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Uncle Tom's
Cabin





i




CHILDREN'S BOOK
COLLECTION



LIBRARY OF THE V

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA <$
LOS ANGELES n>




UNCLE TOM HEARS OF HIS SALE,



ALTEMUS' YOUNG PEOPLE'S LIBRARY



UNCLE TOM'S CABIN



LIFE AMONG THE LOWLY



BY HARRIET BEECHER STOWE



ARRANGED FOR YOUNG READERS



WITH NINETY ILLUSTRATIONS



Copyright 1900 by Henry Altemus Ccmoan



PHILADELPHIA

HENRY ALTEMUS COMPANY




CONTENTS,



CHAPTER. P GI

INTRODUCTORY . . . . . xi

I. A MAN OF HUMANITY . . . .7

II. THE MOTHER . . . . .13

in. THE HUSBAND AND FATHER . . .16

IV. AN EVENING IN UNCLE TOM'S CABIN . .19

V- SHOWING THE FEELINGS "OF LIVING PROPERTY

ON "CHANGING OWNERS . . .26

vi. DISCOVERY . . . . .35

vn. THE MOTHER'S STRUGGLE . . .43

vin. ELIZA'S RETREAT . . . . .52

IX. IN WHICH IT APPEARS THAT A SENATOR IS BUT

A MAN . . . .62

X. THE PROPERTY IS CARRIED OFF . ' . .74

XI. IN WHICH PROPERTY GETS INTO AN IMPROPER '

STATE OF MIND . . . .80

XII. SELECT INCIDENT OF LAWFUL TRADE . . 87

XIII. THE QUAKER SETTLEMENT . . .95

XIV. EVANGELINE ..... 101
XV- OF TOM'S NEW MASTER AND VARIOUS OTHER

MATTERS . . . . 107

XVI. TOM^S MISTRESS AND HER OPINIONS . .115

XVII. THE FREE MAN'S DEFENCE . . .124

xvin. MISS OPHELIA'S EXPERIENCES AND OPINIONS . 140
xix. MISS OPHELIA'S 'EXPERIENCES AND OPINIONS,

CONTINUED ..... 149

W



Ti Contents.

CHAPTER. PACH

XX. TOPSY ...... 155

XXI. KENTUCK ..... 169

xxn. "THE GRASS WITHERETH THE FLOWER

FADETH" ..... 174
XXHI. HENRIQUE ..... 179
XXIV. FORESH ADO WINGS . . . .185

XXV. THE LITTLE EVANGELIST . . . 189

XXVI. DEATH ...... 193

xxvii. "THIS is THE LAST OF EARTH" . . 202

xxvni. REUNION ..... 207

XXIX. THE UNPROTECTED ... * 216

XXX. THE SLAVE WAREHOUSE . . . 221

XXXI. THE MIDDLE PASSAGE f 230

XXXII. DARK PLACES ..... 234

xxxm. CASSY ...... 240

xxxrv. THE QUADROON'S STORY . . . 246

XXXV. LEGREE AND CASSY .... 251

XXXVI. EMMELINE AND CASSY . ' . 255

XXXVII. LIBERTY ..... 260

XXXVIII. THE VICTORY ..... 265

XXXIX. THE STRATAGEM .... 269

XL. THE MARTYR ..... 279

XLI. THE YOUNG MASTER . 285

XLII. AN AUTHENTIC GHOST STORT . . . 293

XLIII. RESULTS ..... 299

XLIV. THE LIBERATOR . . * 304




ILLUSTRATIONS.



Portrait of Mrs. Harriet B. Stowe
The Shelby Mansion
"I was looking for Harry"
"Walk like old Uncle Cudjoe " .
" What ails you ?"

"Isn't the man mine?" . .

"For my sake, do be careful " .

"Pray for me, Eliza " . . .

Uncle Tom's Cabin .

Mose, and Pete, and Polly . ,

" Only hear that 1 "
" Is he a negro trader ? "
"Her slumbering boy" . .

"I ain't going" ,

"I believe she's just done clared out"
"The young imps on the verandah"
"If I only had them" .
" Sam made a dive for the reins "
"Mother can't eat " . . .

"I shall take the straight road "



Frontispiece.



