Hamilton Child.

Gazetteer and business directory of Crawford County, Pa., for 1874 online

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gave him a suit of clothes, and paid his passage in a schooner to Buflalo.
On reaching the latter place, Ray met with a Mohawk chief, of the name
of Stripe Neck, who resided at Meadville, and who conducted him to
Franklin, and from thence he proceeded to join his family at Pittsburgh,



VERNON— WA YNE. 115



to the agreeable surprise of his relatives and friends, who had relinguished
all expe'ctation of having him return."

In the early part of 1794, the settlers organized a military
company, and Cornelius Van Horn was chosen captain.

Watsoiu Ran Chnrch (German Reformed) was organized in 1825,. by
Rev. Philip Sizer, the first pastor ; and the church edifice, which will seat
250 persons, was erected in 1847, at a cost of $1,200. There are about 100

members, who are under the pastoral care of Rev. Apple. The

Church property is valued at $2,000. — \_Infoiination furnished hy Mr. John
Andrews.

Watsons Run United Presbyterian Church was organized with forty
members in 1870, in which year was erected, at a cost of $1,800, the church
edifice, which will seat 200 persons. The first pastor was Rev. Samuel
Black, who is also the present one. The Society numbers forty, and its
property is valued at $2,050. — {^Information furnished hy Mrs. Shartel.

TF.^ y^/^ was formed in 1811. It lies near the center of
the south border of the county, and contains 20,066 square
acies. The general shape of the township is that of a rip^ht-
angled triangle, the hypothenuse or south-east line, bordering
on Venango county, consisting of a series of right-angles, pro-
ducing a somewhat singular conformation. The streams are
French Creek, which crosses the extreme south-v>^est corner of
the township, and Sugar Creek and Deckers Run, which run
parallel with the former stream through the township — in a
south-easterly direction — and empty into it in Venango county.
Sugar Lake in the north part, on the creek of the same name,
is a small sheet of water, about a mile in circumference. The
Franklin branch of the Atlantic & Great Western R. R., extends
along the left bank of French Creek, across the south-west cor-
ner of the township.

The population in 1870 was 1,464, all of whom were white,
1,3.')9, native and 105, foreign.

During the year ending, June 3, 1872, it contained eleven
schools and employed twenty-one teachers. The number of schol-
ars was 409; the average number attending school, 365; and
the amount expended for school purposes, ^;i, 174.54.

Deckardyille, (p. 0.) situated in the south i)art, on Deck-
ers Hun, four miles east of Cochranton, contains tiiree churches,
a school, two groceries, a shoe shop, blacksmith shop aiul fifty
to seventy-five inhabitants. It is ple:;.-^':intly located and is grow-
ing rapidly.

Wayne Centeu post otfice, which was established about
1862, was discontinued in 1872.

We cannot state detiiiitely in what year nor by whom the
settlement whs commenced, thungii it was doubtless at a
much earlier date than we are able to record. We can do no



116 WA YNE.



better than give the names of a few of the early settlers.
James D. Allen and Wheeling, father of Mr. Jacob Wheel-
ing, settled in the township in 1819. Allen is a native of Ire-
land, and is now sixty years old. He located where he now
resides, when the locality was a wilderness infested by wild
beasts. His nearest neighbors, the Brawleys, were two miles
distant. Francis McDaniels, who was born in Ireland in 1788,
immigrated to this country m 1818, and to this township in
1822, having previously resided in Lancaster county. He set-
tled in the woods and had to make a clearing to erect his dwell-
ing. Wm. Record, who was born in Allegheny county, in 1808,
moved to his present place of residence in 1824, and was one of
the first to settle in that locality. Jacob Rees came in from
Philadelphia in 1829, and located on the site of Deckardville,
when there was no house there and the locality was covered
with a dense forest, and was the haunt of wild beasts. He was
obliged to cut a road to the place of his settlement. Some idea
of the animals and game which abounded here may be formed
from the fact stated by Mr. John Ferry that his uncle, James
Ferry, killed near Sugar Lake eighteen bears and eight hun-
dred deer of which he kept a record. Many encounters with
these denizens of the forest, involving great personal danger to
those who engaged in them, are related, but the scope of this
work does not admit of their repetition here.

The 'Evangelical Reformed Church at Deckardville, was organized with
twenty-one members, in June, 1861, by Rev. L. D. Leberman, the first
pastor, and the church edifice, which will seat 200 persons, was erected in
1859, at a cost of $1,000. At present the Society numbers seventy, and
its property is valued at $1,250. The pastor is Rev. D. B. Ernest. — \In-
farmation furnished by Henry Hoffman and E. Noll.

