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Census

Bureau

Programs

and
Publications




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Area and
Subject Guide




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BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

A. ROSS ECKLER, Director
ROBERT F. DRURY, Deputy Director

EDWIN D. GOLDFIELD, Assistant Director for Statistical Information



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This publication was prepared in the Statistical
Information Division under the direction of
Ann D. Casey, Chief, Technical Reports Branch, assisted
by William P. Peirce, Beverly A. Wierbinski,
Valerie M. McFarland and Suzanne J. Johnson.
Consultation and review were provided by
Phyllis G. Carter, Census Historian



Library of Congress Card No. A68-7551



SUGGESTED CITATION

U.S. Bureau of the Census. Census Bureau Programs and

Publications: Area and Subject Guide
U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1968

Issued June 1968



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents,
U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington,
D.C., 20402, or any of the Field Offices of the
Department of Commerce. Price $1.50



Census Bureau Programs

and Piihlir^^tinns

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UNH LIBRARY



3 m^OO DlD5t MbM3

Area and
Subject Guide



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

C. R. Smith, Secretary

William H. Chartener, Assistant Secretary

for Economic Affairs



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

A. Ross Eckler, Director



University of New Hampshi:
Library



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Preface 2.0'\



HP HIS is a comprehensive review of the statistical programs of the Census Bureau and of
-■- the reports issued by the Census Bureau in the 1960's. The geographic areas covered
and principal subjects are shown for most of the publications.

For reports issued periodically (weekly, monthly, quarterly, semiannually, and
annually), the areas covered in the latest issues are shown. No attempt has been made to
show the changes, if any, in the areas covered in earlier issues.

Almost all statistical and geographic reports, including maps, published by the Census
Bureau from 1960 through 1967 are covered. However, unpublished data and special
tabulations are not included in this publication.

If plans for forthcoming publications appeared to be firm at the time this guide was
prepared, the areas to be covered are shown; however, in some cases there may be changes
in the final reports. Preliminary and advance reports are described only when the tinal
reports which will supersede them are not described.

Publications such as catalogs and other guides to statistics are described in Appendix
A — Guides to Recent Census Bureau Statistics. Selected reports on procedures, methodol-
ogy, and evaluation studies are described under Appendix B — Recent Methodological
Studies. An index by geographic areas is also included.

The Bureau of the Census Catalog provides information on new publications as they
are issued. The Catalog may be used to update the information in this guide.



