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M



tbe 3far East



LETTERS FROM GERALDINE GUINNESS.

FROM THE MEDITERRANEAN TO THE PO-YANG LAKE, CHINA.
18881889.



LONDON :

PRINTED BY GILBERT AND RIVINGTON, LIMITED,
ST. JOHN'S HOUSE, CLERKENWELL ROAD.




LETTERS FROM GERALDINE GUINNESS IN CHINA.

EDITED BY HER SISTER.



FIFTEENTH THOUSAND.



LONDON: MORGAN & SCOTT, PATERNOSTER BUILDINGS, E.G.



Ni:\V YORK:
12 Bible House, Astoi



Unfro&ucficw.




from a photograph by P. Abraham

Keswick.



I AM very thankful to hear that another edition of " /;/
thelFar East" is called for. It is a book that I
value highly ; and I feel sure that no one can read it
without being deeply interested, and really profited.
It is a photograph of the spiritual experience of
a devoted worker among a most needy and interest-
ing people." Its graphic descriptions bring the
reader into the very presence of the Chinese, to
their homes, and even to their hearts. I can
scarcely imagine anyone reading the book without
receiving a Missionary inspiration, and being brought
nearer to God, and nearer to the heathen.

To those especially who wish to acquaint themselves
with the work of the China Inland Mission the book
has a special value. To Miss Guinness, the deep
spiritual truths which underlie the methods of the
Mission are not mere theories, but have become a part of her own inner life. The
reader sees these truths illustrated in the daily life of the worker, in the homes of the
Chinese themselves.

And what is the secret of the deep sympathy which makes our dear friend so truly
one with those she has gone to raise and bless ? Is it not the very " love of God shed
abroad " in her heart by the Holy Spirit ; love for the unloving and unlovely ? God's
love needs no attractiveness to draw it out. He loves because He is love; just as
the light shines, because it is light. And love is as constant and untiring in its
operations as light, and as mighty in its results. Such love transforms by the power
of the Holy Spirit the unlovely into loveliness ; and really transfigures many a dark
life.

May God so bless the circulation of this book that many of its readers may be led
thus to follow in the footsteps of their Master.

Will not each reader join us in prayer that God will guide and bless our dear
friend, and give the health and strength that are necessary for her work ?



December $th, 1889.



(7

2005179




" Ye shall be -witnesses to Me . . . unto the uttermost
part of the Earth."

HESE were the last words of our LORD JESUS CHRIST
"When He had spoken these things . . . He was taken
up, and a cloud received Him out of their sight." A
prophecy, a promise, and a command were contained in
this fatewell sentence, and the nineteen Christian cen-
turies that have elapsed since it was spoken have seen the
prophecy come to pass, the promise fulfilled, the command
obeyed .

The parting words of Jesus lifted the eyes of His disciples
from the narrow Jewish world that filled their horizon, to the
greater world which lay beyond ; a world shut out by their
national prejudices, but which their Lord had died to redeem.
His purposes towards humanity were not bounded by the
limits of the land of Palestine. He had come to the Jew
first, but not to the Jew only. He had brought mankind a new
Thought, a new conception of the Father. He had told them that
" God so loved the world." That world He committed to His disciples,
in His parting charge to His Church. " The uttermost part of the
Earth ;" these were the last words of JESUS.

* *

The letters contained in this little book are from " the uttermost
part of the Earth," and come straight from a heart that is earnestly seeking to witness for
JESUS CHRIST. The reception that they met with on their first appearance in the pages




Preface.



of Regions Beyond has led to their being thus reprinted. They make no pretensions
to literary merit, being written in the simple, familiar style that one would naturally
use to one's home-people, and have been thrown into chapters somewhat irregularly
with regard to subject-matter rather than- to any special number of pages. As will be
seen, the first chapter is introductory, and Miss Guinness's letters begin with Chapter II.

The "Mary" often alluded to in the letters is Miss MARY REED, youngest
daughter of MRS. HENRY REED, and sister of MRS. HARRY GUINNESS. Miss REED
had been for more than a year preparing for China, by living and working in one of
the worst and lowest parts of East London, where she very bravely and successfully
threw herself into home-mission effort, amid surroundings which for spiritual darkness
and moral depravity could scarcely be exceeded in China. She sailed with the
missionary party on board the Kaisar-i-Hind, and she and Miss Guinness were
companions in the varying experiences described in the letters until they parted at
Tsing-kiang-pu (see p. 77). Miss LOTTIE MCFARLANE is the " L - " of the later
Journals, and Miss MAGGIE MACKEE the " M - ." A few editorial explanations will
be found in large type here and there, where parts of the Journal have been omitted
and connecting links are necessary.

