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HORACE W. CARFENTIER






the far East



LETTERS FROM GERALDINE GUINNESS.



FROM THE MEDITERRANEAN TO THE PO-YANG LAKE, CHINA



18881889



AND



MOST RECENT EXPERIENCES.



; ;;- :'. : Y ';:





(Mrs. HewABD TAYLOR, nee OEKALDINE GUIKSESS.I




togt



LETTERS FROM GERALDINE GUINNESS IN CHINA.



u



(Now Mrs. Howard Taylor.)

dn n e C. ^~ |J - ' "~






EIGHTEENTH THOUSAND.

THIRD EDITION.
RE-CAST AND FRESHLY ILLUSTRATED.



LONDON :

MORGAN & SCOTT, PATERNOSTER BUILDINGS, E.G.
CHINA INLAND MISSION, NEWINGTON GREEN, N.

1901.



T




\






Jntrobuctioru




v_



I AM very thankful to hear that another edition
of " In the Far East' 1 ' 1 is about to be issued ; it has
long been called for. Tt is a book that I, with
many others, value highly ; and I feel sure that
no one can read it without being deeply interested,
and really profited.

It is a photograph of the spiritual experience
of a devoted worker among a most needy and
interesting people. Its graphic descriptions bring
the reader into the very presence of the Chinese,
to their homes, and even to their hearts. I can
scarcely imagine anyone reading the book with-
out receiving a Missionary inspiration, and being
brought nearer to God, and nearer to the heathen.
To those especially who wish to acquaint them-
selves with the work of the China Inland Mission the book has a special value.
To the writer, the deep spiritual truths which underlie the methods of the
Mission are not mere theories, but have become a part of her own inner life.
The reader sees these truths illustrated in the daily life of the worker, in the
homes of the Chinese themselves.

And what is the secret of the deep sympathy which makes our dear friend
so truly one with those she has gone to raise and bless ? Is it not the very
" love of God shed abroad " in her heart by the Holy Spirit ; love for the
unloving and unlovely ? God's love needs no attractiveness to draw it out.
He loves because He is love ; just as the light shines, because it is light.
And love is as constant and untiring in its operations as light, and as mighty
in its results. Such love transforms by the power of the Holy Spirit the
unlovely into loveliness ; and really transfigures many a dark life.

We have met many workers for Missions, as well as Missionaries, to whom
this book has been an inspiration. May the present issue in like manner
speak to many hearts and lead many to follow in the footsteps of their Master.

Will not each reader join us in prayer that God will guide and bless the
dear writer and continue to give the health and strength that are necessary
for her work.



DAVOS, December, 1900.





443973



preface to the present fiWtton.

nOT since the days of the Indian Mutiny has so much interest centred on
" the Far East " as to-day. All Europe and America have recently waited
with almost breathless anxiety to learn the fate of their representatives in Pekin,
and now that suspense has given way to relief, another problem the restoration
of peace presses heavily on the Allied Powers.

But while the concern of the various Governments has been centred in
Pekin, the Christian Church has felt the deepest concern regarding the Work
of God throughout the whole of China. The century of Missions in that land
has closed with a Baptism of Fire such as seldom visited the Church, even during
the early centuries of the Christian Era. No fewer than one hundred and
thirty-three Protestant Missionaries and forty-eight children have been put
to death, while thousands of Native Christians have suffered martyrdom or
the loss of all things rather than deny their Lord. Dr. Morrison, in his
graphic account of the siege of Pekin, tells how they "heard the shrieks of
victims and the groans of the dying. For ' Boxers ' were sweeping through the
city, massacring the native Christians and burning them alive in their houses."
" The Native Christians," a Missionary writes, " have had to bear the brunt of
the hate and opposition. In some parts they are nearly exterminated. Some
have fled, but there are few places where they can flee to, as the enemy is
everywhere. It will be a purified ' remnant ' that will be the nucleus of the
future native Church."

