Henry Williams Clark.

Genealogies of the Clark, Parks, Brockman and Dean, Davis and Goss families online

. (page 1 of 51)
Online LibraryHenry Williams ClarkGenealogies of the Clark, Parks, Brockman and Dean, Davis and Goss families → online text (page 1 of 51)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


■^im^mamM



a.#_CSTI.Cl.



^05



GU



B O STO N 7U B Lie LI BRARY

,."!! I Ill




1




The Author



GENEALOGIES



OF THE



.Clark, Parks, Brockman and Dean,
Davis and.Goss Families



IN






FIVE PARTS



By
HENRY WILLIAM CLARK



Montgomery, Ala.,
PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR ^

1 905 ■-> /






• "••• r '•

•••••• . • ,

• • • •♦•;..



• • r






.• • . •



.'. • '



/



(Ax.

u



Press of the

HARRISBURG PUBLISHING CO.

Harrisburg, Pa.



PREFACE.



This volume contains an account of the family or families
named in the title page and of their descendants. The full work,
in five parts, contains all that is known to the compiler concerning
the Clark, Parks, Brockman and Dean families and their descend-
ants, his ancestors and kindred ; and of the Davis and Goss fam-
ilies and their descendants, the ancestors and kindred of his be-
loved wife, now deceased.

The separate parts are: No. I. The Clark Family; No. II.
The Parks Family ; No. III. The Brockman and Dean Families ;
No. IV. The Davis Family, and No. V. The Goss Family.

He engaged in the work with no intention of publishing it, but
instead he intended simply to leave a manuscript copy to his chil-
dren. After many inquiries as to his purpose, and with expres-
sions of desire from many persons to possess a copy, he deter-
mined to publish it in book form. He so announced, enlarged the
scope, invoked the aid of his friends, and has devoted much time
and patient labor collecting information for use in its preparation.
The work has assumed proportions greatly beyond his expecta-
tion.

The chronology of persons and families has had special atten-
tion. This, however, is not the highest function of genealogy,
valuable though it be in tracing and proving a line of descent
and relationship, but it is the preserving and presenting to our
contemplation the lives and real character of our ancestors and
kindred. This has been kept prominent and becomes therefore an
interesting feature of the work.

Each of the several parts of the work comprises a distinct line,
and the persons are named in the order of birth, so far as the
facts were obtainable. In some of the parts eight generations
are accounted for.

There is a system of reference by numbers, thus enabling one
with facility to trace the lineage and ascertain the exact relation-
ship of any person named in the book with any other person.
There are some remarkable genealogical tracings, degrees of re-



iv Preface.

lationship, the result of inter-marriage in related families, and
some of these it will be found impracticable to define.

There are a number of pages arranged for continuing the family-
record in direct line of descent. Thus may be added many genera-
tions and so the work will become an heirloom of value in the
coming centuries.

The work has been to the compiler a labor of love rather than
profit. If he has succeeded in rescuing from oblivion the names
and deeds of some of his ancestors and numerous kindred, he
will in some measure be compensated for his arduous labor, and
though his success has not been commensurate with his wishes
and efforts, he trusts his labors have not been in vain. It is a
matter of regret that not only the names of some but the deeds
of many equally worthy have not been obtained for use in its
preparation. He is greatly indebted, however, to his friends for
the prompt manner in which many of them have responded to
his request for information, and for words of cheer and encour-
agement, and to these is largely due whatever of success he has
achieved. He wishes especially to acknowledge his obligation to
his esteemed friend and kinswoman, Mrs. Alfred W. Parks, of
Clifton, S. C, for information relating to the Parks family; to his
friend, his wife's kinsman. Dr. J. D. Garrard, late of Birmingham,
Ala., for information relating to the Davis and Goss families ; to
Dr. Thomas M. Owen, Director of the Department of Archives
and History of Alabama, for courteous and generous aid in the
preparation of the work; and finally to his very dear mother, but
for whose intelligence and great strength of memory he should
never have known so much of his ancestry and collateral kindred.

To his mother he dedicates the work in loving and tender mem-
ory and affection.

