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EXHIBIT 8.
OFFICERS OF THE 22ND INFANTRY RECOMMEND CAPTAIN BALLANCE

FOR POSITION OF JUDGE ADVOCATE, MARCH 16, 1892.

Fort Keogh, Montana, March 16, 1892
Captain John Green Ballance,
22nd U. S. Infantry.

Sir: The undersigned officers of the 22nd U. S. Infantry, take
great pleasure in bearing testimony to your many excellent qualities
as an officer and a gentleman. WE HAVE ALL KNOWN YOU and been
intimately associated with you, both socially AND OFFICIALLY, (some of
us since your first entry into the service.) AND WE KNOW YOU TO BE

A PERFECT GENTLEMAN, THOROUGHLY CONSCIENTIOUS AND CAPABLE IN

THE PERFORMANCE OF ALL DUTIES; we know further that you have
made a special study of law, both military and civil, and that you have



40

been admitted to practice in the civil courts in different parts of the
country, and that you have had extensive experience before military
courts, both as prosecutor and defender. THE RECORD OF YOUR FIVE

YEARS AND A HALF SERVICE AS JUDGE ADVOCATE OF THE DEPARTMENT

OF TEXAS, is ALREADY WELL KNOWN AT THE WAR DEPARTMENT.
From your character, qualifications and experience with both civil and
military courts, we believe you eminently qualified for appointment to
the Corps of Judge Advocates of the Army.

P. T. Swaine, Colonel, 22nd Infantry.

John H. Page, Lieutenant Colonel, 22nd Infantry.

Wm. H. Powell, Major, 22nd Infantry.

Platte M. Thorne, Captain, 22nd Infantry.

H. H. Ketchum, Captain, 22nd Infantry.

William Conway, Captain, 22nd Infantry.

Jno. McA. Webster, Captain, 22nd Infantry.

Robert N. Getty, ist Lieutenant, R. Q. M., 22nd Infantry.

F. B. Jones, ist Lieutenant, Adjutant, 22nd Infantry.

E. O. C. Ord, ist Lieutenant, 22nd Infantry.

J. F. Kreps, ist Lieutenant, 22nd Infantry.

Thomas M. Moody, 2nd Lieutenant, 22nd Infantry.

Wm. A. Phillips, 2nd Lieutenant, 22nd Infantry.

H. E. Ely, 2nd Lieutenant, 22nd Infantry.

A. C. Dalton, 2nd Lieutenant, 22nd Infantry.

EXHIBIT 9.

PROCEEDINGS COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Shoshone County, STATE of IDAHO
JULY TERM A. D. 1892, Twenty-first Day.

Commendatory of the action of

CAPTAIN J. G. BALLANCE
Murray, Idaho, August 23, A. D. 1892.

On motion of Commissioner Livers seconded by Commissioner Kraus,
the following Resolution was unanimously carried and adopted,
to-wit :

WHEREAS CAPTAIN JOHN GREEN BALLANCE, UNITED STATES ARMY,
ASSISTANT JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL, AS MILITARY COUNSEL TO THE
STATE AUTHORITIES EXERCISING MARTIAL LAW HAS, BY HIS WISE AND
ABLE COUNSEL, ENABLED THE AUTHORITIES TO SO DIRECT THEIR COURSE
OF ACTION, THAT THEY HAVE BEEN ABLE TO BRING ORDER OUT OF CHAOS
AND RESTORE LAW AND ORDER IN THIS COUNTY, WITHOUT THE SHEDDING
OF A DROP OF BLOOD, AND SERVED TO RELIEVE MARTIAL LAW OF ALL ITS
HARSHNESS, AND GIVEN THE HIGHEST SATISFACTION TO OUR PEOPLE.



41

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COM-
MISSIONERS OF SHOSHONE COUNTY, IDAHO, THAT THE THANKS OF THE

PEOPLE OF THIS COUNTY ARE DUE TO CAPTAIN BALLANCE FOR HIS ABLE,
ENERGETIC AND CONSERVATIVE COURSE.

