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to endeavor to keep touch and communication with the Third U. S.
Artillery on the left of Otis's brigade, MacArthur's division : . . .

The rebels were found in their intrenchments in great force, and
line after line of their works was carried with the utmost gallantry.



By 1 1 :3O a. m. the enemy was thrown to the line of intrenchments
in my front along the Tuliahan River, he having been driven from
his successive line of intrenchments with great slaughter." .

As on the previous day, the tactical operations extended over a
front of several miles, which, as a necessary consequence, resulted in
another series of detached combats, the best reference to which may
be found in the various sub-reports herewith, from which the follow-
ing excerpts are reproduced :
General Wheaton :

"March 26. At daylight the indications were that the enemy was
preparing for retreat. The city of Malabon on my left was on fire
and a stream of fugitive soldiers of the enemy and inhabitants was
pouring from the city toward the north. I directed Colonel Egbert
with his regiment the Twenty-second U. S. Infantry to ford the
Tuliahan near my right and form line perpendicular to the river, his
right to the north, the left of the 22nd to be supported by the battalion
of the 23rd U. S. Infantry. By 1 1 a. m. all intrenchments near the
river were carried, ... I directed the 22nd U. S. Infantry to
form line facing the intrenchments and to charge and carry them,
which the regiment did with great gallantry. Col. H. C. Egbert was
mortally wounded in this charge and died soon after.



120

The enemy fled north, pursued by Major-General MacArthur's
left and center."



Maj. W. A. Kobbe, commanding 3rd U. S. Artillery:



"The first brigade moved out to the Malinta road and this com-
mand ordered to take the advance against that town in conjunction
with General Wheaton's force, then coming up on the left. This we
did about noon, occupying the town and joining Wheaton's force
simultaneously, about the time Col. Egbert was killed. The insurgents
moving northward along the railroad came in contact during the after-
noon with troops of the Second Brigade."

**

UNITED STATES MILITARY TELEGRAPH.

March 30, 1899, 5:30 p. m.
Gen. E. S. Otis:

Command left Guiguinto at 2:20 p. m. . . .

MACARTHUR.

The general impression which existed to the effect that a desperate
resistance would be made at Malolos, was confirmed by reports brought
in by natives who entered the American lines from time to time dur-
ing the day of the 3Oth.

*

By conference with General Wheaton, who now commanded the
line of communication, it was decided that his five battalions of regu-
lar troops should be placed in support. . . .

*

The two battalions of the 22nd Infantry were placed respectively
behind the interval between Kansas and Montana; . . .

The order of attack prescribed an artillery preparation of twenty-
five minutes, to commence at 7 a. m. on the morning of the 3ist.

The first shot was fired precisely at 7 a. m. as intended ; and
thereafter the pre-arranged plan was carried out in every particular
as it had been originally ordered. . . . General Wheaton, "March
31, . . . action commenced about 7:00 a. m., the left occupying
Malolos. ... I was with the right and opened fire on an intrench-
ment of the enemy." . . .



121

Killed, 8 officers, 48 enlisted men, total 56; wounded 25 officers,
453 enlisted men, total 4/8. Total officers 33, enlisted men 501, total

534-

Nothing of importance occurred until 12:30 a.m., April
11, when the insurgents made a determined and simultaneous attack
on all points of the line, between Marilao and Guiguinto,

***

Very respectfully,
(Signed) ARTHUR MACARTHUR,
Major-General, U. S. V., Commanding.

EXHIBIT 51.

CAPTAIN J. G. BALLANCE'S REPORT ON THE BATTLE OF SANTA ROSA.

PUBLISHED IN REPORT OF SECRETARY OF WAR YEAR 1900, VOL.

i, PART 6, PAGE 87.

Neuva Ecija, P. I., Santa Rosa,

Oct. 27, 1899.
Adjutant-General,

Provisional Brigade, First Division, 8th Army Corps.
Sir:

I have the honor to make the following report of the battle of
Santa Rosa:

My battalion left San Isidro at 5 a. m. and marched to the ferry
over the Gapan River. After crossing the river the command went
forward as advance guard, in order prescribed by the brigade com-
mander, as follows:

When I arrived at the Tambo River, the bridge was found to be
destroyed. I immediately had a temporary bamboo bridge constructed
and crossed the foot troops with little delay.



