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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY

OF CALIFORNIA

RIVERSIDE



LETTERS OF

HORACE WALPOLE

MRS. PAGET TOYNBEE



VI



HENRY FROWDE, M.A.

PUBLISHER TO THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD

LONDON, EDINBURGH

NEW YORK



Two hundred and sixty copies of this edition
have been printed on hand-made paper, of which
this is Number




front, a firin (Me-r eya



THE LETTERS OF
HORACE WALPOLE



CHRONOLOGICALLY ARRANGED

AND EDITED WITH NOTES AND INDICES

BY

MRS. PAGET TOYNBEE



IN SIXTEEN VOLUMES
WITH PORTRAITS AND FACSIMILES

VOL. VI: 17641766



OXFORD

AT THE CLARENDON PRESS

MDCCCCIV



-V.



OXFOED

PRINTED AT THE CLARENDON PRESS

BY HORACE HART, M.A.
PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY



CONTENTS OF VOL. VI

PAGES
LIST OF PORTKAITS vi

LIST OF LETTERS IN VOLUME VI vii-xi

LETTERS 934-1114 1-460



LIST OF PORTRAITS



HORACE WALPOLE Frontispiece

From print after Falconet.

SIR WILLIAM HAMILTON, KB To face p. 83

From painting by Sir Joshua Beynolds in National
Portrait Gallery.

GEORGE WALPOLE, THIRD EARL OF ORFORD .' ' 216

From painting by Sir Joshua Reynolds in possession of
Earl Waldegrave.

CHARLES LENNOX, THIRD DUKE OF RICHMOND . 362
From a print.



LIST OF LETTERS IN VOL. VI



T

934 Feb. 15, 1764 .

935 Feb. 20, 1764 .

936 Feb. 21, 1764 .

937 [Feb. 1764] .

938 Feb. 23, 1764 .

939 Feb. 24, 1764 .

940 Feb. 29, 1764 .

941 March 3, 1764

942 March 11, 1764

943 March 18, 1764

944 March 18, 1764

945 March 27, 1764

946 March 27, 1764

947 April 5, 1764 .

948 April 9, 1764 .

949 April 12, 1764

950 April 12, 1764

951 April 19, 1764

952 April 20, 1764
953f April 20, 1764

954 April 21, 1764

955 April 24, 1764

956 May 10, 1764 .

957 May 14, 1764 .

958 May 27, 1764 .

959 June 5, 1764 .

960 June 5, 1764 .

961 June 8, 1764 .

962 June 8, 1764 .

963 June 18, 1764 .

964 [July 2, 1764].

965 July 16, 1764 .

966 July 16, 1764 .

967 July 21, 1764 J

968 July 21, 1764 .



C

1764.

Earl of Hertford. ... 902
Sir Horace Mann . . . 908
Miss Anne Pitt.

Rev. William Cole . . .899
Sir David Dalrymple . . 904
Earl of Hertford. . * .905
Grosvenor Bedford . . . 906
Rev. William Cole ... 907
Earl of Hertford. . . .908
Sir Horace Mann . . .909
Earl of Hertford. . . .910
Earl of Hertford. . . .911
Charles Churchill . . . 912
Earl of Hertford. . . .913
Sir Horace Mann . . . 914
Earl of Hartford. . . .915
Rev. William Cole . . .916
Hon. Henry Seymour Conway 917
Earl of Hertford. . . .918
Sir Horace Mann.
Hon. Henry Seymour Con way 919
Hon. Henry Seymour Conway 921
George Montagu. . . . 923
Sir Horace Mann . . . 924
Earl of Hertford. . . .925

Thomas Pitt 926

Hon. Henry Seymour Conway 927
Earl of Hertford. . . . 928
Sir Horace Mann . . . 929
George Montagu .... 930
Hon. Henry Seymour Con way.
George Montagu .... 931
Rev. William Cole . . .932
Rev. Henry Zouch . . .933
Rev. William Cole . . 934



