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Gazetteer and business directory of Crawford County, Pa., for 1874 online

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lumber manuructured here.

The ])opulation in 1870 was 1,131, of whom 1,088 were native,
43, foreign and all, except three, white.

During the year ending June 3, 1872, the townshi}) contained



98 SPARTA— SPRING.



eight schools and employed thirteen teachers. The number of
scholars was 249; the average number attending school, 212 ;
and the amount expended for school purposes, $2,688.54.

Spaetan"SBUKG, (p. V.) situated on the east-branch of Oil
Creek and the Oil Creek & Allegheny Valley E. R., a little
north-east of the center of the township, is a thriving village
of about 600 inhabitants. It is rapidly improving, both in the
number of buildings and inhabitants. It contains two churches,
two hotels, fourteen stores of various kinds, two carriage shops,
a woolen mill, steam tannery, saw and planing mill and a
cabinet shop. The first store, (which is now occupied
by Blackmer & Parley as a boot and shoe store,) was
built in 1837, by Andrew and Aaron Akin, from whom the
place was known as Akinsville, which name it retained until
the establishment of the post office, when the present one was
substituted. It was incorporated as a borough in 1856. Its
population in 1870 was 457.

Spartan Lodge No. 372 ^. Y. M. was organized Jan. 2, 1867,
and is in a prosperous condition. John G. Burlingham is
W. M.

Brittaii^" is a hamlet in the south-west part on Brittain
Run.

GLTiiTDOisr Station" is situated on the south line and on the
0. C. & V. E. R. R.

The settlement of this township was commenced at a com-
paratively recent date, by Reuben and Abraham Blakeslee,
father and son, who came from Washington county, N. Y., to
Meadville in 1817, and to Sparta, April 11th, 1818. They
located on the place now occupied by Abraham, who was sixty-
two years old Jan. 4, 1872. Reuben died July 20, 1848, aged
sixty-two years, and his wife Prudence, died Peb. 8, 1851, at
the same age. Near the door of their residence stands an apple
tree which is forty-five years old and measures seven and one-
half feet in circumference. David Blakeslee, who was born at
New Haven, Conn., May 12, 1740, came in from Granville, N.
Y., the same year, and settled upon a tract of 175 acres which
he cleared and on which his son, Jesse A., who was then sixteen
years old, is still living.

SPRING was formed from Beaver in 1830. It lies upon
the north border of the county, west of the center, and con-
tains 26,102 square acres. It is drained in the west by Conneaut
Creek and in the east by the headwaters of Little Cussewago
Creek. The soil is of good quality and is well and profitably
cultivated. The Erie & Pittsburgh R. R. crosses the township



SPRING, 99



in close proximity to the west border, and the old Beaver &
Erie Canal extends along the valley of Conneaut Creek. It is
a fine dairy township, and possesses valuable manufacturing in-
terests. At one time it contained no less than seven distilleries,
all of which did a good business.

The population in 1870 was 1,522, of whom 1,457 were na-
tive, 65, foreign and all, except one, white.

During the year ending June 3, 1872, it contained twenty-one
schools. The number of scholars was 837; the average number
attending school, 670 ; and the amount expended for school
purposes, 84,939.11.

Coi?"NEAUTViLLE, (p. V.) located on the south line, west of the
center, and on Conneaut Creek and the old Beaver & Erie Ca-
nal, is surrounded by a rich and populous agricultural district,
for the products of which, especially those of the dairy, it is the
principal shipping point, and this is true not only of the coun-
try in the immediate vicinity, but also of the whole western
portion of the county. Most of the lumber and the articles
manufactured therefrom in this section seek a market through
this channel. It is distant one and one-half miles east of the
E. & P. R. R., and contains five churches, a fine public school,
a newspaper office, (^The Courier and Record,) a bank, [The First
National Bank of Conneautville, which was organized Jan. 1,
1864,) two hotels, two drug stores and several dry goods stores
and groceries, two iron foundries, (one of which, F. M. Robin-
son's, manufactures portable and stationary engines, saw and
grist mill machinery, sash, doors, blinds, window and door
frames, and comprises a turning shop,) a tannery, (which gives
employment to six persons and tans about 200 sides of leather
per week,) John Spellacy's shook factory, (which gives employ-
ment to nine persons and manufactures about 200,000 shocks
per annum — about one-third the number made previous to the
insurrection in Cuba, to which place most of them wereshi})ped,)
throe harness shops, four blacksmith shops, and had, in 1870,
1,000 inhabitants. It lies partially in Summerhill, and was in-
corporated as a borough in 1845. Its streets are mostly shaded
with maples, and it presents an appearance of neatness and
thrift.