The Editor's best thanks are due to Miss CONSTANCE F. GORDON-GUMMING for
kindly allowing one of her tasteful Chinese sketches to be reproduced on the cover
of this book; also to the CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY for the use of the blocks of
their capital map of China, which is quite the best thing of its kind to be had at
present ; and to Mr. B. BROOMHALL, of the CHINA INLAND MISSION, for the extracts
and information facing the map, and for the statistical table on page xiv.

Miss GUINNESS herself is associated with the CHINA INLAND MISSION. Current
letters from her appear every month in Regions Beyond, an illustrated missionary
magazine, connected with the East London Institute for Home and Foreign Missions,
some notice of which will be found at the end of this book. Our last tidings from
her, received at the time of going to press, were written en route for HONANV the great,
central, flood-devastated and famine-stricken province of Chind.

Millions are perishing to-day in that vast land, simply for want of common bread to
eat. But oh ! what countless millions have perished, throughout the length and
breadth of the great Empire of the East, day by day ever since JESUS CHRIST bade
His people go and carry the bread of life to the uttermost part of the Earth !



Preface.



The bread of life, the common bread of life, that belongs by right to " every
creature " since JESUS died for all, they are perishing for lack of, while we have
enough and to spare, and CHRIST is saying to us

" Give ye them to eat."

Shall we not, at any rate, tiy to obey HIM ?

Shall we not lift our eyes from the often-narrow world in which we live, to GOD'S
wider world, that lies beyond us, to the fields white unto harvest that have waited so
long for reapers, and that HE is calling us to reap ?

Shall we not pray HIM to enlarge our limited sphere of existence, and open our
hearts to sympathize with and care for other lives less rich than our?, and other hearts
less happy ; that into lives that know nothing of the Life Eternal, and into human
hearts that are hungering after God and feeling for HIM through the darkness that
still covers the uttermost part of the Earth, we may bring the knowledge of JESUS
CHRIST THE SAVIOUR OF THE WORLD.

LONDON, 1889.

Preface to the Second Edition.

THAT five thousand copies cf the First Edition of this book-
should have been circulated within five months of its
I publication, is surely evidence that the burden of the
Evangelization of the World is being increasingly laid on the
Church. We earnestly commend this second and enlarged
Edition to the prayerful consideration of all who belong to
CHRIST. Within three weeks of its first publication, " /// the Far
East" so stirred the heart and conscience of one reader that she was
led to give her life to missionary work in China. Would GOD that the
Second Edition might be used to send forth many labourers into the
great harvest field !

How is it that we are so little in earnest about the swiftly passing
opportunities that our brief life offers for the service of Jesus our Lord ?
They are such short and precious opportunities ! Before the first copy of this book




x Preface.

fft Ig 3$ J tit $ & II ffi fll f i] ftt

came from the press, heavy tidings had reached us from China. Miss Guinness wrote
on their last New Year's Eve :

These have been solemn hours, in which this great nation has stepped across the dim dividing line
and entered another unknown year. Another, another to add to the scores and hundreds and
thousands of her dark and Christless, irrevocable past !

Yes ! these have been solemn hours, and the Master has drawn very nigh, for only to-night we have
had the tidings of the sudden death of another of our dear workers. Sweet Maggie Mackee has died
from small-pox at Yangchau. It seems only the other day that we were going up the canal together
on our way to Tsing-King-Pu, and now she is gone dead buried with the Lord to-night ! I can
hardly believe it ! She was one of the strongest, bonniest creatures you could imagine, so full of life,
and had only been in China about eighteen months. I must not write more, though my heart is full.

The bright young life, full of busy service and happy witnessing, of which we get so
pleasant a glimpse in Chapter VII., was suddenly cut off and its story finished. Maggie
Mackee had passed beyond the toil and travailing of earth far beyond its struggling
and sin into the "happier place" of the child-hymn: not less busy there, only less
burdened, and more full of joy because seeing the King in His beauty.

Jesus Christ is always near those who follow Him,
But we cannot see Him here, for our eyes are dim ;
Yonder there's a happier place where His people see His face.

But her life had been well used, and when its story ended she left a worthy record
behind. The Chinese verse printed on every page of this book

f* ii ft PJ tit & -a m m ft m *t

"As Thou hast sent me into the world, even so have I sent them into the world" had
for her a depth of meaning. She felt that it demanded her life, herself, her all ; and
she willingly and gladly yielded to that demand everything.