It is supposed that these insurgents formed part of the same
Manila battalion that my battalion whipped twice near Arayat.

Before the battalion arrived at the crossing of the Taboatin River,
as previously ordered by General Young, Lieutenant Castner was sent
with his scouts and A Company, 22nd Infantry, 96 men, under Lieut.
H. O. Ripley. to the right, with orders to cross the river a long distance
above and swing around to the left to Santa Rosa, and take the enemy
in his rear. To enable him to make this turning movement, the main
column was delayed for an hour and forty-five minutes, i. e. from
ii :25 a. m. to i p. m.



122

Shortly before arriving at the crossing of the Taboatin River an
outpost of the enemy was encountered by the infantry scouts and
quickly driven back.

The crossing of the stream and the rapid advance of the infan-
try was evidently unexpected by the enemy, and when the 22nd
Infantry scouts encountered him he thought they were a reconnoiter-
ing patrol.

By moving through the bamboo thickets and through the high
green rice, I was enabled to make (while waiting for the flanking
column to gain their position) complete disposition of the infantry
and two guns of the battery entirely concealed from the enemy, and
when I opened fire simultaneously with the infantry and artillery he
was completely taken by surprise.

The enemy was strongly intrenched on the opposite bank of the
river in front, both above and below the crossing.

His works were not continuous, but consisted of a number of
detached intrenchments.

Taken altogether, the intrenchments in the first line along the
bank of the river afforded concealment and shelter for about 400 men;
back of these in the bamboo there was a second line of intrenchments.

The scouts and Company K crawled through the grass and bam-
boo until just opposite the line of intrenchments of the enemy. One
squad got within about 40 yards from a small trench of the enemy
and none were over 150 yards from the enemy. This disposition was
accomplished without a shot being fired by either side, until I gave
the order at i :io p. m. to commence firing. The enemy, although
subject to a very hot fire, stuck to his intrenchments and as I could
not cross the river in front, I sent companies F and I up the river
with directions to cross and attack him on his left flank. The enemy
evidently discovered the object of this move, for before it was com-
pleted he abandoned his trenches and fled in the direction of the
mountains.

Lieut. Castner with his scouts and Company A completed the
movement assigned to them, but owing to the pathless jungles and
flooded rice fields through which they had to pass did not arrive at
Santa Rosa in time to completely intercept them, but saw them retreat-
ing in a demoralized condition, and fired volleys at them at long range.
Lieut. Stone and Lieut. Leonard completed the movement assigned to
them, but the enemy had retreated.



L23

Total <>n the firing lint-. 8 officer*. 553 men, and (> guns.

..

Number of enemy unknown. They were seen at various places.
The most actually seen at any one place was about 150. The nature of
the country was such that a great many could have been concealed a
few hundred yards away and their presence not even suspected. A
number of natives reported to me that there were over i.ooo insurgents,
but I think there were 400. The number of enemy killed is unknown,
as he was behind intrenchments or sheltered by bamboo thickets most
of the time. The number of casualties was not probably as great as the
short range at which most of the firing occurred would lead one to
suspect.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

(Signed) JOHN GREEN BALLANCE,

Captain, Twenty-second Infantry.

EXHIBIT 52.

LIEUTENANT COLONEL TRUEMAN'S IST N. D. INF. REPORT ON THE

EXPEDITION TO SAN ISIDRO, APRIL 21 TO MAY 22, 1899.
Published in Report of Secretary of War, Year 1899, Vol. i, Part
5. Page 592.

Hdqrs. ist North Dakota Vol. Inf.

Manila, P. I., July 31, 1899.
Adjutant-General, First Division, Eighth Army Corps.

