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*| LIBRARY

UNIVERSITY OF

CALIFORNIA

SAN DIEGO



HOMER'S ODYSSEY

BOOKS XIII XXIV



MONRO



HENRY FROWDE, M.A.

PUBLISHER TO THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD

LONDON, EDINBURGH

NEW YORK




HOMER'S ODYSSEY



BOOKS XIII XXIV



EDITED

WITH ENGLISH NOTES AND APPENDICES

BY

D. B. MONRO, M.A.

PROVOST OF ORIEL COLLEGE, OXFORD



OXFORD
AT THE CLARENDON PRESS



M DCCCCI



OXFORD

PRINTED AT THE CLARENDON PRESS

BY HORACE HART, M.A.
PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY



ALMAE MATRI
GLASGUENSI

NONUM JUBILEUM AGENTI



PREFACE

THIS volume is designed as a continuation of the commen-
tary on the Odyssey which was begun, more than a quarter
of a century ago, by the late Mr. Riddell of Balliol. As all
scholars are aware, the first part of the projected work,
comprising books i-xii, was completed by Dr. Merry and
published in 1875. A second edition, with a good deal of
new matter, appeared in 1885.

In the present state of scholarship an editor of Homer
is almost obliged to form some opinion on the multifarious
issues which make up the ' Homeric question.' I have
therefore been led to add Appendices of somewhat unusual
length, containing a statement of the views which seem to
me on the whole the most in accordance .with the existing
evidence. In the course of this work I found it desirable to
reproduce the substance (and occasionally the language) of
two papers on the Epic Cycle which appeared in the Joiirnal
of Hellenic Studies (in the volumes for 1883 and 1884). I have
to thank the Hellenic Society for permitting this, and also
for allowing me to use the illustrations of the Homeric House
which will be found on pp. 490, 491, 497.

A similar acknowledgement is due to Dr. Valtyr Gir$-
mundsson for the sketch of a mediaeval Icelandic megaron
on p. 218, and to Mr. W. A. Craigie of Oriel for directing
my attention to the interesting parallel which it offers to the
Mycenaean house. I have also had much help on this and
other archaeological points from Mr. J. L. Myres of Christ
Church and Mr. G. C. Richards of Oriel. Mr. Raper of
Trinity has aided me by his opinion on many doubtful
passages.

D. B. MONRO.
OXFORD,
August 12, 1901.



CONTENTS

PAGE

ODYSSEY XIII ... i

XIV 20

XV .45

XVI 71

XVII 96

XVIII 125

XIX 147

XX 179

XXI 199

XXII . . . . . . . . .219

XXIII 243

XXIV 261

ADDITIONAL NOTES AND CORRECTIONS 286

APPENDIX I. THE COMPOSITION OF THE ODYSSEY . .289

i. Sources of the Homeric narrative . . . .289

2. Folklore Tales (Mdrchen) in the Odyssey . .292

3. Heroic Saga treatment of it by the Singers . . 293

4. Unity of action in the early epics the Iliad . . 297

5. The plan of the Odyssey admixture of Marchen . 298

6. The transformations of Ulysses .... 300

7. The wooing of Penelope and the return of Ulysses . 301

8. The Slaying of the Suitors ..... 304

9. Summary of the original tale .... 307

10. The supposed Telemachia . . . . 308

11. The first book . 313

12. Later references to a Telemachia . . . -314

13. Books V-XII .... .,,*,;,_ . 317

14. Interpolations in the Phaeacian Story . . . . 318

15. The NtKvia . 320

16. The Continuation (Od. 23. 297 ff.) . . . 321



x CONTENTS

PAGE

APPENDIX II. RELATION OF THE ODYSSEY TO THE ILIAD . 324

i. Influence of the Iliad on the narrative of the

Odyssey 324

2. Passages of the Iliad borrowed or imitated in the

Odyssey . ' . . . . . . . 327

3. Comparison of the Iliad and Odyssey in respect of

Grammar . -331

4. Vocabulary . . 334



S O- " L ) i"viug_y .

6. History, Geography, &c


330

336


APPENDIX III. HOMER AND THE CYCLIC POETS


340


i . The Epic Cycle . .


340


2. Sources . . . . . .


34i


3. The poems of the Epic Cycle


342


4. The Cypria .... .


347


5. The Aethiopis of Arctinus ....


355


6. The Little Iliad ... .


362


7. The Iliupersis of Arctinus .


37i


8. The Nosti


378


9. The Tekgonia of Eugammon .


. 382


10. Other cyclic poems .....


383


APPENDIX IV. HISTORY OF THE HOMERIC POEMS


385


i. Sources ........


