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THE STORY OF

BAYARD

THE GOOD KNIGHT WITHOUT
FEAR AND WITHOUT REPROACH

Retold from tfa ofd
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fen/ttor and other*

BY CHRISTOPHER HARE



With if lustrations by Herbert Cole



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THE STORY OF BAYARD



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BOOKS BY THE SAME
AUTHOR



CHARLES DE BOURBON ; CON-
STABLE OF FRANCE.

THE ROMANCE OF A MEDICI
WARRIOR; GIOVANNI DELLE
BANDE NERE.

ISABELLA OF MILAN.

COURTS AND CAMPS OF THE
ITALIAN RENAISSANCE.

THE LIFE OF LOUIS XL

THE HIGH AND PUISSANT PRINCESS
MARGUERITE OF AUSTRIA.

THE QUEEN OF QUEENS AND THE
MAKING OF SPAIN.

DANTE THE WAYFARER.

THE MOST ILLUSTRIOUS LADIES
OF THE ITALIAN RENAISS-
ANCE.



^j Le l)onCf)evaier sanspeur et sans reprocfie

>ur frt.i




THE STORY

BAYARD

THE GOOD KNIGHT WITHOUT
FEAR AND WITHOUT REPROACH

'Retofdfrom the ofd
Chronic fes of f he Loyal
Servitor and others

BY CHRISTOPHER HARE



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With t (lustrations by Herbert Cote
LONDON

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NEWYORK

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[All Rights Reserved.}






DEDICATED TO A RUGBY BOY,

J. L. A.

A famous author of the seventeenth century thus

wrote to his son : ., , - - - . ,

- -

"Je veux que la Vie de' Bayard soit la premiere histoire
que tu lises et que tu me racontes. TacKe de 1'imiter en ce
que tu pourras. . .

" Si tu ne peux arriver a sa valeur, qu: est hors d'example,
sois fidele a ton prince et debonnaire comme lui."



*



> *

-



.

...

; . ">'.

...;.. . - .



CONTENTS

PAGE

INTRODUCTION ...... xiii

CHAP.

I. Birth and Lineage of Bayard His Home Life
How Aymon, Lord of Bayard, his
father, gave his Sons the Choice of a
Career . . . . i

II. How the Father of Bayard sent for the
Bishop of Grenoble and gave his son, Pierre,
into his Charge . . . .11

III. How the Bishop of Grenoble presented his
nephew, Pierre Bayard, to Charles I., Duke
of Savoy, who received him gladly Life
and Training of the young Page at the
Court of Savoy . . . .17

IV. How the Duke of Savoy set forth from
Chambery to go and see the King of France
Charles VIII. in his City of Lyons, and
took with him young Bayard as his Page
Bayard enters the King's Household, and
is given into the charge of the Count de
Ligny . . . . 25

V. How a Gentleman of Burgundy, named
Claude de Vauldray, came to Lyons for a
Display of Arms, and how young Bayard
touched his Escutcheons How Bayard and

vii



viii CONTENTS

CHAP PAGE

his friend went to the Abbe of Ainay and
obtained what they needed for the Tourna-
ment . . . . .32

VI. Concerning the "Pas d'Armes' : against
Messire Claude de Vauldray, and how
young Bayard distinguished himself in the
Tournament . . . .38

VII. How the Count de Ligny sent young Bayard
to the Garrison in Picardy where his Com-
pany was stationed, and how he was lodged
in the little town of Aire . . .42

VIII. How Bayard caused a Tournament to be
proclaimed in the town of Aire, offering
rich Prizes How he distinguished himself
and won high Renown . . .49

IX. How Charles VIII. prepared to set forth on
the Conquest of Naples, and how Bayard,
the Good Knight, w r ent with him -The
Battle of Fornovo and the gallant Deeds
of Bayard Death of Charles VIII. . 60

X. How Louis XII. came to the Throne He
divorces Jeanne of France to marry Anne
de Bretagne He recovers the Duchy of
Milan . . . . .66

XI. How the Good Knight remained in Italy
after the Conquest of Milan, and how he
visited the Duchess of Savoy and held a
Tournament in honour of the Lady he
loved . . . . .70



CONTENTS ix

CHAP. PAGE

XII. How Lodovico Sforza returned to Milan,
which rose against the French How the
Good Knight rode into Milan in Pursuit
and was taken Prisoner, and set free . 78

XIII. How Lodovico, Duke of Milan, was taken
Prisoner and carried to France What
befell the Good Knight when he served
under the Count de Ligny in the Duchy of
Milan . . . . .86