Sir : I have the honor to submit the following report of the opera-
tions of my command in the late expeditions to San Isidro and Morong:

Five days rations were drawn at Angat, and on May i the column
marched again in the direction of San Rafael, my command, con-
sisting of the First North Dakota Volunteer Infantry, 22nd U. S.
Infantry, and Hawthorne's battery. Major Starr, accompanying the
column.

About 9 a. m.. Mr. Young, chief of scouts, sent back word
that his detachment had the enemy engaged on the outskirts of Bustos.
where strong barricades were constructed across the road. I ordered
Major Parker of the 22nd U. S. Infantry, to deploy his command, Cap-
tain Ballance commanding the First Battalion to the right of the road,
with orders to keep the right of his line on the river bank in order to
be able to co-operate with Colonel Summers' command.
The enemy held a splendid position behind stone walls and barricades.



124

and kept up a hot fire without exposing himself. Near Bustos the
river makes a wide bend to the right, and this necessitated Captain
Ballance to stretch out his line in order to thoroughly scour the fields and
thickets between the river and road, it being my plan to cover the
ground between the road and river with a thin skirmish line, as it
afforded an excellent hiding place for the enemy. It was fortunate that
this was done, for quite a large force of the enemy were found in hiding
in these thickets, and were surprised by Captain Ballance's advance, and
a sharp engagement ensued. This force was evidently lying in wait
to harass our flank. . . . The field to the left of the road,

got an effective fire on the enemy's barricades. The scouts and Captain
Ballance's line coming up from the direction of the river and the
flanking movement on the left forced the enemy out of town, a portion
of his force retreating on the south bank of the stream, the remainder
crossing over to Baliuag.

.*

My command had operated over difficult ground under a very
hot sun, and a number of men had succumbed to the heat. The com-
mand was quartered in vacant houses in Bustos, the 22nd Infantry
furnishing the provost guard,

On May 3 I was ordered to move my command into quarters in
Baliuag, leaving one company for outpost duty in Bustos. The com-
mand rested in Baliuag several days, waiting for rations and supplies.

The troops did outpost duty and guard duty at Baliuag and Bustos
until Monday, May 15.

The column marched at 5 a. m. that date in the direction of San
Ildefonso, resting at Maasin from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., to allow wagon
train to come up. Left Maasin at 3 p. m., arriving at San Ildefonso
at 4 :3O p. m., where command went into camp.

May i6th the column marched at 5 a. m., arriving at San Miguel
at 8:30, where the command rested until 3 p.m., when the march was
resumed.

Arrived at Salacot at 6 p. m., where the command went into camp.
About 7 p. m. orders were received to push on with two battalions of
the 22nd Infantry.

On the 1 8th of May the column left San Isidro at 3 p. m., under
command of Colonel French, in the following order: Twenty-second
U. S. Infantry, Scott's battery and First North Dakota Volunteer Infan-



125

try. About 4 p. m., near the village of San Fernando, the advance
guard of the 22nd Infantry suddenly came upon the enemy's outposts.
The fire came from a series of trenches commanding the road, and
from the other side of the river. The Twenty-second Infantry was
deployed, and a part of Major Frame's battalion. ... It was
dark before the enemy were repulsed. Strong outposts were put out
to protect our position, and the troops camped for the night. On the
morning of the iyth the command was on the march.

When nearing Cabiao I had the entire battalion deployed.
There was a small force of the enemy in the village, and we were
also fired upon from the bamboo thickets across the river. The enemy

retreated in the direction of Arayat. We were in possession
of Cabiao at 8 a. m.

The march was continued on the 2Oth, the column leaving Cabiao
at 3 p. m.

At 6 o'clock the following morning the march was resumed, and
by 7 o'clock the head of the column reached the river, where a crossing
was to be effected. Outposts were posted to protect the troops in
crossing, and only a few shots were fired by small parties of the enemy,
and they were quickly dispersed.



Promptly at daylight on May 22 the column marched in the direc-
tion of Candaba, which was reached about 9 a. m.

** ,

Very respectfully,

(Signed) W. C. TREUMANN,
Lieutenant-Colonel ist North Dakota Vol. Infantry, Commanding.