Approved,

Attest: C. KRAUS, Chairman.

BARRY N. HILLARD, Clerk.

EXHIBIT 10.

COLONEL (LATER BRIGADIER GENERAL) W. P. CARLIN'S LETTER TO
SECRETARY OF WAR RECOMMENDING CAPTAIN BALLANCE AS JUDGE
ADVOCATE.

Headquarters, U. S. Troops in the Field,

Wardner, Idaho, Aug. 30, 1892.
To the Secretary of War,
Washington, D. C. :

I have the honor to invite your attention to the great merits of
Captain John G. Ballance, 22nd Infantry, who has for a month and
a half been on duty in this region, during the riots of the miners in
July, and since the suppression of such riots, has been on duty with
the Governor of Idaho, as legal adviser to the Governor's representative
in this County, who has been charged with the administration of Martial
Law. THE ADVICE AND ASSISTANCE OF CAPTAIN BALLANCE HAS BEEN

EMINENTLY USEFUL TO THE STATE AND OFFICERS AND TO THE COMMUNITY.

His past services as Judge Advocate of a Department were of
the most distinguished and meritorious character.

His services with his company in the line have always been highly
creditable.

BY CHARACTER, ACQUIREMENTS AND EXPERIENCE HE IS SPECIALLY
QUALIFIED TO FILL WITH HONOR TO HIMSELF AND BENEFIT TO THE
GOVERNMENT, THE OFFICE OF JUDGE ADVOCATE IN THE ARMY. AND
I MOST RESPECTFULLY BUT URGENTLY RECOMMEND HIM FOR AN APPOINT-
MENT AS MAJOR IN THE JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL'S BUREAU.

Very respectfully,

Your obedient servant,
(Signed) WILLIAM P. CARLIN,
Colonel 4th Infantry, Commanding.

EXHIBIT IT.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF WALLACE, IDAHO, RESOLUTIONS COMMENDING
THE ACTION OF CAPTAIN BALLANCE DURING MlNING RlOTS

Wallace, Idaho, Sept. 6, 1892.
At a regular meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Town of



42

Wallace the following resolution was presented, and upon motion of
Henry E. Howes, seconded by Thomas A. Helm, was unanimously
adopted :

Resolved, That the Board of Trustees of the Town of Wallace,
Idaho, in APPRECIATION OF THE MOST EXCELLENT SERVICE OF CAPTAIN
JOHN GREEN BALLANCE, UNITED STATES ARMY, ACTING IN THE
CAPACITY OF ASSISTANT JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL AND MILITARY
COUNSEL TO THE STATE AUTHORITIES DURING THE PERIOD OF MARTIAL
LAW IN SHOSHONE COUNTY, HEREBY TENDER HIM THEIR SINCERE
THANKS:

FIRST. FOR HIS AID IN ESTABLISHING THE SUPREMACY OF THE LAW
IN OUR MIDST.

SECOND. FOR HIS CONSERVATIVE COURSE IN ENFORCING MILD
MARTIAL LAW, WITH NO UNNECESSARY HARSHNESS NOR UNPLEASANTNESS.

THIRD. FOR ENFORCING SANITARY MEASURES IN OUR CITY WHICH
HAVE RESULTED IN BEAUTIFYING IT, IN REMOVING ALL MANNER OF
OBSTRUCTIONS FROM PUBLIC HIGHWAYS, AND IN DESTRUCTION OF EVERY-
THING WHICH TENDS TO BREED DISEASE.

A true and correct copy of the record.

(Signed) J. L. DUNN,
(Signed) JAY LAWYER, Chairman Board Town Trustees

Seal Secretary.

EXHIBIT 12.
GOVERNOR N. B. WILLEY OF IDAHO, ORDER COMMENDATORY OF CAPTAIN

BALLANCE FOR His ACTION DURING MINING RIOTS, DEC. 12, 1892.
HEADQUARTERS, IDAHO NATIONAL GUARD.

GENERAL ORDERS Boise City, Idaho, Dec 12, 1892.