PAGE

xii
7
9
11
12
15
17
18
19
23
25
27
31
33
36
37
39
41
45
47



viii Illustrations.

PAGE

"She leaped to another cake" . . . . .49

"Good evening, Mas'r 1" . . . . .51

"Why, Loker, how are ye?" . . . . .55

Sam in the kitchen . . . . , .60

"Senator Bird was drawing off his boots" . . .63

" He drew his breath short " . . . . .65

" I rather think I am " . . . . . .71

"Tom sat with his Testament on his knee " . .75

" It's a nasty, mean shame " . . . . .78

"Henry Butler, Oaklands, Shelby County" . . .83

" Where is your wife, George ?" . . . .85

"Put us two up togedder" . . . . .89

"I don't believe it" . . . . . .91

" But she only groaned " . . . . .93

"I must go on" . . . . . . .97

"Her husband was sobbing " ..... 100

"What's little missy's name?" ..... 103

" He caught her in his arms " ..... 104

"Look up, Tom" . . . . . . .106

"Now, we're ready . . . - . . 109

Arrival at St. Clare's mansion ..... Ill

" Puh, you puppy " ...... 113

Miss Ophelia . . . . . . .116

" Oh, Tom, you look so fuuny " .... 117

"Miss Ophelia stood at her side " . 121

"We are not yet in Canada" ..... 125

"But you haven't got us" ..... 135

"Languidly opening and shutting his eyes" . . . 139

" Oh, my dear young mas'r" ..... 141

" Seated on the kitchen floor " . . . . -.143

"I wisht I's dead " .147

" What funny things you are making " . . . 153

Topsy . 156

" Poor Topsy, why need you steal ? " .... 163*



Illustrations. ix

PACK

"Raising Cain" 166

"Well, Chloe, what is it?" 171

"Uncle Tom, I'm going there " .... 175

"There, you impudent dog " ..... 181
"How could you be so cruel to Dodo?" . . . 183

"No, papa, don't deceive yourself" . . < 187

"I will tell your master" . . . . .191

"Law, Missis ! they're for Miss Eva " .... 195
"I am going to leave you" ..... 197
" She threw herself on the floor " . . . .203

"A fatal stab in the side" 213

"Do plead for me" ...... 217

"All ages, sizes and shades" ..... 223

" Where's your curls, gal ?" ..... 225

"The auctioneer grows warmer " .... 229

" D'ye see this fist ?" . . . . . .232

" Trailing wearily behind a rude wagon " . . . 235

" Ye see what ye'd get ! " ..... 237

" Touch me, if you dare !" . . . . .243

"Drink all ye want" ...... 247

"You're afraid of me, Simon" ..... 253

"Singing, dancing or fighting" .... 254

"I'll make ye give out, though " .... 259

"Eliza turned to the glass" . . . . .262

"Then I shall do it!" . . . . . ,267

"Walking right up to your bed" .... 273

" The hunt is begun " . . . . . .277

"Give it to him !" . . . . . .282

" We's been awful wicked to ye " .... 283

"Oh, Mas'r George, ye're too late' ' .... 289

"Witness, eternal God" . . . . . .292

"It stood still by his bed" . . . . .295

"Depend on yourself, my son " .... 301

"We don't want to be no freer" .... 307



INTRODUCTORY.



No apology is necessary for placing a carefully-prepared
edition of " Uncle Tom's Cabin " in the hands of the young
people of America. The wonderful story, with its striking
characters, wealth of incident, and lofty tone of benevo-
lence and humanity, is as full of fascination to-day as in
the times for which it was written.

All the old friends are here Uncle Tom and Eva, Topsy
and Miss Ophelia, St. Clare and George Harris, Legree and
Tom Loker. Eliza's escape over the floating ice with her
child, the slave hunt in the swamp, the heroic stand of
the fugitives and their Quaker friends, the horrors of the
slave market all the incidents that the author has set in
such effective contrast are here to delight and instruct.

" Uncle Tom's Cabin " has been translated into almost
all the civilized languages of the world, and into some as
yet only half civilized ; yet it has never been in greater
demand than at the present time. Of it the poet Long-
fellow wrote :

' " It is one of the greatest triumphs recorded in literary
history, to say nothing of the higher triumph of its moral
effect."