Was she not right in that conviction ? Was she not right in that obedience ? Was
she not right in that entire devotion ? Does she regret it now?

When we see Him face to face, Who loved us and gave Himself for us, what shall
we think of the lives we lived down here? Oh let us listen to His "Follow Me!"
Let us OBEY IT !

LUCY E. GUINNESS.
CLIFF, Christmas, 1889.



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CHINA.




from-Oie Chunf,. Ifasaianajy Ada.':




re of tfye



AN ancient and populous Empire exists in the far East,
the most ancient, the most populous the world knows. Its
people number over four hundred millions, an inconceivable
multitude. Its eighteen provinces have been penetrated to
some extent by the messengers of Jesus Christ, but in the
seven provinces where missionaries have longest laboured, over
i eighty millions are beyond the reach of the Gospel ; in the other
eleven provinces a few missionaries are labouring, but over one
hundred millions are beyond tJieir reach ; while in the vast regions of Manchuria,
Mongolia, Thibet, and the North-Western Dependencies, which exceed in extent the
whole of Europe, are other twenty millions, making an aggregate of over two hundred
millions beyond the reach of all existing agencies.



" The claims oj an empire like this should stir ely be not only admittea but realized ! Shall
not the eternal interests of one-fifth of our race stir up the deepest sympathies of our nature, the
most strenuous efforts of our blood-bought powers? Shall not the low wail of helpless ,
Jiopeless misery i arising from one-half of the heathen world, pierce our sluggish ear, and
rouse us, spirit, soul, and body, to one mighty, continued, unconquerable effort for China's
salvation ? " /. Hudson Taylor.



" 'lake your Bible, and carefully count, not the chapters or the verses, but the letters from
the beginning of Genesis to the ' Amen ' of the Revelation; and when you have accomplished
the task, go over it again and again and again ten times, tw;nty, forty times nay, you must
read the very letters of your Bible eighty times over before you have reached the requisite sum.
'It would take something like the letters of eighty Bibles to represent the men, women, and
children of that ola ana wonarous empire. Fourteen hundied of them have sunk into Christ-
less graves during the last hour; thirty-three thousand will pass to-day for ever beyond your
reach. Dispatch your missionary to-morrow, and one million and a quarter of immortal
souls, for whom Christ died, will have passed to their final account before he can reach their
shores. Whether such facts touch us or not, I think they ought to move our hearts, it is
enough to make an angel weep." Rev. Silvester Whitehead.







PROPORTION OF MISSIONARIES TO THE POPULATION IN THE

EIGHTEEN PROVINCES OF CHINA PROPER.

(The estimate of population is that given in the last edition of " China's Spiritual Need and Claims.'
The number of Missionaries is according to an account corrected to May, 1888).



Province.


Population.


Jr?'- Proportion to
^TeT P P ulati "-


Or, One Missionary to a Population exceeding that of


Kwang-Tung


ijh m llions j 96 ! to 182,000


Huddersfield and Halifax (171,557).




Fuh-Kien ...


10"


64 ,


to 156,000


Newcastle (1 59,003).




Cheh-Kiang .
Kiang-Su ...


12

20


53 1
1 02


o 226,000
o 196,000


Hull (202,359).
Leicester ( 1 46 , 790) .




Shang-Tung .


19


66


o 287,000


Edinburgh (262,733).




Chih-Li


2O


: 78 :


o 256,000


Bradford (229,721).




Ilu-Peh


20\


43


o 476,000


Birmingham (447,912).




Kiang-Si
Gan-Hwuy ...


15

9




19 l'
33


o 789,000
o 272,000


Liverpool (599.738).
Bristol (226,510).




Shan-Si


9




42 1


o 214,000


Derby and Huddersfieid (187,660).




Shen-Si 7




9


o 777>ooo


Glasgow (526,088).




Kan-Suh 3




21


to 142,000


Oldham (138,220).




Si-Chuen ...


20




2 5


to 800,000.


Glasgow and Edinburgh (788,821).




Vun-nan 5
Kwei-Chau... i 4




13

3


to 384,000
to 1,333,000


Manchester (378,164).
Liverpool Manchester, and Dublin (1,330,984).


Kwang-Si ... 5




O (


> to 5 millions


London (no missionary).




Hu-Nan 16 ,,


3 itine-
rating


' o to 16 ,,


Four times Scotland.




Ho-nan 15 ,,


5


to 3 ,,


Paris.





" If tlwu forbear to deliver them that are drawn unto death, and those that are ready
to be slain ; if tJiou saycst ' behold we knew it not] doth not He that pondereth the heart
consider it ? and He that keepeth thy soul doth He not know it 1 and shall He not render
to every man according to his works ? "




afifc of C[cmfents.