J- Now printed for the first time.
J Misdated ; see note on this letter.



viii List of Letters

T c

969 July 27, 1764 . . . Sir Horace Mann . . .935

970 July 80, 1764 . . . Grosvenor Bedford . . . 936

971 Aug. 8, 1764 . . . Earl of Hertford . . . .937

972 Aug. 9, 1764 . . . Christopher Wren.

978 Aug. 13, 1764 . . . Sir Horace Mann . . . 938

974 Aug. 16, 1764 . . . George Montagu .... 939

975 Aug. 21, 1764 . . . Viscount Nuneham.

976 Aug. 27, 1764. . . Earl of Hertford . . . .940

977 Aug. 29, 1764 . . . William Pitt .... 941

978 Aug. 29, 1764. . . Rev. William Cole . . . 942

979 Sept. 1, 1764 . . . Hon. Henry Seymour Con way 943

980 Sept. 3, 1764 ... Dr. Birch 944

981 Sept. 25, 1764. . . Rev. William Cole.
982f [Sept. 1764] . . . Duke of Newcastle.
988f [Sept. 1764] . . . Duke of Newcastle.

984 Oct. 6, 1764 . . . Earl of Hertford . . . .945

985 Oct. 5, 1764 . . . Hon. Henry Seym our Con way 946

986 Oct. 9, 1764 . . . Rev. Thomas Warton . . 947

987 Oct. 18, 1764 . . . Hon. Henry Seymour Conway 948

988 Oct. 21, 1764 ... Sir Horace Mann . . .949

989 [Oct. 1764] . . . Rev. William Cole.

990 Oct. 27, 1764 . . . Rev. William Cole.

991 Oct. 29, 1764 . . . Hon. Henry Seymour Conway 950

992 Oct. 30, 1764 . . . Rev. William Cole.

993 Nov. 1,1764 . . . Earl of Hertford . . . .951

994 Nov. 8, 1764 . . . Rev. William Cole . . .952

995 Nov. 9, 1764 . . . Earl of Hertford . . . .953

996 Nov. 10, 1764 . . . Lady Hervey .... 954

997 Nov. 15, 1764 ... Sir Horace Mann . . .955

998 Nov. 25, 1764. . . Earl of Hertford . . . .956

999 Dec. 3, 1764 . . . Earl of Hertford. . . .957

1000 Dec. 16, 1764 . . . George Montagu .... 958

1001 Dec. 20, 1764 ... Sir Horace Mann . . .959

1002 Christmas Eve, 1764 . George Montagu .... 960

1765.

1003 Jan. 10, 1765 . . . Earl of Hertford . . . .961

1004 Jan. 13, 1765 ... Sir Horace Mann . . .962

1005 Jan. 20, 1765 . . . Earl of Hertford. ... 963

1006 Jan. 27, 1765. . . Earl of Hertford. ... 964
1007 f Feb. 5, 1765 . . . Rev. Thomas Percy.

1008 Feb. 11, 1765 . . . Sir Horace Mann ... 965
f Now printed for the first time.



List of Letters



IX



T

1009
1010
1011
1012
1013
1014
1015
1016
1017
1018
1019
1020
1021
1022
1023
1024
1025
1026
1027
1028
1029
1030
1031
1032
1033
1034
1035
1036
1037
1038
1039
1040
1041
1042
1043
1044
1045
1046
1047
1048
1049
1050
1051