1. Captain John Green Ballance, 22nd Infantry, U. S. A., having
reported for duty to the Governor in compliance with telegraphic
instructions from the WAR DEPARTMENT and having completed the
service to which he was assigned is hereby relieved.

2. Captain Ballance reported to the Governor in compliance with
orders from his military superiors, and WAS AT ONCE ASSIGNED TO THE
DUTIES OF JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL AND MILITARY LEGAL ADVISER
OF THE STATE AUTHORITIES, ADMINISTERING MILITARY LAW IN SHO-
SHONE COUNTY, IDAHO, promulgated and declared by reason of the
destruction of life and property in said County by members of the
Miners' Union.

AFTERWARDS CAPTAIN BALLANCE WAS PLACED IN COMMAND AND
HAD ENTIRE CHARGE OF THE ADMINISTRATION OF AFFAIRS IN SHOSHONE
COUNTY UNDER MARTIAL LAW.



43

In relieving Captain Ballance of the responsible duties which have
been devolved upon him, THE GOVERNOR, as Commander in Chief of
the National Guard of Idaho, DESIRES TO EXPRESS HIS HIGH APPRE-
CIATION OF THE SKILL, TACT AND ACUMEN DISPLAYED BY CAPTAIN

BALLANCE DURING THE LAST FOUR MONTHS AS MILITARY LEGAL ADVISER,
AND RARE ORDER OF EXECUTIVE ABILITY EVINCED WHILE IN COMMAND.

THE TRULY GREAT SERVICES PERFORMED BY CAPTAIN BALLANCE TO
THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, CANNOT BE OVERESTIMATED AND

THE GOVERNOR WISHES TO THUS PUBLICLY THANK HIM FOR THE WISE
AND SAGACIOUS COUNSEL WHICH HAS SO MATERIALLY ASSISTED IN
REPRESSING A MOST FORMIDABLE INSURRECTION WITHOUT THE SHEDDING
OF A DROP OF BLOOD BY THE MILITARY AUTHORITIES AND RENDERING
LIFE AND PROPERTY IN SHOSHONE COUNTY SECURE FROM VIOLENCE,
AMPLY PROTECTED BY THE REIGN OF LAW AND PEACE.

(Signed) NORMAN B. WILLEY,
Governor and Commander-in-chief.

EXHIBIT 13.
SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. LICENSE TO

PRACTICE LAW.
January 17, 1895.
John Green Ballance, Esquire, of San Antonio, State of Texas,

WAS, ON MOTION FIRST MADE TO THE COURT IN THIS BEHALF BY MR.

T. J. HENDERSON, duly ADMITTED AND QUALIFIED AS AN ATTORNEY
AND COUNSELOR OF THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES
ON THE l/TH DAY OF JANUARY IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND
EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY FIVE and of the Independence of the
United States of America the one hundred and nineteenth.

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I, James H. McKenney, Clerk of said
Court, have hereunto set my hand and affixed the Seal of said Court,
at the City of Washington, this I7th day of January in the year of
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five.

(Signed) JAMES H. MCKENNEY,

Clerk of the Supreme Court of the
United States.



44

EXHIBIT 14.

GOVERNOR W. O. BRADLEY OF KENTUCKY LETTER EXPRESSING THE
DEEP OBLIGATION THE STATE OWES CAPTAIN BALLANCE. AUGUST
7, 1898.

STATE OF KENTUCKY,
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

FRANKFORT.
WILLIAM O. BRADLEY, August 7, 1898.

Governor.
Major John Green Ballance, U. S. A.,

My dear Major: It distresses me to know that you will shortly
leave the State of Kentucky. The soldier's life is so replete with vicis-
situde that we may never see you again in Kentucky.

Allow me to take this method of expressing the deep obligation
the State owes you for the very careful, thoughtful, earnest and able
manner in which you superintended the mobilization of her troops.
You have proven yourself to be a thorough and splendid officer and
above all, in every sense of the word, a gentleman.

Personally and officially I entertain for you the profoundest friend-
ship and shall follow your future with the keenest interest.

