Ildefonso Antonio Bermejo.

Architect and engineer (Volume v.131-132 (Oct. 1937-Mar. 1938)) online

. (page 20 of 57)
Online LibraryIldefonso Antonio BermejoArchitect and engineer (Volume v.131-132 (Oct. 1937-Mar. 1938)) → online text (page 20 of 57)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


without breaking.

Vitrolux, Mr. Alexander pointed out. Is unique in that
no other material so fully meets the requirements of
luminous architecture. As a result of its development,
the scope of this type of architecture is being greatly
increased.

For instance, store fronts of arresting eye-appeal,
and of a type of beauty usually confined to costly in-
teriors, are now achieved by covering ordinary walls
of brick or other material with an outer wall of Vitrolux,
in panes up to four feet square. Such walls of glass,
backed with illumination, are made possible by the un-
usual strength of tempered plate glass.

Large squares of such glass can be used around en-
trance doors and store windows, and the Idea can be
carried upward to any desired height, so that at night
the structure becomes a beacon of soft, glowing color.



AND NEW DEVICES

FORCED DRAFT VENTILATION FOR KITCHENS

A new type kitchen ventilator "Trade-wind Clipper
Blower" is being marketed by a Los Angeles firm. Avail-
able as a complete unit,
including motor and
wheel, the ventilator Is
ready for electrical con-
nection to plug outlet in
motor compartment, to
be installed between
joists, over kitchen range.
A small dimension duct
is run out of doors. Centrifugal, squirrel cage wheel
generates pressure to force air rapidly through ducts.
It is quiet in operation, compact with housing built of
welded steel, aluminum alloy wheel and chromium
plated grille. Descriptive bulletin for A. I. A. filing Is
available from the manufacturers.




PREFABRICATED HOUSE OF V^OOD PANELS

A new demonstration house of prefabricated wood
panel had its first showing on the occasion of Mrs.
Franklin D. Roosevelt's visit to the Forest Products Lab-
oratory, November 6. Interest was manifested by Mrs.
Roosevelt in the complete living arrangements pro-
vided, the type of construction as related to low-cost
housing projects, and the speedy erection possible with
the unit panel system.

The house is one story, 24 by 36 feet In floor area,
and has a large living room, kitchen, two bediooms,
bath, utility room, and halls, with garage adjoined. Its
completion is to be followed by construction of a two-
story house on the same system with flat and gable
roofs that can be used alternately.

As in previous examples, the structural units of the
cornpleted house are framed panels with surfaces of
firmly glued plywood, built to standard lengths and a
width modulus of 4 feet.



"MASTER" SIGN REFLECTOR
This new streamlined display board reflector incorpor-
ates the famous "Master" sign reflector superiorities
of Illumination together with a new angle-hood, vertical
socket construction which permits direct lamp service
from the ground — eliminating the use of ladders.

The master reflector provides a straight line cut off
at top of the board which practically eliminates light
spillage, scallops and shadows. Of compact construc-
tion and shaped to contours which blend perfectly with
the design of even the most modern "streamliner"
boards, it offers no obstruction to easy reading of the
message day or night.

Conduit is led straight into the angle-hood, no bends
being necessary while the lamp (75-150 watts) hangs
base up In a vertical plane. The reflector Is easily re-
movable by loosening two screws In the hood.



THE ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER






2^^^:^^^ OF DESIGN FOR ECONOMY




where live loads
are light

Vv'HKRKVFR live load ratings are relatively low, Bethle-
hem Light Sections open the way to definite economies
in the use of steel in floor construction and in all types ot
upper-tier work. In apartment buildings, hotels, office
buikiings, hospitals and similar structures, their proper-
ties make it possible to keep floor slabs within economi-
cal limits and materiallv reduce the total tonnage of steel.
Bethlehem Light Sections were developed to sup-
plement the familiar Wide-Flange Sections and to be
used wherever loads do not utilize the full capacity
ot regular sections of depth called hir bv the span. '1 he\'



are rolled of the same grade of steel and to essentially
the same shapes as Wide-Flange Sections. They have
ample thickness of metal in web and flange to comply
with all buikling code requirements and to be eligible for
all first-class construction. In adtiition to their use as floor
beams. Light Sections are used eflectively as columns in
upper stories, as struts between columns anti as purlins
in roof construction, particularly of industrial buikiings.
Complete data and advice of Bethlehem engineers on
the most efficient and economical use of Bethlehem Light
Sections are alwavs a\-ailable to interested architects

BETHLEHEM STEEL COMPANY, General Ofiices:

Bethlehem, Pa. ON THE PACIKIC ilOk^T—Sud Plants: San Francisco.
Los •\ni;.les. Seattle. Warthou5ts: San Francisco. Los Angeles, Seattle, Portland.
Sud FahruMins. Works: Alameda. Ix)8 Angeles. Du/riV/
Officfs: San Francisco. Los Angeles, Seattle, Portland, S.ili
LakeCitv, Honolulu.



