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& reminding their Idships th even if they hd done so, they

(hd no auth'ty to prejudice the interests of the city .He al-
so directs their attention to the Act of Parliament of the
5th of her My's reign which specially enacted th foreigners
mt not only buy in Leadenhall on Monday, but during the rest
i of the wk in the markets of Southwark( 1 52)
(5^1580,25 June:Lr fr the O'l to the LdMayor, informing him that
the Counsel for the Foreign Os hd Id certain informations
bef the Ot of Star Ohamber;that they hd also rec'D Irs fr
the Ld Chief Baron and Mr Justice Meade, who hd been appted
by th Ct to settle the controversy betw them & the FVee Cs.
The O'l direct th the foreign Os be permitted to buy leather
at all accustomed markets within the City, the same as the
Free C8,until the next Ot of Parliament,unle8s in the
mean time gd cause be shown to the contrary



PREFACE.



one, without reckoning the 424 Burgundians, who did not come from Bur-
gundy, but from that portion of the Netherlands which had been under the
rule of the House of Burgundy. The Burgundians alone had increased from
44 in 1567 to 424 in 1571.

Two other important returns, in November and December, 1571, will
appear in the next volume, which will also comprise several later returns,
found among the Cecil MSS., and transcribed by permission of the Marquis
of Salisbury.

Until an index to the whole work can be compiled, it is hoped that
/^he Index of Localities in and near London will enable inquirers after any
"ndividual stranger, when once discovered, to trace him from list to list
'vithout much trouble.

A table of the trades, occupations, and other descriptions of the
foreigners in London is appended. The identification of the Latin, Dutch,
!^'rench, and English descriptions has given much trouble, but it is hoped
that no serious mistakes have been made. While the numbers of foreign
tailors, shoemakers, and other trades already common in London were large,
it may be doubted whether they were really much in excess of the
requirements of the immigrants themselves, although, according to Burn
(p. 9), a few years later in 1576, the English Cordwainers obtained a
commission of inquiry as to the number of aliens bom who were shoemakers,
and in 1578 the "Free Shoemakers" petitioned Lord Burghley against "cer-
tain strangers ".

Little complaint could be made by the English artisans of the new
arts introduced by the strangers, such as the making of arras or tapestry,
lace-making, embroidery, and the various branches of silk-working and silk-
weaving ; * while many trades already existing in England doubtless received
extensive developments. But other English tradesmen no doubt suffered
I severely from the competition of the numerous foreign brewers, coopers,
' cutlers, goldsmiths, hatters, joiners (or cabinet-makers), leather-dressers, lock-
I smiths, merchants, printers, sawyers, smiths, weavers, and others. The many
foreign physicians, surgeons, and schoolmasters must also have been in excess
of the demands created by the strangers.

Most of the "pa;inters" were no doubt artists in the modern sense, the
famous Lucas de Heere, for instance, being included among them. Hans
Holbein and his fee of thirty pounds a year are duly entered on p. 41, but
his occupation is not there set down.f

The general nature of these returns has now been indicated, but their
chief value, in the eyes of people of Huguenot descent, will lie in the
biographical and genealogical details which they so abundantly furnish.
Owing to the varieties of spelling presented by many of the surnames, diffi-
culty will, however, often be experienced in identif5dng and tracing individuals
and families. Some names would be quite unrecognisable without the aid

* The benefit to the revenue accruing from some of these is pointed out in Grindall's letter of 22nd July
1567.

t It is curious that the name of "Gaynsborow" occurs on p. 26, but without any description. "Garick the
paynter " occurs on p. 164,



PREFACE.



which can be derived from the collation of similar lists, and doubtless many
errors will be discovered, but for these there is every excuse. It must be
remembered that the English commissioners, in their visitation from house
to house, would have great difficulty in reducing the unwonted sounds to
writing, which would be roughly done on the spot, and further blunders
would naturally be made by the engrossers in copying from the original
notes names all more or less unfamiliar to them. Then again, as before
remarked, some of the returns are in a decayed and faded condition, and
the names have in such cases been read only with the greatest trouble and
with some uncertainty ; but as the various lists have now been brought
together, it will be easier to see and correct any mistakes that may have
been made.