EXHIBIT 53.

GENERAL LAWTON'S REPORT OF THE SAN ISIDRO OR NORTHERN
EXPEDITION, APRIL 22 TO MAY 30, 1899. MADE ON SEPT. 26, 1899.

Published in Report of Sec. of War, Year 1899, Vol. i. Part 5,
Page 75.

Hdqrs. First Division. Eighth Army Corps.

Manila, P. I.. Sept. 26. 1899.
Adjutant-General U. S. Army,
Washington, D. C.

Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the oper-
ations of an expedition in the provinces of Bulacan, Nueva Eciji, and
Pampanga. covering the period April 21 to May 30. 1899.



126

To carry out the verbal instructions received from the department
commander, the following orders were issued :

Hdqrs. 1st Div., Eighth Army Corps.
General Orders, ) Manila, P. I., Apr. 19, 1899.

No. 20. )

The following named troops of this command will hold themselves
in readiness to march on receipt of notice :

Twenty-second Infantry, U. S. Infantry.

join the column directed to march next morning, as
indicated in the following order:
General Field Orders,) Hdqrs. 1st Div., 8th Army Corps,

No. i ) In the field, near La Loma Church,

Manila, Apr. 21, 1899

This command will march at 5 o'clock tomorrow morning, the
22nd instant, in the following order :

Twenty-second U. S. Infantry.



During the afternoon the pickets of the Twenty-second Infantry
on the northeast side of the village were fired on by the enemy, who
was intrenched on a hillside near the San Mateo road, about 1,700
yards distant.

........

Headquarters Third and Twenty-second regiments of infantry, and
Scott's artillery platoon reached the ford crossing the Pasunkambor
River, about 2 miles south of San Jose, at 3 130 o'clock p. m., and rested
for the night.

Early next morning, April 24th, the Twenty-second Infantry and
Scott's artillery platoon were sent forward, accompanied by Capt. W.
E. Birkhimer, of the division staff, to reconnoiter the town of San
Jose. None of the enemy was encountered, and the town was occupied
about 8 o'clock a.m. (Appendix, P. 131.)

.

April 26 the Third and Twenty-second Infantry . . . were
put into camp at Angat.

.*

Col. J. W. French, Twenty-second Infantry, commanding his own
regiment and the First North Dakotas and Scott's three guns, had been



127

-cut forward during tliv afternoon to camp at Salacat for the night, and
the next day to Join Colonel Summers for the contemplated movement on
to San Isidro, May 18 \bout 4 o'clock a.m., May 17, head-
quarters and staff left San Miguel, arriving about 6 a.m. at the
front. .........

Telegraphic communication was established with San Miguel and
corps headquarters without delay and the movement on San Isidro
commenced. Colonel Summers deployed the column ; the Twenty-
second Infantry on the left, their right resting on the road;

The command advanced toward the town, and when within about
i ,Soo yards of it, fire was opened on the scouts of the Oregons and
on the North Dakotas on the right of our line. . . . The advance
was continued and the city was occupied by our forces.

The afternoon of the capture of San isidro it was rumored that
the enemy had fled toward Gapan, a town of considerable importance
about 4 miles east of San Isidro, where the army had a field hospital
filled with wounded.

On the afternoon of the i8th instant. Col. J. W. French, Twenty-
>econd Infantry, with his own regiment, the North Dakotas, and two
guns of Scott's Battery, accompanied by Captain Birkhimer of the
division staff, proceeded down the river (Rio Grande de Pampamge)
toward Cabiao, where it was reported there were about 300 insurgents.
(Appendix, page 246.) Near San Fernando he encountered the enemy
intrenched at a bend in the road. ... An engagement ensued
which lasted until dark, when the enemy was forced across the river,
and his fire silenced.

Casualties, five enlisted men. Twenty-second Infantry, wounded
two severely. (Appendix, page 265.) The column rested here until
morning, when it proceeded to Cabiao, where it camped waiting the
main column.

