Henry Grey.

A key to the Waverley novels : in chronological sequence, with index of the principal characters online

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I -in r r T^

Iv L\ 10 THE

\ VVERLEY NOVELS




SPROUL HALL LIBRARY



A KEY



WAVERLEY NOVELS



a



OPINIONS OF THE PRESS

(A Iphabctkally arranged)



' The entire essence of the stories.' Bedfordshire Mercury.

'A valuable and exceedingly handy little work.' Court Journal.

' We heartily commend this very happy idea.' Ecclesiastical Gazette.

'Another useful work by Mr Grey.' Edinburgh Coiirant.

'An admirable idea carried out with great literary skill. ' - Glasgow
Herald.

' The plot of each novel is carefully condensed in as few words as
possible.' Graphic.

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' A marvel of compactness.' Harper s Magazine.

' Written in a very attractive manner.' Jersey Express.

' Admirably compiled.' Manchester Courier.

' The plots are clearly set forth.' New York Critic.

' The principal scenes are vividly sketched.' North Wales Guardian.

' Will be welcomed by a large class of readers.' Ontario Chronicle.

' Will be read with interest and advantage.' Oxford Chronicle.

' Gives a lucid outline of the plots.' Oxford and Cambridge Undet-
graduates' Journal.

'' Very successfully condensed.' People's Journal, Dundee.

' A very careful summary.' St Andrews Gaze tic.

' Gives a very pithy outline of each tale.' School Newspaper.

' Fits into the wards of each story in the smoothest fashion.' SnnJ<iy
Times.

' Capitally done.' Tablet.

' Unlocks several historical obscurities.' \Vakeficld Herald.
A veritable wultum in parvo. ' Worcestershire Chronicle.



A KEY TO THE

WAVERLEY NOVELS

IN CHRONOLOGICAL SEQUENCE
WITH INDEX OF THE PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS



HENRY GREY

FR.B.S., F.Z.S., F.I.INST.

AUTHOR OF

'THE CLASSICS FOR THE MILLION*
' A BIRD'S-EYE VIEW OF ENGLISH LITERATURE '

'THE PLOTS OF OLD ENGLISH PLAYS'

'RESTING WITHOUT RUSTING' 'zoo NOTES'

'SCIENCE NOTES,' 'SIXTY-FIVE YEARS' REMINISCENCES'

ETC., ETC.



NEW YORK
CHARLES L. BOWMAN AND CO.



Library



5341
GS



PREFACE

TFIESE brief sketches of the Historical Novels by Sir
Walter Scott, whom Lord Meadowbank eulogised as
'The mighty magician, who has rolled back the current
of time, and conjured up before our living senses the
men and manners of days which have long since passed
away,' are offered to the public with the hope that,
to those who have read the Tales (which fill ten
thousand closely printed pages, and extend over a
period of more than seven hundred years), they may
serve as a memento of the principal scenes and char-
acters ; and to those who have not, as an appetising
foretaste of the intellectual feast in store for them.



CON TENTS

Date of

the Story. I-AGIC

1098. COUNT ROBERT OF PARIS . 1

1187. THE BETROTHED .... .5

1191. THE TALISMAN 9

1194. 'IVANHOE 14

1306. CASTLE DANGEROUS 18

1402. THE FAIR MAID OF PERTH . . 22

1468. OUENTIN DURWARD 27

1474. ANNE OF GEIERSTEIN 31

1550. THE MONASTERY . 35

1567. THE ABBOT . .... 39

1575. KENILWORTH 43

1600. DEATH OF THE LAIRD'S JOCK . . .48

1604. THE FORTUNES OF NIGEL . . . .50

1645. A LEGEND OF MONTROSE .... 54

1652. WOODSTOCK .58

1678. PEVERIL OF THE PEAK ... 02

1679. OLD MORTALITY 67

1695. THE BRIDE OF LAMMERMOOR ... 71

1700. THE PIRATE 75

1702. MY AUNT MARGARET'S MIRROR 80



viii CONTENTS

Date of

the Story. PAGE

1706. THE BLACK DWARF ... 82

1715. ROB ROY 86

1736. THE HEART OF MID-LOTHIAN . 90

1745. WAVERLEY . . 94

1763. REDGAUNTLET . 98

1765. GUY MANNERING ... . 103

1775. THE HIGHLAND WIDOW .... 107

1780. THE SURGEON'S DAUGHTER . . . 109

1782. THE TAPESTRIED CHAMBER . . . 113

1795. THE Two DROVERS 115

1795. THE ANTIQUARY 117

1812. ST RONAN'S WELL 121

INDEX OF THE PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS . 125



A KEY TO THE

WAVERLEY NOVELS

COUNT ROBERT OF PARIS



Principal Characters



ALEXIUS COMNENUS, Greek
Emperor of Constantinople.