We have already stated the obligations we are under to Mr. Moens, and
we desire to express our thanks for his contributions to this work. We
must especially thank Mr. G. H. Overend, F.S.A., of the Public Record
Office, Assistant - Secretary of the Society, for constant advice and for
numerous references. We are further under great obligation to Mr. W. C.
Waller, F.S.A., a member of the Society, for visiting Hatfield, inquiring as
to the missing returns, and obtaining the loan of several later ones, before
referred to. Nor must we omit to acknowledge the facilities which have
been accorded to us by the Rev. A. D. A. van Scheltema, Minister of the
Dutch Church.



R. E. G. K.
E. F. K.



27 Chancery Lane,

London, June., 1900.



TRADES; OCCUPATIONS, AND OTHER DESCRIPTIONS.



Ambassadors of Spain, a man belonging to the,

455.
Apothecaries (apothecarius, pharmacopola, apo-

teker), 211, 275, 291, 446, 453.
Aquavitfe-maliers, 54, 168, 293, 453.
Armour. See Harness.
Armourer, 19, 22.
Arras-makers or workers (tapetarius, tapitsier), 205,

209, 319 ter, 357, 402, 420, 424, 447, 477, 478 ter,

479.

— in the Queen's work, 274, 275. See Work-
men.

— See Tapestry.

Arrow-maker, 425. '

Bakers, 80, 273. See Brown-baker.

Balance-maker, 430.

Ball-maker, 465.

Band-maker, 458. See Hatband-makers.

Basket-makers (sportarius, sportularius, mande-
maker), 22, 60, 162, 202, 203, 206, 208, 212, 213,
214, 270, 273, 275, 276, 278, 333, 340, 390, 419,
429, 432, 444, 445, 450, 452, 453.

Bayes (made at Norwich), buyers and sellers of,
" 448 ler, 475. See Cloth.

Blacksmith, the Queen's workman, 292.

— master, to the Queen, his sei"vant, 455.
Blacksmiths ffaber ferrarius), 29, 248, 274, 276, 288,

289, 290, 350, 351, 462.

Blade-smiths, 421, 423.

Blind men, 206, 209.

Boarders (scholars), 431, 441. See School-children.

Boatman, 22.

Bonnet-maker, 202.

Bookbinders (compactor librorum, boucbindere),
49, 67, 83, 211, 274, 275, 270, 277, 281, 286, 294,
320, 391, 410, 411, 413, 415, 418, 423, 425, 435
436, 442, 454.

Bookseller (bibliopola), 289, 405, 411.

Botchers * (bocher, bowcher, bucher), 50, 54, 55, 65,
87, 102, 164, 165, 175, 179, 294, 305, 317 seq., 390,
404 seq., 474. See Menders ; Shoe-botchers.

Box-makers (busmaker, bosmaecker, bosroermaker,
doosemaker), 206, 209, 281, 285, 413.

Brasiers (ahenarius), 274, 409.

Brewers, or beer-brewers (eoetor cerevipiarius,
brauwer), 21, 22, 23, 25, 45, 152, 203, 212, 274,
276, 293, 342 seq., 391, 408, 409, 422, 425, 434,
447, 455, 456, 458, 468, 469, 470, 471, 472.



Brewers, master, 23, 54.

— under, 45, 293.

— servants of, 461.
Bricklayer, 437.

Broderers, or browderers (acupictor), 60, 66, 289,

290. See Embroiderers ; Needle-men.
Brokage, a man living by, 451.
Broker to the Ergasies, 453.
Brokers, 47, 165, 339, 340, 341, 352, 354, 385, 391, 403,

409, 417, 418, 427, 433, 434, 441, 442, 446, 451,

454 bis.
Brown-baker, 477.

Brush-makers, 342, 414, 419, 450, 467, 474.
Buckle (or brooch ?)-makers (fibularius), 289-92.
Butchers (boucher),t 302, 416 seq., 447, 449, 450, 451,

454, 455, 474 seq.
Butler, 46.
Button-makers (botonier), 289, 389, 391, 403, 416,

420, 435, 430, 437, 439, 440, 449, 451, 452, 455, 463,

476.

— moulds, maker of, 421.

