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their heads many of his stock go quite back to
Blacklock, but they have rather prick ears, and it
is just a doubt in our minds whether they are not
rather overtopped.

In respect of this short prick ear, they veiodDede
bore no small resemblance to Velocipede, ^ °°P®^®'
the greatest of the line, whose plate encircling his
portrait may well be the first that meets the eye, as
you enter John Scott's yard at Whitewall. This king
among horses had a rough, vulgar, Roman head, with
a white blaze, and a flesh-coloured nose, which he
transmitted to all his stock, the great majority of
which took after him in colour and marks. His
Juniper dam, half-sister to Camarine. the great mare
of the South, was not more than fifteen hands, but



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2 24 Szl^ and Scarlet.

his own standard was just above sixteen, and Quiver
was by far the smallest thing he ever got. Mr.
Ridsdale gave eight hundred guineas for his brother
George IV. as a yearling, but he turned out a most
sorry bargain ; and a mere foil for his elder brother.
His finest daughter, Queen of Trumps, was a bad
beginner ; and if you watched her gallop, she went
lame first with one leg and then with the other, till
you became convinced that she was " lame all round."
One small knot on Velocipede's off fore-leg, half-way
between the knee and the fetlock, pressed on the
inner tendon, and made him the magnificent cripple
he was, and oddly enough, as if to knock over all
theories, his whole chestnut leg was the one affected.
After his fatal trial Scott and George Izard hardly
left him for three weeks, night or day, and George
never ceased applying lotions to it, as the last hope of
getting him round. He would let them do it as he
lay, but the mischief was too deeply seated, and there
was no more dependence to be placed on the sinew,
though the heart was never found to falter.
Velocipede's Stud When he Went first to the stud, he was
Days and Death, stationed at Ainderby, which seems on a
clear day to nestle beneath the range of the Hamble-
ton hills, and " commanded the whole country " for
two seasons. The village were not unmindful of the
high honour of his stay, and his portrait still creaks
mournfully on the ale-house sign. And well they
might be, as a four-thousand offer from the foreigners
was promptly refused. Eventually he passed out of
Mr. Armytage's hands into Dr. Hobson's, and stood
at the Shadwell Lane Paddocks near Leeds. John
Scott often came over to see him, and ** Ahl if I had
only such a four-year-old as you, with sound legs, I
could break the world,' fell more than once on his
groom Berridge's ear, when the two old friends met in
the box. His last public appearance, so to speak, was
at Doncaster in 1846, whither he accompanied some



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The Darley A rabiun. 225

Melboarne and Sheet Anchor yearlings of his owner's,
^* just to let the world have another look at him." And
what audiences he had, too, as he paced in the ring
near the Pond, or convoyed his young friends down
the lime avenue, back to the Rockingham! Even
Bill Scott in his Jim Crow hat, which had two wheat
ears in that morning, stepped off the causeway as he
was going out to waste (with his t\w) aide-de-camps,
lay and clerical, behind him) just to give him greeting.
It was none less hearty than his elder brother's, and
forcible as usual. ^' You old beggar ! if Vd you a
three-year-old, Fd straight them all if I catit on my
czvn horse; but I think I can with himr

Two years afterwards he quitted Yorkshire, and
took a four days* journey to his owner's farm at
Corney Hall in Cumberland, and there in 1850 he
came to his end. Dropsy had set in, with chronic
disease of the lungs, and his respiration became so
difficult, that he could be heard all over the yard.
Non-civilization has been described as being ten
miles from a lemon ; and here was the dying crack,
twenty-one miles from a vet. His body filled, and
he became so unsightly and oppressed that he dare
not lie down, for fear of not being able to get up
again, and propped himself against the wall, as well
as he could, refusing all corn for three weeks. His
last foal, however, dated from a fortnight before his
death, and was a big white-legged chestnut, who
ran in a gig at Whitehaven. Matters became so
bad, that the groom determined to kill him on his
own account, and he led him out to a hill just over-
looking the Irish Channel, where he had dug his grave
in the sand ; but his heart misgave him, and he could
not handle his gun. A tailor was accordingly sum-
moned from a neighbouring farm-house, and he soon
broke the thread of life, with as little remorse as he
would a cat's, and the mighty heart and little prick
cars were still. Berridge issued from behind his wall,

