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laiNOlS H'STORICAt SURVI^



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The Illinois
Military School



Aledo, Illinois




"To Build a More Virile Patriotism"



BOARD OF VISITORS

Hon. Len Small, Governor, State of Illinois

General Carlos E. Black, Adjutant General, State of Illinois

Captain Oscar E. Carlstroni, Atturney General, State of Illinois




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THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL



THE FACULTY



COL. CLYDE R. TERRY

President

A. 1'.. (ihiii \\'isl.y:ni liiivi rsity

A. M. I niviM-sity nl Chioago

— o —

MAJOR L. S. STAFFORD

Commandant

riiitfil St:. lis Na\al Ai-ail.iny

MATIli:.MATll'S ANIl SI'AMSII

— O —

CAPTAIN FOSTER GARRETT. B. S.

Registrar

Iowa W'csl.y.ni CoUi-gv

SCIKNCK A.\|) KKKNCH

— o —

CAPTAIN N. B. LILEY, A. B. AND L. L. B.

Principal

Missouri Teachers' (.'olle^e

Pni\'ersity of Missouri

University of I'liicaBii

HISTORY AND ]';N(;1.1SH



CAPTAIN DONALD KINNEY
Athletic Coach and Principal of Junior School

I^awl'enoe (\»Ilej^c
GRADES

— o —

MAJOR A. C. SELLS. M. D.

K.-,,kuk M.-ili.al <-..ll.-K.-
PHYSICIAN AMI SIlUnOON

— O —

MRS. C. R. TERRY

Colorailo ColU-Kf

Kansas City Conservatory <»f Music

VOICK AND PIANO



LIEUTENANT PHILIP LICATA

I iKcii i:s'i'i:.\ .v.Nii r..\.\i)



MRS. DONALD KINNEY

l..l« l.n..- I'nII.-K.-

CliADKS

— O —

MR. J. C. DAULTON
STlOWAKli A.\I> i'I1I:F



MR. ED OHEARN
CUSTODIAN OF BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS



THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL




COL. CLYDE R. TERRY
President



MAJOR L. S. STAFFORD
Commandant




CAPT. FOSTER GARRETT
Registrar



CAPT. N. B. LILEY
Principal



THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL




CAPT. DONALD KINNEY
Athletic Coach



MAJOR A. C. SELLS
Physician and Surgeon





LIEUT. PHILIP LICATA
Band and Orchestra



MRS. CLYDE R. TERRY
Voice and Piano



THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL





ii Ift iiiii



DRURY HALL



WHY THE MILITARY SCHOOL, TODAY



Fidin l'vlmt side tDiiav there conies the call for leaders. In industry, in

the church, in politics, there is a lamentable lack of men with the power to

hold the confidence of the masses in the solving' of the vital problems of
American life.

The Illinois Military School has for its aim the building of a group ol
leaders who will go back to their various homes with the vision and ability
that will make them valuable forces in their communities. The school is not
working in competition to the public schools, but is striving to do a task that
the public school cannot possibly do while it is crowed by great masses of
pupils, making impossible any close individual attention.

Tlie modern home is facing a very definite problem in developing lead-
ership and virility in its sons. The luxury and comfort surrounding the bo\
of today in his home are far different from the pioneering conditions of a
generation or two ago, and the modern boy is paying the price in a softness
of character.



THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL



I. M. S. AIMS AT STRENGTH AND CULTURE



The Illinois Military School seeks to build into the life of her cadets that
spirit of initiative and agjiressiveness by a routine of living;- that throws the
cadet upon his own resources, but j^ives to him the personal s^uidance of manly
leaders to see him safely through the difficult places. Our aim is not to cram
the boy's brain with abstract knowledge, but to train him to be a worth-while
member of society.

In doing this the academic work is so en vitalized that the students discover
more readily their relationsb.ip to the social organization, recognizing both
their opportunities and obligations.

The military training is so conducted that every boy may attain the poise
and balance which comes from self-control, and that initiative and leadership
which is best developed by actual experience in obeying and giving commands.

The social and moral life of the school shall be so directed that a genuine
spirit of democracy shall be engendered, and the pre-eminent place of service
in human relationship be definitely brought home.