Contents



1 . INTRODUCTION 1

2. DEFINITIONS AND DESCRIPTIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC

AREAS COVERED 5

3. AGRICULTURE

Programs and Activities 18

Publications —

Census of Agriculture 19

Current Cotton Statistics 22

4. CONSTRUCTION

Programs and Activities 23

Publications 24

5. DISTRIBUTION AND SERVICES

Programs and Activities 28

Publications —

Census of Business 30

Census of Business of Puerto Rico 35

Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Industries^

Virgin Islands and Guam 35

Current Business Reports 36

Other Reports 39

6. FOREIGN TRADE

Programs and Activities 40

Publications 41



Contents — continued



7. GEOGRAPHIC REPORTS AND MAPS

Programs and Activities 44

Publications —

Geographic Reports 45

Area Measurement Reports 46

United States Maps 46

Congressional District Atlas 48

U.S. County Outline Maps 48

MCD and CCD Maps 48

Census Tracts 49

8. GOVERNMENTS

Programs and Activities 50

Publications —

Census of Governments 51

Current Government Reports 54

State and Local Government Special Studies 56

9. HOUSING

Programs and Activities 58

Publications —

Census of Housing 60

Censuses of Population and Housing 65

Current Housing Reports 66

10. MANUFACTURING AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES

Programs and Activities 68

Publications —

Census of Manufactures 71

Census of Manufactures of Puerto Rico 75

Census of Mineral Industries 75

Census of Commercial Fisheries 78

Annual Survey of Manufactures 78

Current Industrial Reports 79



Contents— Continued



11. POPULATION

Programs and Activities 90

Publications —

Census of Population 93

Graphic Pamphlets 107

Supplementary Reports 107

Census Monographs 107

Current Population Reports 108

12. TRANSPORTATION

Programs and Activities Ill

Publications 114

13. GENERAL ECONOMIC STATISTICS

Programs and Activities 116

Publications —

Long Term Economic Growth 116

Business Cycle Developments 117

Exports and Imports as Related to Output 117

Enterprise Statistics 118

County Business Patterns 119

14. STATISTICAL ABSTRACT AND SUPPLEMENTS

Programs and Activities 120

Pubhcations —

Statistical Abstract of the United States 121

Pocket Data Book USA 121

County and City Data Book 121

Congressional District Data Book 122

Historical Statistics of the United States 122

1 5. STUDIES OF FOREIGN COUNTRIES

International Population Statistics Reports 124

International Population Reports 1 25



Contents — continued



APPENDIX A— GUIDES TO RECENT CENSUS BUREAU STATISTICS

Directory of Federal Statistics for Local Areas: 1966 128

Directory of Federal Statistics for States: 1967 128

Bureau of the Census Catalog 128

Statistical Abstract of the United States, Appendix III — Guide to

Sources of Statistics 129

Fact Finder for the Nation 129

Guide to Industrial Statistics 129

Guide to Foreign Trade Statistics: 1968 129

U.S. Census of Population: 1960 — Availability of Published and

Unpublished Data 1 29

U.S. Census of Housing: 1960 — Availability of Published and Un-
published Data 130

Guide to Statistics Published from the 1962 Census of Govern-
ments 130

APPENDIX B— RECENT METHODOLOGICAL STUDIES

Atlantida: A Case Study in Household Sample Surveys 131

The Development of Punch Card Tabulation in the Bureau of the

Census: 1890-1940 131

Technical Papers 131

Working Papers 135

Methodological Reports on the 1960 Censuses of Population and

Housing 138

Evaluation and Research Program, 1960 Censuses 140

Governments Statistics Methods 140

Methodological Reports, 1900-1966: Annotated Bibliography . . 141

Foreign Social Science Bibliographies 141

GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 142



1



Introduction



Role of the Bureau of the Census



The Bureau of the Census is a general-purpose statistical agency whose primary
function is to collect, process, compile, and disseminate statistical data for the use of the
general public and other government agencies.

The Bureau occupies a unique place in the Federal statistical system — it publishes more
statistics than other Federal statistical agencies do, covers a wider range of subjects, and
serves a greater variety of needs.

Until 1902, the census organization was temporary. It was built up before each
decennial census and disbanded after the work was finished. In 1902, the Congress set up a
permanent office to take the census and to collect other statistics. At first, this office was in
the Department of Interior; but in 1903 it was transferred to the new Department of
Commerce and Labor. When that Department was split in 1913, the Bureau of the Census
was placed in the Department of Commerce.

Legislation authorizing the Bureau of the Census to collect and publish statistics is
included in Title 13, U.S. Code.

Confidentiality

The Census laws guarantee the confidentiality of replies to Census inquiries. Census
employees swear an oath to protect that confidentiality. Under no circumstances will
individual returns be made available to persons who are not Census Bureau employees.
Data files and unpublished materials are also protected to ensure the confidentiality of
individual respondents or establishments. In addition, tabulations that reveal confidential
data for individual units are not published.

Censuses

The first census of the United States was taken in 1790, as authorized by the Consti-
tution, and the census enumerators counted the number of free and slave persons in each
State — with a national total of nearly 4 million inhabitants.



CENSUS BUREAU PROGRAMS AND PUBLICATIONS



Today the Bureau is responsible for taking all censuses authorized by Federal law,
including;

Recent
Census Periodicity censuses Next census

Population 10 year 1950, 1960 1970

Housing 10 year 1950,1960 1970

Agriculture 5 year 1959, 1964 1969

Business 5 year 1958,1963 1967

Manufactures 5 year 1958, 1963 1967

Mineral Industries 5 year 1958, 1963 1967

Transportation 5 year — 1963 1967

Governments 5 year 1957, 1962 1967

In addition to census programs, construction statistics are now centralized in the
Bureau. The Bureau of the Census is also responsible for tabulating and publishing the
official statistics on the foreign trade of the United States, and issues monthly, quarterly, and
annual reports in this field. Results of special surveys of transportation, commodity move-
ments, and personal travel are also published, although not on a regular basis.

Reports Between Censuses

Because many people and organizations need information provided more frequently
than every 5 or 10 years, and more promptly than data from a full-scale census can be
tabulated, the Census Bureau gathers and reports statistics on many census subjects in the
form of current reports, dealing with population, manufacturing activity and commodity
production, retail and wholesale trade. State and local government finances, and housing
characteristics and vacancies. These are issued at different intervals, annually, quarterly, or
monthly. One report, on retail trade, is issued weekly.

The current reports provide fewer facts than are found in a census report on the same
general subject. Most of the statistics are national totals for the United States, but some
apply to States or smaller areas. Most of the reports are based on data gathered from
carefully chosen samples, while some represent tabulations of data based on the records of
other agencies of government.