Feb. 12, 1765 .
Feb. 19, 1765 .
Feb. 28, 1765 .
March 9, 1765
March 16, 1765
March 18, 1765
March 26, 1765
March 26, 1765
April 5, 1765 .
April 7, 1765 .
April 17, 1765
April 18, 1765
April 21, 1765
May 5, 1765 .
May 11, 1766 .
May 12, 1765 .
May 14, 1765 .
May 20, 1765 .
May 25, 1765 .
May 26, 1765 .
June 10, 1765.
June 11, 1765.
June 26, 1765.
Saturday night
July3, 1765 .
July 3, 1765 .
July 9, 1765 .
July 11, 1765 .
July 12, 1765 .
July 28, 1765 .
July 30, 1765 .
Aug. 9, 1765 .
Aug. 12, 1765.
Aug. 23, 1765.
Aug. 27, 1765 .
Aug. 31, 1765.
Sept. 3, 1765 .
Sept. 3, 1765 .
Sept. 5, 1765 .
Sept. 5, 1765 .
Sept. 11, 1765.
Sept. 14, 1765
Sept. 18, 1765.



Earl of Hertford.
George Montagu .
Rev. William Cole
Rev. William Cole



966

967
968
969



Dr. Warton 970

. 971



Elie de Beaumont

Earl of Hertford.

Sir Horace Mann

George Montagu ....

Earl of Hertford.

Rev. William Mason .

Earl of Hertford.

Sir David Dalrymple

Earl of Hertford. . . .

Sir Horace Mann

Earl of Hertford. .

Sir Horace Mann

Earl of Hertford.

Sir Horace Mann

George Montagu ....

George Montagu ....

Lady Hervey ....

Sir Horace Mann

George Montagu ....

Hon. Henry Seymour Conway

Countess of Suffolk .

Countess of Suffolk .

George Montagu ....

Sir Horace Mann

George Montagu ....

Sir Horace Mann

Miss Anne Pitt.

Sir Horace Mann

George Montagu.

Sir Horace Mann

George Montagu ....

Earl of Strafford .

Lady Hervey ....

Rev. William Cole .

Grosvenor Bedford .



List of Letters



T




1052


Sept. 20, 1765.


1053


Sept. 22, 1765.


1054


Sept. 26, 1765.


1055


Oct. 8, 1765 .


1056


Oct. 8, 1765 .


1057


Oct. 6, 1765 .


1058


Oct. 8, 1766 .


1069


Oct. 13, 1765 .


1060


Oct. 15, 1765 .


1061


Oct. 16, 1765 .


1062


Oct. 16, 1765 .


1063


Oct. 16, 1765 .


1064


Oct. 19, 1765 .


1065


Oct. 28, 1765 .


1066


Nov. 2, 1765 .


1067


Nov. 4J 1765 .


1068


Nov. 18, 1765 .


1069


Nov. 17, 1765 .


1070


Nov. 19, 1765 .


1071


Nov. 20, 1765 .


1072


Nov. 21, 1765.


1073


Nov. 21, 1765 .


1074


Nov. 28, 1765.


1075


Nov. 29, 1765 .


1076


Nov. 80, 1765 .


1077


Dec. 2, 1765 .


1078


Dec. 5, 1765 .


1079


Dec. 5, 1765 .


1080


Dec. 25, 1765 .


1081


Jan. 2, 1766 .


1082


Jan. 4, 1766 .


1083


Jan. 5, 1766 .


1084


Jan. 5, 1766 .


1085


[Jan. 8, 1766].


1086


Jan. 11, 1766 J .


1087


Jan. 12, 1766 .


1088


Jan. 18, 1766 .


1089


Jan. 19, 1766 .


1090


Jan. 25, 1766 .


1090*


Jan. 31, 1766 .



Countess of Suffolk .
George Montagu ....
Sir Horace Mann
Lady Hervey ....

John Chute

Hon. Henry Seymour Con way

Miss Anne Pitt.

Lady Hervey ....

Lady Mary Coke.

George Montagu.

Countess of Suffolk .

Sir Horace Mann

Thomas Brand ....

Hon. Henry Seymour Conway

Sir Horace Mann

Miss Anne Pitt.

Sir Horace Mann

Lady Mary Coke.

Thomas Gray ....

Grosvenor Bedford .

Lady Hervey ....

George Montagu ....

Lady Hervey ....

Hon. Henry Seymour Conway

Sir Horace Mann . .