In developing her cultural program, 1. M. S. has taken a new departure
for private schools and is arranging to take her cadets to Europe each summer
for a five weeks' trip. The aim of the trip basically is to instill in the boys a
more definite understanding of the peoples and places across the sea and to
develop that lively feeling of international good will that will make them
constructive leaders in the dav that is just before us.



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PRESIDENT
The Illinois Military School



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THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL




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THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL



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MR. C. W. DETWILER
President Board of Trustees



HISTORY



The basis of the Illinois Military School was conceived by a .t^roup of
men while still in France after the World war. The school thus visioned was
opened at Burlini^ton, Kansas, in the autumn of 1919 with three boys. After
three years' time the school had outgrown the quarters at Burlington and
opportunity was presented to secure the buildings formerly occupied by the
Oswego college, at Oswego, Kansas. Here the school made splendid strides
until in the spring of 1924 a very disastrous fire destroyed the barracks and
seriously damaged the administration building.

Within ten days after the fire the school had been moved intact to .\ledo,
Illinois, and class-room work resumed. Two of the buildings formerly oc-
cupied by the William and V'ashti college had been quickly put in condition
and the cadets and faculty made very comfortable for the rest of the school
year.

During the summer, possession was secured of all the buildings and
grounds of the former William and Vashti college and several thousand dollars
were spent in redecorating and equipping these buildings for occupancy. So
from a very humble beginning six years ago in an old residence, the school
has had a wholesome consistent growth and now has equipment of the most
attractive type, valued at a quarter of a millifm dollars.



12



THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL




THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL



13



ALEDO, THE HOME OF THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL



Aledo, Illinois, is a wide-awake trnvn of twent\-t'i\e hundred pet)ple with
every nmdern convenience and a splendid water suppl\ from deep artesian
wells. While the town is large enough to furnish these conveniences it is
small enough to be free from those distractions and temptations that make the
city dangerous to the growing boy in his school days.

A beautiful country club building is occasionally opened to the cadets
and the many beautiful homes of this "Biggest Little City in the State of
Illinois," have always a very hospitable welcome for the boys of 1. M. S.




BOYS' ROOM



A HOME SCHOOL



Our visitors remark about the home-like atmosphere of our school.
Intentionally the institutional idea is avoided in every phase. The cadet is
given the most zealous care that is possible apart from his own home. He has
constant association with virile leaders as I. M. S. has one faculty officer for
every ten boys. The definite regulation that only boys free from vicious
habits shall be admitted to the school makes possible the sort of selection in
the boy's association that his own home would maintain.

In table etiquette and in the ordinary relationship of daily life that
standard of refinement is maintained which gives to one in every situation the
ease and naturalness of a gentleman.

With our club house and summer camp at Starved Rock we are equipped
to provide a home for our boys throughout the year and several boys without
a definite homelife are making this their home all the year around.



14



THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL



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THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL IS



THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT



THE PLACE OF THE PRIVATE SCHOOL

Tlie value nt the private scIkuiI in preparin,i; tor colk\i;e is becoming
more aiul more evident. The individual attention in small classes develops a
mental reaction that is impossible in the large classes where mechanical means
must be used. A recent investigation discloses that 80 per cent of the students
at Princeton had been trained in private schools and 70 per cent of the students
at Yale.

OUR SCHOLASTIC AIMS

In mapping out its academic courses, I. M. S. has been guided by a two-
fold purpose. First, to select and require courses of such nature as to fit into
the curriculum of any modern college or university course, and to assure her
graduates admission without examination into the Freshman class of the
Highest Standard University or College. As a foundation for future work, she
gives them an introduction into the methods of study and research found in
these higher institutions of learning. Second, to give a well-rounded and
practical course that will fit her graduates to take up the duties of life, and to
be better able to solve, in a practical way, the problems that they present.
The school is looked upon not merely as a preparation for life, but as a very
real part of life.

INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION

The method of instruction used is that of individual attention, and tn
accomplish this, the classes are restricted to ten boys. With this method in
practice it is possible for us to give a greater opportunity than the school
with much larger classes. We attempt to give the boy who is backward
academicallv assistance in overcoming that defect, and at the same time to
give the boy who is intelligently brilliant an et|ual opportunity for advance-
ment. In no case will a boy be kept in a class with those who are less brilliant
so that his interests are retarded.