T/ie Crawford County Anriculturnl Society, the pioneer organ-
ization of the county, and the only one now in existence, holds
•a fair here on the llrst Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of
October in e^ch year.

Spkino (p. V.) is situated on Conneaut Creek, a little west of
the center of tlie township, and contains three churches, one



r^ r» -^ ry^^t



100 SPRING.



hotel, a drug store and a tin shop. It was incorporated as a
borough in 1867, and in 1870 had a population of 323.

EuxDEL is a hamlet in the south-east corner, and contains a
store, steam saw mill and cheese box factory, carriage shop,
blacksmith shop, hand rake factory, cheese factory and millin-
ery shop. The country in the vicinity is adapted and chiefly
devoted to dairying.

Settlement was commenced as early as 1795, in which year
Alex. Power, from Cumberland county, who, if not the first,
was one of the first to settle in the township, located on the site
of Conneautville. He was engaged the previous year in the
first surveys made in Spring, and took up 800 acres, a part
of which he gave to settlers, the remainder being still owned by
the Power family. He built the first grist mill in the
township, and the first saw mill west of French Creek.
He also erected the first house in Spring, though the first
framed house was built by Wm. Crosier. Other early settlers,
though in what year we are not advised, were Justus Ross, from
Monroe county, N. Y., Robert Temple, from Seneca county in
the same State, Henry Hadsell, from Connecticut, Isaac
Thayer, from Sadsbury, James Patterson, Wm. McGuire, who
settled first in Beaver, and subsequently in Spring, Stephen
Eighmy, from Saratoga county, N. Y., and Samuel W. Sheldon,
from Steuben county, in the same State. John Foster, Robert
Nelson, from Philadelphia, Samuel Thompson and James
Fetterman, settled here in 1796. These early settlers were
accustomed to procure their provisions from Pittsburgh. They
conveyed them in boats up French Creek as far as Meadville,
and thence upon their backs, a distance of sixteen miles,
through the woods, being guided by blazed trees. Foot paths
were the best roads which the wilderness then afforded. The
animals indigenous to the climate were abundant and frequent-
ly troublesome. Game was an important item in the bill of
fare of those days. Robert McCoy settled here about 1797.
His son, Wm. R. McCoy, was born here in 1803. Thomas
Foster located here about 1800; Thomas Bowman, from Utica,
N. Y., in 1815; Barker Wells, from Conn., in 1816; Samuel
Wetmore, from Oneida county, N. Y., a soldier of the war of
1812, in 1817, on the farm upon which he now lives ; Piatt
Rogers, from Dutches county, N. Y., and Isaac Hurd, from
Bennington county, Yt., in X818 ; Oliver Hall, from Onondaga
county, N. Y., in 1819; and Elijah Thompson, from Vermont,
in 1822. Black salts was the chief article of commerce with
these pioneers and about the only thing which commanded
ready money. They made their own sugar, and traded the sur-



SPRING—STEUBEK 101



plus for other necessaries, sometimes exchanging for fresh fish,
pound for pound. So scarce an article was money that many
went barefoot to Meadville to attend general training rather
than subject themselves to a fine of only fifty cents. The first
school house in the township was constructed of logs and was
located about one and one-half miles north of Spring borough.

Spring Chrktian Churchy at Spring borough, was organized about 1825.

The first pastor was Rev, — • Morrison ; the present one is Rev. J. J.

Snmmerbell, our informant. The Society consists of about 130 members,
and its property, consisting of two church buildings and a parsonage, is
valued at $5,500.

The First Presbyterian Church, at Conneautville, was organized with
nine members, Oct. 31, 1835, by Rev. P. Ilassiuger. The first church edi-
fice was erected in 1838. The present one, which will seat 400 persons,
was dedicated June 14, 1871. It is a fine brick structure, with stone win-
dow caps and corners, and a spire 140 feet high. The audience room is
finely frescoed and is furnished with modern improvements. Its cost wi.s
$17,000. The first pastor was Rev. J. W. Dickey ; the present one is Rev.
Moses D. A. Steen. There are ninety-six members. The Church property
is valued at $25,000. — [^Information furnished by Mr. A. P. Foster.

The M. E. Church was organized with seven members, in 1836, by Rev-
Daniel Richey, the first pastor, and the house of worship, which will seat
300 i>ersons, and is located on Center St., was erected in 1863, at a cost of
^1,500. The Church is composed of fifty members, who are under the
pastoral care of Rev. J. B. Wright, and the property is valued at $2,500. —
. [Information furnisTied by Mr. G. R. Cook.