As might be expected, at such a time, the critics of Missions have not been
silent, and Missionaries have been accused of being the cause of all this trouble.
It would be easy to show the baselessness of such charges. Let it suffice to
say that the command to " Preach the Gospel to every creature " permits no
hesitation on the part of the Church of Christ. We think the following pages,
with their vivid pictures of missionary life and work, cannot be read without
its being abundantly manifest how much such work is needed and what such
labour involves. These letters, with their narration of facts, constitute a powerful
refutation to the charges brought against Missionaries.

The writer of the letters was in 1894. married to Dr. Howard Taylor (son of
the Rev. J. Hudson Taylor). In this edition a new chapter has been added,
giving the substance of some of Mrs. Taylor's recent addresses in England, telling
of their work during the last few years in the province of Ho-nan.



PREFACE. vii

In the light of subsequent experience, what does the writer say concerning
the impressions recorded in her early years in China ? She says that the
" early convictions expressed in the letters have only deepened, early hopes
have been realized, and love to the land, the people, and the work has only
grown with the passing years."

During the recent visits of Rev. and Mrs. J. Hudson Taylor and Dr. and
Mrs. Howard Taylor to Australia and America, the book was constantly asked
for, and not a few testimonies were heard as to its usefulness. This has led
to its being reprinted. The present Edition is entirely re-cast and illustrated
with more modern pictures. The latest statistics have been given, and the map
at the end of the volume has been brought up to date.

At the recent Church Congress held at Newcastle, Mrs. Bishop in her paper
on the Far East said : " After eight and a half years of journeying among
Asiatic peoples I say unhesitatingly that the raw material out of which the
Holy Ghost fashions the Chinese converts, and ofttimes the Chinese martyr, is
the best stuff in Asia. The problem of China, religiously as well as politically,
is now upon us. Events call a halt in missionary operations a halt, not to
admit defeat, but to bring up overwhelming reinforcements. The word ' retreat '
is now on the lips of many, but the Church of Christ cannot, dare not, retire
from the blood-drenched battlefields of the Far East, so long as the Captain
of our Salvation is in the front, and men and women are ready to fight and die
under His banner."

With the earnest prayer that it may help the bringing up of " overwhelming
reinforcements," this book is once again sent forth.

March, 1901. MARSHALL BROOMHALL.

from preface to the first Efcition.

letters contained in this little book are from " the uttermost part of
the Earth," and come straight from a heart that is earnestly seeking to
witness for JESUS CHRIST. The reception that they met with on their first
appearance in the pages of Regions Beyond has led to their being thus reprinted.
They make no pretensions to literary merit, being written in the simple, familiar
style that one would naturally use to one's home-people, and have been thrown
into chapters somewhat irregularly with regard to subject-matter rather than
to any special number of pages. As will be seen, the first chapter is introductory,
and Miss Guinness's letters begin with Chapter II.

The " Mary " often alluded to in the letters is Miss MARY REED, youngest
daughter of MRS. HENRY REED, and sister of MRS. HARRY GUINNESS. Miss REED
had been for more than a year preparing for China, by living and working in
one of the worst and lowest parts of East London, where she very bravely and
successfully threw herself into home-mission effort, amid surroundings which



viii PREFACE.

for spiritual darkness and moral depravity could scarcely be exceeded in China.
She sailed with the missionary party on board the Kaisar-i-Hind, and she and
Miss Guinness were companions in the varying experiences described in the
letters until they parted at Tsing-kiang-pu (see p. 69). Miss LOTTIE MCFARLANE

is the " L " of the later Journals, and Miss MAGGIE MACKEE the " M ."

A few editorial explanations will be found in large type here and there, where
parts of the Journal have been omitted and connecting links are necessary.
LONDON, 1889.

Ifrom preface to tbe Seconfc jEMtion,

HAT five thousand copies of the First Edition of this book should have
been circulated within five months of its publication, is surely evidence
that the burden of the Evangelization of the World is being increasingly laid on
the Church. We earnestly commend this second and enlarged Edition to the
prayerful consideration of all who belong to CHRIST. Within three weeks of
its first publication, " In the, Far East " so stirred the heart and conscience of one
reader that she was led to give her life to missionary work in China. Would
GOD that the Second Edition might be used to send forth many labourers into
the great harvest field !