385


2. Life of Homer


385


3. The poems brought from Ionia


39i


4. Recitation of Homer


394


5. The Homeridae


- 398


6. The rhapsodists and the text Pisistratus


. 402


7. Ancient criticism the fifth century B.C.


. 410


8. Fourth century B.C


. 416


9. Antiquity of the vulgate ....


. 418


10. Early forms of textual corruption .


. 419


11. Interpolation in early texts ....


. 420


12. Interpolation in papyrus fragments


. 422


13. Quotations from Homer ....


426


14. The apparatus criticus of Aristarchus


43


15. TrSo-at, al n\fiovs, &c. in the scholia


43 2


1 6. Zenodotus


43 6



CONTENTS xi

PAGE

17. Aristarchus the sources ..... 439

1 8. Aristarchus as a textual critic .... 444

19. Aristarchus and the modern vulgate . . . 446

20. Aristarchus as an interpreter of Homer . . . 449

APPENDIX V. THE TIME AND PLACE OF HOMER . . 455

455

458
460

465

47 1

474

476

477

. 478

. 480

. 484

. 489

. 489

49

493

493

495

497
. 498



501

53

508



I.


Antiquity of the Homeric Dialect archaism


2.


Restoration of the original form of Homer


3-


Relation of epic to other dialects .


4-


The language of the Homeric age


5-


Theory of an Aeolian epos .


6.


Theory of an Ionian epos


7-


Influence of dialects on the Homeric text




a. Ionic .....




ft. Aeolic .....




y. Attic . . .'


8.


Mr. Ridgeway's Theory


APPENDIX VI. THE HOMERIC HOUSE


i.


The opposing theories ....


2.


The Fire-place .....


3-


The neyapov of the women


4-


The BaXapoi .....


5-


The position of the women's quarters


6.


The Door, or Doors, of the ^yapov


. 7-


The Threshold, or Thresholds


8.


The use of avd and KOTO


9-


The op<ro6vpr) t &c. ....


INDEX I


. . ...


II


........



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PAGE

THE OLD HARBOUR OF CORFU : from a photograph . . 19
A MEDITERRANEAN VESSEL, WITH LADING PLANK . -44

NAVAL BATTLE : from a vase (probably of the seventh century)

in the Capitoline Museum at Rome 95

PENELOPE AT HER LOOM, WITH TELEMACHUS: from a vase in

the Museum at Chiusi .124

MYCENEAN CRATER FOUND IN CYPRUS . . . . .146

HOMERIC AXEHEADS .... . . 176

EURYCLEIA WASHING ULYSSES : from a vase in the Museum at

Chiusi 178

HARPIES : from a Lebes in the Museum at Berlin . . .198
THE GREAT HALL (Stofa) OF AN ICELANDIC HOUSE (circa

1000 A.D.) . . 218

SLAYING OF THE SUITORS: from a vase in the Museum at Berlin 242
ULYSSES WITH THE OAR: from an engraved gem . . .260
FIGURE OF A RHAPSODIST RECITING : from a vase . . .285
PALACE OF TIRYNS . . . . . . . . 490

RESTORATION OF THE HALL AT TIRYNS . . . . -491

ICELANDIC stofa (TRANSVERSE SECTION) . . . . . 492

PALACE AT MYCENAE, WITH WOMEN'S QUARTERS (?) OPPOSITE

THE MAIN ENTRANCE 497

VIEW OF ITHACA, LOOKING NORTHWARDS r from a photograph

belonging to the German Archaeological Institute of Athens 502
ULYSSES PLANTING THE OAR: from an engraved gem . .512



O A TZZEI A3 N



'O8v<rcrQ)$ dnoTrXovs napa $aiaKcov Kal d<pigi$ e/s



ol tf dpa Travres a,Kr}v kykvovro
ea")(ovTO Kara fteyapa a-KiotvTa.
TOV 8 avr 'AXKivoos dira/J-eifieTO (pcovrjo-ev re-
" co 'OSvo-fv, eirfl IKCV tfj.bv TTOTI xaX/co/3ares Sa>,
u\/repe0e9, ra> a-' oti n TraXi/iTrXay^^e^ra y oica
a\lr dTrovoo-Trjo-eiv, fl Kal ftdXa TroXXa TreTror^ay.
v/j.ea>v f? dvSpl e/cacrro) e^ie/zefoy rdSe eip<o,
o<r<roi kvl p.eydpoi(TL yepovaiov aiOoTra dlvov
aUt TrivfT ep.oLO'Lv, aKovdfccrOe tf doiSov.