During the evening stud\ hall periods the instructors are with the boys to
assist them in the preparation of the lessons for the following day. They also
make sure that the students are acquiring the proper methods of study, and that
thev learn to relv upon their own abilitv. and to appiv it. Manv bovs are able
to cover twice the aninunt of work that they do in the public school, because
of the intensive methods of studv.



16



THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL



SPELLING AND WRITING

Every cadet must take spelling and writing, to remedy that evident defect
of our modern educational system. The School considers spelling so important
toward a well-rounded education that a regular grade of 75 per cent must be
made on it for each day, and should the cadet fail to make that average he
must do extra study in the subject the following afternoon.




SMALL CLASSES AND INDIVIDUAL ATTENTION



VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE



The selection of a life work is an engrossing problem of a young man's
life. Many tiresome tragedies might have been avoided by a bit more en-
lightenment in the selection of a life's work. To aid in this problem a class
in vocational guidance is formed among the older cadets and a study is made
of the various occupations. The business and professional men of Aledo and
other cities have very courteously and enthusiastically aided the work of this
class by talks upon their vocations or occupations and have taken the cadets
through their business houses and explained the problems and opportunities
of that particular field.



THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL



17



SENIOR CUSS, 1923




RICHARD STAFFORD. Altoona. Kansas

,WAYNE HOOSER. Ponca City. Oklahoma
EDGAR CLEMOW. Kansas City. Missouri

EUGENE JONES. Kansas City. Missouri
HARRY SHURTLEFF. Neodesha. Kansas



EDWARD LITTLE. Tulsa. Oklahoma

ARTHUR ELLIOTT. Fairfield. Illinois
STEPHEN MacKINLAY. Kansas City. Missouri
DAVID BAILEY. Cofteyvi!le. Kansas
MAURICE HUBBARD. Cl.nthe. Kansas



18 THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL



DETAILED COURSE OF STUDY



ENGLISH

The won; in Enj^lish, required throui;h(>ut the course, is based on the
recdmniendations of the State Superintendent of PuliHc Instruction, and is
planned in such a manner as to give the student a competent mastery of his
mother tongue in speaking and writing, and to develop a taste for good liter-
ature. During the first two years oral and written composition receive much
attentidii. Considerable experience is gained in newspaper writing by the
puiilication of the school paper, The 1. M. S. Megaphone.

In order to inculcate an appreciation of good literature, much time is spent
each year in the study of masterpieces. The school library and the .\ledo
Carnegie library allow considerable latitude of choice. The course meets all
requirements for college entrance.

Composition and Rhetoric — Required of Freshmen

Great stress is laid on spelling and grammar. Written and oral com-
position, sentence structure and letter writing are drilled thoroughly. A
number of the classics are used as supplementary reading. Text. Damon &
Herrick, "Composition and Rhetoric. (One Unit)

Composition and Rhetoric — Required of Sophomores

In this course particular emphasis is placed on paragraph structure and
composition as a whole. Much practice writing is required. Robinson Crusoe,
Silas Marner, The Ancient Mariner, Treasure Island, .Adam Bede, House of
Seven Gables, Quentin Durward and others are studied. Text, Damon &
Herrick "Composition and Rhetoric." (One Unit)

English Literature — Required of Juniors

A thorough outline course of the history of English literature from the
early Anglo-Saxons to the present time. The development of the modern
novel is stressed. The course includes a wide range of outside reading. Text,
Halleck, A History of English Literature. (One Unit)

American Literature — Reauired of Seniors

This course is devoted to familiarizing the student with the greater
American authors and consists of an exhaustive study of the historv of Ameri-
can literature, supplemented by a large amount of required outside reading.
The works of the Puritan writers, Crevecoeur, Frenau, Irving, trooper, Bry-
ant, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Whittier, Longfellow, Holmes, Whit-
man and others are studied. Lext, Boxiiton's "American Literature." (One
Unit)



THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL 19



MATHEMATICS

The courses in mutheiiialics have for their aim the development of clear
reasoning power and the acquisition of thoroughness and neatness in execu-
tion. The attempt is made to correlate mathematical principles with the
practical problems of everyday life.