XIV How the King of France, having conquered
Milan, sent a great Army to conquer the
Kingdom of Naples France and Spain
unite against Naples and quarrel over the
Spoils A long and disastrous Campaign
for France . . . .92

XV. How the Good Knight went forth from his
Garrison at Monervine in Apulia How
he met some Spanish Knights and what
befell . . . . .98

XVI. Concerning a Combat which took place in
Apulia between thirteen Spaniards and
thirteen French Knights, where the Good
Knight distinguished himself How a
Treasurer, with Ducats for the great
Captain, was taken Prisoner . .106

XVII. How Bayard, the Good Knight, kept the
Bridge on the River Garigliano for half an
hour, alone, against two hundred Spaniards 113

XVIII. Concerning many Events in Spain, Italy and
France The Revolt of Genoa and the



CONTENTS



CHAP.



XIX.



XX.



XXI.



How Bayard fought at Verona, and how he
was betrayed by a Spy, but in the end was
victorious over the Venetian Captain

XXII. How Bayard, the Good Knight, escaped
betrayal by a Spy who had promised to
deliver him up to Manfroni, and what was
the end of the Story

XXIII. How the War was continued in Italy How

Pope Julius came in person to fight, and
how he laid Siege to Mirandola .

XXIV. How Mirandola was taken by the Warrior

Pope, Julius II. His Attack on La Bastida,
and how the Place was saved by the Skill
and Courage of Bayard

How the Good Knight kept the Duke of
Ferrara from a great Sin .



XXV.
XXVI.



Continuance of the War in Italy Gaston de
Foix, Duke of Nemours, in Command of



PAGB



French Expedition against the City, in
which Bayard greatly distinguished him-
self . . . . .120

How Louis XII. again invaded Italy to fight
against Venice Battle of Agnadello
Bayard at Pavia . . . .125

The Siege of Padua How the Emperor
ordered an Assault The Reply of the
Good Knight and Dismay of German
Lords Maximilian departs and the Siege
of Padua is raised .



'34



140



148



156



162



172



CONTENTS



CHAP,



XI
PAGE



2OO



the French Army How he raised the
Siege of Bologna and took Brescia
Bayard's Exploits . . . .177

XXVII. How Ravenna was besieged by Gaston de
Foix, and concerning the Battle of Ravenna,
in which he met his Death Gallant
fighting of Bayard, the Good Knight

XXVIII. Ravenna taken by the French They are
driven out of Italy within three Months
Gallant Conduct of Bayard in the Retreat
from Pavia, where he is wounded His
dangerous Illness at Grenoble

XXIX. How Bayard was sent to fight in Navarre
against the King of Spain His brave
Deeds The Siege of Pampeluna and the
Disastrous Retreat of the French Army . 207

XXX. How King Henry VIII. landed in France
and narrowly escaped being taken by
Bayard How Therouanne was besieged
by Henry VIII. and the Emperor, and
taken The Battle of Spurs Bayard's
Exploits ; he is taken Prisoner and re-
leased . . . . .212

XXXI. Death of Queen Anne of Brittany Second
Marriage and Death of Louis XII.
Francis I. succeeds him, and at once makes
war in Italy Bayard takes Prisoner the
Lord Prospero Colonna . . .222



XXXII. Concerning the great Battle of Marignano
won by Francis I., and how the King



xii CONTENTS



CHAP.



received Knighthood at the Hand of the
Good Knight ....

XXXIII. How Bayard defended the City of Mezieres

against the might of the Emperor, and
acquired great Honour Of other Events
in which Bayard was concerned .

XXXIV. How Bayard, the Good Knight without

Fear and without Reproach, met his
Death at the Retreat of Biagrasso, in Italy
... to the irreparable Grief of all
France, and even of his Foes

NOTE ......

INDEX



PAGE



228



233



241
250

2 53



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS



Le bon Chevalier sans peur et sans reproche . Frontispiece



PACK



He gave such a fine exhibition of horsemanship that

he delighted all the company . . . facing 28

The Battle of Fornovo. Bayard, fighting on foot,

captures the standard of the enemy . 60

Bayard defends the bridge over the Garigliano 114

As Bayard sat at table with the two Venetian
captains, a young page of his, named Boutieres,
came in to shew a prisoner he had taken during
the fighting . . . . . . ,,132

Seized Vizentin by the collar and asked him what

he was doing . . . . . 1 50

The King of England desired that the Good Knight

might be presented to him . . . ,,218

Death of Bayard. Raising the hilt of his sivord in

the sign of the cross .... 246



BAYARD

THE GOOD KNIGHT WITHOUT FEAR
AND WITHOUT REPROACH

IN the pages of history, how rarely do we meet
with a name so richly crowned as this one with
the love and praise of all men. With what
gallant, gay defiance does that heroic title echo
through the ages ! It has the true ring of high
chivalry, and was rightly given to one so noble
and generous, so brave and true as our gallant
Bayard.

