Henry F. W. Little.

The Seventh Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers in the War of the Rebellion online

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lost a tooth, for he was likely to get more bugs than soup.

" The meat was soon discontinued, and we had for a time
only raw sweet potatoes, with no means for cooking them.
The men were driven to strange extremities ; starvation
made manv of them worse than beasts. A fat little dog
belonging to a Confederate officer by some mischance
strayed into the enclosure and was literally torn to pieces
and the meat eaten raw. So we dragged along, till
typhoid fever and pneumonia took me prisoner. I was
sent over to Richmond and put into a building very simi-
lar to the Libby Prison. In this building there were about
five hundred patients, and patient indeed they were ; poor,
helpless, uncared for fellows.

" During the month of January, one hundred and ten of
this number died, and the average mortality through Feb-
ruary was twelve per day. None of the bedding was
changed during the three months I lay there. It is easy
to imagine how long a very sick person would live under
such treatment. The number captured and taken to Rich-
mond with me, belonging to the Seventh New Hampshire,
was fourteen ; only four lived to get back to the Union
lines. The food given to the sick was the same as the
prisoners had on Belle Island. Those sick with fevers
had nothing to nourish them but a small piece of corn
bread and cold water twice a day. Over fifty were

3G



562 History of the Seventh Regiment

brought to the building I was confined in, with frozen feet,
and they would live until their feet dropped off up to their
ankles, when, if the Confederate doctors had attended
them in a proper manner, there might have been a chance
for some of the poor fellows.

" Some curious experiments were tried » by those who
were sufficiently daring, to get to the Union lines, and
often with success. One fellow, who was acting as nurse,
told the men if they would put him into a blanket and
carry him to the dead house, which was outside of the
guard, and nail him carelessly in a coffin, he would take
care of what followed. Accordingly the thing was done,
and the next morning the old darkey started with his load
of dead for a burial place outside of the city. When
they were a safe distance out the nurse gave the coffin lid
a kick. The darkey gave one frightful 3-ell and fled
toward Richmond, while the dead man went on his way
rejoicing.

"On the 2ist of March, 1864, I was paroled, and
when I reached the Union lines and saw "Old Glor}' "
once more, a happier boy never lived than Winslow J.
Spalding."

He now resides at Roslindale, Mass.

Sergt. Otis A. Merrill.

Sergt. Otis Addison Merrill, the eldest son of Benjamin
A. and Mary J. (Winn) Merrill, was born in Hudson,
N. H., August 22, 1844, and is a descendant of Nathaniel
Merrill, an emigrant from England, who settled in New-
bury, Mass., in 1634.

His early life before the war was spent on his father's
farm. His education was obtained at the district schools
of his native town. At the breaking out of the War of
the Rebellion he felt that it was his duty to serve his coun-
try, and enlisted August 14, 1862, as a private in Com-



New Hampshire Volunteers. 563

pan}' H, Seventh N. H. Volunteers, joining the regiment
at St. Augustine, Fla., September 17, 1862. He was in
every battle and skirmish in which the regiment partici-
pated with the single exception of the second assault on
Fort Wagner, S. C, July 18, 1S63. He was an eye-wit-
ness of the assault from his post of duty as a guard. He
was detailed during the siege of Morris Island, S. C, as
a sharpshooter, under Capt. Richard Ela, of the Third
N. H. Volunteers. He was awarded a Gillmore medal of
honor for o-allant and meritorious conduct at the siege of
Charleston, on Morris Island, S. C, which was not pre-
sented him until June 19, 1864. He was promoted to
corporal, to date trom August 25, 1864, and was soon after
detailed as one of the color guards, in which capacity he
served until his promotion to sergeant, January 26, 1865.
At Wilmington, N. C, he was detailed bv General Haw-
ley to take charge of tour hundred colored people on
board a transport and report to General Gillmore at Hilton
Head, S. C.

During his last month's duty at Wilmington he acted as
first sergeant of the provost guard, which was composed
of a detail of one hundred and twenty-five men from
General x\bbott's brigade. He was hit by rebel bullets
four times, but was not hurt severely enough to be reported
on the list of wounded. He left the regiment June 25,
1865, by reason of the expiration of his term of enlist-
ment, and received a final discharge at Concord, N. H.,
July 7, 1865.