THE EMPRESS IRENE, his
wife.

PRINCESS ANNA, their daughter.

NICEPHORUS BRENNIUS, her
husband.

ASTARTE,



ACHII.LES TATIUS, officer of the

Imperial Varangian Guard.
HEREWARD, an Anglo-Saxon,

his subaltern.

STEPHANOS CASTOR, a -wrestler.
LYSIMACHUS, a designer.
HARPAX, centurion of the city

guard.
SEBASTES, a recruit in the

corps.
NICANOR, commander-in-chiefof

tlic Greek army.
Zos I M us, Greek patriarch.



MICHAEL AGELASTES, an old

sage.

GODFREY DE BOUILLON,^
PETER THE HERMIT,
COUNT BALDWIN,
COUNT DE VERMANDOIS,
BOHEMOND OF ANTIOCH,
PRINCE TANCRED OF

OTRANTO, s C

RAYMOND, COUNT OF

TOULOUSE,

COUNT ROBERTOF PARIS/
BKENHILDA, Countess of Paris.
TOXARTIS, a Scythian chieftain.
AGATHA, afterwards BERTHA,

Here-ward's betrothed.
DIOGENES, a negro slave.
ZEDEKIAS URSEL, a rival for

the throne.
DOUBAN, a slave skilled in

medicine.
SYLVAN, an ourang-outang.



Greek citizens, courtiers, military officers, seamen, soldiers, priests
and slaves. Army of Crusaders.

Period, 1098. Localities: Constantinople and Scutari.

EIGHT hundred years ago Constantinople then
as now unrivalled as regards the beauty of it?
situation on the confines of Europe and Asia

A



2 A KEY TO THE WAVERLEY NOVELS

was threatened by barbarians from the east, and
by the Franks from the west. Unable to rely on
his Greek subjects to repel their incursions, the
emperor was obliged to maintain a body-guard of
Varangians, or mercenaries from other nations, of
whom the citizens and native soldiers were very
jealous. One of these, Hereward, had just been
attacked by Sebastes, when Tatius intervened and
led him to the palace. Here he was introduced to
the imperial family, surrounded by their attend-
ants ; and the Princess Anna was reading a roll of
history she had written, when her husband entered
to announce the approach of the armies composing
the first Crusade. Convinced that he was power-
less to prevent their advance, the emperor offered
them hospitality on their way ; and, the leaders
having agreed to acknowledge his sovereignty, the
various hosts marched in procession before his
assembled army.

As Comnenus, however, moved forward to re-
ceive the homage of Count Bohemond, his vacant
throne was insolently occupied by Count Robert
of Paris, who was with difficulty compelled to
vacate it, and make his submission. The defiant
knight, accompanied by Brenhilda, afterwards met
the sage Agelastes, who related the story of an
enchanted princess, and decoyed them to his her-
mitage overlooking the Bosphorus. Here they
were introduced to the empress and her daughter,
who, attended by Brennius, came to visit the sage,
and were invited to return with them to the palace
to be presented to the emperor. At the State
banquet which followed, the guests, including Sir



COUNT ROBERT OF PARIS 3

Bohemond, were pledged by their royal host, and
urged to accept the golden cups they had used.
On waking next morning, Count Robert found
himself in a dungeon with a tiger, and that Ursel
was confined in an adjoining one. Presently an
ourang-outang descended through a trap-door,
and afterwards Sebastes, both of whom the count
had overpowered, when Hereward made his ap-
pearance, and undertook to release his Norman
adversary.

A treasonable conference was meanwhile taking
place between Tatius and Agelastes, who had
failed in endeavouring to tamper with the Anglo-
Saxon ; and the countess had been unwillingly
transported by Diogenes to a garden-house for a
secret interview with Brennius, whom she chal-
lenged to knightly combat in the hearing of her
husband. Having hidden the count, Hereward
encountered his sweetheart Bertha, who had fol-
lowed Brenhilda as her attendant, and then ob-
tained an audience of the imperial family, who
were discussing recent events, including a plot in
which Brennius was concerned for seizing the
throne, and received permission to communicate
with the Duke de Bouillon. Bertha volunteered
to be his messenger, and, at an interview with
the council of Crusaders at Scutari, she induced
them to promise that fifty knights, each with ten
followers, should attend the combat to support
their champion.