tvl



Io



Ka



8a>p' ,



TroXvSaiSaXos dXXa re ndvra
(3ovXr]<p6poi t

ivra AT., valg. : itaXiv



5-6. The words here are taken from
II. I. 59 vvv a/x/xe ira\ifj.ir\afxOevras oita
Sap airovoarfiafiv ft Kfv Oavarov ff <j>\>-
yoipev, but with a change of application
which has made them somewhat obscure.
In the Iliad aip dirovoarriativ refers to
returning disappointed to Greece, and
thus carries on the idea expressed by
na.\inir\ai\()tvTas. Here a return home
is not a disappointment, and cannot be
described by such a phrase as im\in-
ir\.a"fx0tvra. Some commentators meet
the difficulty by confining the negative
to that phrase : ' I think that, not having
been driven from your course, you will
return home.' But, apart from other
objections, an interpretation by which
cap airovo(TTT)fffiv and na\ifjur\ayxOtvTa.
are made to express contrasted things is

II. B



PS. See H. G. 125, b.



surely excluded by II. i. 59. The ne-
cessity for such an interpretation only
arises from taking o^ airovoa-rrjativ of
return to Ithaca. The meaning is simply
that Ulysses will not return driven back
from the house of Alcinous, but will
have his desire. So Naegelsbach, An-
merk. zur Ilias* (on II. 1.59).

5. TU. There seems to be enough
evidence in Homer for an adverbial TO),
distinct from the dative rw.

9. dicovaf <r0e ' please yourselves with
listening ' (II. 4. 343). Verbs of this
formation have an ampliative and often
unfavourable meaning: cp. lu^vta and
/u/micu, /uyvvm and fuyaofj.ai, piirraj
and fiiirrafa, i^-yeofxat and iJ-yTjA-afeu (17-
217), apporafo, afKa^o/jiai, olfoirora^a> t
, vtvara^ca, pvardfa.



13. O ATS 'S El AS N



d\\ aye oi 8a>fj.v rpiTroSa /j.eyav rjB\ Xe

dvSpaKas' rffJ.fi? tf avre dyfipofj-fvoi Kara 8i]fJ.ov

rio-ofifO'' dpyaXeov yap eW irpoiKos )(apio-ao~6at." 15

*/2y e0ar' 'AXxtvoof, roicriv 8' TTt^v8av fj.v0os.
ot fj.lv KaKKeiovTts e/3ai> oiKovSs eKaoroy,
^//oy $ rjpiytvtia (pdvrj poSoSdKTvXos 'Hot?,
vrjdft fTreo-aevovTO, (pepov * evyjvopa \a\Kov.
Kal TO, n\v v KdTtOrjx iepov //eVoy ' ' A\KLVOOLO 20

auroy i<av 8ia vrjos VTTO vyd, p.ri TIV eraipow



oi tf e/y 'A\Kivooio KLOV Kal Satr dXtyvvov.

Toicri > fiovv iepfvcr Upov /ze^oy 'A\Kivooio
Zrjvl K\aive(f>i KpoviSrj, oy iraviv di>d(rcri. 25

f*f]pa 8e Krjavres SaivvvT fpiKvSta Salra
Tfp7r6[j.voi- /iera Se afyiv e/ieA7reTO Oeios doiSos,
Atifj.oSoKos, XaoTai rerf/zeroy avrap 'O8va-(rev$
TToXAa 7r/?oy rj\Lov KftpaXrjv rpeTre -nap-^avocovra,
Svvai tTTfiyofievos- Sr/ yap fj.tveai.vf veea-dai. 30

toy 8' or dvr)p Sopiroio XiXaferai, <p re 7ravf}fJ.ap
Vfibv dv tXKr)Tov /36e oa/07re -rrr]KTOv aporpov
do~7rao~iQ>s 8' dpa r<S



13 ^Se] ^^ Eust. who however found iy8e in the better MSS. 14 ai/Spa d6' v. 1.
known to Eust. 16 nvOos] 0v/*> P H S U. 19 vrja 5* Ar., F M : j'^' dp' vulg.
22 l/)T/xors] Perhaps iptrny, cp. mjSo) (1. 78).