He;nry W. C1.ARK.

Montgomery, Ala., January i, 1905.



CONTENTS

Preface, iii — iv

PART I. THE CLARK FAMILY.

Genealogy, pages.. i— io8

Index, pages. . 109—122

Forms, etc., for additional records.

Illustrations.

(Married names in italics.)

The Author, Frontispiece

Clark, Benjamin Howard, facing page 100

" Charles Ruf us, facing page yS

" Mrs. Charles R. (Menla J. Swann), facing page 80

" Dr. Courtney James, facing page 12

" Mrs. Dr. C. J. (Nancy Davis), facing page 16

" Group surviving sons and daughters of John, facing page 44

" Harvey Tucker, facing page 40

" Henry W. and Mary S., facing page z^

" Henry William, facing page 24

" Mrs. Henry W. (Mary S. Wright), facing page 28

" Henry William, Jr., facing page 68

" Mrs. Henry W., Jr., (Kittura D. Elam), facing page 72

" James Davis, facing page 88

" Mrs. James D. (Martha B. Moody), facing page 92

" John, facing page 4

" Mrs. John (Susan Parks), facing page 8

" John Austin, facing page 48

" Julius B. and (Julia A. Barker), facing page 64

" Residence, facing page 32

" Thomas Harvey, facing page 56

" Mrs. Thomas H. (Carrie Marks), facing page 60

" William H., Family Group, facing page 52

" William Harvey, facing page 96

Hill, Herbert Clay, facing page 84

" Mrs. Herbert Clay (Lizzie R. Pope), facing page 84

" Ruth, facing page 84

" Walter Clay, facing page 84

McNair, John Gazzaway, facing page 20

" Mrs. John G. (Eloisa A. Clark), facing page 20

PART II. THE PARKS FAMILY.

Genealogy, pages, 1-121

Index, pages, 123-144

Illustration.

Francis Marion Parks, facing page 25



PART III. THE BROCKMAN AND DEAN FAMILIES.

Genealogy, pages, 1-88

Index, pages, 89-103

Forms, etc., for additional records.

'Illustrations.

Maj. Hosea J. Dean, facing page 14

Mary Nina Martin, facing page 42

PART IV. THE DAVIS FAMILY.

Genealogy, pages, 1-103

Index, pages, 1 104-121

Illustration.

Mary Morton Davis, facing page 40

PART V. THE GOSS FAMILY.

Genealogy, pages, 1-120

Index, pages, 121-140

Illustration.

The Old Dictionary, facing page 4



PART I



The Clark Family



THE CLARK FAMILY.



ORIGIN OF THE NAME.

The name "Clark" is of distinguished derivation. The follow-
ing account of its origin, prepared by Eleanor Lexington, will
therefore form an interesting introduction to the genealogy of the
particular family here treated:

"The name Clark is derived from 'clericus,' meaning a priest,
or one connected with the service of the Church.

"At first the term was used only to designate those in clerical
orders, but as in early times the Church was the only source of
learning, any person who had been educated by the clergy event-
ually came to be called a 'clerk.' The designation was finally
given to all who were able to read and write.

"So distinguished a name was eagerly coveted. Hence its fre-
quency, many people adding 'le clerk' to their names. This was
finally dropped, and only Clerk left, or, as it was pronounced,
Clark. The final 'e' is an addition in later times.

"Compounds of the name are Beauclark, the good Clark ; Mau-
clerk, the bad Clark ; Kenclerk, the knowing Clark ; and Petyclerk,
the little Clark.

"The name Milo le Clerk is found in the 'One Hundred Rolls,'
compiled in the reign of Edward I., which contain records of the
persons who owned lands in the time of William the Conqueror,
for which they paid rent in money, sheep or hens, or gave their
service as soldiers. Several Domesday tenants are designated
'Clericus.'