The author's own words were:

" I could not control the story ; it wrote itself I "




(Ill)




UNCLE TOM'S CABIN:

OR

LIFE AMONG THE LOWLY.
CHAPTER I.

A MAN OF HUMANITY.

ONE chilly day in February, two gentlemen were sit-
ting in a well-furnished room, in a Kentucky
town, discussing some subject with great earnest-
ness. One of the parties, however, did not seem to be a
gentleman when critically examined. He was short and
thick-set, with coarse features and a swaggering air; un-
grammatical and sometimes profane in his speech. His
companion, Mr. Shelby, had the appearance of a gentle-
man, and the arrangements of the house indicated easy
and even opulent circumstances.

"That is the way I should arrange the matter/' said Mr,
Shelby.



8 Uncle Tom's Cabin; or

"I can't make trade that way I positively can't, Mr.
Shelby,"' said the other.

"Why, the fact is, Haley, Tom is an uncommon fellow;
he is certainly worth that sum anywhere, steady, honest,
capable, manages my whole farm like a clock."

"You mean honest, as niggers go," said Haley.

"Xo; I mean, really, Tom is a good, steady, sensible,
pious fellow. He got religion at a camp-meeting, four
years ago; and I believe he really did get it. I've trusted
him, since then, with everything I have, money, house,
horses, and let him come and go round the country; and
I always found him true and square in everything."

"Some folks don't believe there is pious niggers, Shelby/*!
said Haley.

"Well, Tom's got the real article, if ever a fellow had/'
rejoined the other. "'Why, last fall, I let him go to Cin-
cinnati alone, to do business for me, and bring home five
hundred dollars. I am sorry to part with Tom. You
ought to let him cover the whole balance of the debt; and
you would, Haley, if }^ou had any conscience."

"Well, I 've got just as much conscience as any man in
the business can afford to keep ; but this, yer see, is a leetle
too hard on a fellow a leetle too hard." The trader
sighed contemplatively.

"Well, then, Haley, how will you trade?" said Mr. Shel-|
by, after an uneasy interval of silence.

"Well, haven't you a boy or gal that you could throw in
with Tom?"

"Hum ! none that I could well spare. I don't like part-
ing with any of my hands, that's a fact."



Life Among the Lowly.



Here the door opened, and a small quadroon boy, be-
tween four and five years of age, entered the room.

"Come here, Jim Crow," said Mr. Shelby. "Now, Jim,
show this gentleman how you can dance and sing." The




"I was looking for Harry."

boy commenced one of those wild, grotesque songs common
among the negroes, in a rich, clear voice.

"Bravo !" said Haley.

"Now, Jim, walk like old Uncle Cudjoe, when he has the
rheumatism," said his master.



10 Uncle Tom's Cabin; or

Instantly the child assumed the appearance of deformity
and distortion, as, with his back humped up, and his
master's stick in his hand, he hobbled about the room, his
childish face drawn into a doleful pucker, and spitting
from right to left, in imitation of an old man.

"Now, Jim," said his master, "show us how old Elder
Bobbins leads the psalm." The boy drew his chubby face
down to a formidable length, and commenced intoning a
psalm tune through his nose, with imperturbable gravity.

"Bravo! what a young 'un!" said Haley. "Tell you
what," said he, "fling in that chap, and I'll settle the busi-
ness !"

At this moment, the door was pushed gently open, and
a young quadroon woman, apparently about twenty-five,
entered the room.

"Well, Eliza?" said her master.

"I was looking for Harry, please, sir."

"Well, take him away, then," said Mr. Shelby.

"By Jupiter/' said the trader, "there's an article, now!
You might make your fortune on that ar gal in Orleans,
any day."

"I don't want to make my fortune on her," said Mr,
Shelb}% dryly.
- "Come, how will you trade about the gal?"

"Mr. Haley, she is not to be sold," said Shelby. "My
wife would not par,t with her for her weight in gold."

"Ay, ay! women always say such things, 'cause they
ha'nt no sort of calculation, I reckon."

"I tell you, Haley, this must not be spoken of; I say no,
and I mean no," said Shelby.



Life Among the Lowly.



11



"Well, you'll let me have the boy, though/' said the
trader.

"What on earth can vou want with the child?" said
Shelby.

"Why, I've got a friend that's going into this yer branch
of the business wants to buy up handsome boys to raise
for the market. They fetch a good sum."