15. Tio-ojuOa 'will repay ourselves.' 27. Cp. 4. 17. On ptXirtoOai of .rz'

' as a free gift,' without such *' see Lehrs, Arist. p. 138.



repayment; originally a partitive gen., 30. 80vai eirci-yotJievos ' in haste, eager

' of his bounty ' (cp. xap'CA t *''7 faptov- for (his) setting.'

T<W), but used as an adverb, like the 32. ITTJKTOV ' put together,' an epithet

Attic itpoiKa., = gratis, impune. The describing the workmanship of a plough.

Homeric form is probably irp6i, irpol'Kos So n-otijT^s of a house (13. 306), SIVQJTOS

(or rather wpoi'/cos, since ir/>oo's is so of a bed (19. 56), TVKTOS of a floor (17.

accented on the analogy of monosyllabic 169), &c. We need not translate ' well

nouns'; : so -rrpoiKTTjs ' a gift-man,' ' one made,' though that may be implied.

who lives on doles,' and the Ionic fut. The point is that the object (whatever

na.TairpoiofJtai. The word is evidently it is) is a work of mechanical skill.

a compound of irpo. See also 17. 413. 33. dcriracruos. Cobet and Nanck

1 8. Morning of the 34th day of the would get rid of this adverb by sub-

action of the poem. stituting the adj. Here e.g. Cobet

21. iiiro vyd, with Kart&rjKf. would read dairaffty (cp. dfffj.vca pot

24. On the play of language see 144, <<*""), and Nauck aa-naaiov, as aairaarov

^4- 6 9> 37 r -> i5- 10 -> l6 - 2 -> 1 7-332. in 1. 35. But cp. II. 7. 118., n. 327.



13. OAT22EIAS N 3

Soprrov eTrofyfaOai, /2Aa/3erou 8f re yovvar IOVTI'

coy 'O8vo-fj' do~irao~Tov f8v 0aoy rjfXtoio. 35

atya 8f $airJKfo~o~t <f)iXrjpfTfJ.oio~i fjLfrrjvSa,

' A\Kivo<p Sf fj,dXio~Ta 7n0afcr/c6/ze'oy 0aro [tvdov

" AXictvot Kpfiov, Trdvrcav dpiSfiKfTf \aStv,

yue crTretcrai/rey aTrrniova, ^aipfTf 8' avrot-
yap rereAecrrai a //oi 0/Xoy -rj0\ Ovpos, 40

TTO/ZTTT) /cat 0/Xa 8<opa, ra /iot 0eo2 Ovpaviwves
o\f3ia iroLrjcreiav. dfj.vfj.ova 8' O'IKOI CIKOITIV
vo&Trjcras fvpoifii uvv dpTfj.(T(n (fiiXoKriv.
vfj-fTs 8' avQi p.tvovT$ evcfrpaivoire yvvaticas
KOVpiSias KOL TtKva* Otol 8' dpfTrjv o-rrdo-fLav 45

Trai>Tofr)i>, real fj.r) ri KaKov fj,Ta8ijfJ,Lov en;."

A /^ v j / tft'v r > / O>>'\

J2y e0aa , Of o apa zrai/rey eTrijvzov rjo tK\vov
TTffj.7reiJ.fvai rov gflvov, fTTfl Kara, po'ipav eetTre.
Kat Tore KrjpvKa 7rpoo-f(f>r) fj,evo$ 'AXKivooio*
"IIovTOvof, KprjTrjpa Kfpa<r(rdfj,fvos fJ.fOv vftftov 50

Tracrii/ dva fj.eyapov } o(f>p' fvdfj.fvoi Ail irarpl
rov fTvov 7rffnra)fj:fv frjv ey TrarpiSa yalav."

/2y 0aro, Ilovrovoos 8z fj.fXi<j>pova oivov fKipva,
v<ofj.r)o~fv 8' apa 7ra<nv fTrio-TaSov oi 8e 6folo~iv

fiaKapfao-i, rot ovpavbv fvpvv f^ovaiv, 55

fg fSpfav. dva 8' arraro Sios 'O8v<ro~vs,
'Apr/Ty 5' fv \ftpl Tidft Stiras dp.^LKtnrfXXov,
Kai fj.iv (f)Q3vr)o-as firfa irTfpofvra Trpoa-rjvSa"
" \cupt fJ.oi, co f3ao~i\fia, 5ia/n7repey, e/y o Kf yfjpas
fX&y KOI OdvaTOS, ra T CTT dv6pa>7roio-i rrfXovTai. 60



34 /3\a/3eTcu] For this anomalous present it is always possible to read

which would be the form of the aor. mid. : see H. G. 30. 35 'OSuoT;'] See on

5. 398. 42 fo'iKm may be restored by writing d/iu/iora fo'utoi (with epexegetic

asyndeton). 53 (tcipva] so 7. 182., 10. 356 : but Kipvrj in 14. 78., 16. 52.