CHAPTER PACK

I. "GOOD-BYE!" . . i

II. SECOND CLASS .' . 7

III. ON THE WAY TO CHINA . . . . . ., . -13

IV. HONG- KONG AND SHANGHAI TO YANGCHAU . . . ' . 25
V. FIRST DAYS IN THE FLOWERY LAND . . . .-..-. 36

VI. OPIUM SUICIDES AMONGST WOMEN . . . . i . 51

VII. TEN DAYS ON A CHINESE CANAL 63

VIII. AT HOME IN OUR CHINESE HADDON HALL . . . . -77

IX. BY WHEELBARROW TO ANTONG 82

X. LIFE ON A CHINESE FARM '.-'. . .92

XL SICK NURSING: THE " Hien" CITY; AND chez les Aristocrats . .109
XII. BLESSING AND NEED OF BLESSING IN THE FAR EAST . . . .123

XIII. A JOURNEY IN CENTRAL CHINA. FROM HANKAU TO HONAN . . 136

XIV. IN THE HEART OF HEATHENDOM 159

XV. A CRY FROM CHINA ". . 167

XVI. THE WAY TO THE WESTERN PARADISE . . . . ; -. 179



APPENDIX.

THE EAST LONDON MISSIONARY INSTITUTE. Press Notices of " In the Far East"
ORDER FORMS. INDEX OF ILLUSTRATIONS. INDEX OF CONTENTS.
BOOK ANNOUNCEMENTS.



they

Jiad been

mindful of

that country

from whence

they came out,

they might

have had

opportunity

to have

returned ;

but now they

desire a

better

country, that

is an

heavenly ;

Wherefore GOD is not
ashamed to be cctllea

'Their God';

for he hath prepared for
them a city"




ffc



A Missionary Farewell.

3% m fit $ <& at



CHAPTER I.



How many scenes are recalled by that one word
' Good-bye ' !

On the 25th of January, 1888, it was spoken
by not a few voices to a Missionary party
on the eve of setting sail for China. Per-
haps we cannot better preface Miss
Guinness' account of all that has followed
that Farewell, than by recalling a few of
the scenes that accompanied it.

After all it is real life that touches
us. We live in an earnest world, in
our every-day surroundings there is a
Great Deep that we cannot understand.
We live in a common world, and there
is a heart-sympathy that binds us all
together, whatever our name or nation.



Our

mission

aries abroad will be

glad to look at these

pictures. It will remind them of a good-bye long since said ! Our friends at home

may also like to see them. God grant that to many of them, just such a good-bye may

come !




Exeter Hall is crowded. There is no standing room. People are being turned
away from the doors. Honoured servants of God, representatives of all phases of
Christian life and effort are gathered on the platform. It is a Missionary meeting;
a Missionary Farewell.

Standing amongst the multitude, we realize, with an aching heart, all that this im-
plies ; the great Farewell Meeting has come at last ; we are going to say good-bye- /



A Missionary Hymn.



Suddenly the great organ peals forth, and from thousands of thrilling hearts and
voices in the vast congregation, the grand old hymn swells up :

" Thou whose Almighty Word Chaos and .darkness heard

And took their flight,

Hear us, we humbly pray, And where the Gospel ray
Sheds not its glorious day

Let there be Light ! "

It is wonderful. We are conscious that we are speaking to GOD. All the pain of
parting, the strain of the last few days, the anguish scarcely kept back, the forced
turning of thought from the actual cause of our coming together, lest self-control
should fail, vanishes in a great blinding light, the Infinite Presence of God. And with
a strange calm the thought comes ovjer us " Yes. It is not we, not our work, nor any
human effort that we seek, but THOU, whose Almighty Word . . . !"

Each word of the hymn as it passes is instinct with life and meaning ; but when on
the closing lines the great organ's full power comes out in the triumphant infinite
appeal " Blessed and Holy Three, Glorious Trinity, Wisdom, Love, Might, '
it is overwhelming. The billows of sound roll out like some vast surging sea, lifting
up mighty waves on high, bearing us right beyond self and time, and flooding the
soul with a sense of Infinitude. And a strong tide of feeling sweeps up from thousands
of hearts with the inspiring prayer,

" Blessed and Holy Three ! Glorious Trinity !

Wisdom, Love, Might !

Boundless as Ocean's tide rolling in fullest Pride,
O'er the world far and wide
Let there be Light .'"