The T?ie Church of the United Brethren, at Deckardville, was organized
with twenty-six members, in 1805, by Kev. Wm. Cadman. Their house
of worship, which will seat 200 persons, was erected in 1855, at a cost of
$1,100. The first pastor was Rev. Daniel Bolster ; the present one is Rev.
R. Crispen. There are forty members. The Church property is valued
at $1,20U. — [Information furnished by Mr. Wm. Holtz.

The 'Freewill Baptist Churchy at Deckardville, was organized with forty

members in September, 1865, by Chase. Their house of worship

was erected the previous year at a cost of $1,500. It will seat 200 persons.
The first pastor was Rev. Bumpus. At present the Church is with-
out a pastor, and its membership has dwindled to fifteen. The Church
property is valued at $1,600. — [Information furnislied by Mr. John Waldo.

Zions Church, (Dutch Reformed,) at Wayne Center, was organized with
thirty members, July 17, 1870, by Rev. John Kretzing, the first pastor,
and their house of worship, which will seat about 300 persons, was
erected about the same time, at a cost of $1,600. The Church is dis-
continued. Its property is valued at $1,700. — [Information furnished by
Mr. Thomas Allen.



WEST FALLO WFIELD. 117



WBST FALLOWJFIELU was formed from East Fal-
lowfield in 1845. It lies upon the south border of the' county,
west of the center, and contains 6,629 square acres. The sur-
face is undulating and heavily timbered, principally with pine,
oak and chestnut. The soil is a clayey loam. The principal
stream is Crooked Creek, which separates it from East Fallow-
field. The old Beaver & Erie Canal extends through the east-
ern part of the township, in close proximity to Crooked Creek.

The ])opulation of the township in 1870 was 691, all of whom
were white, 664, native and 27, foreign.

During the year ending June 3, 1872, the township con-
tained five schools and employed nine teachers. The number
of scholars was 204; the average number attending school, 137 ;
and the amount expended for school purposes, $1,173.12.

Haktstowx (p. V.) is situated a little north of the center of
tlie township, on the line of the old Beaver & Erie Canal and
at the outlet of a large reservoir which fed the Canal, but from
which, since the hitter's abandonment, the water has been
drawn. It was incorporated as a borough in 1851, and had, in
1870, a population of 188. Tjie number of inhabitants has not
materially changed since then. It has three churches, one
school, a hotel, two stores, one harness shop, three carriage
shops, two blacksmith shops, a barrel factory, a shoe shop and
a steam grist niill, just comi)leted, containing two runs of stones.
The reservoir which supplied the canal at this place covered
about 600 acres, and being well stocked with fish was a favorite
resort for the lovers of piscatorial sport. Bass, white fish and
pickerel were caught here in great abundance. The water was
drawn off in 1872. Before the canal was abandoned Hartstown
was a thriving village.

Adamsville (p. o.) is situated in the southern part of the
township and contains two churches, (and a Society of Old-
School Presbyterians who have no edifice,) three stores, two
blacksniilh shops, twu shoe shops, one carriaw shop, a steam
llouring mill, (with three runs of stones and a capacity for
grinding forty bushels of grain per day,) thirty dwellitigs and
al)out 150 inhabitants.

Settlement was begu!i in the latter part of the last century.
Hugh Fletcher was the first to settle in the northern part of
the township. He was a native of Ireland and came here in
1797. His daughter, Sarah, was the first white fenuile child
born in Shenango township. Hugh Blair, also from Ireland,
cainr in 1802 and settled upon a tract of one hundred acres
aboul one mile north of llaitstown.

The Ifiirt.stoirn I'liiUil l^rtxlnjttrinii Chiiirh wu^ oruiaiii/iHliii 1830, by Dr.
Diiiwiildic. The lirst jjaatur wiuj Kev. S. 1\ JSmilh. The lirsl churcJi cdi-



118 WEST FALLO WFIELD— WEST SUENANGO.

fice was erected in 1830, and the present one in 1855, at a cost of $2,500.
It will seat 500 persons. The present pastor is Rev, H, H, Hervey, our in-
formant, and the number of members, 130, The Church property is val-
ued at $3,000.

The J/. E. Church, at Hartstown, was organized with fifteen members
in 1840, in which year was erected the church edifice, (which will seat 175
persons) at a cost of $500. The pastor is Rev. H. S. Goodrich, and the
number of members, 35. The Ciiurch property is valued at $400. — ^In-
formation furnished by Mr. Enoch Ellis.