Buttons, maker of loops for (a woman), 391.
Candle-makers (candelifex, candelarius), 276, 277,

289, 393.
Cap-thicker, 471.
Cappers, 1, 67.
Captain, 354, 389.
Carpenters (faber lignarius), 273, 274, 275, 277, 291,

292, 343, 417, 427, 469, 472.
Carrels and sackcloth, weavers of, 455.
Cauls, silk, maker of, 443. See Knitters.
Chair-maker (stoeldraeyer), 385.
Chandler? (chamler), 345. See Tallow-chandlers.
Charwomen (washing and brushing in strangers'

houses), 432, 464.
Cheese-maker (kausmaker), 204.
Chest-makers (arcularius, kistmaker), 203, 204, 206-

209, 213, 277, 280. See Trunks ?
Child, kept by the strangers called the Congregation,

432.
Civilian, 416.
Clerks, 49, 88, 165, 389.
Clock-makers (horologiarius, orloger), 276, 289, 420,

477.
Cloth, seller of, by great, 393.

— called bayes, sellers of, 390, 391. See Bayes.

— makers (pannifex), 274, 277.

— merchant, 97.



* In most cases this term may be intended for " shoe-botcher " or " cobbler " (see p. 175) ; but in others it means
"mender of old apparel," or "tailor" (c/. pp. 54, 164, 165, 390, with pp. 203, 205, 208).
t Qu. whether some of these were "botchers".



xviii TRADES, OCCUPATIONS, AND OTHER DESCRIPTIONS.



Cloth shearer (pannitonsor), 276. See Shearman.

— workers, 416, 469.

— broad, buyer of lists and shreds of, 448.
Clothes-dealer (cleercoper), 385 [cf. p. 282). See Old-
clothes-dealer.

Cobblers (sutor, sutor-calcearius, sutor-caligarius,
cobelaer), 22, 60, 63, 87, 162, 175, 179, 202, 204,
206-9, 212, 213, 214, 288, 289, 291, 294, 309, 317
seq., 407 seq.

— art of, 426.

Collar-makers (eollarius, colletier), 274, 275, 277,

291.
Comb-makers (pectinarius), 141, 235, 289, 341, 462.

463.
Comfit-maker, 391.

Commissioner from the Duke of Alva, 454.
Compositors. See Printing letters.
Concionator, 209, 275.
Consul in Breda, formerly, 273. ■
Cook, the King's, 23.
Cooks (cocus, eoquus), 48, 276, 290, 322, 411, 414, 418,

430, 440, 445, 450.
Coopers (doleator, cowper, cuper, kuyper), 21, 22,

23, 188, 202, 205-9, 212, 213, 214, 274, 281, 319,

338, 343, 355, 369, 408, 422, 445, 464, 465, 468, 469,

470, 472.
Copper-smiths (faber terarius), 235, 289 bis, 413, 420,

421, 466.
Cordwainers, 1, 138, 404, 422.
Coulter-smith (cultrorum faber), 291.
Cowman ? (cooman *), 282.

Crossbow-makers (balistarius), 289 ter, 291, 451.
Cupper ? (cornetier), 290, 291.
Curriers, 351, 463. See Tanners.
Cutlers (mesmaker), 202-206, 208, 211, 212, 213, 270,

285, 342, 353, 386. 414, 416, 419, 420, 421, 424, 458,

459, 466, 473.
Damasker, 458.
Damaskynner, 281.
Deacons, 210, 289 bis, 373, 374.
Denizens, passim.

— list of, 456, 457.
Disciple of P. Detenus, 281.
Distiller, 202.

Divinity, Master of, of Cambridge and Oxford, 441.
Doctor of Law, 393.

— in Medicines, 30.

Doctors, 47, 97, 286, 365. See Physicians.

Drapers, 354, 431.

Draymen, 63, 65, 293, 338, 465, 466, 470, 471, 477.

Drum-player, 345.

Dyers (tiiietor, blauverwer), 273, 275, 286, 351, 390,

445, 462, 471. See Leather ; Sackcloth ; Silk ;

Thread.
Elders (seniores), 202, 210, 278, 289 bis, 372-75, 387,

398 399.
Embroiderers, 389, 391, 403, 408, 420, 454, 477. See

Broderers ; Needle-men.
Engraver (cselator), 277.

— on brass (calcographus), 209. -
Excommunicated persons, 278, 281, 371.



Factor for Venetian ships, 452.