Again expressing sincere regret, that you have been ordered South
and with a friendly good-bye, I remain,

Your friend,

(Signed) W. O. BRADLEY.
EXHIBIT 15.

GOVERNOR W. O. BRADLEY OF KENTUCKY. LETTER COMMENDING
CAPTAIN BALLANCE FOR His PROMPTNESS, EFFICIENCY, COURAGE
AND HONOR. AUGUST 15, 1898.

STATE OF KENTUCKY,
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

FRANKFORT.

WM. O. BRADLEY, August 15, 1898.

Governor.

Major John Greene Ballance, U. S. A., having completed his
duties at Lexington, Ky., as mustering officer of the Kentucky troops,
and having been ordered to Chickamauga, I take his method of speaking
a few words in his commendation.

FROM THE BEGINNING TO THE END HE HAS SHOWN HIMSELF AN
OFFICER OF RARE ABILITY, PROMPTNESS, EFFICIENCY, COURAGE AND

HONOR. He has performed every duty faithfully and has won the
respect and admiration, not only of the soldiers and officials connected



45

with them always, but of the citizens as well. His MANLY AND SOCIAL

QUALITIES HAVE ENDEARED HIM TO ALL WHO HAVE MADE HIS
ACQUAINTANCE.

IT IS WITH DEEP REGRET THAT I PART FROM HIM and I sincerely

trust that he may receive that great recognition which he so fully
deserves from soldiers and citizens, wherever he may in future be
called.

(Signed) WILLIAM O. BRADLEY,

Governor Kentucky.

EXHIBIT 16.

BRIGADIER GENERAL (LATER MAJOR GENERAL) LOYD WHEATON'S
REPORT OF OPERATIONS ALONG THE PASIG RIVER, MARCH 13-19.
1899. MARCH 31, 1899. FROM REPORT OF SECRETARY OF WAR.
1899, VOL. I, PART 5, PAGE 364.

Manila, P. I., March 21, 1899.
ADJUTANT-GENERAL UNITED STATES ARMY,
Washington, D. C.

Sir: By General Orders, No. n, current series, headquarters
Department of the Pacific and Eighth Army Corps, I was assigned
to the command of "a provisional brigade" composed of the Twentieth
and Twenty-second Regiments, U. S. Infantry. . . . The brigade
was formed on the night of the I2th instant and bivouacked in line in
rear of the intrenched position extending from San Pedro Macati on the
Pasig one and one-half miles in the direction of Passay from right to
left in the following order: . . . Twenty-second U. S. Infantry,
Colonel Egbert ; . . .

Soon after daylight on the morning of March 13, the brigade
moved under my instructions, by echelon, from the right, the .
Twenty-second U. S. Infantry moving first; . . .When the Cavalry
and Twenty-second U. S. Infantry had advanced one and one-half miles
the line wheeled to the left and marched toward the river road along
the Pasig. Scott's guns had now opened upon the position of the
enemy at Guadalupe. . . . The right of the Twenty-second U. S.
Infantry struck the enemy as he was retreating in the direction of
Pasig, inflicting heavy loss. The whole line moved on and occupied
the Pasig Road, and then marching east along the road soon came
under fire of the enemy from his intrenched position at Pasig, on the
north side of the river . . . occupied the ridge with infantry and
extended the Twentieth and Twenty-second U. S. Infantry to the right
on the high ground in the direction of Paternos. . . . attacked a



46

force of the enemy in the direction of Paternos and drove him beyond
Taghuig. . . .

March 14. Extended my line to the south and west of Paternos
and reconnoitered the country to the west and south. . . .

March 15. . . . The enemy lost at least 1,000 men this day.

*

On the afternoon of March 18, a force of the enemy appeared
in the vicinity of Taghuig, . . . Reenforced the place with two
companies of infantry and directed the colonel of the Twenty-second
U. S. Infantry to send one battalion of his regiment south of the
position held by his regiment and to the west of Taghuig to ascertain
.the force of the enemy. The enemy was found about 800 strong
occupying the crests of the ridges, and a spirited combat ensued, which
was terminated by darkness. The Twenty-second had 20 men killed
and wounded in this affair. Among the wounded was Captain Frank
B. Jones, Twenty-second Infantry, commanding the battalion. The
enemy fell back toward the south.