LUCY E. GUINNESS.
CLIFF, Christmas, 1889.



IX




of t$e



AN ancient and populous Empire exists in the
far East, the most ancient, the most populous the
world knows. Its people number over four hundred
millions, an inconceivable multitude. Its eighteen
provinces have been penetrated to some extent by
the messengers of Jesus Christ, but in the seven
provinces where missionaries have longest laboured,
over eighty millions are beyond the reach of the Gospel;
in the other eleven provinces a few missionaries
are labouring, but over one hundred millions are
beyond their reach ; while in the vast regions of

Manchuria, Mongolia, Thibet, and the North- Western Dependencies, which
exceed in extent the whole of Europe, are other twenty millions, making an
aggregate of over two hundred millions beyond the reach of all existing agencies.

a The claims of an empire like this should surely be not only admitted but realized!
Shall not the eternal interests of one-fifth of our race stir up the deepest sympathies of
our nature, the most strenuous efforts of our blood-bought powers^ Shall not the loiv
wail of helpless, hopeless misery, arising from one-half of the heathen world, pierce our
sluggish ear, and rouse us, spirit, soul, and body, to one mighty, continued, unconquerable
effort for China's salvation ? " -J. Hudson Taylor.

" Take your Bible, and carefully count, not the chapters or the verses, but the letters
from the beginning of Genesis to the ' Amen ' of the Revelation ; and when you have
accomplished the task, go over it again and again and again ten times, twenty, forty
times nay, you must read the very letters of your Bible eighty times over before you have
reached the requisite sum. It ivould take something like the letters of eighty Bibles to
represent the men, women, and children of that old and wondrous empire. Fourteen
hundred of them have sunk into Christless graves during the last hour ; thirty -three
thousand will pass to-day for ever beyond your reach. Dispatch your missionary to-
morrow, and one million and a quarter of immortal souls, for whom Christ died, will
have passed to their final account before he can reach their shores. Whether such facts
touch us or not, I think they ought to move our hearts. It is enough to make an angel
weep}' 1 Rev. Silvester Whitehead.



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Xll



PROPORTION OF MISSIONARIES TO THE POPULATION IN THE

EIGHTEEN PROVINCES OF CHINA PROPER ; SHOWING

THE ADVANCE MADE FROM 1888 to 1900.



(The estimate of population is that given in the last edition of "China's Spiritual Need and
Claims." The number of Missionaries is according to an account corrected to May, 1888, and June,
1900.)



Province.


Population.


No. of
Missionaries

1888.


Proportion to
Population.


.No. of.
Missionaries
1900.


Proportion to
Population.


Kwang-Tung


17^ millions


9 6


I to 182,000


253


I to 67,200


Fuh-Kien


10


64


I to 156,000


252


I to 40,000


Cheh-Kiartg . . .


12


53


I to 226,000


209


to 57,ooo


Kiang-Su


20


102


I to 196,003


372


to 54,000


Shang-Tung...


19


66


I to 287,000


205


to 92,000


Chih-Li


2O


78


I to 256,000


294


to 68,000


Hu-peh


20^


43


I to 476,000


2O I


to 102,000


Kiang-Si


15


19


I to 789,000


138


to 109,000


Gan-Hwuy ...


9


33


I to 272,000


IIQ


to 76,000


Shan-Si


9


42


i to 214,000


'58


to 57,ooo


Shen-Si


7


9


I to 777,000


8 9


to 78,000


Kan-Suh


3


21


I to 142,900


35


to 86,000


Si-Chuen


20


25


I to 800,000


205


to 97,000


Yun-nan


5


13


i to 384,000


34


to 147,000


Kwei-Chau ...


4


3


i to 1,333,000


18


to 222,000


Kwang-Si


5





o to 5 millions


19


to 265,000


Hu-Nan


16


3 itinerating


o to 16 ,,


10


to 1,600,000


Ho-nan ...