"An interesting tradition connects the Clark family by marriage
with that of the descendants of Joseph of Arimathea. After the
Crucifixion, Joseph was banished from Judea. In company with
Philip the Apostle, Mary, Martha, Lazarus and a servant, Mar-
cilia, he was put into a vessel without sails or oars and set adrift,
to perish on the sea. The ship was thrown upon the French
coast. Joseph finally found his way to Britain, where he founded
a church at Glastonbury, to which place thousands of the devout,

(1)



2 Genealogy of

in the Middle Ages, journeyed every year to see the blossoming
of the sacred thorn on Christmas day.

"Upon what authority the tradition of the connection of the
family of Clark with Joseph rests, history maintains a discreet
silence. It gives the tradition, and leaves the rest to the imagi-
nation."



FIRST GENERATION.
1.

The earliest account we have of the Clark family is of four
brothers and one sister, descendants of English ancestry, the date
of whose emigration to America is not known. These were all
born in Amelia Co., Va., and were:

Thomas, William, Dudley, George and Nancy. Nancy married
a Greenwood in N. C.

We have no further knowledge of these except Thomas, the
eldest, who was born about 1753 and who married a widow, Pris-
cilla Tucker, of N. C, whose maiden name was Doyle.

THOMAS CLARK was a farmer though a man of small
means. He left Va. and settled in N. C, where he remained
some years and then moved to Spartanburg district, S. C, and
later on to Laurens district, where he lived about twenty years,
and was then removed with his wife to the State of Ga. by his
son John. He died at the home of his son William, in Newton
county, Ga., in 1837, aged eighty-four years. The widow died
some years later at the home of John Clark, is Jasper county,
Ga., about ninety years of age. They were buried in the family
graveyard at the home of William Clark in Newton county, Ga.

Priscilla Tucker Clark had two brothers and one sister, James,

John and Sallie Doyle. Of these we have no information. There
were born to her by her first husband. Tucker, one son and three
daughters: Starling, Fanny, Martha and Mary. Of these we
will give a further account later. (See Appendix No. 216.)
The children of Thomas Clark and his wife Priscilla were :

2. i. Elizabeth Doyle , b. Mar. 25. 1775 ; m. John Wallace.

3. ii. GiLLAM, b. about 1777; m. Nancy Waldrop.

4. iii. John, b. Nov. 19, 1780; m. Susan Parks.

5. iv. William, b. Aug. 21, 1782; m. Judith Craddock.

6. V. Nancy, b. about 1784; m. Henry Burdett.



The Clark Family. 3

SECOND GENERATION.

2.

ELIZABETH DOYLE=^ CLARK (i) was born in N. C, Mar.
25, 1775, and married John Wallace, a farmer of Laurens dis-
trict, S. C, Mar. 19, 1796.

Mr. Wallace was born in 1774 and died Aug. 6, 1824. Mrs.
Wallace died Oct. 24, 1854, at the home of her son Walton in
Chambers Co., Ala. Their children were six sons and five daugh-
ters (order of birth conjectural) :

i. Starling', b. Jan. 11, 17—; d. May 4, 1810.
ii. Thomas Doyle, b. Mar. 15, 1800; d. Aug. 20. 1802.

7. iii. Walton Washington, b. Jan. 17, 1803; m. Nancy Mc-

Veigh,
iv. Frances, b. ; m. Henry Holcom in Laurens

district, S. C. They moved to Buncombe Co., N. C.
V. Odelia, b. ; never married; lived with her

widowed sister, Mrs. William Sims, in Newton Co., Ga.,

for many years,
vi. Alfred CotesworTh, b. Mar. 24, 1809; d. July 26, 1826.

8. vii. John Welsey. b. Mar. 31, 181 1; m. Louisa A. Felder.
viii. Eliza, b. ; m. Wm. Sims; d. Dec. 31, 1891.

(See Appendix No. 217.)
g. ix. Selena Mira, b. 1814; m. Noah Fairbairn.

X. Louisa, m. James Blakely. They moved to Miss.
xi. Welsey Wilds, m. Miss Rutherford, of Rutherford Co.,
N. C. They moved to Miss., and d. after the Civil
War, he in Miss, and she in Ark.