The morning of the iQth inst., soon after daylight I formed line,
deployed in the extended order facing to the south, as follows : Twenty-
second U. S. Infantry . . . Advanced the line and struck the
enemy four miles south of Taghuig. My line, wheeling to the left,
partly inclosed him toward the lake, and he was completely routed,
with great loss. . . .

This ended the operations of the provisional brigade. In one week
all his positions that were attacked taken and his troops killed, captured,
or dispersed ; the towns from where he brought over troops or in which
he resisted, burned or destroyed. He burned them himself. His
loss in killed, wounded and captured was not less than 2,500
men. . . .

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

(Signed) LOYD WHEATON,
Brigadier-General, U. S. V., Commanding.

EXHIBIT 17.

BRIGADIER GENERAL (LATER MAJOR GENERAL) WHEATON'S REPORT
CONCERNING THE OPERATION OF His BRIGADE, COMMENDS, CAPTAIN
BALLANCE FOR His COURAGE AND SKILL AND ABILITY TO HANDLE
His BATTALION, MARCH 31, 1899.



47

Published in report of Sec'y of War, year 1899, Vol. I, Part 5, page 498.
HEADQUARTERS THIRD BRIGADE, FIRST DIVISION, EIGHTH ARMY CORPS,

Malolos, P. I., March 31, 1899.
ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. A.,

Washington, D. C.

Sir: Relating to the recent operations of this brigade in con-
nection with the movements of Major General MacArthur's Second
Division, Eight Army Corps, I have to report that I was directed . . .
to report for temporary duty, with my brigade, to General MacArthur,
March 22, 1899. The brigade consisted of ... Twenty-second
U. S. Infantry. . . .

The night of March 24 the brigade relieved the First Brigade,
Second Division ... in the trenches extending from the left west
of Caloocan to the vicinity of La Loma Church . . . Twenty-
second U. S. Infantry on the right; . . .

On March 25, soon after daylight, Major General MacArthur
commenced his movement by advancing his right brigade to attack the
enemy in the trenches in his front and to advance his right on Polo.
Soon after, his left took up the movement and advanced to the front
and left, his artillery near the center advancing with the line.

As soon as his left brigades moved I advanced one battalion,
Twenty-second U. S. Infantry on my right to cover the movement
of the Third U. S. Artillery, foot, on General MacArthur's left. The
turning movement having sufficiently developed to threaten the rebel
intrenchments on their left flank, I directed that fire be opened on the
rebel intrenchments in my front . . . directed my whole line to
advance in the following order: Twenty-second U. S. Infantry, Col.
H. C. Egbert, on the right to endeavor to keep touch and communication
with the Third U. S. Artillery, on the left of Otis's brigade, Mac-
Arthur's Division ; . . .

The rebels were found in their intrenchments in great force and
line after line of their works was carried with the utmost gallantrv
The roll of infantry fire was now continuous and intense.

By 11:30 a.m. the enemy was thrown to the line of intrerchments
in my front along the Tuliahan River, he having been driven from his
successive lines of intrenchments with great slaughter. ... I had
now suspended my forward movement in order that the enemy might
not be driven beyond Polo or Malinta before the ground in that vicinity
had been seized by General MacArthur. Night closed with my right
connecting with Otis's brigade of the Second Division, and my line
close to the Tuliahan, with the enemy all driven to the north bank.