Having made his confession to the Patriarch,
while Agelastes was killed by Sylvan as he argued
with Brenhilda respecting the existence of the-



4 A KEY TO THE WAVERLEY NOVELS

devil, the emperor led his daughter to the cell in
which Ursel was confined, with the intention of
making him her husband, instead of Brennius.
She had, however, been persuaded by her mother
to intercede for the traitor, and Ursel was merely
placed under the care of Douban to be restored to
health after his long imprisonment. Alexius had
decided that Brennius should fight the Count of
Paris, instead of the countess, and all the prepara-
tions for the combat had been made, when the
ships conveying the Crusaders hove in sight ; and,
after defeating the Greek fleet, they landed in
sight of the lists. Brennius, in the meantime, was
pardoned, and, in answer to shouts of discontent
from the assembled crowd, Ursel was led forth to
announce his restoration to liberty and the imperial
favour, and the conspiracy was crushed. Hereward
then appeared to do battle with Count Robert,
and, saved from the knight's axe by Bertha, he
joined the Crusaders, obtaining on his return the
hand of his betrothed, and, ultimately, a grant of
land from William Rufus, adjacent to the New
Forest in Hampshire, where he had screened her
when a girl from the tusk of a wild boar.



THE BETROTHED



Principal Characters



GWENWYN, Prince of Powys-

land.

BRENGWAN, his -wife.
FATHER EINION, his chaplain.
CADWALLON, his principal bard.
JORWORTH AP JEVAN, a mes-
. senger.
BALDWIN, Archbishop of Canter-

bury.
SIR RAYMOND BERENGER, of

Garde Doloureuse.
His daughter, EVELINE.
His sister, A BENEDICTINE

ABBESS.
FATHER AI.DROVAND, his chap-

lain.

DENNIS MOROI.T, his squire.
REINOLD, his butler.
RAOUL GILLIAN, his huntsman.
DAMP. GILLIAN, his wife.
SIR HUGO DE LACY, Constable



DAMIAN LACY, his nephew.

RANALD LACY, their kinsman.

PHILIP GUARINE, Sir Hugo's
squire.

AMELOT, Damian Lucy's page.

RALPH GENVIL, his banner-
bearer.

WILLIAM TF'LfMM.QCK., a Flemish
weaver.

His daughter, ROSE, Eveline's
waiting- maid.

ERMINGARDE, the Lady of
Baldringham .

BERWINE, her housekeeper.

HUNDWOLF, her steward.

SIR GUY MONTHERMER, in
command of the King's troops.

THE EARL OF GLOUCESTER.

KING HENRY II.

PRINCE RICHARD.

PRINCE JOHN,



of Chester.

Norman cavaliers, M'elsh borderers, soldiers, camp followers,
minstrels, pedlars, mendicants, outlaws, peasants ; general
assembly.

Period, 1187. Locality: Wales.

THE archbishop, as he travelled and preached
among them, had exhorted the Britons, and the
Anglo-Normans who were settled on the borders
of the Welsh principalities, to lay aside their feuds,
and join in the third Crusade. Accordingly, the
Prince of Powys-land and the Knight of Garde

5



6 A KEY TO THE WAVERLEY NOVELS

Doloureuse had accepted each other's hospitality,
and Gwenwyn, at the suggestion of his chaplain,
had arranged to divorce his wife, in order that he
might marry Sir Raymond's daughter. In reply
to his proposal, however, a messenger brought a
letter stating that she was promised to the Con-
stable of Chester, which being taken by the Welsh
as an affront, the call to war was sung by the bards,
the Norman castle was attacked, and its owner
slain in a combat with his would-be son-in-law.
Nerved by the presence of Eveline on the battle-
ments, and supplied with food by a ruse of her
father's vassal the Flemish weaver, the garrison,
assisted by the military predilections of their
chaplain, held out until Damian Lacy arrived with
a large force, when the brave but unarmoured
Britons were repulsed, and their prince was killed.
Having granted an interview to her deliverer,
Eveline was escorted by her suitor the Constable,
and a numerous retinue, to her aunt's nunnery.
On her way thither she passed a night at the house
of a Saxon kinswoman, the Lady of Baldringham,
where she occupied a haunted chamber, and saw
the ghost of an ancestor's wife, who foretold that
she would be

' Widowed wife, and married maid,
Betrothed, betrayer, and betrayed.'