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226 Silk and Scarlet

at the report ; and ere his old favourite was tumbled
into his grave, curiosity determined him, to probe his
malady to the source. Taking out his gully, he ripped
open his chest, and nearly half-a-dozen pailfuls of
yellow fluid, between water and oil, Ci^^ne away. And
so the great chestnut champion, father of Queen of
Trumps, and grandfather of Canezou, died at last, in
his twenty-sixth year.
The Sons of The stud fame of Pot-8-o's, a chestnut
Pot-8-o's. sQji Qf Eclipse, was by no means doubt-
ful or chequered, and began in 1793, with Waxy,
who was out of Maria by Herod. The story went
that it was originally intended to call his sire " Po-
tatoes," and the idea struck one of the lads as so
ludicrous, when Lord Abingdon first told his trainer
of it, in the stable, that he burst out a laughing. His
lordship good humouredly took up a piece of chalk,
and said, " I'll give you a crown, my boy, if you can
spell the word on the corn-bin." He wrote the
'^ Pot-^'ds'' accordingly, and although some stuck to
the Pot-00000000, the lad's version was latterly
adopted. Waxy, the idol of his trainer Robson's
heart, was a very beautiful, one-eyed, lengthy style of
horse, with a great deal of the Arab in his look. His
quality was superb, and with him, so to speak, it came
in the highest degree into English blood stock. He
in his turn was put to Penelope by Trumpator, out of
Prunella by Highflyer, and this union of the Darley,
Byerley, and Godolphin strains was crowned by the
births of Whalebone and Whisker at the Duke of
Grafton's paddocks, at Euston, in the days when his
brother, Lord Henry Fitzroy, was in command, in
1809-18. Waxy's stock won the Derby four times,
thrice for the Duke of Grafton, and the Oaks three
times ; and with Whisker and Minuet, His Grace
fairly swept th^ Epsom board.

wiiisker ^^ those days the Northern and

Southern breeds were V.ept very dis*



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The Day ley Arabian. 227

tinct, and the rich bay Whisker was the first of the
Southern cracks who was sent North, and pitched his
tent near Catterick. The racing circuits too had little
to do with each other : and there must have been a
%'ery great end in view, to tempt the horses off the
one to Epsom, or off the other, across the Trent to
York or Doncaster. Many Northern men never came
farther south than Newmarket, which they reached by
a weary post, or jolt with their saddle-bags, through
the fens of Lincolnshire and the Isle Ely ; and one of
them, a Mr. Cornforth, who performed that journey
regularly three times a year, for nearly half a century,
had not even once the curiosity to ride on to London.
When they did get Whisker there, the Yorkshire and
Durham men, led by the Duke of Cleveland, dipped
pretty deeply into him ; and he left The Colonel for
Mr. Petre, Memnon for Mr. Watt, and Emma for Mr.
Bowes. Whisker was as near perfection in look as
anything could be, with the exception of being a little
calf-knee'd \ and he seemed equally likely to get a racer,
hunter, machiner, or hack. If a departed horse-dealer
had seen him he would have once more dictated to
his daughter as she sat, pen in hand, " The shadow of
hirn on the vail is vorth all the money I axes ; he can
pick up his fut and go and catch a bird."

The Duke of Leeds loved his blood even more than
Shuttle's, and Tom Pierse and his father Billy Pierse
thought Swiss (who was out of a Shuttle mare, and
savaged his boy so severely in the Belle Isle paddock,
that his leg had to be taken off), one of the very best
two-year-olds he ever trained. The Whisker blood
has descended through The Colonel and Chatham in
the male line, to Woolwich, who, considering his jady
sire and Actaeon dam, was a perfect wonder for a
distance ; and through Economist, to Harkaway and
King Tom. It was always Mr. Herring's habit to
submit his St. Leger sketch of St. Leger winners to
His Majesty through Jack Ratford. When The

nq 2



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228 Silk and Scarlet.