48

March 26 at daylight the indications were that the enemy was
preparing to retreat. The city of Malabon on my left was on fire
and a stream of fugitive soldiers of the enemy and inhabitants was
pouring from the city toward the north. I directed Coloned Egbert
with his regiment, the Twenty-second U. S. Infantry, to ford the
Tuliahan near my right and form lines perpendicular to the river, his
right to the north, the left of the Twenty-second to be supported by
the battalion of the Twenty-third U. S. Infantry. By n a.m. all
intrenchments near the river were carried ; . . . I directed the
Twenty-second U. S. Infantry to form line facing the intrenchments
and to charge and carry them, which the regiment did with great
gallantry. Col. H. C. Egbert was mortally wounded in this charge
and died soon after. . . . The enemy fled north pursued by Major
General MacArthur's center and right. Went into camp at Malinta
with whole brigade, . . .

March 27. Under orders from the division commander, left the
Second Oregon Volunteer Infantry at Malinta and joined head of
column with . . . Twenty-second U. S. Infantry. . . .

March 28. March Third and Twenty-second U. S. Infantry to
Marilao.

March 29. Crossed the Marilao and marched up the railroad.

March 30. Column moved at 6:30 a.m. All trains left at Bocaue
with one battalion Twenty-second U. S. Infantry as guard. Column
reached Guiguinto at 9:30 a.m. and before dark . . . two bat-
talions Twenty-second U. S. Infantry were in bivouac one-half in the
rear of Major General MacArthur's line of battle, one and one-half
to two miles from Malolos.

In conference with Major General MacArthur it was decided that
I should support his attack on the enemy's position in front of Malolos
by supporting his right with three battalions Third U. S. Infantry
and left with two battalions Twenty-second U. S. Infantry.

March 31. Soon after daylight the five battalions mentioned were
placed, deployed in two lines of skirmishers, . . . Action com-
menced about 7 a.m., the left occupying Malolos, the enemy's capital
early in the day. I was with the right and opened fire on an intrench-
ment of the enemy with Hotchkiss revolving cannon soon after the
line was formed. . . . The entire movement from our lines in
front of Caloocan to Malolos was a complete success.

Great damage and heavy loss in killed and wounded has been
inflicted upon the rebels and nowhere was the enemy able to con-
siderably retard our advance. He was in strong force in front of



49

our lines on March 25. In front of my brigade his intrenchments
were held by not less than 4,000 men, mostly armed with Mauser rifles.
The conduct of our officers and men was distinguished by daring
and the utmost energy. I desire to express the highest admiration
for the distinguished gallantry of Colonel H. C. Egbert, Twenty-second
U. S. Infantry, who fell at Malinta during the charge of his regiment
upon the enemy's intrenchments. He should be held in grateful remem-
brance by his countrymen.

THE CONDUCT OF CAPTAIN JOHN G. BALLANCE, TWENTY-SECOND
U. S. INFANTRY, WAS DISTINGUISHED FOR COURAGE AND SKILL. His

ABILITY IN HANDLING THE BATTALION HE COMMANDED UNDER THE

ENEMY'S FIRE is WORTHY OF THE HIGHEST CONSIDERATION.

Very respectfully,

(Signed) LOYD WHEATON
Brigadier-General, U. S. V., Commanding.

EXHIBIT 18.

MAJOR (LATER LIEUT. COL.) L. O. PARKER, COMMANDING 22ND
INFANTRY, REPORT ON THE OPERATIONS OF His REGIMENT FROM
MARCH 24-31, RECOMMENDING CAPTAIN BALLANCE FOR A BREVET
FOR JUDGMENT AND GALLANTRY IN LEADING His COMMAND UNDER
A VERY HEAVY FIRE. APRIL 6, 1899. GIVEN IN REPORT OF SEC-
RETARY OF WAR, 1899, VOL. I, PART 5, PAGE 503.

Headquarters, Twenty-second U. S. Infantry,

Adjutant General, U. S. Army, Manila, P. I., April 6, 1899.

Washington, D. C.



Left Manila with regiment at 7 130 a.m., March 24, and marched
seven miles to trenches between La Loma and Caloocan, relieving Mon-
tana Volunteers. AT DAYLIGHT, MARCH 25, REGIMENT ADVANCED OVER
THE TRENCHES AND ENGAGED WITH THE ENEMY INTRENCHED IN FRONT.
ENEMY WAS DRIVEN ACROSS THE TULIAHAN RIVER TO STRONG POSITION
IN FRONT OF MALINTA. Camped along river, with considerable firing
throughout day and night.