During her visit to the abbess she was formally
espoused to Sir Hugo ; but the archbishop having
the next day commanded him to proceed to
Palestine for three years, he offered to annul their
engagement. Eveline, contrary to her aunt's



THE BETROTHED 7

advice, promised to await his return ; and it was
arranged that she should reside in her castle, with
Rose and Dame Gillian as her attendants, and
Damian as her guardian. Wearied with her
monotonous life during this seclusion, she was
induced one day to join in a hawking expedition
unaccompanied by her usual escort, and was seized
by rebels secretly instigated by Ranald Lacy. In
attempting to rescue her Damian was severely
wounded, and she insisted on nursing him in the
castle, while Amelot led his men-at-arms in pursuit
of the outlaws, whose disaffection had reached the
king's ears, with a rumour that Damian was their
captain. Sir Guy Monthermer was, accordingly,
sent to demand admittance to Garde Doloureuse,
where he was reported to be concealed ; and when
Eveline ordered the portcullis to be dropped
against him, a herald proclaimed her, and all who
aided and abetted her, as traitors.

The constable and his squire, who were sup-
posed to be dead, returned from Syria, disguised
as palmers, just as the royal troops, headed by
Prince Richard, had occupied the castle, Eveline
at the same time being sent to a convent, and
Damian consigned to a dungeon. Having learnt
the ill news from old Raoul and his wife, Sir Hugo
made his way towards King Henry's camp, near
which, surrounded by an assembly of spectators,
Ranald Lacy, who by fal.se representations had
obtained a grant of Eveline's forfeited lands, and
assumed his kinsman's dress and title, was about
to present a royal charter of immunities to a pro-
cession of the Flemish settlers. Cadwallon, the



8 A KEY TO THE WAVERLEY NOVELS

Welsh bard, had, however, attached himself to
Sir Hugo as a Breton minstrel, in order that he
might avenge the death of Gwenwyn ; and mis-
taking Ranald for the returned constable, suddenly
sprang behind him as he leant forward in his
saddle, and stabbed him in the back. Sir Hugo
now made himself known, and was welcomed by
the king, the assassin was executed, and, con-
vinced that his betrothed's love had been given
to Damian, the old Crusader resigned her to him,
and consoled himself by taking part in the sub-
jugation of Ireland.



THE TALISMAN



Principal Characters



SIR KENNETH OF THE COUCH-
ANT LEOPARD, Prince Royal
of Scotland.

STRAUCHAN, his squire.

ILDEKIM SUEERKOHF, a Sara-
cen Emir.

THEODORIC OF ENGADDI, a
Christian hermit.

KING RICHARD I., one of the
Council of the third Crusade.

QUEEN BERENGAKIA, his wife.

LADY CAUSTA OF MOUNT-
FAUCON, her attendant.

LADY EDITH PLANTAGENET,
Richard's kinswoman.

NKCBATANUS,//^ Queen 's dwarf.

GUENKVRA, his lady-love.



EL HAKIM, a physician; after-
wards SULTAN SALADIN.

THE ARCHBISHOP OF ^
TYKE,

THE GRAND-MASTER OF
THE TEMPLARS,

THE MARQUIS CONRADE
OF MONTSERRAT,

THE ARCHDUKE LEO-
POLD OF AUSTRIA,

KING PHILIP AUGUSTUS) _
OF FRANCE,

EARL WALLENRODE, an Hun-
garian warrior.

A MARABOUT, or Turkish
fanatic.

BLONDEL, King Richard's min-
strel.



SIR THOMAS DE MULTON,

SIR THOMAS DE VAUX OF ]- in attendance on the King,

GlLSLAND,

Choir of boys and maidens ; knights and soldiers of the Christian
and Mohammedan armies.

Period, 1191. Locality: Syria.