We must remember that it is no fancy name
bestowed by modern admirers on our hero, but
that he was so called in his own day and by his
own people. The most valuable chronicle of the
Good Knight's life and deeds was written with
charming simplicity by a faithful follower, his
squire or secretary, who, in single - hearted
devotion to his beloved master's fame, took no



Xlll



xiv INTRODUCTION

thought for himself, but blotted out his own
identity, content to remain for all time a name-
less shadow merely the LOYAL SERVITOR.

As in the past the knightly virtues of Bayard
have ever been held up as a shining example to
the young of every nation, so do they well
deserve to hold the same high place in the
future.

Even in his lifetime the Good Knight's fame
was so resplendent that the greatest princes of
Christendom were proud to welcome him in their
camps, and his own King, Frangois I., begged
for knighthood at his hand on the battlefield of
Marignano. Pierre Terrail de Bayard had indeed
all the attributes of a perfect Knight. Dauntless
courage of knowledge not of ignorance which
saw danger with a clear eye, and went forth to
meet it with eager joy. Unfailing courtesy and
gentleness to all so much so that in a conquered
city, where riot and pillage raged around,
Bayard's presence was a safeguard to his hosts,
whom he paid for all that he took, while he
was ever a shield of protection to the terror-
stricken women and children.

The Good Knight was so generous that he



INTRODUCTION xv

never kept for himself any spoils or the ransom
of his prisoners, but divided everything with all
his company, often refusing to take any share of
it. Such was the devotion and enthusiasm which
he inspired, that his men would gladly follow him
into the most deadly peril, and catch the glow of
his heroic courage until no foe could resist them ;
his very name was a tower of strength to his own
side, and an omen of disaster to the enemy. A
past master in the art of war, Brantome says
of him that " no general of Bayard's time would
undertake an expedition without seeking to have
his presence and advice, so that if he did not
command the army he always ruled the
general. "

But to me the supreme charm of our Bayard is
his bright, gallant nature ; the happy, childlike
spirit which the years have no power to dim ;
the delight which he ever takes in his work,
the gladness which he spreads on all around
him. His is indeed the " merry heart which
goes all the way," from the eventful day when,
as an ardent little lad, he chose the profession of
arms, until that last solemn hour when, on a
foreign shore, he fell in the service of his King



xvi INTRODUCTION

and his country . . . and the dying hero passed
away amid the tears and lamentations of friend
and foe alike.

Noble and generous, brave, with a buoyant,
happy courage all his own, tender and true
to all men, would that we could look upon his
like again.





THE
STORY OF BAYARD



CHAPTER I

Birth and Lineage of Bayard His Home Life in the Castle
of Bayard How Aymon, Lord of Bayard, gave his
Sons the Choice of a Career.

PIERRE TERRAIL, the renowned Bayard of history,
was born at the Castle of Bayard, in Dauphine,
about the year 1474, when Louis XI. was King
of France. His family did not rank amongst the
great and wealthy nobles of the land, but he came
of an ancient and heroic race, whose chief privilege
had been to shed their blood for France through-
out the Middle Ages. His brave and simple
ancestors had sallied forth from their mountain
fastness whenever there was fighting to be done



2 THE STORY OF BAYARD

for their king, for whom they freely laid down
their lives on many a famous battlefield.

In that memorable roll of honour we find the
names of Aubert and his brother Robert, fighting
to the death for their king, Charles IV., at the
battle of Varey, 1326. On the fatal day of
Poitiers (1355), Philippe, lord of Bayard, fought
with desperate courage to save the lost battle,
and fell at length, covered with wounds, at the
feet of the good King John II. His two sons,
Jean and Pierre, vindicated the honour of their
House by a like noble death in the service of
Charles VII., when Jean was killed at Verneuil
in 1424, and Pierre at the battle of Agincourt,
1415, where the flower of French chivalry was
laid low by the English archers.

The grandfather of our Bayard died at the
battle of Montlhery, 1465, when Louis XI.
barely saved his life and his crown, and the
boy's father, Aymon de Bayard, had done knightly
service and distinguished himself at Guinegaste,
1479, fighting in the service of King Louis
against the might of the Emperor Maximilian.
In this battle Aymon was so severely wounded
that he could never go to the wars again, and
his forced inaction was a bitter trial to him, for
he was a man of great stature and strength, to
whom the clash of war was the very joy of his
life.