A telegram was received from department headquarters late May
19, directing the expedition to proceed to Candaba after reaching
Arayat. (Appendix, page 261.)

The entire command left San Isidro on the morning of May 20.
proceeding down the river toward Candaba. . . . rejoined the main
column at Cabiao. Here Colonel French and his command also joined



128

(Appendix, page 261), and all proceeded down the river to the vicinity
of Mount Arayat, where the command rested for the night.

The advance of the column a battalion of the Twenty-second
Infantry entered the town of Arayat at 7:12 a, m., and found no
evidence of the presence of the enemy anywhere in the vicinity.
(Appendix, page 262.)

Two companies of the Twenty-second Infantry, which had crossed
the river at Cabiao and marched without opposition down the right
bank, rejoined here. These companies had had to push their way
through thick underbrush, finding nothing but cross trails.

.

On The morning of May 22, the entire command moved on down
the river toward Candaba, pursuant to telegraphic orders from depart-
ment headquarters (Appendix, page 261), arriving without incident
about noon of the same day.

During the day, after the departure of the troops for Calumpit,
considerable firing was heard to the eastward, in the direction of San
Miguel and Baliuag. A battalion of the 22nd Infantry, commanded
by Captain Ballance, and the detachment of scouts were sent in the
direction from which the sound of the firing came, but were unable
to discover anything, the swamp preventing their continuing to the
San Miguel-Baliuag road.

..*

Insurgent loss reported at 50 killed and 50 wounded.

During the evening of May 23 telegraphic orders were received
from the adjutant-general of the department, breaking up the expedi-
tion, and the following orders were issued early next morning.
HEADQUARTERS, FIRST DIVISION, STH ARMY CORPS.

In the field, Candada, Luzon, 5-24, 1899.

GENERAL FIELD ORDERS, )
No. 13. )

*

Twenty-second U. S. Infantry : Headquarters and two battalions



129

to San Fernando ; one battalion to Candaba and San Luis ; headquarters
and three companies at Candaba ; one company at San Luis.

By command of Major-General Lawton:

(Signed) CLARENCE R. EDWARDS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.



Very respectfully,
(Signed) H. W. LAWTON,
Major-General, U. S. V., Commanding.

EXHIBIT 54.

COLONEL O. SUMMERS, 2ND OREGON INFANTRY, REPORTS ON THE
BATTLE OF SAN ISIDRO, MAY 17, 1899. PUBLISHED IN REPORT OF
SECRETARY OF WAR, YEAR 1899, VOL. i, PART 5, PAGE 245.
HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL BRIGADE, FIRST DIVISION,

STH ARMY CORPS.

In the Field, San Isidro, Luzon, May 17, 1899.
ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

FIRST DIVISION, EIGHTH ARMY CORPS, SAN ISIDRO, LUZON.
Sir: In compliance with instructions from division commander
1 left San Roque at 5 o'clock a. m. and advanced on road leading to
San Isidro in the following order : Twenty-second U. S. Infantry ;
the line was formed with the Twenty-second U. S. Infantry on
the left, their right resting on the road. ... In this position the
line moved forward on San Isidro. . . . Line continued advancing
and routed the enemy and entered the city at 9 130 o'clock, a. m.
Enemy's strength estimated at 2,000; their loss, as far as can be esti-
mated, 15 killed, 20 wounded.

Respectfully,

(Signed) O. SUMMERS,

Colonel Second Oregon Infantry, U. S. V.
Commanding Provisional Brigade.

ExinniT 55.
REPORT OF LIEUT. E. D. SCOTT, SIXTH ARTILLERY ON THE FIGHT AT

CABIAO, MAY i8TH, 1899. Pur.usnF.D IN REPORT OF SECRETARY

OF WAR, YEAR 1899, VOL. i, PART 5, PAGE 124.
ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

First Division, Eighth Army Corps, Manila, P. I.

Sir : I have the honor to submit the following report : . . .



130

On May 18 I was ordered to send two sections to report to
Colonel Summers, and to report with the other two to Colonel French.
Second Provisional Brigade.