56 (Staiv v. 1. ap. Eust 57 X t P' vu lg- ' X P ff ' M U al. : cp. II. I. 585.

34. Bopirov iroix<r9cii 'for going and the verb aptrata 'to prosper" (19.

about his supper,' i.e. 'in that he can 114); also 12.211., 14.212., 18.251.
now go about his supper.' 54. tirurraBov : see 12. 392., 18.42:;.

45. dperfiv ' good ' : not restricted, 56. avroOtv ' in their places,' ' even

as in later Greek, to 'merit' or ' excel- as they sat': cp. II. 19. 77 avro&fv (

lence.' Cp. 14. 402 fvKteirj T' apery rt } tSpijs ov8' tv Hfffffoiaiv

B 2



13. OATSZEIAZ N



OLKO*



avrap eyo> veofiai' ait <5>e reprreo T&8' tvl
iraia-t Te Kal Xaoi<ri Kal 'AXKivoa) pa<riXfji'."

*/2y fiirJbv imfp ovSbv e/37/o-ero Sios 'O8vcr<Tvs.
TO> 8 s dfia KtfpvKa wpoiet /*eVoy 'A\Kivooio,

i CTTI vfja 6or)v Kal diva 6aXda-<rr)S- 65

8* dpa ol 8fJ.a>a$ dfi fire/j.irf yvvaiKas,



TTJV 8 1 Irfprjv ^rjXbv TTVKIVTJV ap oiraa-ve
f) 5' dXXrj crirov T <f>fpv Kal oivov t

Avrap TTi p' tTrl vrja KarTJXvOov T)8t 6dXa<T(rav, 70

atya rd y' kv vrjt yXa(j)Vpfj Tro/jnr^fS dyavol
Sfgdfjievoi KariOfVTO, iro<nv Kal Ppaxnv (Liravav
KaS 8' dp 'OSvo-a-fj'i a-Topca-av p'fjyos re \ivov re
vrjbs 7r' iKpi6<f>iv yXa(f>vpfjs, iva vf\yptTov evSoi,
TrpvfJLvfjr av Sk KOI avrbs ^TJ(TTO Kal AcareXe/cro 75

<riyfj- rol 5e Ka6tov firl KXr)i<riv Ka<rTOi
Afocr/zct), Trefoyza 8 tXvcrav dirb Tprjroio XiOoio,
fv& ol dvaKXivQtvTts dveppiTTTOvv dXa
Kal T(p vJjSvfjios VTTVOS fnl f$X<j)dpoi(rii'
vriyperos TjSicrTos, Oavdrat dy^icrra eoi/ccoy. 80

77 8' WJ T kv 7Tf8l(p TTpdopOl dp(TVS ITTTTOl,

irdvres dp op/iT/^evres VTTO TrXrjyfja-iv i[j.d(r6Xrjs,
v-^rocr dfipofievoi pijitya 7rpr)<r(rov(ri KeXevOov,
a>s dpa rfjs irpv/jivr) [ttv dfipero, Kvp.a 8' oT



61 o*K(f\ \QJpq> P H al. : from lo. 271. 66 ywoTasl -f) trtpa rSn> '

" vf(ff0cu " elx* (Did.) : so H', v. 1. in X. 68 oira<7<re] titt^t F P M East. 80
ijZiffTos, apart from the f of jySw, is weak after vrfmfto^ (i.e. ^SvfM)s\ Read
perhaps T//MOTOS (or ^wffros) ' most gentle,' ' feeblest ' (II. 23. 531).

62. irauru The dat. is instrumental, 81. f| 8' KT\. The sentence is taken

with a partly 'comitative' sense: cp. up again in 1. 84 &s dpa rijs KT\. The

II. 21.45, O^- J 4- 2 44- harshness of the anacoluthon is softened

69. f| 8* aAA-r]. The article marks by the nom. tairoi in the next clause :

contrast, ' another again,' H. G. S 260^ cp. 14. 85, II. 4. 433., 17. 755.