Algebra I — One Unit

1. Fundamental principles.

2. Factoring and fractions.

.?. Simple and linear equations.

4. Graphs.

5. Involution and evolution.

6. Fractional exponents.

Text, First Course in .Algebra, Hawkes, Luby, Teuton.

Algebra II — One Unit

1. Review of work included in .Algebra 1.

2. Quadratic equations and graphs.

3. Radicals and radical equations.

4. Theory of Exponents.

5. Ratio and proportion.

6. Theory and use of logarithms.

7. Arithmetic and geometric progressions.

8. Binomial theorem.

Text, Second Course in .Algebra, Hawkes, Luby, Touton.

Plane Geometry — One Unit

t. Fundamental principles.

2. Theorems.

3. Problems and constructions.

Text, Plane Geometry Revised, Palmer, Taylor, Farnum.

Solid Geometry — One-Half Unit

1. Theorems.

2. Problems and constructions.

Text, Solid Geometry, Palmer and Taylor.

Trigonometry — One Half Unit

L Trigonometric ratios.

2. Theory and use of logarithms.'

3. Solution of triangles.

4. Solution of practical problems in engineering.



THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL



HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE

The work in this dep;irtment is intended primarily to prepare the student
for an intelligent participation in the duties and responsibilities of citizenship.
This object is attained by acquaintin,;; him with the course and customs of the
different peoples of the world; and by careful attention to cause and effect
as seen in history; and 1\\' the development of a true insii^ht into American
traditions and ideals.

History I — Ancient ?.nd Medieval

Open to Sophomores and Freshmen. A study of European history from
earliest time to French Revolution. Text, "Europe Before the Eighteenth
Century," Robinson and Brested. (Required) (One Unit)

History II — English History

Open to Juniors. Elective. Text, "A Short History of England," Chey-
ney. (One Unit)

History III — American History

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Much attention is given to our history
since the Civil war. The course is supplemented largely by numerous bio-
graphical studies. Text, "A History of the United States," Beard; also Muz-
zey's "An American History." (Required) (One Unit)

Civics

A practical study in prepar;ttion for more intelligent citizenship. Text,
"A Textbook in Citizenship," Hughes; the Literary Digest; the Outlook.
(One-Half Unit)

Economics

Three hours of recitation and two hours lecture. Text, "Elementary
Economics," Ely and Wicker. (One-Half Unit)

SCIENCE COURSES
General Science

This course is used as an introduction to the fields of science, covering
in a general way, and giving an insiglit to. Chemistry, Physics, Zoology, Bot-
any and Agriculture. The work covered includes matter, energy, electricity,
the solar system, erosion, climate, plants and animals.

The student is assigned laboratory experiments which acquaint him with
the laboratory, and the manipulation of apparatus.

Cadwcll and Eikenberry's General Science is used as a text.

Physics

The course covers mechanics, heat, magnetism, electricity, light and
sound. Five recitations and two laboratory periods a week, with a minimum
of ?5 experiments. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Millikan and Gale's text
and manual are used.

Chemistry

Exercises in general (Chemistry covering the gas laws, theory of ioniza-
tion, valence, equations and calculations. A careful study is given to the
compounds of the more important elements, and the relation of chemistry
to sanitation and daily life.

McPherson and Henderson's text is used.



THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL 21



SPANISH

o

Spanish I — One Unit

1. Elementary grammar.

2. Conjugation of regular, radical-changing, and irregular verbs through
indicative mood.

5. Simple translation and composition.

4. Dictation and conversation.

Text, "Brief Spanish Grammar," De\itis.

Spanish II — One Unit

1. Review of all work included in Spanish I.

2. Study of the subjunctive mood including conjugations, translation
and composition.

.?. Translation of modern Spanish describing geography, life, customs,
history and literature of Spain and Spanish America.

Text, -Brief Spanish Grammar," DeVitis; "Spanish Reader," DeV'itis.

FRENCH

French I — Elementary French

Frazier and Squair's 'Shorter French Grammar" is used as the text
book. The rudiments of grammar are carefully studied, including the in-
flection of regular and the more common irregular verbs, the use of adjectives
and pronouns, word order and rules of syntax.