"I would rather not sell him," said Mr. Shelby, thought-
fully, "but"

"What do you say?"

"I '11 think the matter
over, and talk with my
wife. Call up this even-
ing, between six and sev-
en, and you shall have my
answer," said Mr. Shelby,
and the trader bowed
himself out of the apart-
ment.

Mr. Shelby was a fair
average kind of man,
good-natured and kindly,
and disposed to easy in-
dulgence of those around
him, and there had never
been a lack of anything
which might contribute
to the physical comfort
of the negroes on his es-
tate. He had, however, " Walk like old uncle Cu <oe."
speculated, largely and quite loosely; had involved himself




12



Uncle Tom's Cabin; or



deeply, and his notes to a large amount had come into the
hands of Hale}'.

Now, it had happened that Eliza had caught enough of
the conversation to know that a trader was making offers
to her master for somebody.

She would gladly have stopped at the door to listen, as
she came out; but her mistress just then calling, she was
obliged to hasten away.

"Eliza, girl, what ails you to-day ?" said her mistress.

Eliza started. "0, mis-
sis I" she 'said, raising her
eyes; then burst into
tears.

"Why, Eliza, child!
what ails you?" said her
mistress.

"0! missis, missis," said
Eliza, "there's been a tra-
der talking with master in
the parlor! Do you sup-
pose mas'r would sell my
Harry?" And the poor
creature sobbed convulsively.

"Sell him ! No, you foolish girl ! You know your master
never deals with those Southern traders, and never means
to sell any of his servants, as long as they behave well."

Reassured by her mistress' confident tone, Eliza laughed
at her own fears.




"What ails you?"



Life 'Among tEe Eowly. 13



CHAPTEE II.

THE MOTHER.

ELIZA had been brought up by her mistress, from
girlhood, as a petted and indulged favorite. She
was a beautiful quadroon and was married to a
bright and talented young mulatto man by the name of
George Harris, a slave on a neighboring estate.

This young man had been hired out by his master to
work in a bagging factory, where his adroitness and in-
genuity caused him to be considered the first hand in the
place. He had invented a machine for cleaning the hemp,
which, considering the education and circumstances of the
inventor, displayed quite as much mechanical genius as
Whitney's cotton-gin. Nevertheless, as this young man
was in the eye of the law not a man, but a thing, all these
superior qualifications were subject to the control of a
vulgar, narrow-minded, tyrannical master. This same gen-
tleman, having heard of the fame of George's invention,
took a ride over to the factory, to see what this intelligent
chattel had been about.

He was shown over the factory by George, who talked so
fluentty, and held himself so erect, that his master began
to feel consciousness of inferiority. Accordingly, he sud-



14' Uncle Tom's Cabin; or

denly demanded George's wages, and announced his inten-
tion of taking him home.

"But, Mr. Harris," remonstrated the manufacturer,
"isn't this rather sudden ?"

"What if it is? isn't the man mine?"

"But, sir, he seems peculiarly adapted to this business."

"Dare say he may be; never was much adapted to any-
thing that I set him about, I'll be bound."

"But only think of his inventing this machine," inter-
posed one of the workmen, rather unluckily.

"0 yes ! a machine for saving work, is it ? He'd invent
that, I'll be bound ; let a nigger alone for that, any time.
They are all labor-saving machines themselves, every one
of 'em. No, he shall tramp!"

George stood like one transfixed. He folded his arms,
tightly pressed in his lips, but a whole volcano of bitter
feelings burned in his bosom. Fearing that he would make
matters worse, his employer said:

"Go with him for the present, George; we'll try to help
you yet."

George was taken home, and put to the meanest drudg-
ery of the farm.

The manufacturer, true to his word, visited Mr. Harris
a week or two after George had been taken away, and tried
every possible inducement to lead him to restore him to his
former employment.

"You needn't trouble yourself to talk any longer," he
said, doggedly ; "I know my own business, sir. It J s a free
country, sir; the man 's mine, and I do what I please with
him, that 's it !"

And so fell George's last hope; nothing before him but




" Isn't the man mine?"

Uncle Tom's Cabin.



15



1< Uncle Tom's Cabin; r

a life of toil and drudgery, rendered more bitter by every
little smarting vexation and indignity which tyrannical
ingenuity could devise.