The Adfinisville Freewill Baptist Church was organized with twenty-one
members, in April, 1852, by Revs. J. S. Manning and J. B. Page, the
former of whom was the first pastor. Their house of worship, which will
seat 250 persons, was erected in 1853, at a cost of $1,200. The Soc ety
numbers fifty-five, and is under the spiritual tutelage of Rev. N. H. Farr,
our informant.

WEST SUENANGO was formed from South Shenango
August 14, 1863. It lies in the south-west corner of the
county, being separated from South Shenango by Shenango
Creek, which is the only considerable stream. It contains
5,195 square acres. The surface is level and the soil adapted
to the culture of fruit and grain. The Ashtabula & Franklin
R. R., passes through the township adjacent to Shenango Creek.

The population of the township in 1870 was 357, all of whom
were white and all, except 13, native.

During the year ending June 3, 1872, it contained four
schools and employed eight teachers. The number of scholars
was 89 ; the average number attending school, 75 ; and the
amount expended for school purposes, $589.23.

TuR]srESViLLE (p. o.) is situated in the eastern part of the
township and is distant from the A. & F. R. R. one-fifth of a
mile. It contains one hotel, a school house, store, harness
shop, wagon shop, two blacksmith shops and twenty-one dwell-
ings.

Royalto:n' (West Shenango p. o.) is situated in the south-west
corner of the township.

Settlement is believed to have been commenced in 1800, by
Andrew and John Betts, father and son, the latter of whom pre-
ceded his father a few months. They came from Fayette county
and located on the farm now owned by Henry Betts, on road 6.
Andrew followed hunting for a number of years and his son
John relates that in one season he killed deer to the number of
175. John subsequently became a preacher of the Methodist
persuasion. Benjamin Snodgrass and Thomas Loughery also
came in 1800. Tliey both emigrated from Ireland. The former
settled near where Matthew H. Snodgrass now lives. Samuel
Scott and John White, the latter from Perry county, were earl



WEST SHENANGO— WOODCOCK. 1 1 9



settlers. A son of the latter advises us that his father settled

about 1791, on the farm Avhich he (the son) now owns, and that

Scott settled about two years prior to that time. There is

reason, however, to doubt this statement. Jeremiah Yokes,

from Fayette county, settled in 1801, on the farm now owned

by Alfred Kinne, and Robert French, from Redstone, settled

in the northern part of the township in 1802. The first school

in the township is believed to have been taught by Edward

Hatton, who located on the place now owned by his son

Leonard Hatton. ^

State Liiie M. E. Ghurcli was organized with fourteen members, about
1819 by Rev. E. Morse, the first pastor. The Society first worshiped in a
school house, and in 1851, their church edifice, which will seat 400 persons,
was erected, at a cost of $1,100. Tlie present value of Church property
is $1,875. — [Information furnislied by Mr. Fi'ancis U. Royal.

WOODCOCK was formed in 1830. It is an interior
township, lying upon the east bank of French Creek, a little
north of the center of the county, and contains 18,702 square
acres. The surface is pleasantly diversified by upland and
valley, and is well watered by streams flowing into French
Creek, the principal of which is Woodcock Creek, which enters
the township in the south-east corner and extends in a north-
westerly direction to the southern limits of Saegertown. The
north branch of that creek rises in the north-east part of the
township and flows south along the east border to its recipient.
Bussard Run is a smaller tributary to Woodcock Creek in the
central part of the township. The northern and north-western
parts of the township are drained by Gravel Run and the south
branch of that stream, which unites with its recipient near
the confluence of the latter with French Creek, in the north-
west corner of the township. Many small streams discharge
their waters in Woodcock Creek on the south, the surface in
the south part of the townshi]) having a slight declination
toward that stream. The surface has a gentle ascent as it
recedes from French Creek. Along this stream a steep bluff
seventy-five to one hundred feet high extends from one and one-
half miles below to two miles above ISaegertown. A beautiful
valley of great fertility coinnu'nces between the sources of the
north branch of Woodcock Creek and (rravel Run, (both of
which rise in the north-east ])art of the township,) and exteiuls
in a southerly aiul westerly tlirecti(»n, througii the central part,
to Krencii Creek, 'i'he soil in ihis valley consists of a rich,
alluvial loam, the most elevated portions containing the nu)St
loam. It is nuirked l)y niuny line farms, especMally in the
vicinity of Saegertown and along Woodcock Creek. The soil
of the township is generally of a line (luality ami produces



t^a^^^^^m^mmMt^m^m^m



1 20 WOODCOCK.



good crops of corn, wheat, oats and grass. Dairying is the chief
branch of agriculture, the milk being converted into cheese.