BETHLEHEM STEEL COMPANY



—\ —

BtTHlEHtu,
STEtl

-1—



DECEMBER, 1937




THE PORCELAIN enameled office building illustrated here is the new home of Davidson
Enamel Products Company at Lima, Ohio. Douglas Andrew, architect, designed the build-
ing to show the wide variety of finishes, colors and designs available in porcelain enamels for
architectural uses. He achieved distinctions in well-balanced fluted parts, rounded corners,
embossed side panels and two decorative plaques.

The plaques show nine colors, ranging from chocolate to Ivory. Areas above and below
the window course are In semi-mat stipple finish of a light buff color. The window course is
light tan with snap-on moldings, and the area about the doorway is ivory.






PLAYS SAFE

To see for himself how
we would manage his
family's affairs, he is
testing the operation of
a part of his estate un-
der a Living Trust.

TRIST DEPARTMENT

CROCKER FIRST
MTIONAL BANK



A BUILDING IS as

MODER]\

AS ITS ELEVATORS

An out-moded elevator instantly dates
a structure. Your first consideration in
planning a building renovation should be
the existing elevator system.

Westinghouse offers complete co-
operation in rehabilitation plans for ele-
vators and electric stairways in older
buildings — everywhere.

Westinghouse Electric
Elevator Company

LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO



THE ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER



TREE FORETHOUGHT

is part of the
Architects Service



IT COSTS A' O MORE FOR C E !\U I !\ E




^uSi^ SURGERY CO., LTD.



SAN FRANCISCO Fresno LOS ANGELES

Russ BIdq. Mattel Blag. Story BIdq,

SUtter 3377 TUcker 1929

Local ptioncs in: Pasadena, Palo Alto.
Oakland, San Rafael. Burlingame

SKILL - KNOWLEDGE - RESPONSIBILITY



Afacle4^ atfaMed gab



n



U LLL



n



u



n



• DESIGNED and built by the S. T.Johnson Co.,
pioneer manufacturers of Oil Burners, this smart
new air-conditioner combines in one compact unit
every feature desired by home-owners, architects
and engineers for economical heating,air-condition-
ing and ventilating the modern home. Year-'round
hot water. Forced air circulation for summer. Equip-
ped with the popular BANKHEAT Pressure-Type
Burner. Furnished in enamel with chrome trim.
Send for "Seleclair" Bulletin d> complete Specifications

S. T. JOHNSON CO.

940 Arlington Avenue, Oakland, California
401 Broad Street, Philadelphia, Pa.

• THERE'S A JOHNSON OIL BURNER FOR EVERY PURPOSE



BUILDING
MATERIAL
EXHIBIT



Inrorniation Center Icr

Diiildinc; /Vlinaeu

1 e o p I e



ARCHITECTS BUILDING

Fitth and Figueroa
Los Angeles



BUILD
WE L L —

A PROPERLY designed and well con-
^ *■ structed building is a credit to any
city and a profitable investment for its
owner.

Such structures are the Stand-
ard Oil Building, Matson
Building, Four-Fifty Sut-
ter Street, Stock Exchange,
S. F. Base Ball Park, Mills
Tower, Opera House and
Veterans' Memorial, San
Francisco, Oly.mpic Club Al-
terations, Santa Avita Rac-
ing Plant and other notable
structures — all built or super-
vised by —

Liiidsren & Swiiierton, Inc.



60S W. Tenth Street
Los Angeles
We Maintain a Termite Control Department



StnnHnrd Oil Building
San Francisco



DECEMBER, 1937



PULSE OF THE READER

THE GOVERNOR EXPLAINS
Dear Editor:

In the issue of The Architect and
Engineer for October 1937 a commu-
nication appears on page 14 under
"Pulse of the Reader" and over the
signature of Mr. John S. Seibert of
San Diego, California, referring to an
article in your August issue regarding
the two State buildings recently com-
pleted in Sacramento, one for the De-
partment of Public Works and the
other for the Department of Motor
Vehicles.

Please find enclosed herewith a
copy of a statement bearing upon the
fact that these two buildings were
constructed without extra cost to Cali-
fornia taxpayers. The information con-
tained in this statement would likely
be of interest to Mr. Seibert and pos-
sibly also to others.

Sincerely yours,
GEO. B. McDOUGALL

[Editor's Note — The statement re-
ferred to by State Architect Mc-
Dougall follows:]

"How the State Department of
Public Works is able to construct a
$750,000 building to house its various
Divisions without any extra cost to
California taxpayers was revealed by
Governor Frank F. Merriam at the
ceremonies attending the laying of
the cornerstone of the new building in
Sacramento.