CHAPTER III.

THE HUSBAND AND FATHER.

ELIZA stood in the verandah, when a hand was laid
on her shoulder. She turned, and a bright smile
lighted up her fine eyes.

"George, is it you ? How you frightened me ! Well ; I
am so glad you 's come ! Missis is gone to spend the after-
noon ; so come into my little room, and we '11 have the
time all to ourselves.

"How glad I am! why don't you smile? and look at
Harry how he grows. Isn't he beautiful?" said Eliza,
lifting his long curls and kissing him.

"I wish he'd never been born!" said George, bitterly.
"I wish I 'd never been born myself !"

"George ! George ! how can you talk so ? What dread-
ful thing has happened, or is going to happen ? I 'm sure
we 've been very happy, till lately."

"So we have, dear," said George. "I have been careful,
and I have been patient, but it 's growing worse and worse;
flesh and blood can't bear it any longer."



Life Among the Lowly.



17



"It was only yesterday/' said George, "as I was busy
loading stones into a cart that young Mas'r Tom stood
there, slashing his whip so near the horse that the creature
was frightened. I asked him to stop, as pleasant as I could,
he just kept right on. I begged him again, and then he




"For my sake, do be careful.



turned on me, and began striking me. I held his hand, and
then he screamed and kicked and ran to his father, and
told him that I was fighting him. He came in a rage, and
said he M teach me who was my master ; and he tied me to
a tree, and cut switches for young master, and told him



18



Uncle Tom's Cabin; or



that he might whip me till he was tired; and he did do
it! Yesterday he told me that I should take Mina for a
wife, and settle down in a cabin with her, or he would sell
me down river/'

"Why but you were married to me, by the minister, as
much as if you 'd been a white man!" said Eliza, simply.

"Don't you know a slave can't be married? There is no
law in this country for that; I can't hold you for my wife.

if he chooses to part us.
So, Eliza, my girl," said
the husband, mournfully,
"bear up, now; and good-
by, for I'm going."

"Going, George! Going
where?"

"To Canada," said he;
and when I'm there, I'll
buy you; that's all the
hope that's left us. You
have a kind master, that
"Pray for me, Eliza." won 't refuse to sell you.

I '11 buy ycu and the boy God helping me, I will!"

"0, George, for my sake, do be careful ! Don't do any-
thing wicked; don't lay hands on yourself, or anybody
else ! You are tempted too much too much ; but don't
go you must but go carefully, prudently; pray God to
help you."

"Well, then, Eliza, hear my plan. I 've got some prep-
arations made, and there are those that will help me;
and, in the course of a week or so, I shall be among the




Life Among the Lowly.



19



missing, some day. Pray for me, Eliza ; perhaps the good
Lord will hear you."

"0, pray yourself, George, and go trusting in Him; then
you won't do anything wicked."

"Well, now, good-by," said George, holding Eliza's
hands, and gazing into her eyes, without moving. They
stood silent ; then there were last words, and sobs, and bit-
ter weeping, and the husband and wife were parted.



CHAPTER



AN EVENING IN UNCLE TOM S CABIN*

THE cabin of Uncle Tom was a small log building,
close adjoining to r _
"the house," as
the negro designates his
master's dwelling. In front
it had a neat garden patch,
where, every summer,
strawberries, raspberries,
and a variety of fruits and
vegetables, flourished un-
der careful tending. The

Whole front of it Was COV- Uncle Tom's Cabin.

ered by a large scarlet bigonia and a native mutiflora
rose.




20 Uncle Tom's Cabin; or

The evening meal at the house is over, and Aunt Chloe.
who presided over its preparation as head cook, has left to
inferior officers in the kitchen the business of clearing
away and washing dishes, and come out into her own snug
territories, to "get her ole man's supper." A round, black,
shining face is hers. Her whole plump countenance beams
with satisfaction and contentment from under her well-
starched checked turban, for Aunt Chloe was acknowl-
edged to be the best cook in the neighborhood.

In one corner of the cottage stood a bed, covered neatly
with a snowy spread; and by the side of it was a piece of
carpeting, of some considerable size. In the other corner
was a bed of much humbler pretensions, and evidently de-
signed for use.