The industries of the township are represented by three
cheese factories, which receive the milk from 1400 to 1500
cows; four water-power grist mills, one at Saegertown, one a
mile west of Woodcock borough, on Gravel Run, and two on
Woodcock Creek ; five saw mills, four of which are propelled
by water and one by steam, and which are located, one on
Gravel Run, one on French Creek, two on Woodcock Creek
and one on the north branch of Woodcock Creek ; and two
wooden bowl manufactories, both situated on Woodcock Cr(;ek.

The Atlantic & Great Western R. R. crosses the township
along French Creek, and passes through deep cuts in the steep
declivities of the bank above and below Saegertown.

The population of the township in 1870 was 1,943, all of
whom were white and all, except ninety-six, native.

During the year ending June 3, 1872, it contained seventeen
schools and employed twenty-seven teachers. The number of
scholars was 702 ; the average number attending school, 519;
and the amount expended for school purposes, $4,928.17.

Saegertown" (p. v.) is pleasantly situated upon a beautiful
plain on the east bank of French Creek and on the A. & G. W.
R. R., and is distant six miles north of Meadville. It is sur-
rounded by some of the best farming lands in the county. It
was organized as a borough in 1851. It contains three churches,
(Reformed, Lutheran and M. E.) a fine school building, two
hotels, two stores, two groceries, a tin shop, two cooper shops,
four blacksmith shops, two shoe shops, one millinery and three
dress making establishments, a large flouring mill, a saw mill,
lath mill, gun shop and about five hundred inhabitants. The
population in 1870 was 441.

Three bridges cross French Creek within the limits of the
township connecting it with Hayfield township. One of them
located in this borough is substantially constructed of iron.

Woodcock Borough (p. v.) is situated on the north line,
about two miles from Venango Station on the A. & G. W. R. R.
It was organized as a borough in 1845, and contains three
churches, (one M. E. and two Presbyterian, but, owing to the
unification of the two Presbyterian Societies, only one of the
latter is occupied by that denomination,) one hotel, three dry
goods, one drug and one jewelry stores, a tailor shop, harness
shop, a cheese factory, using the past season the milk of 500
cows, though having a capacity for twice that number, and
about forty dwellings. The population in 1870 was 220.

The estimated value of the school property in the borough is



_



WOODCOCK. 121



$2,500. The amount raised for school purposes in 1872 was
$476.77; the amount expended for school purposes the same
year, $408.10. The number of resident pupils attending school
was 65, and the number of non-resident pupils was eighteen.

Blooming Valley (p. v.) is situated in the south-east part
of the township, on the State Road, and was organized as a
borough May i7, 1867. It contains one hotel, five stores, a
wagon shop, two blacksmith shops, a bowl factory, cooper shop,
marble shop, planing mill and about forty-five dwellings. The
population in 1870 was 209. It has a graded school, the build-
ing for which cost 83,700.

The first settlement of which we have information was made
in 1791, by James Humes, who located one mile west of Wood-
cock borough. Settlements were made in 1794 by Henry Rust,
from Westmoreland county, James Long, a native of Lancaster
county, who died in 1830, in the 93d year of his age, and John
H. Bossard, who came from the vicinity of Greensburg, West-
moreland county. Patrick and Arthur McGill, brothers, came
to the township in 1795. Arthur took up 800 acres and
located on the farm now occupied by David and Josiah McGill.
The south half of this tract was subsequently taken up by
Patrick. John McGill, son of the latter, was about one year
old when his father settled here and is now 78 years old. He
retains his mental faculties well, though he is afHicted with a
cancer in his face. Samuel Blair, grand-father of Mr. J. J.
Long, and George Long, father of that gentleman, camef to this
township in 1797 and located on the farm owned by him. Blair
was a native of Ireland and both came here from the Susque-
hanna country. VV'm. WykofT, a native of New Jersey, came
with his son, John Wykoff, in 1797, and settled on Gravel Run,
about two miles east of Woodcock borough, on the farm now
occupied by Wm. C. Wykoff. John Greenlee came from the
Susquehanna country in 1797 and in 1798 he located on the
farm occupied by his son, Wm. (Jreenlee. The animals which
infested the forests, though they furnished tlie settlers an am-
ple supply of meat, were very troublesome to their llocks.
Wolves and bears were especially destru(;tive. For a long time
it was necessary to yard the sheep at night, and they were IVe
quently attacked in the day time. The bears tore down their
pig pens and cari'ied olftije pigs, and not unrre([uently the cows
were set upon by wolves.