Colonel was sent in he received a special enquiry
back with the sketch, to ask if he had flattered him
at all, and when he returned, as answer, that he had
not, the King never rested till he bought him.
"^//j, buy'' (like the *' Run, run'' of Lord Berners to
his trainer when he came, over night, to beg that
Phosphorus might not start for the Derby) — ^was all
the commission he would deign give. At the royal
sale Mr. Tattersall thought it such a shame that
the French should get him for a thousand guineas
that he bid fifty guineas more and bought him for his
own stud farm. Setting aside Emma, the Whisker
mares have always been out of the common way.
Liverpool, Tearaway, Euclid, Knight of the Whistle,
The Era, Mango, Cotherstone, Meteor, Mowerina,
Mundig, and Theon are all out of them ; and his
daughter Catherina, who ran for 171 races, was at the
stud in the thirtieth year of her age.
The Son3 of Whalebone was as shabby to the eye
Whalebone. ^ old Prunella herself. He had rather a
Turkish pony look, and was broad and strong, with a
shortish neck. His own feet grew very pumiced, and
his mares lost their speed early. Unlike Whisker,
it is on his sons that he has to rely; and Camel,
Waverley, Sir Hercules, Defence, and Stumps, in
each of whom respectively his blood has united with
Selim, Sir Peter, Wanderer, Rubens, and Delpini,
have proved it quite as elastic as his name. There
are scarcely any Stumps mares left, and we met with
almost the last of this lily-white clan at Sir Tatton's
and Mr. Parr's, last year. Save and except a beau-
tiful Shorthorn heifer, made up for show, we know of
nothing quite so beautiful in nature, or so effective in.
a painter's fore-ground. The line of Defence, who
was rather thick and cobby-looking, has to trust to
its mares now, from which Hero, Old England,
Andover, Turnus, and Pyrrhus the First sprang.
Waverley, whose head and neck helped off rather



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The Darky Arabian. 2 29

light fore-legs, most probably begot Don John, who
showed not a little temper in his stall at John Scott's,
where he had a see-saw style of trying to get on to
your toes, and then putting you below the manger,
which Henry Bradley, who stuck to him through all
his training, was obliged perpetually to guard against.
He was a creeping goer, with great propelling power,
pla5^ul at exercise, and had two big spavins at last.
It is said that in America he got sadly neglected,
scarcely going out for exercise for weeks together,
and died not many months after his arrival.

His price was two hundred; but he was dear at
that, as he did not leave a single " colt " (the name
they give to fillies as well as colts there) behind him.
Waverley's other son, The Saddler, out of a Castrel
mare, still lives in Footstool; and the odd-looking
Mortimer by Fitzallen by The Saddler, who ran forty
times before Mr. Parr got him for 200/., would have
hit Mr. Davis for 27,000/. if he had only got through
for the Chester Cup. He was a sluggish style of
horse, and Fordham, who could then ride under five
stone, could hardly spur him. The Provost was also
by The Saddler, but there is little to remind us of
him save a few mares. Hybla, the dam of Mince-
meat and Kettledrum, is a fine specimen of them ;
her hind-legs are beautiful, but her fore ones are rather
nipped in at the elbows, as both The Provost's and
Tomboy's were.

But among The Saddlers, we must not inheritress
forget the rare old Inheritress. She was
a big little one, with good ribs, a straight head and
neck, and a tail rather high set on. Her original
price was a hundred and fifty, and perhaps her finest
race was with Sweetmeat at York. Nat got the best
of the fifty yards of very deep ground near the dis-
tance, and that just settled the matter by a head.
Horses generally run well on particular courses. Rata-
plan liked a little country one ; EUerdale delighted in



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230 Silk and Scarlet

York, and Fisherman in Chester, but it was no matter
to Inheritress where she ran, provided it was not New-
market. The dead expanse of the heath seemed
quite to scare her, and she stood and trembled at the
post till the spurs and a couple of strokes from Sim's
whalebone, which he was sadly loth to inflict on such
a pet, roused her from her dreamy state, although it
could not stir her heart. In after years, Birdcatcher
quite hated her. It was the first time he had ever
shown such daintiness, and when he could be got to
notice her, it was not only a case of " Strangers with-
draw," but even the groom was obliged to retire, and
apply his eye to the key-hole. As might have been
expected, the produce was wretched enough. Touch-
stone had also a great objection to young mares ; and
Assault not merely disliked (for that trait is common
enough), but used to regard it as a perfect insult when
any, be the age what it might, were brought to him,
with satin coats or smelling of the stable. In fact, he
cut up so rough with his groom, when one of Lord
Glasgow's came to him straight from the racing
stables, that the former was fain to save himself and
her from being worried alive, by tying him up as
quick as he could, and producing some highly artistic
efforts in light and shade, with glazing from a friendly
dung-heap, which quite satisfied the little connoisseur's
eye.