After his return home he learned the trade of carpenter
and joiner in Haverhill, Mass., at the same time taking up
the study of architecture. He moved to Lowell, Mass.,
in 1869, and followed his trade until 1873, when he gave
all his time to the study and practice of architecture, and
was for a short time in partnership with Charles S. Eaton ;
in 1883, the firm of Merrill & Cutler was formed and



504 History of the Seventh Regiment

has continued in business to the present time. Among
the pubHc buildings designed by this firm are the Concord
High School building, Concord, N. H. : the Young Men's
Christian Association building, New Bedford, Mass. : the
Town Hall, Wilton, N. H. : the First Congregational
Church, Odd Fellows' building, Central Fire Station,
Old Ladies' Home, the Lowell Armory, and the new
City Hall, all of Lowell, Mass. He now resides in
Lowell, Mass.

Samuel A. Simonds.

Samuel A. Simonds was born in Princeton, Mass., and
at the time of his enlistment was thirty-eight years of age.
At the breaking out of the War of the Rebellion he re-
sided in the town of Dunbarton, N. H., and when the
Seventh New Hampshire was being recruited he deter-
mined to go to the front in the defense of his country and
flag ; therefore he enlisted as a private in Company K,
on the second day of November, 1861, under Capt.
Warren E. F. Brown, and after serving nearly his whole
enlistment was killed at the battle of Laurel Hill (New
Market Road), Va., October 7, 1864.



New Hampshire Volunteers.



565




HEADQUARTERS SE^■E^'TH X. H. VET-
ERAN ASSOCIATION, WEIRS, X. H.



The Seventh New Hampshire Veteran
Association.

The first meeting of the veterans of the Seventh New
Hampshire was at Manchester, N. H., in August, 1875,
but no steps toward an organization were made until
August, 1878, when a meeting was called at Weirs,
N. H., and the organization of the Seventh New Hamp-
shire Veteran Association was perfected, and a president,
vice-president, secretary and treasurer, and a regimental
historian (H. F. W. Little) were chosen. At that time
but few were present, but an effort was made to have the
surviving comrades take an interest in the matter of these
reunions, and in August, 1S79. another meeting was held



566 History of the Seventh Regiment

at the same place, a State Veterans' Association having
been formed which invited all regimental associations to
hold their reunions at Weirs, the State having made an
appropriation tor buildings or barracks, and the Concord
& Montreal Railroad Company having appropriated land
for the purpose. In August, 1880, fifty-seven comrades
of the Seventh Regiment reported present, and the asso-
ciation became an assured success, increasing in numbers
each year. A list, as far as could be ascertained, of all
survivors of the Seventh New Hampshire was made, and
a record of the deaths which occurred was kept, as was
also a record of each meeting, which was to occur during
the last full week in August, or the first week in Septem-
ber, of each year.

In August, 18S4, a special meeting was called to select
a lot of land and see what steps could be taken to erect a
headquarters building, which should be the home of the
comrades of the Seventh when attending these reunions,
and a committee was appointed, to be called a " Building
Committee," consisting of Comrades James M. Seavey,
of Meredith, George W. Abbott, of Penacook, Otis A.
Merrill, of Lowell, and H. F. W. Little, of Manchester:
Comrade J. F. Cotton, who was then president of the
association, was afterwards added, and by virtue of his
office was placed at the head of the committee.

Steps were at once taken to raise the necessary funds,
and at the reunion of 1885, a building had been erected,
which, although not wholly completed, had cost $1,293.74.
Between three and four hundred dollars more was after-
wards laid out in improvements and in completing the
building, and the Seventh has to-day one of the prettiest
and most convenient buildings upon the grounds. The
plans for the building were designed by Comrade Otis A.
Merrill, one of the building committee. The building is
most pleasantly located on the shores of the beautiful Lake



New Hampshire Volunteers. 567

Winnipesaukee, and from its broad piazzas a beautiful
view of the lake and its numerous islands is obtained,
while towering hills and mountains are seen in the back-
ground.

Thus the permanent location of the Seventh New
Hampshire Veteran Association has been assured, while
any comrades survive.

The officers of the association for the present year
(1896) are :

President — Granville P. Mason.

Vice-President — Francis White.

Secretary and Historian — H. F. W. Little.

Treasurer — Darius Merrill.

Trustees — Otis A. Merrill, D. W. Hayden, and George
W. Abbott.

Sergeant-at-Arms — William F. Spalding.

Delegate to the N. H. Veterans' Association — William
E. Dow.



COMPLETE ROSTER



SEVENTH REGIMENT



New Hampshire Volunteers.



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