GILLAM- CLARK (i) was born in N. C. about 1777 and at
about twenty years of age married Nancy Waldrop in the vState
of S. C. There were born to this union seven or eight children.
One of these, James, lived one year with his uncle, William
Clark, in Newton Co., Ga., about 1835 to 1838. Gillam with his
family moved to Ala. and settled near Huntsville. His wife died
and he married again. It is thought the family moved to Miss.
We have lost all trace of them.

4.

JOHN^ CLARK (i) was born in N. C, Nov. 19, 1780, and
received a good common school education. In early life he emi-
grated to S. C, settling in Laurens district, and about 1806 was
elected to the office of sheriff, and was re-elected and succeeded



4 Genealogy of

himself for several terms, serving seven or more years. He was
called the High Sheriff, and as was the custom at that day, pre-
ceded the Judge of the Court to and from the Court House with
drawn sword and cocked hat in vindication of the law, an
English custom. He was a volunteer soldier in the war of 1812
between the United States and Great Britain, as shown by the
following from the War Department:

Department oe the Interior,
Bureau of Pensions,
Washington, D. C, Aug. 14, 1902.
Sir : In reply to your communication of recent date, you are advised
that, as shown by the records of this Bureau, Susan Clark was pensioned
as the widow of John Clark on account of his service in Capt. N. T.
Martin's company. South Carolina Militia, from February i, 1814, to
August 10, i8i4j War of 1812.

Very respectfully,

E. S. Ware,
Commissioner.
Mr. H. W. Clark,

222 Columbus St.,

Montgomery, Ala.

Returning from the war he stopped with a comrade, one Parks,
at the home of his parents, and there met his fate in the person of
Susan, a sister of his comrade and daughter of Thomas and
Annie Parks, of Laurens district, S. C. Feb. 25, 1816, he and
Susan Parks were united in marriage at the home of her parents.

They remained in Laurens district about fourteen years, where
he was engaged at farming near the Enoree River, his farm being
on Durban's Creek, a tributary of that stream. In the latter part
of 1829 he vv'ith his family moved to the State of Ga., resided one
year in Newton Co., and then settled in Jasper Co., where he had
purchased a home and farm.

John Clark owned and had emancipated, as a result of the
Civil War, about fifty negro slaves. He was a humane master,
fed and clothed his slaves well and allotted them small parcels of
land and opportunities to cultivate the same for their own use.
After his slaves were emancipated most of them remained about
him and cultivated his lands and were ever respectful to old mas-
ter and old mistis. Notably one of these, a man named Gilbert,
was a powerful man physically and was a most valuable slave as
an ordinary farm laborer. He and his good wife, Minerva, two
Christian-hearted negroes, were, after they were emancipated,




John Clark (No. 4)-



The Clark Family. 5

good friends and neighbors of their former owners, ever
ready to do them any service. John Clark was a life-long
partisan Democrat. He was never an aspirant for political office,
never very active in political work, but kept well informed on
the political issues of his day and time, and always gave loyal
support to the nominees of his party. At the solicitation of his
neighbors he accepted the office of magistrate for his precinct,
served in that capacity for many years and made an enviable
reputation for impartial, intelligent and faithful discharge of
official duty. He died Nov. 27, 1870, at the advanced age of
ninety years and eight days, and was buried in the family grave-
yard at the family homestead, where they had resided for forty
years.

Mrs. Susan (Parks) Clark was born in Laurens district, S. C,
Feb. 24, 1796. She was one of the best housewives it is the for-
tune of man to be blest with. Intelligent and entertaining, with
a happy faculty for making friends ; as housekeeper, industrious
and skilled in domestic handcraft ; a congenial companion and
true helpmeet. She was ever solicitious for the success in life
and happiness of her children, ever ready by precept and example,
and by word of cheer to lure them on to honorable and useful
lives. She lived and suffered and loved and lost and dreamed
and struggled to attain till she grew rich throughout and ripened
and matured like a fruit. She was a woman of truth, repose,
experience, feeling and grasp. A sister to your labor, a valiant
comrade in the great battle of life ; a woman of strength like a
gulf stream to your love. She was a sympathetic and helpful
neighbor, ever ready to go to the aid of the afflicted, ever found
beside the bed of her sick neighbor as nurse and counselor ; a
true minister of mercy. In her later life, and before she was her-
self stricken with paralysis, much of her time was given to the
noble work of ministering to the sick of her community, and she
so left a halo of grateful memory about the last years of her
long and useful life, and though dead for more than twenty
years the fragrance of her life still lingers in the community
in which she lived. The memory of such a woman deserves to
be cherished lovingly and tenderly ; she is an inspiration, the
hope of the world. She died Aug. 5, 1880, after some years of
patient suffering from paralysis, aged 84 years and 11 days, at