The First Baptist Church of Conneautmlh was organized in the fall of

1847, by Rev. "Whipple, and the church edifice, which will seat 150

persons, was erected in 1848, at a cost of $800, twice the present value of
Church property. The Church contains sixteen members, but is without a
pastor.

STEUBEN was formed from Athens in 1861. It is an
interior township, lying east of the center of the county, and
contains 13,772 square acres. It is drained in the east by Oil
Creek and small streams tributary to it, and in the west by the
head waters of Muddy Creek and the north branch of Sugar
Creek. It possesses abundant railroad facilities, being traversed
ill the eastern })art by the Oil Creek & Allegheny Valley and
Union & Titusville railroads, which run ])arallel with and
adjacent to Oil Creek, and in the central part by the IVnnsyl-
vaiiia Petroleum R. R.

The manufacture of lumber is carried on (juite extensively.
There are four saw mills with an aggregate capacity for cutting
six and one-half millions feet of lumber per annum ; two
shingle and two stave mills, ami one shingle and stave mill
combined, capable of making in the aggregate about six mil-
lions of shingles and five millions of staves; the whole giving
ein|ilovment to about thirty i)er8ons. Geo. A. ]irice ^ Co.,



102 STEUBEN-.



employ eleven men in the manufacture of wagons and carriages,
to the value of about $12,000 per annum.

The population in 1870 was 1,020, of whom 968 were native,
52, foreign and all, white.

During the year ending June 3, 1872, it contained eight
schools and employed sixteen teachers. 1 he number of scholars
was 281; the average number attending school, 182; and the
amount expended for school purposes, $1,762.38.

TowNViLLE, (p. V.) situated on Muddy Creek, near the south-
west corner of the township, contains three churches, one
school, two hotels, five stores, four blacksmith shops, two car-
riage shops, one grist mill, two wooden bowl manufactories,
two milliner shops, a photograph gallery, three doctors' offices,
and had, in 1870, 280 inhabitants. It was incorporated as a
borough in 1869. Messrs. Kingsley and Post were the first two
to build here, the former in 1833, and the latter in 1837.

Tryonyille, (p. 0.) situated in the north-east part on Oil
Creek and on the Union & Titusville and Oil Creek & AUe-
gheuey Valley railroads, contains one church, (M. E.) one
school, one hotel, two stores, a cooper shop and ^forty-seven
dwellings. The first buildings were erected here by James and
David Tryon, who came from Connecticut about forty years
ago, purchased a tract of 700 acres, and built a grist and saw
mill upon the creek.

Clappyille is situated one and one-half miles south of
Tryonville and contains a school, store, saw mill, blacksmith
shop and seventeen houses. The Pennsylvania Petroleum

E. K., when completed, will have a station here, which is to be
named Waidville, hj which name the place is now frequently
designated. It was first settled about forty years ago, by a Mr.
Clapp, from whom it derives its name.

The First Baptist Church of Steuben, at Townville, was organized with
fifty members, in 1851, by a council of delegates from other Baptist
Churches. The church edifice, which will seat 270 persons, was erected
in 1854, at a cost of $1000, and about $400 are now being expended in its
repair. The first pastor was Rev. Warren D. Bradford ; the present one
is Rev. Charles W". Drake. The Society numbers eighty-five, and its
property is valued at $3,000.

Calvai^ Church, (Episcopal,) at Townville, was organized with nine
members, by Rev. Henry Fitch, in 1867, in which year was commenced
the building of the house of worship, which was completed in 1873, and
will seat 175 persons. The first services were conducted by Rev. S. T.
Lord, amissionery. There is no regular pastor, services being held by
clergymen from Meadville and Titusville. There are sixteen members.
The Church property is valued at $5,000. — [Infor?nation furnished by Mr.

F. Bose.



STJMMERHILL. 103



SU3I3IBBHILL was formed in 1830. It is an interior
township, lying west of the center of the county and contains
14,603 square acres. It is watered in the western part by Con-
neaut Creek, and numerous small streams tributary to it, and
in the eastern part by a small stream which empties into Little
Cussewago Creek, in the western part of Cussewago township,
and by the head waters of Pine Run, which discharges into
Conneaut Lake. The old Beaver & Erie Canal extends through
the township, along the valley of Conneaut Creek.