Other Census Bureau Activities

Special Censuses — Many local governments seek more frequent population figures than
are afforded by the decennial censuses. Sometimes a local government requests the Census
Bureau to conduct a "special census" of its area. Some 1,500 of these counts, made at the
expense of local governments, were taken between 1950 and 1960, and 1,000 more were
conducted between 1960 and 1966.

Mapping — A continuing job at the Census Bureau is that of preparing maps. One of
the important tasks in getting ready for a census is defining the limits of each area to be
covered in the census, and subsequently to be included in the tabulations. Maps are prepared
for the field enumerators conducting censuses and surveys and other maps are prepared for
supervisors. (For the 1960 census some 160,000 maps were prepared so that each census
taker would have a visual description of the area he or she was to count. Another 75,000
maps were prepared for supervisors and other census officials.) Other maps prepared by the
Census Bureau are multicolored statistical maps which provide information more vividly
than do the statistical tables in the publications.



INTRODUCTION



Statistical Compendia — Compendia, such as the annual Statistical Abstract of the
United States and its small-area and historical supplements, are compiled and published by
the Bureau of the Census. Another compilation issued periodically is County Business
Patterns, derived from employment and payroll information reported to the Social Security
Administration, supplemented by a special survey of multiunit companies. A monthly
publication, Business Cycle Developments, brings together a large selection of current
economic series in a form convenient for interpretation and use by specialists in business-
cycle analysis.

Bureau of the Census Catalog — The Catalog is issued on a current basis each quarter
and cumulated to the annual volume. A monthly supplement to the Catalog, which lists new
publications other than regular monthly and quarterly reports, enables users to be informed
more currently on publications as they are issued, and provides a means of locating needed
data. See Appendix A of this guide for additional information related to the Bureau of the
Census Catalog.

Data Files and Unpublished Materials Available to the Public — Although the Bureau
of the Census publishes only the most essential and most widely useful data in its reports of
censuses and surveys, a great deal more information is available to the public. The Bureau
maintains data files in the form of punchcards and computer tape, which can be processed
to provide almost unlimited subject cross-classifications and area tabulations. Some of these
tape and punchcard files, which do not contain confidential individual records, may be
purchased and used by the purchaser for making tabulations. All of them, under appropriate
circumstances, can be used by the Bureau to prepare tabulations specified by customers.
Special tabulations can also be prepared directly from files of filled-in questionnaires.
Tabulations made from individual records are subject to review to make certain that the
results are in such summary form that no individual information is disclosed. Some
unpublished nonstatistical information is also available, including maps, computer programs,
and address directories of public officials. Data files and unpublished materials are described
in the Bureau of the Census Catalog, Part II, and include the items which became available
during the Catalog period.

Age Search — As a service to people who do not have birth certificates or other docu-
ments required for certain purposes, the Census Bureau provides applicants with a certificate
showing the age, place of residence, and family relationship of a person as reported to a
census taker during the person's early life. In the early 1960's about 200,000 paid orders
for such certificates were mailed each year to a special office in Pittsburg, Kansas. In 1966,
however, because of Medicare and a change in the Social Security requirements, the appli-
cation rate soared to over 100,000 a month. Census certificates are accepted as proof of age
and place of birth by most government agencies and other organizations.

Services for Other Federal Agencies — Because of its resources of equipment and
specialized skills, the Bureau of the Census performs services for other agencies, such as
data collection, sample design, machine tabulation, or consultation on methods and pro-
cedures. For example, it acts as collecting and compiling agency for the data collected in
household interviews for the national health survey program of the Public Health Service
and for the monthly survey of employment and unemployment for the Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Under arrangements with the Agency for International Development, the Bureau
of the Census maintains an international assistance program.

International Assistance — Many foreign nations avail themselves of services provided
by the Bureau which will strengthen their statistical programs. Training is conducted for
foreign statisticians and specialists interested in studying American census-taking procedures
and related statistical techniques which can be usefully applied in other countries. In a



CENSUS BUREAU PROGRAMS AND PUBLICATIONS



typical year, there may be as many as 100 persons, from 18 or more countries, studying at
the Bureau. Another 35 or more foreign technicians may be in programs of university study
arranged and supervised by the Bureau. American statistical know-how is also transmitted
through advisory services of U.S. officials. These services are sought by governments of other
nations to assist in planning, conducting, or tabulating censuses or surveys in those nations.
At any one time there may be 40 to 50 census and statistical advisors or technicians serving
in these roles overseas.



Figure 1.— UNITED STATES NATIONAL CENSUSES 1960 TO 1970




Agriculture

^ "Business

* Construction

Governments

Housing

^ IVIanufactures

^ IVIineral Industries

Population

* Transportation





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Online LibraryHelen RowanCensus Bureau programs and publications; area and subject guide → online text (page 1 of 14)