78. avaicXivOtvTes ' swinging back ' : rcrpdopos, contr. for rtrpa-riopos : cp.
the aorist describing the movement, aw-rjopos, irap-rjopos (aiipoi of yoking
^ ^ j ?7- horses, cp. II. 10. 499., 15.680).

irr)5<p, the sing, used distributively. 84. For irpvfj.vrj some read vpa/pi], as

79. vri8v|jios, an early corruption of giving a truer picture. But how could
/^Su/ios : see the note on Od. 4. 793. vpvfivt) have crept into the text ?



13. O4TSSEIAS N 5



fitya 6v 7roXv(f)Xoi(r(3oto QaXdo-arjs. 85

8k fjidX' aa-0aXcoy Otcv e/zTreoW- ovSf /cej/



coy 17 pifj.(f>a dtovaa 6a\d<T(rr]$ Kvpa-r
dvSpa (fifpovcra Otois IvaXiyKia firjSt' e^oi/ra,
oy Trplv /zf /*aXa TroXXa irdQ' dXyea o> Kara Ovfibv 90
dvSpStv re TTToXe/^oi/y aXeye^a re KVfiara
8r) rore y' arpe/zay eSo^e, XeXao'/zet'os ocro-'
EVT da-rrjp inrfpo-)( (paavraros, 8s re



TrjfJ.o$ Srj vrj<ra> Trpoo-eTTiXraro iroi/TOTropos vrjvs. 95

o*rt Xifirjv a\ioio yepo^roy

Svo 8t 7rpo(3\fJTfS kv ayra>
aKral aTroppcoyey, Xt/zei/oy TTOTnrtTTTijviai,
at T dvtp.(i>v (TKtTToaxn 8v<rari<)v /zeya /cv/xa

8e r dvtv Sea-poio p.tvov&i too



vfjes kvffa-fX^JLOL, or av opftov fJLtrpov
avrap Tri /cparo? Xi/ze^oy rai'^fXXoy tXairj,
dy^66i 8' avTrjs dvrpov f-rrijpaTO
ipov vvfi(f)da)v at vrjidSts /caXeoi/rat.

!/ $ Kpr)TTJpS T Afttt dfKpL^Opfjf^

XaiVor ei/^a 5' eVetra [email protected]><rcrov(ri

kv 5' /orot XiOtoi Trpi(J.r}KS, tvOct, Tf vvfj.(f)ai

<pdpe vQaivovo-iv aXnrop^vpa, Oavpa tSe<r6ai'



88 frap.vtv G M D al. : trtfU'ev F H U : trtTfifv P X. 98 virorrevTrjvtai F al.
100 fKToOev U al. : tKroaOtv vulg. : read perhaps fKroaO'.

86. ip-qj; KipKos. In combinations of 98. n-OTvireirrritiiai lit. ' crouching

this kind the second term is usually the towards,' ' sinking down in front of the

specific one : cp. 0ovs ravpos, avs icdwpos, harbour,' and so closing it in. iton-

o<f>is Spaxaiv (Hes. Theog. 321). with the gen. is used like -npos in 1. no,

89. Oeols cvoXiyKia, a brachylogy, of direction or aspect.

' like the (counsels of the) gods ' : cp. 99. dvtjtcov Kxijia ' the waves raised

II. 17. 51 KOfiuu Xapirfffatv bp.ouu, Od. by the winds,' cp. II. 2.396., 11.305.

2. 121., 4. 279. Bvo-a-qwv, by metrical licence, foffatow

91. trToXejxovs and Kufxara carry on being impossible in the hexameter.

the construction of iro\\a ira.0' akyta, 101. opp.ov p.Tpov 'the measure of

while irtptiv, ' passing through them,' anchorage,' i. e. the distance at which

belongs only to Kv^ara. Thus it is not ships are fastened by a cable to the shore

properly an instance of zeugma. (if fastening is needed).

93. xiireprx is intrans., ' rises.' This 108. 4>dpea ' webs,' cp. 19. 138.
is the dawn of the 35th day.