6 Genealogy of

the home of her daughter, Mrs. Mary L. Pope, near Monticello,
Ga., who had tenderly and lovingly ministered to her in her
affliction. She was buried beside her husband in the family
graveyard at the old homestead, her home for half a century.
The religion of the family was Baptist. Their children were :

10. i. Courtney James', b. Oct. 27, 1816; m. Nancy Walker

Davis.

11. ii. Thomas Franklin, b. Feb. 21, 1818; twice m.

12. iii. Avaline Frances, b. Sept. 30, 1819; d. Oct., 1846.

13. iv. Matilda Caroline, b. Mar. 20, 1821 ; d. Mar. 31, 1825.

14. V. Nancy Amelia, b. Sept. 30, 1822; m. Dr. T. W. Sims.

15. vi. Eloisa Ann, b. Dec. 11, 1823; m. J. G. McNair.

16. vii. Henry William, b. May 22, 1825; m. Mary S. Wright.

17. viii. Mary Lucy, b. Mar. i, 1827; J. C. Pope.

18. ix. Martha Susan, b. Mar. i, 1827; m. B. J. Flowers.

19. X. Harriet Elizabeth, b. Oct. 8, 1828: m. Hopson Pope.

20. xi. John Parks, b. Feb. 15, 1830; m. Mary E. Marks.

21. xii. Emily Judith, b. May 24, 1831 ; twice m.

22. xiii. Julia Patterson, b. June 18, 1833; m. Dr. Miller Francis,
xiv. Albert Warner, b. Aug. 22, 1835; d. Aug. 27, 1835.

XV. Elvira Minerva, b. Jan. 17, 1837; d. Jan. 29, 1837.

23. xvi. Harvey Tucker, b. May 2, 1838; m. E. S. Locke.

24. xvii. Elmira Caroline, b. Mar. 8, 1841 ; m. Capt. Frank Gentry.

25. xviii. Robert Walter, b. Feb. i, 1845 ; m. Julia J. Lee.



THE WILL OF JOHN CLARK.

fiZ ?;,°r"' } I" "- — "« God. An,en,

L John Clark, of the said State and county, aforesaid, being of advanced
age and knowing that I must shortly depart this life deem it right and
proper both as respects my family and myself, that I should make a dispo-
sition of the property with which a kind providence has blessed me.

1st Item. I desire and direct that my body be buried in a decent and
Christian-like manner suitable to my circumstances and condition of life;
my soul I trust shall return to God, who gave it, as I hope for eternal sal-
vation through the merits and atonement of the blessed Lord and Saviour
Jesus Christ.

2nd Item. I desire and direct that all of my just debts be paid.

3rd Item. I give, bequeath and devise to my beloved wife, Susan, all
the lands that I now possess, (to wit), that tract of land and plantation
whereon I now live, containing six hundred and thirty acres (630) more
or less, lying on the east side of the Alcooghatchie River; also the tract
and plantation of the west side of said River, containing one hundred and
ninety-seven (197) acres more or less; also the tract of land and planta-
tion, containing one hundred and thirty-three acres (133) more or less,
joining lands of R. C. Barnes, B. T. Digby, M. H. Hutchinson's.