March 26, at 8 a. m., crossed river by ford one mile to right of
railroad and made turning movement to the left, driving the enemy
behind stone wall and trenches at Malinta. At about 12 m., advanced
and charged enemy's position, who retreated along the railroad.



50

March 27, 28, 29, 30, marched along railroad in rear of firing
line (MacArthur's division) camping at Meycauayan, Malao, San
Marco river, and point three and one-half miles from Malolos.

*

ON MARCH 26, CAPTAIN BALLANCE'S BATTALION, COMPANIES A,
F, K and I, and COMPANY L, WERE MORE ESPECIALLY ENGAGED IN THE

CHARGE AND I ESPECIALLY RECOMMEND CAPTAIN JOHN G. BALLANCE,

22ND INFANTRY, FOR A BREVET FOR THE JUDGMENT AND GALLANTRY HE

DISPLAYED IN LEADING HIS COMMAND UNDER A VERY HEAVY FIRE.



I desire to report that Gen. H. C. Egbert commanded the regiment
from the time it left the barracks on March 24. until the capture of
the insurgents' intrenchments on March 26, when, after most gallantly
conducting his regiment to the charge, he fell mortally wounded, just
after the capture of the enemy's position. I then assumed command of
the regiment and commanded it during the remainder of the expedition.



Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

(Signed) LEO O. PARKER,
Major 22nd Infantry, Commanding.

EXHIBIT 19.

MAJOR (LATER LIEUT. COL.) L. O. PARKER'S LETTER, COMMENDATORY
OF CAPTAIN BALLANCE, CONCERNING His ACTION AT MALINTA,
NOVEMBER 19, 1901.

Falls Church, Fairfax County, Va.,

GENERAL JOHN G. BALLANCE, Nov. 19. 1901

Manila, P. I.

My dear General : Your letter of October /th has been received
and I hasten to reply. . . . this should be "On March 26th,"
as this latter is the date of the engagement at Malinta, which is the
engagement referred to by me in my endorsement wherein I recom-
mended yOU "FOR A BREVET FOR THE JUDGMENT AND GALLANTRY HE
DISPLAYED IN LEADING HIS COMMAND UNDER A HEAVY FIRE/'

I hope you may be brevetted for that day's work, because I THINK

YOU DESERVE IT FOR YOUR PROMPT AND GALLANT ACTION, BY WHICH

A QUICK VICTORY WAS WON, with much less loss than we would have
suffered had there been delay in making that charge. THE FIRE OF

THE INSURGENTS WAS HOT IN THE EXTREME DURING THE CHARGE AND
FOR SOME TIME AFTER THEIR FIRST TRENCH WAS OCCUPIED BY YOUR
BATALLION AND COMPANY "L."



51

I believe, up to the date of the engagement at Malinta, no more
severe engagement, and none more successful had been fought by any
of our troops with the Insurgents since the outbreak of the rebellion.

Our loss was Colonel Egbert killed and a number of enlisted
men killed and wounded the exact figures I have not at hand. I
am of the opinion that our loss would have been much heavier but
for two causes :

1st. YOUR PROMPTNESS IN ORDERING THE CHARGE WHEN THE
INSURGENTS UNEXPECTEDLY OPENED FIRE, AND THE GALLANT MANNER
IN WHICH YOU CONDUCTED THE CHARGE.

2nd. There was a dip in the ground, as I recollect it, between
the Insurgent trenches and the point from which you charged at
all events the charge was up hill and the Insurgents' fire passed mainly
over our heads. The air seemed to be filled with bullets, and I feel
confident YOUR ACTION AND THE GROUND SAVED MANY LIVES.

Up to this time not a shot had been fired, and I believe everyone
thought that during the night the Insurgents had retreated from our
front. Suddenly, and as I have written above, "unexpectedly," the


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Online LibraryHoldridge Ozro CollinsThe military record of John Green Ballance → online text (page 4 of 13)