Among the more important manufacturing establishments
are McMullin's and J. Close's steam saw mills, the former situ-
ated about three miles south of Conneautville, and the latter in
the south-eastern part of the township, each giving employment
to three persons and being capable of sawing 4,000 feet of lum-
ber per day; McDowell & Hammond's cheese factory, situated
at Dicksonburg, which was erected in 1873, gives employment
to two persons, and manufactures the first quality of Cheddar
cheese, in quantity about ten cheeses per day, each weighing
fifty-seven pounds; and J. & R. Wormald's woolen factory, lo-
cated in the eastern part of Conneautville, (which is partially
in this township,) which occupies a large three-story building,
erected in 1843 for a carding and fulling mill, and which was
adapted to its present uses in 1849. It is operated by water,
and has recently been repaired and furnished throughout with
new and improved machinery. Six to eight persons are em-
ployed and 15,000 to 18,000 pounds of wool annually consumed
in the manufacture of cloths, cassimeres, flannels, blankets,
yarn, &c.

Dicksonburg (p. o. ) (formerly known as McDowell,) is sit-
uated on Conneaut Creek, in the south-west part of the town-
ship.

XoRRisviLLE (p. 0.) is situated a little north of the center of
the township.

Settlement was commenced as early as 1803, by Valentine P.
Gwin, of French descent, who is still living in the township at
the age of seventy-seven years. His father accompanied Lafay-
ette to this country and served under him in the Federal army
till the close of the Revolutionary war. He then settled in
Berks county and worked at his trade — that of a blacksmith —
until 1803. He died in 1821.

Tlie Evangelic/il Church of SuminerhUl was organized with twenty-five
members, in 18G3, by Rev. James Crossnian, the first pastor, and their
church edifice, which will seat 300 persons, was erected in 1871, at a cost
of $%H00, the present value of Church jiroperty. There are thirty four

mem})ers. The pastor is Hcv. Myers. — [Inf(/ri/ui(ioii furnislicd by

Mr. Minor Walton.



104 ^ UJIMEHHILL— SUMMIT.

_^ ■ *• ■ — , ,

The M. E. Church, at Dicksonburg, erected their first house of wor-
ship in 1835, and the present one, which will seat 300 persons, in 1851, at
a cost of $975. The Society numbers eighty and its property is valued
at $4,000. The pastor is Rev. A. R. Rich. — [Information fur?ii8hed by Mr.
John F. McDoweU.

SUMMIT was formed in 1841. It is an interior township,
lying west of the center of the county, and contains 14,012
square acres. It is drained in the eastern part by Pine Run,
which flows south into Conneaut Lake, the northern part of
which lies in this township, and in the north by the head
waters of Conneaut Creek. The old Beaver & Erie Canal
extends north through the central part, and unites with thn
Beaver Canal near the center of the south line. '

Upon the farm of Mr. Almon Whiting in the south-east
part of the township is a fine bed of marl, which is used as a
fertilizer.

The population of the township in 1870 was 1,034, all of
whom were white, 991, native and 43, foreign.

During the year ending June 3, 1872, it contained nine
schools and employed ten teachers. The number of scholars
was 272; the average number attending school, 227; and the
amount expended for school j^urposes, $1,240.97.

Harmonsbueg (p. o.) is situated on Pine Run, at the head of
Conneaut Lake, a little east of the center of the township.

Settlement was commenced by Joseph and Jacob Gehr,
brothers, with their families, including Samuel, Adam, David
and Baltzar Gehr, but in what year we have not determined,
though it was probably near the beginning of the present cen-
tury. Baltzar, being the youngest and not over fond of work,
was furnished with a gun and ammunition and was expected
to supply the two families with game. Adam Foust and Henry
Bright settled here in 1797. Foust came from Berks county
and purchased 1,200 acres of land on the east bank of Conneaut
Lake. Michael Foust, his son, came with him at the age of six
years. He says this section of country was then a wilderness.
There was but one house between them and Meadville, and
that was unoccupied. Bright came from Bedford county, at
the age of twenty-five years, and settled upon a tract of 200
acres on the site of Harmonsburg. His parents were captured
by the Indians during the Revolution and were literally starved
to death. James McClure came in from Mifflin county, in
1798, and bought of one named Field a tract of 400 acres, one-
half of which he subsequently gave to his cousin, John
McClure, as an inducement to settle upon it. In 1814 James
returned to Mifflin county to care for his father in his old age,
and in 1827, six years after the latter's death, he again removed



SUMMIT— TROY. 105
5

to his new home in Summit, and died there in 1852. His son,
John, still lives upon the old homestead. He has a tannery
upon the farm and works a little at the business. William
McFaden, from Philadelphia, settled here in 1801. Mrs.
Elizabeth Clark, his daughter, of Venango township, was born
here in 1803. Daniel Close, came from IJnion county in 1823,
and settled upon a tract of 400 acres, which he bought at an
advance of $50 of Judge Smith, of Waterford, who purchased
it at auction sale the same day for $1,200. There were then no
improvements from this tract to the Cussewago, though many
had settled and made improvements on the Meadville road.

