stream, (forming an amphi-
theatre) rushing over and past the rocks and
trees and small islets, around which the various
streamlets and eddies play, and fall into the
chasm, worn by their descent ; whence the
river

" Gains a safer bed, and steals at last,
"Along the mazes of the quiet vale."

THOMPSON.

If an objection can be made to this view, it is,
that it appears somewhat too lonely amidst all its
loveliness. After enjoying it for some time, I
was glad to retrace my steps and view the fleecy
clouds rolling round the mountain to the left of
the greater fall, which, gilded by the glory of
the setting sun, and enlivened by the calling and
rapid evolution of the birds collecting for their
evening flight, were calculated to fill the mind
with admiration of the wisdom and power of the
Great Creator.

Having taken my last look of this sublime
scene, I returned to a pleasant and retired spot,
called the Fakir's Retreat, comprising, besides
the dwellings of a few of the sect, a tomb and
garden, which are kept with great care and neat-



12 FALLS OF THE CAVERY

ness. The Fakirs in attendance, who beg
alms of visitors through the medium of a present
of fruits and flowers, told a long story of their
saint, whose remains lie buried there; and spoke,
as became them, with grateful respect of the
liberality of the present Jagheerdar, from whom
they have received so much kindness.

It was gratifying to see that their counte-
nances did not manifest those extreme signs of
debility and sickness which might have been
expected, in persons exposed throughout the
year to the fever which too often visits the
Island in the dry season, when the mountains
on the north-eastern side obstruct the circula-
tion of air ; and the dews of the night, and the
extreme rays of the sun during the day, gener-
ate the rankest vegetation, and rapidly corrupt
it. Let me advise all travellers to this celebra-
ted spot, not to sleep on the island in the dry
season, and not to expose themselves to the
night air, at any period. The bridge being now
finished, the safer plan is to effect a retreat in
the evening to Bulkawaddy, a village about two
miles from Sivasamoodrum, where Ramasamy's



AND NEILGHERRY HILLS. J3

hospitality has provided a comfortable bun-
galow.

The Cavery, after leaving the island of Sivasa-
moodrum, gradually descends until it reaches
Bhavany ; here it is joined by the beautiful
river to which that town and handsome Pagoda
give their name ; itself composed of two streams,
which nearly encircle the Neilgherries, bringing
with them the decayed vegetation and super-
fluous mould of those hills. About Bhavany
there are numerous islands, formed by the river,
filled with pea-fowl and aquatic birds, that af-
ford amusement to the sportsman, and which
can only be approached in the round bamboo
basket-boats used upon this river.

To him who has any natural turn or love for
watery excursions, I recommend a descent on
the Cavery, when it is pretty full, and though
his nerves may be a little shaken, when he goes
whirling down the eddies, formed in the river by
the obtruding rocks, he cannot fail to admire the
extreme dexterity with which the boatmen es-
cape from the rock almost at the moment of
touching it. One gentle turn of the paddle



] 4 FALLS OF THE CAVERY

when the boat is rapidly impelled by the current,
is so effective, that it seems as if there was a re-
pulsive power in the rock which forbade the
boat to touch it.

At Caroor, the Ambravutty, and a little higher
the Noel, fall into the Cavery. All these great
streams, now united into one bed, wind in a
serpentine course through the valley of Sanker-
rydroog, from whose top the Cavery is seen in
great magnificence. But large as is the supply
of water, the labours of the husbandmen, and
the wants of every living thing upon the plains
in the dry season, nearly exhaust it, before it
reaches the sea ; so that of this great stream
there is but an imperfect branch when it reaches
Porto Novo, after washing the shores of the
Island of Seringham, the Rock of Trichinopoly,
and the walls of Chillumbrum, so often the
scenes of the immortal Olive's early glory!



AND NEILGHERRY HILLS.



CHAPTER II.

' Away our journey lies through dell and dingle,
' Where the blithe fawn trips by its timid mother,
' Where the broad tree with intercepting boughs,
* Chequers the sun-beam in the greensward alley
' Up and away ! for lovely paths are these
' To tread, where the glad sun is on his throne;
' Less pleasant, and less safe, when Cynthia's lamp
' With doubtful glimmer lights the dreary forest."

ETTRICK FOREST.



BIDDING adieu to the noble river Cavery, I
shall endeavour to present to the reader some
inducement to proceed from its beautiful falls
to the Neilgherry Hills. But if he can go to
the Hills first, and to the Falls afterwards, he
will see and enjoy both to the greatest advantage.
After leaving the sacred Island of Sivasamoo-
drum, the first place in the route is Sattigaul,
the chief village of Ramasamy Moodliar the
hospitable Jagheerdar. From thence to Cooli-
gaul, one of the best cultivated of the Company's
pergunnahs, is about ten miles ; and at the same



16 FALLS OF THE CAVERY

distance from Cooligaul is Shamrauz-nugger, in
Mysore, one of the Rajah's family villages.
Here there is a choice of two routes, either down
the Guzzlehutty Pass, and up to Coonoor, or to
Goondulpet, and thence to Ootacamund. The
route by Guzzlehutty is the most direct, and
provided the pass is not suffered to become dan-
gerous by the inattention of the civil authorities
to the destruction of the tigers that infest it, it
is best. The distances by each route are given
in the Appendix. Having reached Mateepol-
lium on the right bank of the Bhavany, the tra-
veller will there find an excellent bungalow,
with servants in attendance, to give him, upon


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Online LibraryH JervisNarrative of a journey to the falls of the Cavery, with an historical and descriptive account of the Neilgherry Hills → online text (page 1 of 7)