George Augustus Selwyn

Hon. Henry Seymour Conway

Countess of Suffolk . ,

Miss Anne Pitt.

1766.



C

2659
1008
1009
1010
1011
1012

1013

1014
1015
1016
1017
1018
1019

1020

1021
1022
1023
1024
1025
1026
1027
1028
1029
1030



1031



Lady Hervey

Lady Mary Coke.

Sir Horace Mann . . . 1032

George Montagu . . . . 1034

John Chute 1033

Lady Hervey .... 1035
Hon. Henry Seymour Conway 1036
Rev. William Cole . . . 1037
Miss Anne Pitt.

Thomas Gray .... 1038
George Augustus Selwyn.



List of Letters



XI



T C

1091 Feb. 3, 1766 . . . Lady Hervey .... 1039

1092 Feb. 4, 1766 . . . George Montagu .... 1040

1093 Feb. 9, 1766 ... Sir Horace Mann . . . 1041

1094 Feb. 23 [1766] . . George Montagu. . . . 1042

1095 Feb. 28. 1766 . . . Rev. William Cole . . . 1043

1096 Feb. 29, 1766 ... Sir Horace Mann . . . 1044

1097 March 1, 1766 . . Miss Anne Pitt.

1098 March 3, 1766 . . George Montagu .... 1045

1099 March 3, 1766 . . Lady Mary Coke.

1100 March 6, 1766 . . John Craufurd .... 1046
1100* March 7, 1766 . . George Augustus Selwyn.

1101 March 7, 1766 . . Miss Anne Pitt.

1102 March 10, 1766 . . Lady Hervey .... 1047

1103 March 12, 1766 . . George Montagu . . . . 1048

1104 March 21, 1766 . . George Montagu. . . . 1049

1105 March 21, 1766 . . Sir Horace Mann . . . 1050

1106 AprilS, 1766. . . George Montagu . . . . 1051

1107 April 6, 1766. . . Hon. Henry Seymour Con way 1052

1108 Aprils, 1766. . . Hon. Henry Seymour Con way 1053

1109 April 20, 1766 . . Sir Horace Mann . . . 1054

1110 May 6, 1766 . . . Lord Hailes (?) .... 1055

1111 [6 Mai 1766] . . . Duchesse de Choiseul.

1112 May 10, 1766 . . . Rev. William Cole . . . 1056

1113 May 13, 1766. . . Rev. William Cole . . . 1057

1114 [May 1766] . . . Rev. William Cole.



THE LETTERS



OF



HORACE WALPOLE



934. To THE EAEL OF HEETFOED.

MY DEAR LORD, Arlington Street, Wednesday, Feb. 16, 1764.

You ought to be witness to the fatigue I am suffering,
before you can estimate the merit I have in being writing
to you at this moment. Cast up eleven hours in the House
of Commons on Monday, and above seventeen hours yester-
day, ay, seventeen at length, and then you may guess if
I am tired ! nay, you must add seventeen hours that I may
possibly be there on Friday, and then calculate if I am
weary. In short, yesterday was the longest day ever known
in the House of Commons why, on the Westminster election
at the end of my father's reign ', I was at home by six. On
Alexander Murray's 2 affair, I believe, by five on the militia,
twenty people, I think, sat till six, but then they were only
among themselves, no heat, no noise, no roaring. It was
half an hour after seven this morning before I was at home.
Think of that, and then brag of your French parliaments !

What is ten times greater, Leonidas and the Spartan
minority did not make such a stand at Thermopylae, as we
did. Do you know, we had like to have been the majority ?
Xerxes 5 is frightened out of his senses; Sysigambis* has

LETTER 934. 1 In January 1742. minster election petition.