Sir Hercules. ^^ ^^^^ ^^ tongue of old Forth,
seated in his white hat on a summer
evening, under the pleasant shade of his trees ^t
Mitchel Grove, to tell the story of Sir Hercules and
his stock aright. There was none that the old man
clung to so fondly ; and he spoke of his son Hyllus,
whom he sadly wanted to buy back from the Messrs.
Litchwald after he went abroad, as the horse of his
heart, and vowed that he would never have been
beaten, if he could have had a race run exactly to suit
him. The failure of Sting preyed on him to the last



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The Darky Arabian. 231

lie said, " I had never called on nature too much, and
yet he went wrong, I couldn't tell how." There were
few horses in his long career that he had studied so
closely. Jaques was the last he fancied, and he gave
him away to Mr. Parr, with an injunction to run him
for the Goodwood Cup, but he dislocated a pastern in
his preparation. With all his acuteness, he was a man
of very great prejudice, and seemed often to speak of
training a horse to win a great race, without any refe-
rence to the field he might have to meet. He turned
very nervous during Foig-a-Ballagh*s St. Leger, when
some one told him that Harry Bell was only lying
third or fourth below the distance. " Confound the
fellow," we heard him say, " I told him to come along,
we'll be beat for want of a pace." Ireland has had
the best of Sir Hercules, and both Birdcatcher and
Foig-a-Ballagh were out of a Bob Booty dam.

Birdcatcher, who was a hard-puller, Birdwatcher
and very fretful and difficult to train,
would stay a long course ; but his stock, who invari-
ably carry the Sir Hercules crest in the shape of a few
grey hairs at the root of the tail, rather inherit his fine
dash of speed, than his staying powers. He stood
over a good amount of ground, but he seldom got any
thing so long as himself. AH his stock were very
taking and gay as yearlings, though rather short, on
long legs, a little drooping behind, but with capital
back couplings. He invariably got them bright
golden chestnuts ; and if one happens to be a bay, it
has a good allowance of white about it. Mr. Jaques
paid as high as 800/. for him one season, when he
earned 1750 guineas, and got Saunterer and Augury
for his hirer as well. After trying so long for a crack,
he unluckily parted with the pair for 50 guineas each,
by auction, as foals at York, and John Osborne, who
loved the blood nearly as much as the late Mr.
Stephenson, refused, it was said, a thousand guineas
for Augury, At Newmarket in 1852, he had only six



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232 Silk and Scarlet.

blood' maresj but Habena and Warlock did not make
Mr. Disney regret the change from Easby, where he
then returned for four seasons more. Owing to a
whim of Mr. Disney's, his turf career was very short,
but unusually brilliant. He gave Harkaway 2olbs.
for his year, in a mile, and was only beaten a head ;
and he left his horses outside the distance in the mile
and three-quarters Peel Cup, and was never pulled up
till he had gone a mile further. In fact, as the lad
said — "/ had to clap into him to stop him,^* His
hunters have always been nearly mature jumpers to
begin with; and on the turf, in 1841-58, he had 318
winners of 68si races, making 110,568/. in all. One
fact, and a very important one, remains to be added,
that he has realized for his owner, at the stud, no less
th^n7737/. isj.

A cross with an Economist mare first brought him
into especial notice with the slim, neat, and savage
Baron. Pocahontas's Birdcatcher filly, Ayacanora,
was rather slight and small in the bone ; but she put
her own substance on to her sons Stockwell and
Rataplan. Both these horses began to fine very much
after four years old, up to which point they were un-
usually coarse ; but Stockwell's stock, as far as we
have seen, show great quality and finish as yearlings,
and neither his nor Rataplan's, as a general thing, have
quite the bone or size we expected, while Rataplan's
have his peculiar short drop on the quarter. Harlock
believed Stockwell to be as good as ever he had been,
when he was put out of training, and he was always
much the more resolute horse of the two.

Rataoian Once in form. Rataplan could keep

there, and did not require much work.
He liked hard ground ; and his game, when the pace
was strong, was to lie well away. Weight was as little
to him as it was to Longbow, and his performance for
the Manchester Cup under gst. 81bs. was decidedly his
best It was quite a sight to see Prince stroking and



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The Darley Arabian. 235

talking to him, as they followed the leaders ; but in a
hard struggle home, he was rather ungenerous, unless
he had quite the best of it, and that small picket ear
and narrowness between the eyes made him much too
cute and suspicious. People may talk about an intel-
ligent head, but horses may be often too cute in tliat
oi^an. He did not come quite so often as Fisherman,
as the latter only walked for a couple of days, then
took long gallops for two more, and was all ripe and
ready for another start with " Garge*' who was never
to be seen awaiting the arrival of Mr. Parr, on the
railway-platform, in "a state of sanguine despondency'^
about him. Fisherman became Mr. Parr's for five
hundred at two-years-old. He did liot win once in his
six starts that season, but his new owner argued that
if such a great leggy frame could " act" at all then, he
must do wonders as he grew down.

