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PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY

SONS OF THE REVOLUTION

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THE SOCIETY SONS OF THE REVOLUTION CARRIES UPON ITS
MEMBERSHIP ROLL THE NAMES OF BRIGADIER-GENERAL EDWIN
BYRON ATWOOD, WHO DIED AT CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, AUGUST 8, 1909;
BRIGADIER-GENERAL JOHN GREEN BALLANCE, WHO DIED AT MIAMI,
FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 10, 1910; COLONEL WILLIAM ANTHONY ELDER-
KIN, WHO DIED AT MIDDLETOWN, NEW YORK, JANUARY 1, 1900;
MAJOR ERASMUS CORWIN GILBREATH, WHO DIED FROM EXHAUSTION
IN PORTO RICO, AUGUST 22, 1898, IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE BATTLE
AT MAYAGUEZ; CAPTAIN CHARLES LEE COLLINS, WHO DIED AT CEBU,
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, SEPTEMBER 7, 1899, AND COLONEL ALFRED
CLARENCE SHARPE, NOW COMMANDING THE MILITARY POST AT
ZAMBOANGA, MINDANAO, PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.

THREE OF THESE OFFICERS OF THE REGULAR ARMY OF THE
UNITED STATES ACHIEVED DISTINCTION DURING THE WAR OF THE
REBELLION, AND ALL OF THEM SERVED THROUGH MANY INDIAN
CAMPAIGNS AND THE LATE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR.

THE MEMBERS OF THIS SOCIETY HAVE ENJOYED A PERSONAL
ASSOCIATION WITH THEM ALL, FOR ALL OF THEM HAVE BEEN STA-
TIONED AT LOS ANGELES WHILE THIS CITY WAS THE HEADQUAR-
TERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ARIZONA, OR ORDERED HERE AT
VARIOUS TIMES FOR TEMPORARY DUTY, AND THEIR CAREERS HAVE
BEEN REGARDED BY US NOT ONLY WITH PRIDE BUT ALSO WITH
AFFECTIONATE INTEREST.

THE STORY OF THE MILITARY SERVICES OF GENERAL BALLANCE
IS TOLD IN THE RECORDS AND GENERAL ORDERS OF THE WAR
DEPARTMENT AT WASHINGTON, TO WHICH FEW PERSONS HAVE EASY
ACCESS, BUT A PATIENT AND PERSISTENT REQUEST FOR INFORMA-
TION HAS ENABLED US TO OBTAIN COPIES OF THOSE MOST IMPOR-
x TANT, AND WE ARE ABLE TO PLACE THEM BEFORE THE MEMBERS
OF THIS SOCIETY THAT YOU MAY READ WHAT HAS BEEN ACCOM-
PLISHED BY YOUR FELLOW-MEMBER DURING A LIFE DEVOTED TO
A MOST FAITHFUL SERVICE FOR HIS COUNTRY.

REPUBLICS ARE PROVERBIALLY UNGRATEFUL, AND IT WOULD
SEEM THAT THE SAYING IS TRUE IN THE CASE OF GENERAL BAL-
LANCE, FOR, WITH HIS MILITARY CAREER ENDED WHILE IN MIDDLE
LIFE, HOLDING THE RANK OF ONLY LIEUTENANT-COLONEL, BY
REASON OF DISABILITIES INCURRED DURING THE ARDUOUS CAM-
PAIGNS OF THE PHILIPPINE INSURRECTION HE WAS PLACED UPON
THE RETIRED LIST OF THE ARMY WITH NO RECOGNITION OF HIS
BRILLIANT CAREER OTHER THAN THE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PRO-
MOTION, AND THE TRIBUTES TO HIS GALLANTRY, FOUND IN THE
GENERAL ORDERS OF HIS SUPERIOR OFFICERS.

IN ANY OTHER COUNTRY WITH A REGULAR ARMY, SERVICES SUCH
AS SHOWN BY THIS RECORD, WOULD BE RECOMPENSED BY HIGH
RANK AND A COMMENSURATE PENSION.

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.
FEBRUARY 22, 1910.





JOHN GREEN BALLANCE.

LlEUTENANT-COLONEL, UNITED STATES ARMY.
BRIGADIER-GENERAL, UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS.

<1|OHN GREEN BALLANCE was descended from John Ballance, a
*-* youth of nineteen years, who came from London in the ship Mer-
chant's Hope, and landed in Virginia in September, 1635.