On a rough bench in the corner, a couple of woolly-
headed boys, with glistening black eyes and fat shining
cheeks, were busy in superintending the first walking oper-
ations of the baby.

A table, somewhat rheumatic in its limbs, was drawn
out in front of the fire, and at this table was seated Uncle
Tom, Mr. Shelby's best hand the hero of our story. He
was a large, broad-chested, powerfully made man of a full
glossy black, and a face whose truly African features were
characterized by an expression of grave and steady good
sense, united with much kindliness and benevolence.

He was very busily intent on a slate lying before him, on
which he was carefully and slowly endeavoring to accom-
plish a copy of some letters, in which operation he was



Life Among the Lowly 21

overlooked by young Mas'r George, a smart, bright boy of
thirteen.

"Not that way, Uncle Tom, not that way," said he.
briskly, as Uncle Tom laboriously brought up the tail of.
his "g" the wrong side out; "that makes a 'q/ you see."

"La sakes, now, does it?" said Uncle Tom, looking with
a respectful, admiring air, as his young teacher flourish-
ingly scrawled q's and g's innumerable for his edification:
and then, taking the pencil in his big, heavy fingers, he
patiently re-commenced.

"How easy white folks al'us does things!" said Aunt
Chloe, regarding } r oung Master George with pride. "The
way he can write, now ! and read, too ! and then to come
out here evenings and read his lessons to us, it 's mighty
interest in' !"

"But, Aunt Chloe, I'm getting mighty hungry," said
George. "Is n't that cake in the skillet almost done ?"

"Mose done, Mas'r George," said Aunt Chloe, lifting the
lid and peeping in, "browning beautiful a real lovely
brown."

And with this, Aunt Chloe whipped the cover off the
bake-kettle, and disclosed to view a neatly-baked pound
cake, of which no city confectioner need to have been
ashamed.

"Here you, Mose and Pete ! get out de way, you niggers !
Get away, Polly, honey, mammy '11 give her baby some-
fin, by and by. Xow, Mas'r George, you jest take off dem
books, and set down now with my old man, and I '11 take '.ip
de sausages, and have de first griddle full of cakes on your
plates in less dan no time."

"They wanted me to come to supper in the house," said



22 Uncle Tom's Cabin; or

George; "but I knew what was what too well for thai. }
Aunt Chloe."

"So you did so you did, honey/' said Aunt Chloe, heap-
ing the smoking batter-cakes on his plate; "you know'd
your old aunty 'd keep the best for you."

"Now for the cake," said Mas'r George, flourishing a
large knife over the article in question.

"La bless you, Mas'r George!" said Aunt Chloe, with
earnestness, catching his arm, "you would n't be for cuttin'
it with dat ar great heavy knife! Smash all down spile
all de pretty raise of it. Here, I 've got a thin old knife.
I keeps sharp a purpose. Dar now, see ! comes apart light
as a feather! Now eat away you won't get anything to
beat dat ar."

"Tom Lincon says," said George, speaking with his
mouth full, "that their Jinny is a better cook than you."

"Dem Lincons an't much 'count, no way!" said Aunt
Chloe, contemptuously; "I mean, set along side our folks."

"Well, though, I 've heard you say," said George, "that
Jinny was a pretty fair cook."

"So I did," said Aunt Chloe, "I may say dat. Good,
plain, common cookin', Jinny '11 do ; make a good pone o'
bread, bile her taters far, her corn cakes is n't extra,
not extra now, Jinny's corn cakes is n't, but then they 's
far, but, Lor, come to de higher branches, and what can
she do ? Why, she makes pies sartin she does ; but what
kinder crust ? Why, I should n't sleep a wink for a week,
if I had a batch of pies like dem ar."

"I suppose Jinny thinks they are ever so nice," said
George.

"Jinny don't know. She can't be spected to know ! Ah !



Life Among the Lowly.



23



Mas'r George, you does n't know half your privileges in yer
family and bringin' up I"

"I 'm sure, Aunt Chloe, I understand all my pie and pud-
ding privileges/' said George. "I mean to ask Tom here,
some day next week, and you do your prettiest, Aunt




Mose, and Pete, and Polly.

Oiloe, and we '11 make him stare. Won't we make him eat
so he won't get over it for a fortnight ?"


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