DURING a truce between the Christian armies
taking part in the third Crusade, and the infidel
forces under Sultan Saladin, Sir Kenneth, on his
way to Syria, encountered a Saracen Emir, whom he
unhorsed, and they then rode together, discoursing

9



10 A KEY TO THE WAVERLEY NOVELS

on love and necromancy, towards the cave of the
hermit, who was in correspondence with the pope,
and to whom the knight was charged to com-
municate secret information. Having provided
the travellers with refreshment, the anchorite, as
soon as the Saracen slept, conducted his com-
panion to a chapel, where he witnessed a pro-
cession, and was recognised by the Lady Edith,
to whom he had devoted his heart and sword.
He was then startled by the sudden appearance
of the dwarfs, and, having reached his couch again,
watched the hermit scourging himself until he fell
asleep.

About the same time Richard Cceur de Lion
had succumbed to an attack of fever, and as he
lay in his gorgeous tent at Ascalon, the Scot
arrived accompanied by a Moorish physician, who
had cured his squire, and who offered to restore
the king to health. After a long consultation,
and eliciting from Sir Kenneth his visit to the
chapel, the physician was admitted to the royal
presence ; and, having swallowed a draught which
he prepared from a silken bag or talisman, Richard
sank back on his cushions. While he slept Con-
rade of Montscrrat secretly avowed to the wily
grand-master his ambition to be King of Jeru-
salem ; and, with the object of injuring Richard's
reputation, incited Leopold of Austria to plant
his banner by the side of that of England in
the centre of the camp. When the king woke
the fever had left him, and Conrade entered to
announce what the archduke had done. Spring-
ing from his couch, Richard rushed to the spot



THE TALISMAN II

and defiantly tore down and trampled on the
Teuton pennon. Philip of France at length per-
suaded him to refer the matter to the council, and
Sir Kenneth was charged to watch the English
standard until daybreak, with a favourite hound
as his only companion. Soon after midnight,
however, Necbatanus approached him with Lady
Edith's ring, as a token that his attendance was
required to decide a wager she had with the
queen ; and during his absence from his post
the banner was carried off, and his dog severely
wounded. Overcome with shame and grief, he
was accosted by the physician, who dressed the
animal's wound, and, having entrusted Sir Ken-
neth with Saladin's desire to marry the Lady
Edith, proposed that he should seek the Saracen
ruler's protection against the wrath of Richard.
The valiant Scot, however, resolved to confront
the king and reveal the Sultan's purpose ; but it
availed him not, and he was sentenced to death,
in spite of the intercessions of the queen and
his lady -love; when the hermit, and then the
physician, arrived, and Richard having yielded to
their entreaties, Sir Kenneth was simply forbidden
to appear before him again.

Having, by a bold speech, revived the drooping
hopes of his brother Crusaders, and reproved the
queen and his kinswoman for tampering with the
Scot, Richard received him, disguised as a Nubian
slave, as a present from Saladin, with whom he
had been induced to spend several days. Shortly
afterwards, as the king was reposing in his pavilion,
the slave saved his life from the dagger of an



12 A KEY TO THE WAVERLEY NOVELS

assassin secretly employed by the grand-master,
and intimated that he could discover the purloiner
of the standard. A procession of the Christian
armies and their leaders had already been ar-
ranged in token of amity to Richard ; and as
they marched past him, seated on horseback, with
the slave holding the hound among his attendants,
the dog suddenly sprang at the Marquis Conrade,
who was thus convicted of having injured the
animal, and betrayed his guilt by exclaiming, ' I
never touched the banner.' Not being permitted
to fight the Teuton himself, the king undertook
to provide a champion, and Saladin to make all
needful preparations for the combat. Accompanied
by Berengaria and Lady Edith, Richard was met
by the Saracen with a brilliant retinue, and dis-
covered, in the person of his entertainer, the
physician who had cured his fever, and saved
Sir Kenneth, whom he found prepared to do
battle for him on the morrow, with the hermit
as his confessor. The encounter took place soon
after sunrise, in the presence of the assembled
hosts, and Conrade, who was wounded and un-
horsed, was tended by the Sultan in the grand-
master's tent, while the victorious knight was
unarmed by the royal ladies, and made known
by Richard as the Prince Royal of Scotland. At
noon the Sultan welcomed his guests to a banquet,
but, as the grand-master was raising a goblet to
his lips, Necbatanus uttered the words accipe Jioc,
and Saladin decapitated the templar with his
sabre ; on which the dwarf explained that, hidden
behind a curtain, he had seen him stab his



THE TALISMAN 13

accomplice the Marquis of Montserrat, obviously
to prevent him from revealing their infamous
plots, while he answered his appeal for mercy
in the words he had repeated. The next day
the young prince was married to Lady Edith,
and presented by the Sultan with his talisman,
the Crusade was abandoned, and Richard, on his
way homewards, was imprisoned by the Austrians
in the Tyrol.