I also give and bequeath to my wife Susan a negro, Gilbert, a woman,
Minerva, and their son, Joseph ; also a negro man Jim, a negro woman
Sarah and her two children Hannah and Jennie ; also Nicey and her child
Henry. I also give to my wife Susan, all my stock of horses, mules, cattle,
hogs, sheep and goats ; all the farming utensils used on and belonging to
the plantation of every description whatever; also my four horse wagon,
two horse wagon, two buggies, all the household and kitchen furniture of



The Clark Family. 7

every description, cotton Gin, Wheat Fan and Thrasher, blacksmith tools,
all the com, cotton, wheat, oats, bacon, all the growing crops, and all the
money that I may have on hand at the time of my death ; also all notes
and evidences of debt.

4th Item. I give and bequeath to my son Courtney J. Clark, one-four-
teenth part of my estate after deducting what he has already received of
my estate.*

5th Item. I give and bequeath to my son, Thomas F. Clark, one-four-
teenth part of my estate after deducting what he has already received of
my estate.

6th Item. I give to my son, John P. Clark, in trust for the sole and
separate use of my daughter Nancy A. Sims, wife of Thomas W. Sims,
during her life, and after her death to her children, (and to the representa-
tives of such as may be dead) one-fourteenth part of my estate, after de-
ducting what she has already received of my estate.

7th Item. I give to my son, John P. Clark, in trust for the sole and
separate use of my daughter Eloisa A. McNair, wife of John G. McNair,
during her life, and after her death to her children, and the representatives
of such as may be dead, the one-fourteenth part of my estate, after deduct-
ing what she has already received of my estate.

Item 8th. I give and bequeath to my son, Henry W. Clark, one-fourteenth
part of my estate, after deducting what he has already received of my
estate.

gth Item. I give to my son John P. Clark in trust for the separate use
of my daughter Mary L. Pope, wife of John C. Pope, during her life,
and after her death to her children and the representatives of such as
may be dead, one-fourteenth part of my estate after deducting what she
has already received of my estate.

Item loth. I give to my son John P. Clark, for the sole and separate
use of my daughter Martha S. Flowers, wife of Benjamin J. Flowers,
during her life and after her death to her children, (and the representa-
tives of such as may be dead) one-fourteenth part of my estate, after
deducting what she has already received of my estate.

Item nth. I give to my son John P. Clark, in trust for the sole and
separate use of my daughter Harriet E. Pope, wife of Hopson Pope,
during her life (and after her death to her children, and the representatives
of such as may be dead) one-fourteenth part of my estate, after deducting
what she has already received of my estate.

Item I2th. I give to my son John P. Clark in trust for the sole and
separate use of my daughter Emily J. Brooks, wife of Robert J. Brooks,
during her life (and after her death to her children, and the representatives
of such as may be dead), one-fourteenth part of my estate, after deducting
what she has already had of my estate.

Item 13th. I give to my son John P. Clark in trust for the sole and
separate use of my daughter Julia P. Francis, wife of Miller W. Francis,
during her life (and after her death to her children and the representatives
of such as may be dead) one-fourteenth part of my estate, after deducting
what she has already had of my estate.

Item 14th. I give and bequeath to my son John P. Clark one-fourteenth
part of my estate after deducting what he has already had of my estate.

Item 15th. I give and bequeath to my son Harvey T. Clark one-four-
teenth part of my estate after deducting what he has already had of my
estate.

* The testator kept a record, book of accounts, in which were charged
to his children, the several amounts in money or estimated value of prop-
erty given them during his lifetime, and it is to this he refers when he
says "deducting what he has already received," meaning to be taken into
account on final settlement and distribution of his estate.



8 Genealogy of

Item i6th. I give to my son John P. Clark in trust for the sole and
separate use of my daughter Elmira C. Clark, during her life, and after
her death to her children and representatives of such as may be dead, one-
fourteenth part of my estate, after deducting what she has already received
of my estate. It is my will that Elmira C. Clark shall have a negro girl
by the name of Lethean, to be valued to her by two or three disinterested
men as a part of her legacy.

Item 17th. I give and bequeath to my son Robert W. Clark one-four-
teenth part of my estate, after deducting what he has already received of
my estate.

Item i8th. The property given to my wife Susan, in the third Item of



Online LibraryHenry Williams ClarkGenealogies of the Clark, Parks, Brockman and Dean, Davis and Goss families → online text (page 1 of 51)