— for the Venetians towards the Argasies, 454,
Factors, 46, 67, 161, 164, 167, 234, 268, 387, 388, 395,

397, 411.
Falconers (fawkeners), 350, 465. See Hawks.
Feather-maker, 414.
Feathers, dresser of, 322.
Fees, recipients of, 41, 132, 133.
Felt-makers, 343, 404, 408, 413, 414, 478-'.
File-hewer, 463.
Flute-player (auloedus), 289.
Freemasons, 345, 463 bis, 465.
Fringe-weavers or makers (flmbriarius, textor-

flmbriarius), 288-92, 389.
Furrier (pellio), 276.
Gardeners (hortulanus), 274, 276, 406.
Gentlemen, 431, 440.
Gilder, 420.
Girdlers (nodifex, faiseur de cordons), 273, 274, 275,

277, 290, 389.
Glasiers, 193, 195, 462, 463, 465.
Glass, licensee to make, 391.

— makers (vitrearius, glaesmaker), 202-5, 209,
211, 450.

— worker of, 441.

Glovers (chirotecarius), 274, 275, 289, 346, 423, 463.

— (handtschoemaker), 204, 205, 207, 213, 280.

— (handtcleermaker), 207, 208, 212, 213.
Gold-beaters (bateur d'or), 290, 413.

— finer, 467.

Goldsmith, the Queen's (1523), 2.

Goldsmiths (aurifaber, aurifex, goldtsmit, gaud-

smet), 81, 97, 165, 171, 203, 205, 206, 207, 209,

274, 276, 277, 288, 290, 291, 292, 317, 322, 404 seq..

436-9, 441, 459, 475.
Gold-wire-drawer, 138.
Gunners or gun -makers, 19, 20, 340, 427, 463, 466,

472 bis.

— (confeetor bombardularum), 273, 275.

— (tormentularius), 277-
Gunpowder-man, 425.

Gunstock-makers, 451 ter. See Stock-makers.
Haberdashers (habedassarius, kreemer, kramer),

206, 208, 209, 274, 415, 426.

Harness and armour, occupier of, 452.

Harp strings, maker of, 463.

Hatband-makers, 320, 391, 405, 413, 414, 418, 440,
447, 449, 455, 456.

Hatters or hat-makers (pileorum confeetor, pile-
arius, causiarum et petasorum confectores,
petasarius, causiarius, hoemaker, hoeymaker,t
hoedtmaker, hoedenmaker), 1, 203-8,' 212, 214,
273, 274, 277, 279, 280, 286, 288-91, 319, 320, 343
seq., 391, 427, 428, 432, 449, 450 bis, 455, 458, 463,
468-73, 478.

Hawks, comers and goers with, 465.

Hauten tyck snyder, 209.

Hemp-beater, 402.

— dressers, 427, 429, 430, 446.
Horses, buyer and seller of, 432.

Hosen, workers or curlers of hair for great, 391, 447.



* Qu. an error for ooopman = merchant.

t If tills were a correct form, the English of it would be "haymaker," but it is clear that "hoedmaker" or
' hoedenmaker " is intended. The d was frequently dropped, as in "leer" for "leder," " kleer " for " kleederen,"
' vroevrouw," for " vroedvrouw," etc.



on the aid wnich the Florentine raerohantg rdl
?'2?ft^ ?H^f 5 the statement in Va sari (LIVE
I dj3) that when Filippo Brunellegchi guifil
to the ardena of S Maria del Fiore a cont at
or all architecta,in order that the beat de-
sign &r the vaultin6(ijj_,hia own) might be
secured it waa through the merohantg that tt
news trave Lied;

"A great deal of tine was lost before th
-arcnitects aasemb led. They were summoned
from afar by means of directiona given i
to the Florentine merchants living in i
France, Germany .England and Spain who we
commissioned to spend any amount of mor
..^^^ ^^^^- Prii^GiPal,moat experience
f .^oX^^ ."^f^ °^ *^°^^ regions. At leng
in 14^0 ,a 11 these foreign masters and
those of Tuscany were assembled at Flor
^^^Kf-^ ^^'^^ principal Florentine artig
and Flippo returned from Rome"



TRADES, OCCUPATIONS, AND OTHER DESCRIPTIONS. xix



Hosiers, 1, 67, 166, 317, 342, 405, 416 ter., 419, 436,

438, 439, 443, 452, 454, 464, 467.
Hosteler, 465.