/ VANHOE



Principal Characters



CEDRIC THE SAXON, of Rother-
ivood Grange.

WILFRED OK IVANHOE, his dis-
inherited son.

THE LADY ROVVENA, his ward,
beloved by Jvanhoe.

GURTH, his swineherd.

WAMBA, his jester.

SIR PHILIP DE MALVOISIN, a
neighbour,

THE PRIOR OF AYMER, Abbot
ofjourvaulx.

SIR BRIAN DE Bois GILBERT,
a Norman knight-templar.

ISAAC OF YORK, a Jew money-
lender.

His daughter, REBECCA.

PRINCE JOHN, brother of Rich-
ard I.

ATHELSTANE, a Saxon knight,
Ivanhoe's rival.

Servants, knights, and squires
Period, 1194. Localities:



LOCKSLEY, alias ROBIN HOOD,

an outlaid.
REGINALD FRONT DE

BCEUF,
RICHARD DE MAL-

VOISIN,
HUGH DE GRANT-

MESNEL,

RALPH DE VIPONT,
MAURICE DE BRACY,
FRIAR TUCK, of CopmanJntrst.
DAME ULRICA, of Torquilstone.
KING RICHARD I., returned
from the third Crusade.



master of the Templars.

CONRADE DE MALVOISIN, his

attendant knight.
HiGG, a Saxon peasant,



at a tournament, Saxon outlaws.
Yorkshire and Leicestershire.



THE Anglo-Saxons had not yet overcome their
antipathy to their Norman conquerors ; and when
the prior and Sir Brian, with a pilgrim as their
guide, sought the hospitality of Rotherwood on
their way to a tournament, they were received
with haughty dignity. At the evening meal
Lady Rowena was inquiring the latest news from



IVAN HOE 15

Palestine, whither her lover had gone, and Isaac
had craved shelter from the stormy night, when
Cedric elicited that Ivanhoe had gained as much
renown as any of King Richard's Norman knights,
and Sir Brian offered to fight him ; on which the
pilgrim exclaimed, ' I'll be his surety,' and Lady
Rowena gaged her honour on his behalf. The
Jew was conducted by Wamba to his cell, and
during the night, with Gurth's assistance, he and
the pilgrim started for Ashby, near which town
rich and poor were assembling to witness a
passage of arms between several knights-templar,
led by Sir Brian, in the presence of Prince John.
The champions entered the lists attended by pur-
suivants and heralds, and, after several encounters,
the conquerors challenged any other knights
present to meet them, when one in sable armour,
with the word ' disinherited ' on his shield, defied
Sir Brian. At the second charge the Norman
was unhorsed ; and, having with equal prowess
disposed of four other antagonists, the unknown
victor exercised his privilege by naming Lady
Rowena as the queen of the day.

Isaac had provided him with a horse and
armour, and Gurth was now sent to pay him
for them with the money with which the van-
quished knights had redeemed theirs. In the
next day's sports Ivanhoe was recognised by his
father and Lady Rowena, and, having received
a wound, was taken charge of by the Jew and
his daughter, the chief honours being awarded
to Locksley and another knight in black armour.
The latter, however, disappeared, and made his



1 6 A KEY TO THE WAVERLEV NOVELS

way to the hermitage of Friar Tuck, a disguised
bandit. Meanwhile, Cedric and his ward, as well
as Isaac, Rebecca and Ivanhoe, had been seized
in the adjacent forest by Front de Bceuf and his
followers, dressed as outlaws, and carried to the
castle of Torquilstone, where De Bracy and Sir
Brian demanded the hands of their female cap-
tives, and the Jew was threatened with torture
unless he agreed to pay a heavy ransom. Rebecca
was about to throw herself from a window, when
the sound of a bugle announced the arrival of
Locksley and his followers, accompanied by the
black knight. Having escaped from Sir Brian,
the Jewess found Ivanhoe in an adjoining room,
and with him watched the attack on the castle.


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Online LibraryHenry GreyA key to the Waverley novels : in chronological sequence, with index of the principal characters → online text (page 1 of 9)