The settlement at Saegertown was commenced about ITi^O.
About ISOO Maj. A Men built a saw mill on ihe site of the
present mills, and the place was known for several years as
Aldens Mills, hi 1824 Daniel Saeger pun^hased the mill and



122 WOODCOCK.



the lands adjacent to it, and laid out the town under its present
name. Mr. Saeger came from Lehigh county and possessed
more than ordinary energy and business capacity. Being a na-
tive Pennsylvanian, of German descent, he soon attracted to
this locality a large number of the hardy, honest German yeo-
manry of Lehigh and other eastern counties, thus giving to it
all the characteristics of a Pennsylvania Dutch settlement.
The first store in this village was kept by the Saegers and has been
kept in the Saeger name ever since, now more than forty years.
Among the early settlers here were Adam Brookhouser and his
two sons, Adam and Jacob, Adam Newhouser and Peter Shaffer.

The Indians had a village or encampment at an early day
near where the Reformed church now stands.

The first tavern in Saegertown was kept by Peter Shaffer,
where Saeger's brick store now stands. The first school was
kept by Jonathan G. David in a small log cabin, situated a short
distance above the mill. In 1834 a frame school house was
built near the Reformed church. It was a low building with a
partition through the center, designed to have English taught
in one apartment and German in the other. The post office
was established in 1833, the mail being carried from Meadville
to Girard once a week, and when the postman, David Yarrick,
rode into the village on his little black horse, blowing his horn,
no little sensation was produced.

Nathaniel Clark, from Armstrong county, settled in the
township about 1801. Wm. H. Clark, his son, was born about
half a niile from where he now lives, about sixty-two years ago.
George Peiffer, a Revolutionary hero, came to this county from
Northumberland county, in 1802, and removed to this township
in 1809. Thomas Rice came from Allegheny county, in April,
181Q, and settled on the farm now owned by S. T. Rice.

The first store in Woodcock borough was kept by James
Moore; and the first hotel, by Jacob Keptler, who was also the
first postmaster. Henry Zimmerman was one of the first mer-
chants.

The first saw mill erected in the township was built by Archi-
bald Humes, at the mouth of Gravel Run, where he located.
He soon after built at the same place the grist mill which is
now owned by Mr. Apple. James Dickson, who came from
Cumberland county and settled on Woodcock Creek at a very
early day, is said to have built the first grist mill erected in the
north part of the county. The stones, which were common
rock, were obtained near Pittsburgh, at a place called Laurel
Hill. Wm. Wise, who came to this township from Center
county, in 1830, is 96 years old (1873) and is said to be the
oldest man now living in the county.



WOODCOCK. 123



The first religious meetings were held by Robert 0. Hooker,
a missionary from Kentucky, in a log house occupied by one
" Sheaver." '

Gravel Run Churcli, (Presbyterian,) at "Woodcock borough, was or-
ganized in 1801), and their first house of worship was erected soon afterward.
The present edifice was erected in 1854, at a cost of $2,500, which is one-
half the present value of Church property. It will seat 350 persons. The
first pastor was Rev. John Matthews ; the present one is Rev. W. A. Mc-
Carroll. The Society numbers 117- — [Infornuition furnished by Mr. Wm.
CUtrk.

Bockville Church, (M. E.) at Woodcock borough, was organized in 1810,
by Rev. Joshua Monroe, the first pastor. The first church edifice was
erected in 1817 and was constracted of logs ; the present one, which will
seat about 300 persons, was erected in 1838, at a cost of $1,800. The
Society numbers eighty and is ministered to by Rev. R. C. Smith. The
Church property is valued at |3,000. — [Infoi'Jimtion fumisJied by Mr. Isaac
Pciffer.




124-132



POSTAL BATES AND REGULATIONS.



POSTAL KATES AND REGULATIONS.



Letters. — The law requires postage on
all letters (including those to foreign coun-
tries when prepaid), to be prepaid by stamps
or stamped envelopes, pre-pajonent in
money being prohibited.

All drop-letters must be prepaid. The
rate of postage on drop-letters, at offices
where free delivery by carrier is establish-
ed, is two cents per half ounce or fraction
of a half ounce ; at offices where such free
delivery is not established the rate is one
cent.

The single rate of postage on all domes-
tic mail letters throughout the United
States, is three cents per half ounce, with
an additional rate of three cents for each
additional half ounce or fraction of a half
ounce.

Newspapers, etc. — Letter postage is to
be charged on all handbills, circulars, or
other printed matter, which shall contain
any manuscript writing whatever.

Newspaper Postage. — Postage on daily
papers to subscribers when prepaid quar-
terly or yearly in advance, either at the



Online LibraryHamilton ChildGazetteer and business directory of Crawford County, Pa., for 1874 → online text (page 14 of 48)