At 3 p. m. the Second Provisional Brigade started for Cabiao and

FOUND THE ENEMY NEAR THAT PLACE INTRENCHED ON BOTH SIDES OF

THE Rio GRANDE. A SPIRITED ENGAGEMENT OCCURRED, WHICH WAS

ENDED BY DARKNESS.

Very respectfully,

(Signed) E. D. SCOTT,
Second Lieutenant, Sixth Artillery.

EXHIBIT 56.

CAPTAIN J. G. BALLANCE REPORTS FROM SAN FABIAN, NOVEMBER 30,
1899, GIVING CONDITION OF HIS MEN. PUBLISHED IN REPORT OF
SECRETARY OF WAR, YEAR 1900, VOL. i, PART 6, PAGE 328.

San Fabian, November 30, 1899.
General Young, Northern Luzon :

Had no means of communicating with you before arrival here.

Obeyed your last order to go to Binalonan, received at Villasis
from Lieutenant Batson. I had previously received orders to proceed
from Humingan to Villasis via Resales. This I did, having one fight ;
built bridges and ferries. At Binalonan received orders from General
Lawton to return to Villasis, scouting to Resales and on all roads.
This was done. I received orders to proceed to San Fabian for rations
and join you. I came back again over the same road to Binalonan,
thence to San Fabian, leaving there all the men without shoes, under
my order.

On arrival at San Fabian 90 per cent of men were shoeless and
many sick. Nevertheless, I WAS DETERMINED TO PRESS ON WITH EVERY

AVAILABLE MAN ACTING AS GUARD FOR WAGON TRAIN AND UTILIZING THEM
AS FAR AS POSSIBLE TO CARRY BAREFOOTED MEN.

I had made my arrangements with Lieutenant Howard for doing
so, and part of my men had actually started when I received orders
to remain here and refit. I knew your desire to have your own troops
to assist you and would have joined you with my battalion if not over
30 men had been able to go. I was much disappointed. Captain
Burnside and Lieutenant Howard will give you details.

I AM DIRECTED TO REMAIN HERE UNTIL FURTHER ORDERS. THIS

HAS A FATAL SOUND TO ME. I hope that after all the preliminary hard
work I have done my command is not to be put aside and not allowed



131

to go to the front with you. I COULD EASILY BE WITH YOU NOW IF
ORDERS GIVEN ME HAD NOT PREVENTED. Shoes and clothing arc now in
Uagupan harbor for me. A good many are sick, but shoes, blankets,
and good food will soon help them.

Under your orders, to lay aside all impedimenta, THEY PROCEEDED

WITHOUT RATIONS AND COVERING OF ANY KIND, AND AK1. Kl.ADY TO DO
SO AGAIN TO ACCOMPLISH SO MUCH.

(Signed JOHN GREEN BALLANCE,

Captain, Twenty-second Infantry.

EXHIBIT 57.

Ki.roRT OK CAPTAIN BALLANCE FRD.M SAN ISIDRO ON THE FIGHT AT
CALABA AND SAN ISIDRO, OCT. 19, 1899. PUBLISHED IN REPORTS
OF WAR DEPARTMENT, YEAR 1900, VOL. i, FART 6, PAGE 52.

San Isidro, Oct. 19, 1899.
Adjutant-General, Provisional Brigade.

Sir: I have the honor to report that I left Cabiao at 8:15 this
morning in charge of the advance guard.

Before reaching Calaba, and at a small bridge, the enemy was
encountered by the advance scouts, three of whom were wounded near
the bridge. The command was deployed and developed the enemy in
breastworks in force on the left of the road. After a sharp fight he
was driven out with loss. He was followed in two columns on different
roads clear to San Isidro, skirmishing all the way, even into the town.
One more of my men was mortally wounded near Calaba. The enemy
was followed through the town beyond the barrio of San Nicolas, of
Gapan.

My casualties were five : Three scouts, one of F Company, and
one Hospital Corps private.

The casualties of the enemy are unknown, as he followed the usual
custom of carrying off the dead and wounded, but he was so hard


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