15


5


i to 3


39


I to 385,000



" If thou forbear to deliver them that are drawn unto death, and those that are
ready to be slain ; if thou sayest 'behold we knew it not,' doth not He that pondereth the
heart consider it? and He that keepeth thy soul doth He not know it"? and shall He not
render to every man according to his works ? "



Xlll




a>Ce of



* >



CHAPTER

I. "GOOD-BYE!" . ...

II. SECOND CLASS .......

III. ON THE WAV TO CHINA

IV. HONG-KONG AND SHANGHAI TO YANGCHAU

V. FIRST DAYS IN THE FLOWERY LAND .....
VI. OPIUM SUICIDES AMONGST WOMEN . . . . .

VII. TEN DAYS ON A CHINESE CANAL

VIII. AT HOME IN OUR CHINESE HADDON HALL

IX. BY WHEELBARROW TO ANTONG

X. LIFE ON A CHINESE FARM .......

XI. SICK NURSING : THE " Hien " CITY ; AND chez les Aristocrats
XII. BLESSING AND NEED OF BLESSING IN THE FAR EAST

XIII. A JOURNEY IN CENTRAL CHINA. FROM HANKAU TO HONAN

XIV. IN THE HEART OF HEATHENDOM

XV. A CRY FROM CHINA

XVI. RECENT EXPERIENCES

XVII. THE WAY TO THE WESTERN PARADISE ....

INDEX OF CONTENTS

APPENDIX

BOOK ANNOUNCEMENTS .



i

7

13

22
32

44

55
66
70
78
9i

IO2
112
I 3

137
144

I6 7
179

181
184



XIV



ist of Jlltrsfrafions.



rjtutt

Portrait of Mrs. Howard Taylor Frontispiece
Rice Fields .... Title Page
Portrait of Rev. J. Hudson Taylor
The Lake District ....

Berger Hall

The Old Home (Harley House) .

Inside the Big Docks

Bird's-eye View of Han-kow .

On Board a P. & O.

Naples' Beautiful Bay .

In the Suez Canal ....

A Chinese City Gate

Map of Malay Peninsula

Typical Chinese ....

Tropical Fairyland

A Palm Tree

A Japanese Jinriksha

The Su-chau Creek, Shanghai

Daybreak near Hong- Kong .

A Real Chinaman ....

The Shanghai Bund

Shanghai Missionary Home (C.I.M.)

The River Steamer Fuh-ho .

From the Fuh-ho into a Canal Boat

A Waterfall

Sail Up



v
xvi

2

3
4
6

7

9
10

12
13
H
15

16
17

21
22
23
26

27
28
29
31
32



Mission Premises at Yang-Chau .

The Temple of Ten Thousand Idols

Buddhist Abbot at Yang-Chau

This Poor Creature

A Workman's Hut

Chinese Ladies ....

Chinese Soldiers . . .

Wealthy Opium Smokers

The City Gates Reached

Lake on the Tali-Thibetan Road .

On the Grand Canal

A Chinese Tract ....

Chinese Boatwomen and Children

The Floating Homes of China

A Bridal Chair ....

Haddon Hall in Days of Yore

A Chinese Wheelbarrow

A Host of Olive-Tinted Faces

Chinese Ferry and Fishing Boat .

Ten-nai-nai .....

A Mandarin

The Elder Brother ....
Some Worshippers at Lan-chau
Chinese Mill-stone ....
A Chinese Teacher
Ornamental Gardens



34
36
37
40

4i
43
43
44
47
54
56
58
59
61

65
66

7i
73
77
79
82

85
90

9i
95



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



xv



1'AGE

Interior of a Chinese Chapel . . . 101
Street and Pagoda . ' . . . .102

Wheelbarrows 104

Ta-ku-t'ang Lake 107

Station at An-ren 1 10

A Chinese Houseboat . . . .114
Mouth of the River Han . . . 115
Moored for the Night .... 117