House-holders,* 173, 175, 211, 406 seq.
Husbandman (agricola, landtbouwer), 273, 274,

276, 277, 280.
Jacket-maker (eolderemaker), 283.
Jerkin-makers, 414, 422, 434, 436.
Jewellers, 453, 475.
Joiners (faber scriniarius, schrynmaker), 22, 23, 67,

182, 202-9, 212 213, 214, 283, 289, 290, 292, 321,

342 seq., 372, 390, 391, 405 seq.

— one with the Bishop of London, 282.
Journeymen, 72, 171, 190, 477.

Keeper of Burgaynye Place, 67.

Keepers of women in childbed, 429, 430.

King's Household, [members of the,] 73, 112. Se-e

Sei'vants.
Knight, 434.
Knitters of knotted work, 428.

— of cauls and sleeves. 429.
Labourers, 321, 466.
Labouring folks, 422.

Lace-workers or makers (passementier), 279, 463.

— billament or billiment, makers or workers
of, 425, 441.

— French, maker of, 428.

— parchment, makers of, 389.

— purled, maker of, 429.

— silk, weaver of, 424.
Lance-maker (surname), 273.
Land-holders, 133, 432.
Lapidaries (lapydar, lapidorie), 23, 68.
Leather-dressers (alutarius), 289, 290, 348, 386, 390,

413, 466, 468, 470, 471, 473.

— dyers, 53, 435.

— sellers, 343, 345, 348, 404, 414, 471.
Leghwerker, leehwoerker, 207, 208. (Apparently

tapitsier ; ef. 208, 209.)
Letters, founder of. See Type-founder.

— See Printing-letters.
Linen-draper, 437.

— weavers (lynewever), 202, 205, 206, 208, 390,
466.

Locket-maker, 425.

Locksmiths (serse or serarum confector, slotmaker,

loquetier), 202, 206, 207, 212, 270, 275, 289, 368,

373, 414 bis, 415, 423, 424, 463.
Lodger of Dutchmen, 393.
Looms, maker of, 454.
Market-man (marschet man), 210.
Martyr (eombustus, verbrant), 279, 281.
Mason (nietzelar), 211.
Menders of old apparel, 390, 391, 448 bis. See

Botchers.
Mercer, 426.
Merchant s ( mercator. coepman), 30, 46, 49, 67, 93,

97, 1017 165, 167, 202, 204, 205, 283, 288-91, 313,

317 seq., 366, 367, 384, 389-92, 402 seq.

— companies of, 55, 01, 88, 130, 131, 132, 134,
160, 163, 164, 165, 167, 169, 175, 180, 184, 185,
246, 248, 295, 300, 304, 310, 366, 367, 384, 446.

Merchant-venturer, 479.

Midwives (obstetri.x, vroevrouw), 279, 284 bis.



Millers (molitor), 154, 276, 344, 422, 447, 461, 469 bis.
Milliners, 131, 164 bis, 336, 351, 352, 413, 414, 415,

419.
Milner, 197.
Ministers, 201, 210, 211, 276, 278, 282, 292, 320, 373,

375, 377, 389, 391, 392, 393, 398, 399, 413, 439, 452.
Minstrel, 245.

Minstrels, the King's, 24, 68.
Money, persons living by their, without trade, 391,

424, 426, 433, 454, 475.
Mop-maker (Dutch), (mop = a woman's coif ; also

a brick), 207.
Morrispike-maker, 406.
Moulders (boetser), 204, 212.
Mould-maker, 433. See Button-moulds.
Musician, a, to the Marquis of Northampton, 390.
Musicians, 321, 390, 391, 408, 442 bis, 445, 452, 453,

454, 475.

— the Queen's, 340, 342, 390, 391 bis, 406, 430,
434 ter, 451 bis.

Nail-maker, 471.
Needle-makers, 422, 436, 455, 456.

— men (aeuum opifices), 291. See Broderers.

— women, 391, 477.

— seller, 448.
Net-maker, 430.

Notaries public, 389, 409, 431, 442.

Notary, admitted, 442.

Old-clothes-dealer (outcleder vercoper). See Clothes.

Ore-worker, 439.

Organ -maker, 159.

Packer of linen cloth, 433.

Packthread-maker, 423.

Painter upon tables, 452.