6 13. OATZZEIA? N

kv 8' v8aT dtvdovra. Svco 8 re ot Ovpai
at jj.f.v Trpbs Bopeao KaraifiaTal dv6pa)Troio~iv, 110

at 8' av Tiyjoy NOTOV io~l 0ea>re/acu- ov8e. TL
di'Spes kvtpyovTai, aXX* dBavdrmv 686s kvnv.
"Ev6' 01 y' ereAacrai> trplv e/56rey. 17 fj.lv

f}TTlp<*> C7TKe\(Tl>, 0<TOV T 7Tl fjfjUCTV

o"JTpxofj.vr)- TOLOV yap eTrayero X*P

oi 8' K vrjbs j8ai/rey Ivgvyov r]7rip6v8

TrpS>Tov 'O8v<r(rfja yXcKfrvpfjs CK vqbs aeipa

ai/ra) <rvv re \iva>

K.a.8 8' dp' 7r

CK 8\ K.TT\\ia/r aeipav, a ot ^ai'^/cey dyavot 120

u>Tra<rav oiKaS' LOVTI 8ia fj.eyd6vfj.ov ' ABrfvrjv.

Kal ra fj.tv ovv Trapa irvOfitv fXairjs dOpoa OfjKav

e/croy 68ov } firj Trcoy ris oSiTacov avQ p&Tttov ,

-rrpiv 'O8v<rrj' typeo-Oai, eTreX^cbj/ 8r]\^a-aiTO-

avrol 8' av olKov8e -nd\iv KLOV oi>8' kvoviyQav 125

dTrtiXdcov, ray di/rideo) 'OSvo-fji
7rT)7riXr)o-, Albs 8' egtipcro povXrjv'
c: Ztv Trarep, OVKZT eyooye fier dOavdroio-i 6eoio-i
Tipijfis fa-0/j.ai, o T fie fiporol ov n rtovai,
<&air)K$, TOL Trep TOI e/i^y e^ etVi yevedXrj?. 130

Kal yap vvv 'OSva-rj' k^dfirjv KUKO, TroXXa iradovra

Xevcro~6ai, VOCTTOV 8e oi ov TTOT



o~v 7rpa>roj> I'Trecr^eo /cat
oi 8' fvSovr kv vr\i Oofj enl TTOVTOV ayoi/rcy

115 rotov PXDLWEust., ro'uav G F H M S U : cp. 3.496., 24.62, 11.22.
241. 1 20 KTr)fMT~\ \pfifia-r' Mai. This variation is frequent in the MSS.

1 23 M welw G F H 2 : M iru Ar., P H X D S U : /? irov M L W Eust. 1 25 a5
U : avr' vulg. 129 on vulg. 130 rot -nip TOI F : TO/ we/) re vulg.

in. 0ewTp<u, not ' more divine,' but 121. Sui ' by the agency of.'

' divine ' in contrast to the human door : 1 23. Ar. read ya\ TTW TIS ' that no one

cp. 15.422, H. G. 122. yet, before Ulysses should wake, might

1 14. oaov T' tirl fjnuru = (<f> offov rb &c.' But this use of TTW can hardly be

ffniav yiyvtrai, ' to half its length.' Cp. defended.

11. 10. 351 oaov -T tm ovpa irf\ovrcu, 21. 127. irpwrov ' once,' as in 1. 133.

251 oaov T' tiii Sovpos fptari. 129. o re ' in respect that.'

1 18. QVT$ crvv T Xivw 'with the 130. 'Who after all (TO} are sprung

linen cloth as it was.' from me.'



13. OAT22EIA2 N 7

dv 'I6aKrj, tSovav Se oi aairtTa 8>pa, 135

\a\Kov re ^pvaov re aXty to-OfJTa 6'
TroXX , 6V av ov8e rrore Tpoirjs k^-qpar '
d TTfp d.Trri[J.O)v TjXde, Xa^a>v aTTo Xrj'iSos aicrav."
Tbv 8' aTTa/iet/So/ze^oy irpoa-e^rj i/e0eX?/yepra
" a> TTOTTOI, kvvovlyai vpvcrOev$, olov e7rey. 140

oi? TI <r a.Tip.dov(n OOL- yaXtirbv 8e KZV eirj
irpea-pvraTOV /cat apunov d/riftffl<FlV IdXXtiv.
dv8p>v 5' i rrep ris (re f3iij KOL icaprei' fiKcov

OV Tt Tll, (TOL 8' <TTt KOI eo7TiVci) Tl<Tl$ aid.