The lord of Bayard had married, rather late
in life, Helene Alleman, a good and pious lady



THE STORY OF BAYARD 3

of a noble family, whose brother Laurent was the
Bishop of Grenoble. Pierre Bayard, the hero of
this story, was the second son of a large family ;
he had three brothers and four sisters. His
eldest brother, Georges, was five or six years older
than himself, then came his sisters, Catherine,
Jeanne and Marie, while younger than himself
were Claudie, and two brothers, Jacques and
Philippe.

As we shall not have occasion to mention the
sisters again, we may add that Catherine was
afterwards a nun in the Monastery of Premol ;
Jeanne became Abbess of the Convent of Notre
Dame des Haies ; Marie was married to Jacques
du Pont, and her son, Captain Pierre du Pont,
served later under Bayard ; the youngest sister,
Claudie, married Antoine de Theys.

Such was the family circle of Pierre Bayard,
and we shall better understand his early life, and
the training which helped to form his fine char-
acter, if we try to picture to ourselves the castle
home in which he grew up until the age of
thirteen.

Like so many other mediaeval strongholds, the
Castle of Bayard was built upon a rocky hill,
which always gave an advantage in case of attack.
It had been erected by the great-grandfather and
namesake of our Pierre Bayard, a knight banneret
with a small company of men-at-arms, who re-
ceived special permission from the Governor of
Dauphine to build this castle, probably on the



4 THE STORY OF BAYARD

site of an earlier one, in the year 1404. No
better position could have been chosen, for it
commanded a deep valley on two sides, in a wild
and mountainous district of Dauphine, near the
village of Pontcharra in the Graisivaudan. Even
now we can still see from its ruins what a power-
ful fortress it was in its time, with massive towers
three stories high, standing out well in front of
the castle wall, and defended by a strong draw-
bridge. Well fortified, it could have stood a
siege before the days of artillery.

But towards the end of the fifteenth century,
when Bayard's childhood was spent here, such
castles as these were not looked upon as mainly
places of defence and refuge, they were gradually
becoming more like the later manor-houses
family homes, with comfortable chambers and
halls, where once there had chiefly been the rude
dwelling of a garrison used for defence and
stored with missiles and arms.

Each story of the castle, as well as the towers,
would contain various chambers, well lighted with
windows pierced in the thick stone walls. On
the first floor, approached by a broad flight of
steps from the court, we find the oratory
scarcely large enough to be dignified with the
name of chapel the dining-hall, and the private
chamber of the lord of the castle. On the floor
above this the lady of Bayard had her own apart-
ment, the *' c garde-robe ' or closet where her
dresses were kept, and the place where her



THE STORY OF BAYARD 5

daughters as they grew up, and any maidens
who were brought up under her care, sat at
their needlework, and where they slept at night.
On the upper story were the rooms for the young
children with their maids, and the various guest-
chambers.

The ground floor below the dining-halls was
a dark place given up to store-rooms and the
servants' quarters, and below this again were
cellars and grim dungeons, which could only
be reached by trap-doors. The kitchen, usually
a round building, stood in an outer court, and
here great wood fires could be used for the need-
ful hospitality of a country house. The stables
were beyond, and the rough quarters for the
serving-men.

The dining-hall was used as a court of justice
when the lord of the castle had to settle any
difficulties, to receive his dues, or reprimand and
punish any refractory vassal. At one end of
this hall was a great hearth, where most sub-
stantial logs of wood could be laid across the
fire-dogs, and burn with a cheerful blaze to light
and warm the company in the long, cold winter
evenings. At meal-times trestle tables were
brought in, and on these the food was served,
while long benches were placed on each side of
them. On special occasions of important visitors
or unusual festivities, a high table was set out
at the upper end. The floor was covered with
fresh rushes, skins of wolf or bear being laid



6 THE STORY OF BAYARD

before the fire, and the walls were stencilled in
white and yellow on the higher part, and hung
with serge or frieze below. Only in the lady's
chamber do we find carpets and hangings of
tapestry or embroidery, part of her wedding
dowry or the work of her maidens. Here, too,
were a few soft cushions on the floor to sit upon,
some carved chairs, tables and coffers. The
master of the house always had his great arm-chair
with a head, and curtains to keep off the draughts,
which were many and bitterly cold in winter-
time.

Such was the home in which Bayard spent his
happy childhood, with plenty of young com-
panions ; for besides his three brothers there were
other lads connected with his father, either by
kinship or feudal service, who looked upon it as
a privilege to be received at the Castle of Bayard.