His great-grandfather, Charles Ballance, was a private in Colonel
Edward Stevens' Tenth Virginia Regiment of the Continental Army,
and he died May 13, 1777, from wounds received in battle.

His grandfather, Willis Ballance, served three years as corporal in
the Second Virginia Regiment, commanded successively by Colonels
Gregory Smith and William Brent.

His father, Charles Ballance, an eminent lawyer of Illinois, who
left Kentucky and settled in Peoria in 1831, was an officer of Illinois
troops in the Black Hawk War, and during the War of the Rebellion
he recruited and organized the Seventy-seventh Illinois Infantry Regi-
ment, of which he was commissioned Colonel.

His great-great-grandfather, Robert Green, was descended from
Sir Henry Green of Green's Norton, in Northamptonshire, the ancestor
of Katharine Parr, the sixth wife of Henry VIII. Robert came to
Virginia in 1712, with his uncle. Sir William Duff, and they settled
upon the James River. In 1732, with his uncle and two others, he was
granted a patent of 120,000 acres of land in the Valley of Virginia, the
first patent granted for land west of the Blue Ridge, and he became
an active factor for the settlement of that region. In 1736, he was a
member of the Virginia House of Burgesses and Captain of the Orange
County Militia.

His mother was Julia Margaret Schnebly, descended from Dr. Hein-
rich Schnebly, an immigrant from Canton Zurich, Switzerland, who set-
tled in Maryland, near Hagerstown, in the early Colonial days.

John Green Ballance was born May 9, 1853, in Peoria, Illinois.
the ninth child of Charles Ballance and Julia Margaret Schnebly, his
wife. Deciding to adopt the legal profession of his father, he was pre-
paring for entrance to Yale College, when being tendered an appointment



to the United States Military Academy at West Point, by General John
A. Logan, he renounced his aspirations for the law, and he was accepted
as a cadet on June i, 1871.

Graduating in June, 1875, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant
in the Sixteenth Infantry, but the same month he was transferred to
the Twenty-second Infantry, commanded by Colonel, afterwards Brig-
adier-General, David S. Stanley.

He served with his regiment at Fort Wayne, near Detroit, Mich.,
1875-76; at Fort Brady, Mich., 1876-77; at Fort Mackinac, Mich.,
1877-79; at Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, 1879-80; at Fort Clark,
Texas, 1880-82; was promoted to 1st Lieutenant February 25, 1881.

In 1881 he traveled extensively in Old Mexico, examining the
country, and made a particular study of its army, with a view of
being well acquainted with it in case of hostilities with that country
which were threatened about that time.

He was appointed Regimental Quartermaster, 22nd Infantry, in
1882 (See Exhibits 2 and 4), and he had charge of transporting and
subsisting the regiment during its long journey from Fort Clark, Texas,
to Colorado, in the fall of 1882; was appointed Depot Quartermaster,
at Santa Fe, New Mexico, in 1883; Acting Adjutant General of New
Mexico in 1884; Acting Regimental Adjutant in May 1884; served
at Santa Fe, New Mexico, and Fort Lewis, Colorado, in 1883-1884;
took part in the expedition against the Jicarilla Apache Indians in the
fall of 1883 in Colorado and New Mexico, which resulted in the
removal of the whole tribe to the Mescalero Indian Reservation, near
Fort Stanton, New Mexico, thereby relieving the inhabitants of
Southern Colorado and Northern New Mexico from the terror which
had long overshadowed them. In May 1884 he was appointed Aide-
de-camp on the staff of General D. S. Stanley and ordered to San
Antonio, Texas.

In July 1884 he was detailed Judge Advocate of the Department
of Texas. So efficiently did he discharge the duties of that office
that he was kept in it for nearly six years, which tour was two years
beyond the usual time for the detail.

During these years of detail as Judge Advocate he devoted him-
self to the study of law, and he was admitted to the practice of law
by the District Court of Texas in 1886, by the Supreme Court of Texas
in 1888; by the Supreme Court of Montana in 1890; by the Supreme
Court of Illinois in 1893 ; by the Supreme Court of the United States
iu 1895. (See Exhibits i, lA, iB, iC and 13).