2 In February 1751, during the 3 George III.

proceedings against Hon. Alexander 4 The Princess Dowager of Wales.
Murray in connection with the West-



WALPOLK. VI



2 To the Earl of Hertford [1764

sent an express to Luton to forbid Phraates 5 coming to
town to-morrow : Norton's impudence has forsaken him ;
Bishop Warburton is at this moment reinstating Mr. Pitt's
name in the dedication to his Sermons, which he had ex-
punged for Sandwich's ; and Sandwich himself is at Paris,
perhaps, by this time, for the first thing I expect to hear
to-morrow is, that he is gone off.

Now are you mortally angry with me for trifling with
you, and not telling you at once the particulars of this
almost-revolution. You may be angry, but I shall take my
own time, and shall give myself what airs I please both to
you, my Lord Ambassador, and to you, my Lord Secretary
of State, who will, I suppose, open this letter if you have
courage enough left. In the first place, I assume all the
impertinence of a prophet, ay, of that great curiosity,
a prophet, who really prophesied before the event, and
whose predictions have been accomplished. Have I, or
have I not, announced to you the unexpected blows that
would be given to the administration? come, I will lay
aside my dignity, and satisfy your impatience. There's
moderation.

We sat all Monday hearing evidence against Mr. Wood,
that dirty wretch Webb, and the messengers, for their illegal
proceedings against Mr. Wilkes. At midnight, Mr. Gren-
ville offered us to adjourn or proceed. Mr. Pitt humbly
begged not to eat or sleep till so great a point should be
decided. On a division, in which though many said ay to
adjourning, nobody would go out for fear of losing their
seats, it was carried by 379 to 31, for proceeding and then
half the House went away. The ministers representing
the indecency of this, and Fitzherbert saying that many
were within call, Stanley observed, that after voting against
adjournment, a third part had adjourned themselves, when,
8 The Earl of Bute ; Luton was his country seat.



17G4] To the Earl of Hertford 3

instead of being within caU, they ought to have been within
hearing : this was unanswerable, and we adjourned.

Yesterday we fell to again. It was one in the morning
before the evidence was closed. Carrington, the messenger,
was alone examined for seven hours. This old man, the
cleverest of all ministerial terriers, was pleased with re-
counting his achievements, yet perfectly guarded and
betraying nothing. However, the arcana imperii have
been wofully laid open.

I have heard Garrick, and other players, give themselves
airs of fatigue after a long part think of the Speaker, nay,
think of the clerks taking most correct minutes for sixteen
hours, and reading them over to every witness ; and then
let me hear of fatigue ! Do you know, not only my Lord
Temple, who you may swear never budged as spectator,
but old Will Chetwynd, now past eighty, and who had
walked to the House, did not stir a single moment out of
his place, from three in the afternoon till the division at
seven in the morning. Nay, we had Patriotesses, too, who
stayed out the whole : Lady Eockingham and Lady Sondes
the first day ; both again the second day, with Miss Mary
Pelham 6 , Mrs. Fitzroy, and the Duchess of Eichmond, as
patriot as any of us. Lady Mary Coke, Mrs. George Pitt,
and Lady Pembroke, came after the Opera, but I think did
not stay above seven or eight hours at most.

At one, Sir W. Meredith moved a resolution of the illegality
of the warrant, and opened it well. He was seconded by
old Darlington's brother 7 , a convert to us. Mr. Wood, who
had shone the preceding day by great modesty, decency, and
ingenuity, forfeited these merits a good deal by starting up
(according to a ministerial plan), and very arrogantly, and