KO.L TOL (pio
Tbv 8' rjiftfT eVetra HocreiSdav



*' a K tya)v tpaifti, Aceaii/e0ey, coy ayopei/ety
aXXa crbv aid OVJJLOV oTri^op.ai rjS' aXeea/eo.
vvv av $aiTJKa>v e^eXco Trept/caXXea v^a
e/c TTOfjLTrfjs dviovaav kv rjepociSei TTOVT(O
p'aio-ai, 1v f)8r) (T\(avraL, aTroXXij^cDcri Se
dvOpwTrwv, fj.eya 8e cr<pii> opoy

Tbv 8 a7ra/fa/36jtii'oy 7rpoar<pr]
" a> Trenov, coy ynei/ ytta> Ovp.S> 8oKt dvai apiara,
omrore Kv 8r) vrarrey eXavvofJitvriv Trpo'iScovTai 155

Xaot aTTO TTToXioy, Qtivai XiQov kyyvQi yat'^y
f^t ^077 f/ceXoi', iVa Oav^d^axnv



135 afford G F M D : 07X0^ P H S U al. 152 no\tv P H J, ss M c X.



142. d.Ti|UT]cn,v laXXeiv 'to fling into a^iKaAiJi^ai are constraed as an epexe-
dishonour,' or (better) 'to fling at, assail, gesis of SOKSI clvai apicrra, so that there
with acts of dishonour.' Elsewhere is no grammatical apodosis to us ntv :
ld\\ti> is only found with an ace. of the 'as seems best to me, viz. to turn their
thing thrown : but cp. jSaAXcy. ship into stone, &c. (so I say).'

143. eiKoiv 'giving way to,' 'allow- A small island near the entrance of
ing himself to be moved by' : cp. 14. the old harbour of Corfu is pointed out
157., 22. 288. as the Phaeacian ship, and perhaps is

144. There is a play of words bet ween sufficiently ' like a swift ship' to have
Tiei ' pays honour,' and Ticrts ' pay- give rise to the story (Plin. IV. H. iv.
ment,' in the sense of ' vengeance.' 53). It is not, however, the only claim-

152. d(jKJ)iKaXv\|/ai is rather far from ant. ' A rock outside the harbour of

the governing verb, iOf\ca in 1. 149. It Trapani (in Sicily) is said to have been

seems from the scholia that there was a Turkish war vessel, turned into stone

an ancient variant, probably the fut. by the Madonna* (Mr. A. Lang in Long-

inclic. dfuf>iica\v\f/ca. mans Magazine, Jan. 1898, quoting

154-158. The infinitives Oeivat and ^ii.^il^s Authoress of the Odyssey'].



8 13. OAT22EIAZ N



i, fjitya 8 o-fav 0/309 TroXei dfji(f>iKa\v\lrai."
Avrdp kirtl TO y aKovcrt Ho<rti.8da)v kvo<rty(6(ov ,
/3f/ p ifJLtv 9 SxepiTjv, 061 $ai7)Ks ytydaviv. 160

fvO' efifv- ?! 8k fidXa <r\8w rjXvOe rrovronopos
pip^a. 8i(0KoiJ.vr]- r?79 8k cr^fSbv rjXO'' k
oy fjLtv \dav ZOijKe KOL tppigworev tvepOe



Oi 8t TTpo? aXX^Xouy evrea TrrepoevT dyoptvov 165

i>avcriK\vToi avftpts.
(!w ey irXr^criov d\\ov
" & pot, T/S Srj vfja Oor]V 7r8r)cr kvl TTOVTO)
oiKO.8' \avvo/jiVT)v ; Kdl 8r) 7rpov(f)aiveTO Trdcra"

*f2s dpa ris e/Treo-Ke' ra 8' OVK laav CBS krkrvK.ro. 170
Tot(Tiv 8' 'A\Kivoos dyoprjo-aro KCU ftfTeenrev
11 co TTOTTOt, ^ /zaXa 8rj //e 7raXat0ara Q(T(f)aO' iKavsi,
irarpos efiov, oy (pa<TK TlcxrtiSdtov dydcracrOat
rjfjLiv, ovveKd "iropiroi dTrrjfioves flfjiev dirdvTObv.
<prj 7TOT6 ^airjKa>v dv8pS>v TTfpucaXXea vrja 175

K TTOfJiTrfjs dviov(rav tv rjepoeiSf'i TTOVTCO
paiaefJifvaL, \ikya 8' fjfjuv opo9 TroXet
<9 dyopev 6 ytpw ra 8e 8rj vvv Trdvra
dXX' dyed' , 009 civ kya> enrco, Trei^co/ze^a 7rai>re9*



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