A Shan Soldier 120

Boating Experiences . . . .122
Boundary between Hupeh and Ho-nan 124

A Wayside Inn 127

Native Christians in Ho-nan . . .128

A Ho-nan City 130

Scenes at Chau-kia-keo . . . .134
Chinese Scroll 137



PAGE

Strolling Theatricals . . . . 139
Portraits of Dr. and Mrs. Howard

Taylor .... . . 144

The Shanghai Cathedral . . . 145
The Mission-house at Ch'en-cheo . . 147
Some He-nan Christian Women . . 149

Chinese Scenes 152

Ur. and Mrs. Howard Taylor in Chinese

Dress 155

Guest Hall at T'ai-kang. . . .157
Chinese Gentlemen .... 160
Boys' Schools at T'ai-kang 1 . . . 163

On that very Spot 164

The W T ay to the Western Paradise . 167
Facsimile of Buddhist Tract . . .171
The Goddess of Mercy and Child . . 174





fRULYif

they

had been
mindful of

that coiintry
from whence
they came out,
they might
have had
opportunity
to have
returned :
but now they
desire a
better
country, that

is an
heavenly :

IV her ef ore GOD is not
ashamed^to be called

'Their God';
for He hath prepared for
them a city"




H fllM8sionar\> farewell



CHAPTER I.



JOW many scenes are recalled by that one word " GooJ-bye " /
i On the 25th of January, 1888, it was spoken by not a few voices to a

6 Missionary party on the eve of setting sail for China. Perhaps we cannot
better preface Miss Guinness' account of all that has followed that farewell, than
"by recalling a few of the scenes that accompanied it.

After all it is real life that touches us. We live in an earnest world, in our
every-day surroundings there is a Great Deep that we cannot understand. We
live in a common world, and there is a heart-sympathy that binds us all together,
whatever our name or nation. Our missionaries abroad will be glad to look at
these pictures. It will remind them of a good-bye long since said ! Our friends
at home may also like to see them. God grant that to many of them, just such
a good-bye may come .'



# #
*



Exeter Hall is crowded. There is no standing room. People are being
turned away from the doors. Honoured servants of God, representatives of all
phases of Christian life and effort are gathered on the platform. It is a Missionary
meeting ; a Missionary Farewell.

Standing amongst the multitude, we realize, with an aching heart, all that
this implies ; the great Farewell Meeting has come at last ; we are going to
say good-bye .'

Suddenly the great organ peals forth, and from thousands of thrilling hearts
and voices in the vast congregation, the grand old hymn swells up :

" Thou, whose Almighty Word Chaos and darkness heard

And took their flight,

Hear us, we humbly pray, And where the Gospel ray
Sheds not its glorious day

Let there be Light ! "

It is wonderful. We are conscious that we are speaking to GOD. All the pain of
parting, the strain of the last few days, the anguish scarcely kept back, the forced
turning of thought from the actual cause of our coming together, lest self-control
should fail, vanishes in a great blinding light, the Infinite Presence of God. And
with a strange calm the thought comes over us " Yes. It is not we, not our work,
nor any human effort that we seek, but THOU, whose Almighty Word . . . ! "

B




A MISSIONARY HYMN.

Each word of the hymn as it passes is instinct
with life and meaning ; but when on the closing
lines the great organ's full power comes out in the
triumphant infinite appeal " Blessed and Holy Three,
Glorious Trinity, Wisdom, Love, Might, " it is
overwhelming. The billows of sound roll out like
some vast surging sea, lifting up mighty waves on
high, bearing us right beyond self and time, and
flooding the soul with a sense of Infinitude. And
a strong tide of feeling sweeps up from thousands of
hearts with the inspiring prayer,

"Blessed and Holy Three ! Glorious Trinity !

Wisdom, Love, Might !

Boundless as Ocean's tide rolling in fullest Pride,
O'er the world far and wide
Let there be Light .' "

The hymn is ended ; and as the earnest words of the speakers that follow
ring out, reaching the hearts of thousands with their powerful appeal, we look
across the wide, brilliantly-lighted hall, at the great assembly gathered to bid


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Online LibraryHoward TaylorIn the Far East; letters from Geraldine Guinness in China. (Now Mrs. Howard Taylor) → online text (page 1 of 19)