6 Fourth daughter of Hon. Henry M.P. for Durham county, son of
Pelham ; d. unmarried, second Lord Barnard and brother of

7 Hon. Gilbert Vane (d. 1772), first Earl of Darlington.

B 2



4 To the Earl of Hertford [i?64

repeatedly in the night, demanding justice and a previous
acquittal, and telling the House he scorned to accept being
merely excused ; to which Mr. Pitt replied, that if he dis-
dained to be excused, he would deserve to be censured.
Mr. Charles Yorke (who, with his family, have come roundly
to us for support against the Duke of Bedford on the Marriage
Bill) proposed to adjourn. Grenville and the ministry would
have agreed to adjourn the debate on the great question
itself, but declared they would push this acquittal. This
they announced haughtily enough for as yet, they did not
doubt of their strength. Lord Frederick Campbell was the
most impetuous of all, so little he foresaw how much wiser
it would be to follow your brother. Pitt made a short
speech, excellently argumentative, and not bombast, nor
tedious, nor deviating from the question. He was sup-
ported by your brother, and Charles Townshend, and Lord
George ; the two last of whom are strangely firm, now they
are got under the cannon of your brother: Charles, who,
as he must be extraordinary, is now so in romantic nicety
of honour. His father 8 , who is dying, or dead, at Bath,
and from whom he hopes two thousand a year, has sent
for him. He has refused to go lest his steadiness should
be questioned. At a quarter after four we divided. Our
cry was so loud, that both we and the ministers thought
we had carried it. It is not to be painted, the dismay of
the latter in good truth not without reason, for we were 197,
they but 207. Your experience can tell you, that a majority
of but ten is a defeat. Amidst a great defection from them,
was even a white staff, Lord Charles Spencer 9 now you
know still more of what I told you was preparing for them !

8 Charles Townshend, third Vis- 65; Lord of the Admiralty, 1770-79 ;
count Townshend ; d. May 12, 1764. Treasurer of the Chamber, 1779-82 ;

9 Lord Charles Spencer (d. 1820), Joint Vice-Treasurer of Ireland, 1782-
second son of third Duke of Marl- 1801 ; Joint Postmaster - General,
borough ; M.P. for Oxfordshire ; 1801-6.

Comptroller of the Household, 1763-



1764] To the Earl of Hertford 5

Crestfallen, the ministers then proposed simply to dis-
charge the complaint ; but the plumes which they had
dropped, Pitt soon placed in his own beaver. He broke
out on liberty, and, indeed, on whatever he pleased, un-
interrupted. Rigby sat feeling the vice-treasurership slip-
ping from under him. Nugent was not less pensive Lord
Strange, though not interested 10 , did not like it. Every-
body was too much taken up with his own concerns, or too
much daunted, to give the least disturbance to the Pindaric.
Grenville, however, dropped a few words, which did but
heighten the flame. Pitt, with less modesty than ever he
showed, pronounced a panegyric on his own administration,
and from thence broke out on the dismission of officers.
This increased the roar from us. Grenville replied, and
very finely, very pathetically, very animated. He painted
Wilkes and faction, and, with very little truth, denied the
charge of menaces to officers. At that moment, General
A'Court walked up the House think what an impression
such an incident must make, when passions, hopes, and
fears, were all afloat think, too, how your brother and
I, had we been ungenerous, could have added to these
sensations! There was a man not so delicate. Colonel
Barr6 rose and this attended with a striking circumstance ;
Sir Edward Deering, one of our noisy fools, called out,
' Mr. BarreV The latter seized the thought with admirable
quickness, and said to the Speaker, who, in pointing to
him, had called him Colonel, ' I beg your pardon, Sir, you
have pointed to me by a title I have no right to,' and then
made a very artful and pathetic speech on his own services
and dismission ; with nothing bad but an awkward attempt
towards an excuse to Mr. Pitt for his former behaviour.
Lord North, who will not lose his bellow, though he may

10 He was Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, but did not take the
salary attached to the post.



6 To the Earl of Hertford [i?64

lose his place, endeavoured to roar up the courage of his
comrades, but it would not do the House grew tired, and
we again divided at seven for adjournment; some of our
people were gone, and we remained but 184, they 208 ;
however, you will allow our affairs are mended, when we
say, but 184. We then came away, and left the ministers
to satisfy Wood, Webb, and themselves, as well as they
could. It was eight this morning before I was in bed ; and
considering that, this is no very short letter. Mr. Pitt
bore the fatigue with his usual spirit and even old Onslow,
the late Speaker, was sitting up, anxious for the event.