The hymn is ended ; and as the earnest words of the speakers that follow ring out,
reaching the hearts of thousands with their powerful appeal, we look across the wide,
brilliantly-lighted hall, at the great assembly gathered to bid farewell to our missionary,
and our thoughts fly back to a wonderfully different farewell meeting, at which we
had been present only the night before.

# *
*

It was late on Sunday evening. Miss Guinness had just said good-bye to the
people of our largest Mission Chapel. We stepped together out of Berger Hall,



A nother Fareivell Meeting. 3

fo m % ? i] tt H & H ft iff ?i] tt i

leaving the dear folk ihere behind us stepped together out of the old home (as she
felt it long since !) into the black, wintry streets. Andrews and another of the night-
school men were waiting outside in the darkness and rain, to bid her a long good-bye.
We shall never forget the little scene that followed. The tall, grey-headed hawker
was always a familiar friend at Berger Hall, and we had long liked his simple earnest-
ness, knowing how noble a heart lay hidden under his uncouth exterior. We can see
him now standing there, bareheaded, in the rain can see his tall, rough figure, and
almost hear the half-broken voice, husky with emotion, with which he bid her good-
bye ! The trembling words of his mate, who could hardly speak, were more eloquent
than many an oration, when he broke down at last with,

" I can't say no more, Miss ; nor I can't say what I means but God bless you ! "

And tall, grey-headed Andrews bent down, and taking in his toil-hardened hands

hers that had so often brought him blessing, he stooped and kissed them, uncouth

East- end hawker as he was, with as much dignity as a prince could have commanded,

kissed them reverently, tenderly, silently, sobbing aloud the while !

* *
*

We are suddenly recalled from our mind-picture by the ringing applause that closes
an eloquent speech from Dr. Barnardo. Mr. Farwell, of Chicago, Mr. Reginald
Radcliffe, Mr. T. A. Denny, Mr. Grattan Guinness, the Rev. Archibald G. Brown
and others follow, Miss Guinness herself speaking before the close of the meeting.
And now the great gathering disperses. Thousands have bidden her good-bye to-
night but a more real farewell is yet to come for some of us.

* *
*

"Farewell" ? How much it means! What memories it awakens! In xancy
we can almost see the old chapel-keeper of Berger Hall, standing with his good
wife in the familiar doorway, their eyes brimfull of tears to see Miss Guinness go. We
stand once more in the crowded gathering at the Bromley Tabernacle, where the dear
East-end men and women, friends of past years and labourers together in the Gospel,
have met to say good-bye to their " dear friend." The^strange last scenes come back
to one again ; the packing and making of final arrangements, busy outfit prepara-
tions, journeys to town and journeys to Pyrland Road, the well-known English home
of the CHINA INLAND MISSION ; the pathetic little interviews with one and another
of the simple people who had been brought to Christ by the one they were parting
from, and to whose heart theirs were knit above all others ; then the home-scenes,
where, gathered the last morning round the Book of God, that had thus drawn the

B 2



4 The Traveller's Psalm.

f* n ft $ m ^ ^ in si tt

family about Itself every day since first the parents met, the Father's voice reads aloud
with a sound of deepest benison the traveller's psalm for the one who is going away,
. . . . " Shall I lift iip mine eyes unto the hills ? +From whence cometh my help ? My
help cometh from the Lord which made heaven and earth. . . ."

The wintry sunshine playing through the coloured glasses of the window, paints
patches of beautiful light on the floor, as those last, solemn moments pass away, and
one notices the sunlight and colour as details are noticed in the presence of a great,
overwhelming pain. But when the deep voice of the reader comes to the closing
verse of the psalm : " The Lord preserve thy going out and thy coming in, from this
time forth and even for evermore" the sunshine seems to fade away in the radiance of
a brighter Light. There is a PRESENCE that passing across the heart at times, leaves
" no need of the sun," for the Glory of God lightens that heart and the Lamb is the
Light thereof.

* *
*

In thought one can almost hear again the bewildering roar of the great city station
that has seen so many bitter partings and glad encounters. Now we are in the train,
hurrying swiftly past familiar East London districts, seen thus for the last time to-
day ! we stand inside the big docks and find our way with crowds of other passengers
and friends and relations to the ocean-bound " Kaisar-i-Hind ; " we are pressed
with the rest of the throng up the narrow gangway, and stand a few moments together
still on the hurricane deck above. A bell rings . . . again . . . again There
are moments that cannot be thought of, only felt.

# *
*

Our feet are on the shore now and the ship is moving away, slowly, slowly, so
slowly, that we can almost reach, across the gap between us, the missionary party
standing there on the upper deck. Keen January weather is crisping the sluggish


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