While he was Judge Advocate of the Department of Texas, he
conducted the prosecution for the Government of a number of
important cases before courts-martial and successfully contended a num-
ber of times for the right of the military authorities to arrest a
deserter in the State of Texas, without a warrant, wherever found.

He examined and perfected the titles to the numerous military
reservations in Texas, and established the ownership of the United
States to valuable blocks of land in Austin and Houston, Texas, which
had formerly belonged to the Republic of Texas.

In the course of his examination of titles, he discovered that the
United States Government did not have a good title to the old Fort
Bliss Military reservation, on which it had expended hundreds of
thousands of dollars. After great contention, the position taken by
Captain Ballance, that the title was not good, was acknowledged by
the Attorney General of the United States to be correct, and he
was directed to take the necessary steps to perfect the title, to
the reservation, which he succeeded in doing, without its costing
the Government anything but notarial fees and traveling expenses,
although the heirs were scattered from Mexico to Canada.

In May 1890, Captain Ballance joined his regiment at Fort Keogh,
Montana, and very soon thereafter went into the field as Adjutant,
Quartermaster and Commissary of an expedition of Infantry and
Cavalry sent against the Northern Cheyenne Indians in Montana.
This kept him in the field all summer and fall. Shortly after his
return to Fort Keogh, in the fall of 1890, trouble arose with the Sioux
Indians in Dakota, owing to the attempt of the Indian Agent to
abolish the fanatical "Ghost Dance", which had been inaugurated by
their chief Medicine Man, "Sitting Bull." An attempt to arrest this
famous man resulted in his death and caused the Sioux Indian War
of 1890-91.

In preparation for this war, in the fall of 1890. Captain Ballance
was ordered with his command to Fort Abraham Lincoln, North
Dakota. On December 16, 1890, he left Fort Lincoln with his com-
pany for the Upper Cannon Ball River, in South Dakota, thence up
the Cannon Ball River to Taylor's Ranch, which he reached Decem-
ber 1 8th. having marched eighty miles in three days, to keep up
with the Cavalry, for he was guarding a supply train for them.

On December 23, 1890, information was received, through some
friendly Indians, that Captain Fountain's troop of the 8th Cavalry
was surrounded by a band of 500 hostile Sioux Indians in the Cave
Hills of South Dakota. This troop had been part of the same com-



10

mand as Captain Ballance's command, and contained many of their
old friends and companions, which fact undoubtedly gave the men a
great incentive to endure the extraordinary fatigue of the march,
which was at once undertaken to rescue their comrades.

Within an hour after hearing of this startling intelligence, Captain
Ballance broke camp and left the Cannon Ball River at 7:45 P. M.
on December 23, 1890, with his command of Infantry, for the Cave
Hills, to rescue the Cavalry troop, without a guide or anyone with
the command who had ever been before in the country. The section
of the country through which they passed was perfectly wild, practi-
cally uninhabited, and without roads of any kind. The command
marched that night and all the next day, with an occasional rest, and
continued the next night until one o'clock in the morning of Decem-
ber 25th, when they arrived cold, hungry, foot-sore and nearly dead
for sleep, at a little hamlet called the New England Village. Although
the necessity for haste was urgent, it was decided to be impossible
to proceed further without a few hours sle-ep, so the command rested
until daylight.

The anxiety of the men to rescue their comrades caused -them to
make the longest march in the quickest time on record in the American
Army. (See Exhibit 36).

The command had marched sixty-three miles in twenty-nine hours
and fifteen minutes, in light marching order, with the thermometer from
ten to twenty degrees below zero, and part of the time in a driving
snowstorm. This unparalleled feat was specially mentioned in orders
from the War Department. (See Exhibit 5).

The command again started at daylight the next morning on its
march of rescue, but learning en route from a scouting party that the
Cavalry command was out of danger, it made only fifty miles in the
next two days.

The remainder of the winter of 1890-91 was spent in marching,
scouting and maneuvering in the intense cold and snows of North
and South Dakota, giving the Indians no rest, until they were glad
to cease hostilities.