The Chanticleers have always been Birdcatcher's
short, and at one time they were thought stock.
rather bad-hearted as well. They are, however, a
kind which require patience; often pretty good as
two-year-olds, but still oftener improved by keeping.
In fact, the whiter they get, the better they get ; and
we never saw any animal undergo such a thorough
change in his looks as Lord Alfred did, between two
and four. Hurworth, who was bought for 1500
guineas, and sold the year after for fifteen, was out of
a Hetman Platoff mare ; and so were Knight of St.
George and Daniel O'Rourke, the lengthiest and most
compact of the Birdcatcher family. The former cannot
be above fifteen hands ; but Daniel, who was only
fourteen-three when he won the Derby, is now barely
half an inch below fifteen-two ; and all his wild Malton
tricks are gone. He gets his foals of a darker chestnut
than the Birdcatchers generally are, and all with backs
and legs of iron. His own legs are perfection this
way, and as you look down his back, it seems as cloven
as a ram's. He reminded us most of a sort of lesser



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234 •SY//^' and Scarlet.

edition of Pantaloon, and has none of that bulky
grossness which so many stallions arrive at in the
course of a couple of seasons. Womersley, who united
so well at Sledmere, with the blood of " Sleight" (as
Snarry terms him), was out of a Touchstone mare.
He could stay remarkably well, as nearly all his stock
have done, and Peck always attributed his difficulties
with him to a lump forming between his thighs,
which seemed like a callous boil, and interfered so
much with his action as to render it almost impossible
to train him.

None of the Birdcatcher stock have, however, stayed
better than Yellow Jack, who had a good stain of
Liverpool blood to help him, and he did what horse
has never yet done, and hardly ever will again — stand
a strong preparation and run second for the Two
Thousand, Chester Cup, and Derby. His legs were
never equal in substance to his top ; but as trainers
say, "they never break their legs if they're good
enough." Considering his price he was wonderfully
lucky, when we consider the fate of the i8oo-guinea
Lord of the Hills ; and the loio-guinea Voivoide. His
5ale seemed to take every one by surprise in 1854, but
Chantrey by Touchstone had been bought in for a
thousand guineas only seven years before, the cautious
Mr. Gully giving the last bond fide bid of 980 guineas.
Warlock was as delicate as horse could be in his
training days, and very short and jumped up in hi?
first two seasons; but still there is something very
corky about him now, and if he had only been a
chestnut, he was the truest type of what Birdcatcher
almost invariably gets.

Touchstone " ^^^ cart-horse quartered Camel" can
fairly challenge Sir Hercules for the
Whalebone wreath, with the two own brothers. Touch-
stone and Launcelot. They were pretty nearly struck
from the same die, but the latter was perhaps the
biggest of the two, and did not show so much quality.



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Tlie Darley Arabian. 235

The curious growth of Camers quarters was owing to
his having reared and fallen back as a yearling, and
another fall of a different kind made him eventually
useless. Touchstone was hardly fifteen two, and the
roots of his ears were quite his coarsest part. He was
alike good for speed and staying ; and galloped wide
behind as many stayers do, but he wanted very fine
riding, and would swerve if his jockey raised his whip.
Calloway tried to dodge him, by changing his whip
hand behind his back, as he followed Usury up the
Mostyn mile ; but the horse saw the movement, and
was across the mare's track in an instant. Long
gentle sweats were his mode of doing work, and ont!
of John Scott's most elaborate recollections is, the
way in which he staved off from him a threatened
attack of black jaundice. His mares were generally
low in the shoulder, and somewhat flat-sided, and
hence in both these points the Blacklock blood was a
corrective.

The short-shouldered Caravan was caravan
another of Camel's sons, but he was an
idol with no one but Isaac Day ; who in spite of some
undue prejudices, which would make him stick season
after season to a cripple (one of which never lay down
for three years), he had few equals either in training a
racer, or riding some of those hunters for whom price
-was no object, over the stone walls of the Heythrop
and Vale of White Horse. Had Lord George lived
there is no doubt that he would have trained for him ;
and " No relation, but always the best of friends," used
to be his constant answer when any one asked him if
he wasn't own brother to John Day. " You didn't
win," was his only reply to Pavis, when he saw him
after Caravan's Derby, and he never believed that
anything ought to have beaten him. In fact, years
after old grey Isaac had skimmed over the dirt at
Shrewsbury, while Caravan laboured behind him up to



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