The student is required to read a limited amount from an elementary
French reader. Particular attention is given to pronunciation during the
entire course.

French II — Intermediate French

Continued study of grammar and pronunciation. Stories and plays are
read, and prose composition required.

LATIN

The aim of the Latin department is both cultural and practical. The
attempt is made throughout the course to bring the cadet to understand the
basic value of Latin in "all phases of a classical or professional education.

Latin I

Particular stress is laid upon the Latin roots of the English language and
in developing a thorough knowledge of the declensions, conjugations and
rules of syntax.

Latin II

Constant review is made of the knowledge acquired in Course I, the
vocabulary is enlarged and exactness is sought in the translation of the first
tour books of Caesar.



22



THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL



OUTLINE OF COURSES



FIRST YEAR

— o —

English I

Algebra I

General Science

Latin or

Spanish or

French

SECOXn YEAR

English II
Algebra II
Ancient and Mediaeval History
Latin II or
Spanish II or
French II



TIIllU) YEAR
■ — o —

English III
Plane Geometry

Chemistry
Modern History

FOTRTH YEAR

— o —

English IV

American History

Solid Geometry and Trigonometry

Economics and Civics or

Physics




ALEDO PUBLIC LIBRARY



LIBRARY FACILITIES



In :iddition to the library at the school which is directed by faculty orfi-
ccrs, the very excellent library ot the city of Aledo is open to the cadets and
the librarian co-operates very enthusiastically in buildini; up the rii;ht sort of
readinj; habits.



THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL



23



COURSE FOR YOUNGER BOYS

We have a considerable number of boys coming to us eacii year who arc-
not prepared to do high school work or must make up deficiences in the
grade work. Our plan is to take the boy at the point in his educati()nal course
where we can build firmly and from there push him by individual instruction
into correct methods of study and thinking. Many boys are able to shorten
their grade work l\v a year or so through our system of individual attention
and the intensive methods of study that are inculcated. We do not set an age
limit for young boys and have received a number as young as nine and ten
vears of age.




MUSIC DEPARTMENT

Those Cadets desiring to study music have the advantage of the excep-
tional training and ability of Mrs. Terry as a teacher. Her experience, ac-
quired in concert work, both as a singer and pianist, is very valuable in holding
the interest of the boys in their music, and the latest methods of her study are
used with them.

Lieutenant Licata is a gifted musician who has had considerable experi-
ence as an orchestra and band director and develops some real organizations.
Opportunity is given for frequent practice and occasional trips are made by
the musical organizations.

o



AN ACCREDITED SCHOOL

STATE OF ILLINOIS

Office of the Superinteiulenl of f^ublic Instruction. Springfield. Illinois.
Francis G. Blair, Superintendent.
To Whom It May Concern:

This will signify that the Illinois .Military School of .\ledo has been inspected by
the representatives of this office and has been found in the matters of equipment,
course of study and instruction, to be in accord with the requriements of this office
and of the law of Illinois for recognized four year high schools.

The graduates of the school, therefore, are entitled to all the privileges of admis-
sion to the examination for teachers certificates and of admission to those recognized
universities and colleges and normal schools of the state that have agreed to admit
the graduates of regularly recognized fiuir year high schools.

H.ARRY M. THR.\SHER.

Supervisor of High Schools,

F. G. BLAIR.

Superintendent of J^iblic Instruction.



24



THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL




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Reproduced from Motion Pictures Taken by Pathe and Exiiibited by
Them in Several States



THE ILLINOIS MILITARY SCHOOL



25



THE MILITARY DEPARTMENT



It is not our aim to liave a Junior West Point at 1. M. S. We desire to
Iniilci not soldiers, liut men. Rarely will one of our j;raduates go into the reg-
ular army, but they will have a training that fits them as capable officers,
should the peril i^i their country call for their service.

The physical condition of the men returning from France and the army
cantonments bespeaks beyond contradiction the value of military training
from a physical standpoint. Hut in school work there is even more definite
value in the development of system and orderliness which are invaluable aids


1

Online LibraryHenry WilsonThe Illinois Military School, Aledo, Illinois → online text (page 1 of 2)