In April 1891 Captain Ballance was ordered to Sioux Falls, South
Dakota, to assist the United States District Attorney in prosecuting
the Indian Ta-sun-ka-ota, "Plenty Horses", for the murder of Lieu-
tenant Casey of the U. S. Army. This is one of the most celebrated
Indian trials that took place in the West, the main question being
as to whether an Indian was guilty of murder in assassinating an army
officer because he considered him an enemy of the tribe, although at



11

the time no war had been declared between the whites and the Indians.
The trial lasted two months, and created at the time much dis-
cussion as to the various phases of the Indian question, and resulted
in the acquittal of "Plenty Horses", due to the instructions of the
Senior Judge to the jury, which were contrary to the views of the
Junior Judge sitting on the bench at the same time. (See Exhibit 3).

In 1891 Captain Ballance (then First Lieutenant of Infantry)
was examined for promotion to a Captain of Infantry, and a letter
from his former regimental and department Commander, General D.
S. Stanley, shows his standing as an officer at the time. ( See Exhibit 4).

In 1891 Captain Ballance was appointed Adjutant of his Regiment,
in which position he served until 1892. The order of Colonel P. T.
Swaine, commanding his regiment, shows how efficient were his ser-
vices. (See Exhibits 6, 7, 8).

In July 1892 he was sent with his Company to Wallace, Idaho,
by reason of the mining riots in the Coeur D'Alenes.

On the request of the Governor of Idaho to the President of the
United States, asking that an officer familiar with martial law be sent
him to assist in its administration, Captain Ballance was directed to
report to the Governor of Idaho for that purpose.

The administration of martial law was so conducted under Captain
Ballance's direction as to completely quiet all disturbance, without the
shedding of a drop of blood, and for his able management the County
Commissioners of Shoshone County "EXTENDED THE THANKS OF THE

PEOPLE FOR HIS ABLE, ENERGETIC AND CONSERVATIVE COURSE." ( See

Exhibit 9).

The Governor of Idaho published a general order expressing "HIS
HIGH APPRECIATION OF THE SKILL, TACT AND ACUMEN DISPLAYED BY
CAPTAIN BALLANCE ... AS MILITARY LEGAL ADVISER AND RARE
ORDER OF EXECUTIVE ABILITY EVINCED WHILE IN COMMAND. . . .
THE TRULY GREAT SERVICES . . . PERFORMED BY CAPTAIN BALLANCE
CANNOT BE OVER-ESTIMATED, AND THE GOVERNOR WISHES TO THUS PUB-
LICLY THANK HIM FOR THE WISE AND SAGACIOUS COUNSEL, WHICH HAS
SO MATERIALLY ASSISTED IN REPRESSING A MOST FORMIDABLE IXSURREC-
TION." (See Exhibit 12).

The Board of Trustees of Wallace. Idaho, extended to Captain
Ballance their thanks for "ins MOST EXCELLENT SERVICE" "DURING THE

PERIOD OF MARTIAL LAW". "FOR HIS AID IX ESTABLISHING THE SUPREMACY

OF THE LAW", for "ENFORCING MILD MARTIAL LAW" and for "ESTABLISH-
ING SANITARY MEASURES." (See Exhibit 11).

In 1894, on account of differences which had arisen with the



12

Cheyenne Indians, Captain Ballance was sent with his Company to
Lame Deer Agency to quiet the Indians, which he succeeded in doing
so well that there has not been among them any outbreak since that time.
By permission of the War Department he spent the year 1895 in
traveling in Europe, examining the armies of Great Britain, Belgium,
France, Germany, Italy and Spain. In Spain he saw many of the bodies
of recruits that were being raised and drilled for the subjugation of
Cuba, and which were afterwards members of the Spanish Army that
opposed the Americans in Cuba in 1898.

In 1897 he was ordered with his regiment to Fort Crook, near
Omaha, Nebraska, and was in the same year assigned as Professor of
Military Science and Tactics at Knox College, Galesburg, Illinois.

When the War with Spain broke out in 1898, Captain Ballance
was assigned the important duty of organizing, arming and equipping
the troops of the State of Kentucky. He organized four regiments
and had them equipped for the field, and that his work was appreci-
ated is shown by the letters of W. O. Bradley, the Governor of
Kentucky, dated August 7, 1898, "EXPRESSING THE DEEP OBLIGATION

THE STATE OWES YOU FOR THE VERY CAREFUL, THOUGHTFUL, EARNEST
AND ABLE MANNER IN WHICH YOU SUPERINTENDED THE MOBILIZATION

OF HER TROOPS." And in the letter of August 15, 1898, in which he
stated "FROM THE BEGINNING TO THE END HE HAS SHOWN HIMSELF

AN OFFICER OF RARE ABILITY, PROMPTNESS, EFFICIENCY, COURAGE AND
HONOR. . . . HlS MANLY AND SOCIAL QUALITIES HAVE ENDEARED
HIM TO ALL WHO HAVE MADE HIS ACQUAINTANCE/' (See Exhibits

14, IS)-

On completion of the duty of mustering in the Kentucky troops,
Captain Ballance, having been appointed a Major and Inspector
General of Volunteers, was ordered to Chickamauga Park, Georgia,
as Inspector General on the staffs of General McKee and General
Randall.