Painters (pictor), 164, 201,235 bis, 211, 354, 388, 391,

405, 410, 413, 419, 422 bis, 424, 426, 431, 440, 442,

448, 451, 467, 470, 476, 479.
Parchment-maker 427.
Parsonage, inhabitant of a, 442.
Patterns (patrons), drawer of, 423.
Pearls, cutter of, 391.
Pensioners, 67, 94, 106, 112.

— of the Queen, 431.
Perfumer (mostly at Court), 391.
Pewterer (Englishman ?), 42,5.

Physicians (medicijn), 211, 295, 303, 300, 307, 323,
352, 358, 388, 390 bis, 446, 453, 477.

— (medico Romano), 388.

— See Doctor, Doctors.
Pick-maker, 412.
Picture-maker, 345.

Pin-makers, or pinners (spellemaker), 212, 433, 477.

Piper, 243.

Pointmakers, 427, 437.

Polisher (forbisseur), 291.

Poor men, 400.

Porch-maker (pouch-maker?), 216.

Post, the King's, 159.

Postmaker, 310.

— servant of the, 394.
Postmasters, 97, 167, 318, 384, 418, 434.

Posts, 97, 165, 303, 341, 353, 360, 301, 407, 414, 417,

419, 451, 403, 466.
Potter, 465.



' Cf. p. 287.



XX TRADES, OCCUPATIONS, AND OTHER DESCRIPTIONS.



Poueh-inakers(erumenarius,taschraaker,tasmaker,

tesseniaker), 29, 66, 153, 208, 248, 279, 288, 368,

373. See Purse-makers.
Prancier (French), 290.
Preachers, 172, 320, 360, 389 ter, 390, 391, 392, 403,

454.
Prentices, 2, 3, 7, 21, 26, 27, 28, 60, 70, 71, 72, 75, 70,

etc.
Priests, 29, 173, 430, 470.
Printers (impressor, typographus, prenter, drucker),

205, 208 ter, 213, 290, 291, 411, 412, 421 ter, 437,
478.

— book- (boucprenter), 203, 204, 209.
Printer's servant, 84.
Printing-letters, caster of, 393.

— founder of, 421, bis. See Type-founder.

— graver of, 405.

— setter of, 393. See Setter.
Prisoners, 393, 452.
Professor of the Gospel, 389.
Purse-makers, 435, 436, 437. See Pouch-makers.
Queen's man, the, 433.

Quilt-makers, 321, 479.

Reader, 441.

Rector of an English church, 30.

Ring-maker, 50.

Ruler of books of psalms for the Dutch Church,

455.
Sackcloth-weavers or makers, 392, 405, 408, 426,

427, 431, 441, 453, 455, 462, 464, 466, 467, 474,

470.

— dyer, 454.

Saddler (ephippiarius), 290, 291.

Sailors (nauta), 273, 351, 466, 471, 477.

Salter, 317.

Saltfish-dealer (saisamentarius), 274.

Saltpeter-man, 423.

Satin-drawer (sattyn treckere), 278.

— "raser" of, 437.

Sawyer in the Queen's work, 277.

Sawyers (serrator, sager), 205, 206, 213, 275, 276, 277,

283, 349, 466, 472.
Scabbard-makers (seheydemaker, seheemaecker),

206, 213, 286, 420.

School-children, or scholars, 210, 211, 392, 431, 441

bis.
Schoolmasters (ludimagister, psedogogus), 273 bis,

274, bis, 291, 292, 392, 405, 411, 414, 431, 434,

440, 441 ter, 465, 471, 479. See Teacher.
Scrivener, 458.
Scrutarius, 274.
Seamsters or sempsters (women), 393, 405, 420, 429,

430, 438, 4.50, 451, 453, 455, 466, 472, 477.
Serjeant, 345.

— of the Trumpeters, 296.

Servant to the Lady Katherine Dowager, 19.

— to the Lord Great Master, 166.

— to a merchant, 277.

— to the Lord Treasurer, 323.

— to the Earl of " Harforde," 443. .
Servants, passim.

— the King's, 22, 29, 48, 165.

— the Queen's, 340, 341, 390, 451.
Serving-men, 411, 477.



Setter, 207. See Printing-letters.

Sewing-women, 448, 451.

Shear-maker, 457.

Shearman, 390. See Cloth, shearer of.

Shepsters (men and women), 390, 432.

Shippers (schipper), 279, 444, 455.

Shipwrights, 351, 391, 454.