On Friday we are to have the great question 11 , which
would prevent my writing; and to-morrow I dine with
Guerchy, at the Duke of Grafton's, besides twenty other
engagements. To-day I have shut myself up ; for with
writing this, and taking notes yesterday all day, and all
night, I have not an eye left to see out of nay, for once in
my life, I shall go to bed at ten o'clock.

I am glad to be able to contradict two or three passages
in my last letter. The Prince and Princess of Brunswick
are safely landed, though they were in extreme danger.
The Due de Pecquigny had not only been put in arrest
late on the Sunday night, which I did not know, but has
retrieved his honour. Monsieur de Guerchy sent him away,
and at Dover, Virette found him, and whispered him to
steal from D'Allonville and fight. The Due first begged his
pardon, owned himself in the wrong, and then fought him,
and was wounded, though slightly, in four places in the
arm ; and both are returned to London with their honours
as white as snow.

Sir Jacob Downing 12 is dead, and has left every shilling

11 "That a general warrant for 12 Sir Jacob Garrard Downing,
seizing the author, printer, &c. of a fourth Baronet,
seditious libel is not legal.'



1764] To the Earl of Hertford 7

to his wife ; id est, not sixpence to my Lord Holland ; a
mishap which, being followed by a minority of 197, will
not make this a pleasant week to him.

Well ! now would you believe how I feel and how I wish?
I wish we may continue the minority. The desires of some
of my associates, perhaps, may not be satisfied, but mine
ara Here is an opposition formidable enough to keep abler
ministers than Messieurs the present gentlemen in awe.
They may pick pockets, but they will pick no more locks.
While we continue a minority, we shall preserve our
characters, and we have some too good to part with. I
hate to have a camp to plunder ; at least, I am so Whig,
I hate all spoils but the opima spolia. I think it, too,
much more creditable to control ministers, than to be
ministers and much more creditable than to become mere
ministers ourselves. I have several other excellent reasons
against our success, though I could combat them with as
many drawn from the insufficience of the present folk, and
from the propriety of Mr. Pitt being minister ; but I am
too tired, and very likely so are you, my dear Lord, by this
time, and therefore good night I

Friday, noon.

I had sealed my letter, and break it open again on receiv-
ing yours of the 13th, by the messenger. Though I am
very sorry you had not then got mine from Monin, which
would have prepared you for much of what has happened,
I do not fear its miscarriage, as I think I can account for
the delay. I had, for more security, put it into the parcel
with two more volumes of my Anecdotes of Painting; which,
I suppose, remained in Monin's baggage ; and he might not
have unpacked it when he delivered the single letters. If
he has not yet sent you the parcel, you may ask for it, as
the same delicacy is not necessary as for a letter.

I thank Lord Beauchamp much for the paper, but should



8 To the Earl of Hertford [i764

thank him much more for a letter from himself. I am
going this minute to the House, where I have already been
to prayers, to take a place. It was very near full then, so
critical a day it is ! I expect we shall be beaten but we
shall not be so many times more. Lord Granby, I hear, is
to move the previous question they are reduced to their
heavy cannon.

Sunday evening, 19th.

Happening to hear of a gentleman who sets out for Paris
in two or three days, I stopped my letter, both out of
prudence (pray admire me !) and from thinking that it was
as well to send you at once the complete history of our
Great Week. By the time you have read the preceding
pages, you may, perhaps, expect to find a change in the
ministry in what I am going to say. You must have a
little patience ; our parliamentary war, like the last war in
Germany, produces very considerable battles that are not
decisive. Marshal Pitt has given another great blow to
the subsidiary army, but they remained masters of the
field, and both sides sing Te Deum. I am not talking
figuratively, when I assure you that bells, bonfires, and
an illumination from the Monument, were prepared in the
City, in case we had had the majority. Lord Temple was so



Online LibraryHorace WalpoleThe letters of Horace Walpole, fourth earl of Orford; (Volume 6) → online text (page 1 of 36)