Major Ballance joined his regiment in December 1898 at Fort
Crook, Nebraska, and was assigned to the command of the Third
Battalion 22nd Infantry, and he proceeded with it in January 1899 to
the Philippine Islands. This battalion was a new one, two companies
of which had just been organized, and fifty per cent of the other
companies were recruits. (See Exhibit 19).

Major Ballance commenced the task of organizing, arming, equip-
ping, drilling and disciplining this new battalion, composed principally
of recruits, with the greatest energy and succeeded in making out
of it "the finest and most efficient one I have ever seen in the American



13

Army." It became widely and favorably known in the Philippines as
" Ballance 's Battalion." This quotation is from General Young's report
dated Vigan, January 6, 1900. (See Exhibit 31, 39, 43).

Major Ballance arrived with his command in the Philippine
Islands on March 4, 1899, and soon thereafter took a prominent part
in the first advance movement, to clear the Pasig River of insurgents
and to cut off the insurgents in the South from the insurgent army
in the North.

He was attached to General Wheaton's command April 23, 1899,
and he took part in the three days' fight before Calumpit, P. I., and its
capture on April 28, 1899, probably the best planned and most obstinately
contested battle of the whole war. (See Exhibit 27.)

From April to May 24, 1899, he was in the field, engaged in
the expedition under General Lawton to capture the new insurgent
Capital, San Isidro, N. E. Philippine Islands. In this expedition he
was engaged in the skirmish at Santa Elena, 2nd of May 1899 ; fight
and capture of Bustos, May 2nd ; fight at and capture of San Isidro,
May I7th; fight at San Fernando, May i8th; fight and capture of
Cabiao, May igth ; capture of Arayat at seven o'clock A. M., May
21, 1899. (See Exhibits 21, 22, 52, 53, 54.)

The advance of the brigade in the capture of Bustos was given
to Major Ballance, by General Lawton as a compliment to him, by
reason of the acknowledged efficiency of his battalion, and by agree-
ment of the other battalion commanders.

Major General Lawton in his report of September 26, 1899, recom-
mended Captain Ballance to a "Brevet commission as Lieutenant
Colonel for distinguished conduct and public service in the presence
of the enemy," "FOR GALLANTRY IN THE ENGAGEMENT AT BUSTOS ON
MAY 2, 1899." (See Exhibit 21.)

Lieutenant Colonel (later Brigadier General) Clarence R. Edwards'
letter states that General Lawton, in his final report recommended
Captain Ballance for brevet as Lieutenant Colonel, U. S. Army. (See
Exhibit 25.)

When this Northern expedition was broken up at Candaba on
May 30, 1899, Major General Lawton, especially selected Major
Ballance to command the district around Candaba, although he was
the junior field officer in the command, and Candaba was the most
important and advanced post at that time occupied by our troops.

When the insurgents under General Pio del Pilar. became bold
enough to move on to Candaba, and proceeded to entrench themselves
at Matamo, Major Ballance attacked them on October ist and drove



14

them out of their intrenchments, inflicting a known loss on them
of eight killed and tivelve wounded. In this fight Major Ballance's
horse u'as shot under him. Learning that the insurgents were
entrenching at Arayat Major Ballance again attacked them on October
4th, and drove them out of Arayat, INFLICTING A LOSS ON THEM OF

TWENTY-SEVEN KILLED AND THIRTY-EIGHT WOUNDED. ( See Exhibit

32, 49)-

On the special application of Generals Lawton and Young, Major
Ballance and his battalion, were directed to report to them for duty
with the expedition which they were to organize at Arayat, for the
purpose of moving around the flank and getting in rear of Aguinaldo's
army, and he was given command of the Infantry.