The following, entitled "A curious cut in- a tree," is an
extract from The Conneauiville Courier and Record, and as we
have not had opportunity to examine and determine its signifi-
cance we give it, with the credit, without comment :

" Mr. Eli Brown, of Summit township, in felling a large oak tree on his
farm, noticed in one of the large splinters torn out of the center of the
stump the marks of a sharp instrument, the cut seeming to have been
made with an ax or something similar. Mr. Brown had the curiosity to
count the layers marking each year's growth from the cut to the outside,
and was surprised to find them to number upwards of three hundred,
showing that the cutting must have been done as early as 1573. The
block of wood was brought to our office, where it may be seen."

TROY was formed in 1830. It lies upon the south border
of the county, east of the center, and contains 17,581 square
acres. It is watered in the western and central parts by the
north and east branches of Sugar Creek, which unite near the
south-west corner. Oil Creek crosses the north-east corner.
The Oil Creek & Allegheny Valley, Union c^ Titusville and
Pennsylvania Petroleum railroads cross the north-east corner of
the township in close proximity. Among the manufacturing
establishments are S. B. Hayes' saw mill, which is located on
the east branch of Sugar Creek, employs two men and is ca])a-
ble of sawing 4,000 feet of lumber and 10,000 shingles per day ;
A. T. & J. C. Burns' saw and shingle mills, which are located
on the west branch of Sugar Creek, and are ca})able of sawing
1,500 feet of lumber and 5,000 to 8,000 shingles per day ; Albert
F. Newton's steam saw mill, which is situated on Oil Creek and
the line of the P. P. K. K., and saws 8,000 feet of lumber per
day ; and the saw and stave mills of Johnson t*v: Boush of Mead-
ville, which are located in the western })art of the township,
give employment to twenty-seven men, and are capable ot saw-
ing 10,000 feet of lumber and 1(J,000 stuve.s and heailing per
day. The timber is brought IVoni the woods to the mill upon
a tram-way one and one-half miles in length.

The p()j)ulation of the township in 1870 was 983, all of whom
were white, 1>54, native and ^W, foreign.



106 TROY- UNIOI^\



During the year ending June 3,1872, it contained ten schools
and employed ten teachers. The number of scholars was 277 ;
the average number attending school, 214; and the amount
expended for school purposes, 81,165.87.

Troy Cejsttee, (p. o.) situated on the east branch of Sugar
Creek, near the geographical center of the township, contains a
school, grocery, cooper shop, wagon shop and ten houses. Peter
Keyes was the first white man to build here, though when he
came a negro known as " Black Francis " was living there in a
log hut.

Newtontown", situated in the eastern part, on the line of the
P. P. R. R., contains a school, hotel, grocery and saw mill. It
derives its name from Edmond 0. Newton, who located here
Jan. 6, 1847, and purchased of Samuel Sinclair, who is thought
to have preceded him by thirty years, his property, consisting
of 200 acres of land, only four of which were cleared, a log hut
and a saw mill. Newton came from the town of Gerry, Chau-
tauqua county, N. Y., at the age of thirty-three years, and died
at Newtontown, Dec. 5, 1872. Wm. McGinnis and John Rey-
nolds were early settlers in this locality.

Settlement was commenced by James Luse, who came from
Essex county, N. J., about 1795, and located on the place now
occupied by his grandson, Robert A. Luse. His wagon is said
to have been the third one which left Pittsburgh for Meadville.
When he came no one was living within nine miles of him.
Jacob Rishel came with his father from Cooperstown, N. Y.,
about 1833, with a yoke of oxen, having at that late day to cut
their own road a distance of nine miles. They settled upon the
place now occupied by the former, on road 12 (see map.) Pea-
body Faunce came in March, 1838, and located at " Faunce-
town," in the western part, upon a tract of land purchased of
John McKenzie, who left the place a few years before and went
to Cooperstown, and is supposed to have settled it five years be-
fore Faunce bought.

UNION was formed from Yernon, Fairfield and Green-
wood in October, 1867. It is an interior township, lying a lit-
tle south-west of the center, and contains 8,322 square acres.
It is bounded on the east by French Creek, and on the south
and west by Conneaut Outlet, which is a marshy waste one-half
to three-fourths of a mile wide, with but little fall from the
north-west corner of this township to its intersection with
French Creek. Partial arrangements have been made to dredge
it and thus reclaim large tracts of exceedingly fertile land over-
flowed by it. The surface of the township is rolling, especially



Online LibraryHamilton ChildGazetteer and business directory of Crawford County, Pa., for 1874 → online text (page 12 of 48)