A hardy, active life was theirs in that wild,
mountain home ; they learned to run, to leap, to
climb the rockyhillside,to face the burningsummer
sun and the wintry snows alike, to track the foot-
prints of the wild beast through the pathless
thicket, and to be ever prompt and ready with
a quick eye and a steady heart. Of definite
training and of book-learning they may have had
little enough, but this we know for certain that
the boy, Pierre Bayard, learned to speak the
truth, to show courtesy to all men, to fear God
and keep His laws.



THE STORY OF BAYARD 7

The chronicler of Bayard, his devoted friend
and secretary, known as the a Loyal Servitor,' 1
begins his story on a spring day of the year

1487.

Aymon Terrail, lord of Bayard, sat by the
fireside in his own chamber, whose walls were
hung with old arms and trophies of the chase,
feeling ill and out of spirits. He had found the
long winter, when there was no hunting or sport
for him, very tedious, and the monotonous diet
of salt meat and dried fish had not suited him. 1
He was growing old he had not long to live
he assured his good wife, who had come to cheer
him.

What was to become of his sons when he was
gone ? Then a sudden thought occurred to him.
" I will send for them at once, and we will give
them a voice in the matter.'

To this the lady of Bayard quite agreed, for
she never crossed her lord's will, and at least it
would distract his gloomy thoughts. It chanced
that all the four lads were at home, and ready to
obey their father's command. As they entered
the room and came forward, one by one, in front
of the great chair by the hearth, somewhat awed
by this hasty summons, they were encouraged by
a smile from their mother, who sat quietly in the
background with her embroidery.

The assembled group made a striking picture.

1 There was no fresh meat in winter, when only the cattle and sheep
required for stock purposes were kept.



8 THE STORY OF BAYARD

The grand old man, a massive figure seated in
his canopied arm-chair, with white hair and flow-
ing beard and piercing black eyes. He was
closely wrapped in a long dark robe, lined with
fur, and wore a velvet cap, which came down
over his shaggy brows. Before him stood his
four well-grown, sturdy, ruddy-faced boys, await-
ing his pleasure with seemly reverence, for none
of them would have dared to be seated unbidden
in the presence of their father. Aymon de
Bayard turned to his eldest son, a big, strongly-
built youth of eighteen, and asked him what
career in life he would like to follow. Georges,
who knew that he was heir to the domain and
that he would probably not have long to wait
for his succession, made answer respectfully that
he never wished to leave his home, and that he
would serve his father faithfully to the end of
his days. Possibly this was what the lord of
Bayard expected, for he showed no surprise, but
simply replied, " Very well, Georges, as you love
your home you shall stay here and go a-hunting
to fight the bears. >:

This was no figure of speech, for in those days
the mountains of Dauphine were such a splendid
hunting-ground that bears were often met with,
as well as wolves, wild boars, the roe-deer, and
smaller game of every kind.

Next in order came Pierre, the "Good Knight"
of history, who was then thirteen years of age,
as lively as a cricket, and who replied with a



THE STORY OF BAYARD 9

smiling face, " My lord and father, although my
love for you would keep me in your service, yet
you have so rooted in my heart the story of
noble men of the past, especially of our house,
that, if it please you, I will follow the profession
of arms like you and your ancestors. It is that
which I desire more than anything else in the
world, and I trust that by the help of God's
grace I may not dishonour you."

To this choice his father consented with great
joy. " My child, may God bless you! Yes,
indeed, you resemble in face and appearance your
grandfather, who was one of the most accom-
plished knights in Christendom. I will at once
see about fulfilling your desire. ?:

The third son, Jacques, was then asked what
he would like to do, and he said that he wished
to follow in the steps of his uncle, 1 Monseigneur
d'Ainay, the prior of a rich abbey near Lyons.
The youngest boy, Philippe, made the same
choice, and said that he would wish to be like
his uncle, the Bishop of Grenoble. We rather
doubt whether these small boys chose their pro-
fession from any deep sense of religion, or
whether they were not really attracted by the
stately pomp and easy life of these churchmen.
In any case, the lord of Bayard took their
request very seriously, and their wishes were
carried out. As this is the Loyal Servitor's last
mention of them, we may add that Jacques be-

1 Mgr. d'Ainay was really a distant cousin.



io THE STORY OF BAYARD

came in due time Abbe of Josaphat, in the suburbs
of Chartres, and that Philippe was made Canon
of Notre Dame, and afterwards Bishop of Glan-
desves in Provence.

Leaving the other three brothers we now return
to the story of the " Good Knight without Fear
and without Reproach," and learn what steps his
father took to arrange his future life.




\/rom tfc portrait '




CHAPTER II

How the Father of Bayard sent for the Bishop of Grenoble
and gave his Son into his Brother-in-law's Charge How


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15