He took part in the capture of Arayat on October 12, 1899. When
this expedition was organized, Major Ballance was assigned the advance,
and crossing the Rio Grande River on October 17, 1899, he fought
in the morning of October i8th the Battle of Libutad (Malibutad)
with the infantry, Macabebe Indian scouts and Castner's scouts, which
resulted in the CAPTURE of the BLOCK-HOUSE and SEVENTY PRISONERS,
including a Captain and two Lieutenants. (See Exhibit 31, 33, 38, 49.)

He captured Cabiao the same morning. He was engaged in a
fight at San Fernando October i8th. On Oct. I9th Major Ballance
gained a victory in the fight at Calaba, and after this fight, General
Young placed Major Ballance in command of a temporary brigade,
consisting of three toops of Cavalry, a battery of artillery of six guns,
and all the Infantry of his command. With these he engaged the
insurgents, in front of San Isidro, driving them from the city to the
Gapan River. (See Exhibit 23, 31, 33, 35, 36, 38, 49.)

General Young stated in his report dated October 22nd, 1899, on
the action before San Isidro, on October I9th, "CAPTAIN BALLANCE'S

METHOD OF CONDUCTING THE ADVANCE WAS HIGHLY COMMENDABLE AND
HIS INFANTRY SCOUTS DID SPLENDID WORK." (See Exhibit 23.)

Brigadier General (later Lieut. General) Young reported on the
fight at San Fernando that one was killed and three wounded of the
22nd Infantry where they encountered the heaviest resistance Oct. 19,
1909. (See Exhibit 22.)

On October 27, 1899, having been assigned the advance, Captain
Ballance crossed the Gapan River, with his provisional brigade, and
engaged the enemy in a skirmish at Tambo Barrio, driving them
back to the Taboatin River, where they were strongly intrenched on
the opposite bank. He attacked them on the flank and front and
drove them out of their entrenchments, with severe loss, thus enabling



15

the whole command to cross, in safety. For the part he took in the
fight at Taboatin River, General Young, in his report dated November
3, 1899, stated that the "BEHAVIOR OF THE OFFICKKS AND MEN WAS

EXCELLENT. CAPTAIN BALLANCE's METHOD OF CONDUCTING THE AD-
VANCE WAS HIGHLY COMMENDABLE". ( See Exhibits 24, 3!, 35, 38,

49- 5I-)

Major General Lawton in an endorsement of Nov. 19, 1899, in
forwarding a report of General Young, recommended that "FOR DIS-
TINGUISHED GALLANTRY IN ACTION'" . . . THAT CAPTAIN BALLANCE
. . . BE BREVETTED IN THE REGULAR ARMY TO THE GRADE ABOVE THAT

NOW HELD. (See Exhibit 26).

He was engaged in the capture of Cabanatuan October 30, 1899;
fight at Matablan River November 14, 1899, capture of Resales Novem-
ber 1 4th; capture of Villasis November I5th; capture of Urdenata
November 16, 1899. (See Exhibits 31, 36, 48, 49.)

General Young in his report dated January 6, 1900. stated that
"The overwhelming defeat of the enemy at Libutad and San Fernando
. . . enabled me with one battalion of Infantry (BALLANCE'S

TWENTY-SECOND INFANTRY) TO SURMOUNT OBSTACLES AND ACHIEVE
GREATER results THAN I HAD THOUGHT POSSIBLE FOR THEM TO ACCOM-
PLISH, AND WHICH HAD HERETOFORE NOT EVEN BEEN ATTEMPTED BY
AMERICAN INFANTRY AND COULD NOT HAVE BEEN ACCOMPLISHED BY THIS
BATTALION, HAD IT NOT BEEN COMPOSED OF THE BEST MATERIAL AND
BEEN THOROUGHLY WELL TRAINED AND DISCIPLINED. . . .

BALLANCE WAS PLACED IN COMMAND OF THE ADVANCE GUARD AND
GIVEN COMMAND OF A TEMPORARY BRIGADE ... ON ACCOUNT OF HIS
EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE, AND HIS BRAVERY, GOVERNED BY A SOUND
JUDGMENT, III-: WAS WELL FITTED TO COMMAND A BRIGADE IN THE FIELD,

ENGAGED IN AN ACTIVE CAMPAIGN. . . . HE MADE THE PLANS FOR

THE ADVANCE, SUBMITTED THEM TO ME, AND I APPROVED OF THEM IN


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