Shoe-botchers (vefceramentarius, sehoelapper), 204,
205, 208, 212, 273-6. See Botchers, Cobblers.

Shoemakers (ealcearius,* caligarius, schoemaker), 1,
22, 50, 52, 193, 195, 202-214, 248, 270, 275-8, 281,
282, 283, 285, 288, 289, 290, 319 seq., 405, seq.

Shop-keepers, 67.

Silk-dyers, 449, 450.

— men, 411, 438, 439.

— throsters or throwers, 470, 475.

— twisters, 409, 433, 449, 450, 479.

— weavers or workers (sericarius, subsericarius),
,273, 275, 276, 277, 320 seq., 389, 392, 402 seq.

— winders (men and women), 428 bis, 429, 430,
440, 453, 474. See Lace.

Skinners, 151, 166, 392, 410, 452, 456, 465 his, 466.
Slaters, 404, 410.

Smiths (ferrarius, smet), 22, 206, 207, 213, 289, 317,
-a=«yj3 ^,,^^ 386^ 43C, 440, 456, 458, 459, 464, 465,

467, 468, 470, 471, 472, 473.
Soldier, the Queen's, 289.
Sojourners, 410 seq.
Spinners (women), 405, 421, 424.

— (men and women) of worsted yarn, 428 bis,
429.

— (women) of wool, 463.

— (women) of linen, 463.
Spurrier (ealcarius), 255, 275.

Stationers, 2, 392, 406, 411, 440, 441, 447, 472, 478.
Stock-makers, 457, 458, 472. See Gunstoek-maker?
Stone-cutters, 270, 415 bis, 436, 438, 439 bis.

— — for rings, 452.

— graver, 441.

Stools (stoles), maker of, 464.
String-maker, 470.
Students, 273, 389, 431.

Sugar-bakers (saecararius, suyeker backer), 275,
276, 282.

— finer, 452.
Surgeant (a woman), 415.

Surgeons (ehirurgus, surgyn), 240, 275 bis, 277 his,
281, 283, 284, 287, 294, 295, 314, 341, 389, 415,
422, 427 bis, 441, 453, 454, 467, 468, 474, 477.

Table-keepers, 415, 418, 443, 446.

Tailors, 22, 334, 336, 343, 348, 391, 393, 402 seq.

— (snyder), 202, 203, 205-9, 212, 213.

— (sartor, vestiarius, kleermaker),t 202-6, 208,
212, 213, 214, 270, 271, 274-7, 279, 280, 282, 289.

— (sutor-vestiarius,), 290, 291.
Tallow-chandlers, 462, 464.

Tanners (coriarius, leertouwer), 273, 274, 280, 288-

91. See Curriers.
Tapestry-makers, or workers, 357, 390. See Arras-

naakers.
Teacher of children, 410.
Tenements, owner and tenant of, 391.
Tennis-balls, maker of, 391.
Thicker, 351.



* Cf. pp. 204, 275 ; 208, 209 ; 273, 278.



t Cf. pp. 204, 274.



TRADES, OCCUPATIONS, AND OTHER DESCRIPTIONS. xxi



Thicker of caps, 351.

Thread, dyers and makers of, 431.

— maker, white, 433.

— twister (duplator fili), 277, 400.

— winders, 428, 453.
Tiler-' (ty lor), 407.

Tinkers (cacabarius), 275, 349, 351, 463, 467, 470, 472.

Tippler, 464.

Tow-cards, maker of, 423.

Trumpeters, serjeant of the, 296.

Trunks, maker of, 466.

Turners (tornarius, drayer), 206, 288-91, 343, 403,

414, 419, 428, 429, 450, 454, 473.
Type-founder (fusor typorum, fondeur des lettres),

290, 291. See Printing-letters.
Velvet, maker and dyer of, 424.
Victor cupparius, 290.
Victualler, 350.
Vintners, 408.
Virginal-maker, 413.



Voeyr (boeyr?), 207 {of. Boeyer, 373).

Warehouse-keepers, 331, 332, 338, 339, 353.

Washing-balls, maker of, 466.

Water-bearers, 66, 322, 410, 424.

Watermen, 334, 3.51, 421, 470.

Weavers (textor, wever), 1, 203, 205, 207, 213, 273-

277, 280, 289, 317, 333, 343 seq., 404 seq.



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