"The Governor called the working
out of the plan whereby the Depart-
ment of Public Works will erect an
edifice out of Its own funds without a
legislative appropriation or use of any
tax monies or gas tax funds a bit of
skilled financial planning, which will
enable not only the Department of
Public Works, but the Department of
Motor Vehicles as well, to pay for two
splendid buildings in less than five
years.

"Both these departments have out-
grown their present quarters and the
need for new housing facilities for
them has been recognized for two
years. Director Earl Lee Kelly of the
Department of Public Works broach-
ed the plan for a new building to
Governor Merriam and as a result of
conferences between these two and
Arlin E. Stockburger, Director of Fi-
nance, there developed the plan which
led up to the laying of the corner-
stone for the future Public Works
headquarters building.

"The new structure will be financed
in part from the sale of the Depart-
ment's equity In the present Public
Works Building, and the remaining
cost will be amortized over a period
of years by means of a rental charge,
which, including operating expenses.



will be considerably less than half the
rate per square foot which normally
would apply on buildings of the type
of the new structure.

"In September, 1926, the State
agreed to lease for ten years the pres-
ent Public Works Building at a month-
ly rental of $7,415.02, or a total rental
of $889,802.40. It also was provided
that the State would have the privi-
lege of purchasing the building and
site at a cost of $569,692. The State,
through the Division of Highways
exercised this option In September,
1927, and by February, 1929, had
completed purchase of the structure,
the final cost being $597,716.67.

"Other State agencies rented of-
fices in the building, including the
Department of Motor Vehicles. Equi-
ties of this agency in the building ac-
cumulated to such an extent that by
the end of this month Its equity will
amount to $283,592.71. At this rate,
with its rentals accruing as equity,
the Department of Motor Vehicles
within a few years would have owned
the building and the Department of
Public Works would have had to begin
paying rent to its sister organization.

"Forseeing this situation. Director
Kelly proposed to the Governor that
his Department erect its own building
and pay for It out of the sale of its
equity In its present structure and the
savings In rentals which would be ef-
fected. The Department of Motor Ve-
hicles decided to do likewise and also
own its own building.

"The State will use the present Pub-
lic Works building to house the Cali-
fornia Unemployment Reserve Com-
mission."



STOP TAX RAIDS
Dear Editor:

The constant raids made upon the
gasoline tax and motor vehicle funds
for purposes other than those for
which the funds are being applied, to-
day represent the greatest threat
against the orderly expansion of our
California highway system.

If we are to maintain and improve
our 13,000 miles of State highways
outside of cities and maintain and
improve our highways through cities,
diversions must be prevented.

It is possible for the Legislature to
divert, as has been done in other
States, highway funds for such other
expenses as aviation, propagation of
oysters, referendum expense, harbors
and docks, and as has been done in
the State of Oklahoma, for field and
garden seeds. Diversions in other
States have increased in the four
years— 1930 to 1933 from $13,000,000
to $53,000,000.



You know that the Increased auto-
mobile registration and the conges-
tion on our highways make it neces-
sary that the present tax be maintain-
ed. That is why we must be sure to do
all we can to defeat the initiative
peiition now being circulated, calling
for a reduction of the gasoline tax
from 3 cents to 2 cents. If this initia-
tive pacses, many of the counties
would find their gasoline tax funds
reduced to such a small amount that
It would be necessary for them to
reestablish or to increase personal
property tax for road purposes.

There is a big job to be done. It is
always more effective if leadership for
a fight of this character comes from a
disinterested source. Then no one can
be accused of attempting to serve
self-interest. The California State
Chamber of Commerce is the organi-
zation to do this job for us. It is
influential and has a closely knit or-
ganization that reaches Into every
part of California.

O. FREDERICKSON
San Francisco, Nov. 19.



A BOUQUET
Dear Editor:

Could you send me two extra copies
of The Architect and Engineer for
November, 1937.

I want to compliment you on the
way the Santa Barbara convention Is
handled in this issue.

Very truly yours,

LOUIS J. GILL, Architect
San Diego, Nov. 18, 1937.



AMAZING THE WORLD
Dear Editor:

Picking up a copy of "Building."
leading architectural publication In
Australia, I noticed a number of com-
plimentary paragraphs about our two
new bridges under the caption "Strik-
ing Developments Abroad," meaning,
of course, (he United States. The au-
thor, Mick Grace of Grace Bros., had
just returned home after nine months
travel in America. "The most out-
standing engineering achievements in
the United States to my mind," he
says, "are the San Francisco Bay
Bridge and the Mersey Tunnel. Also
their road building. There are about
3,000,000 miles of roads In America
and the rapicHy with which the au-
thorities tackle their traffic problems
is amazing. For instance, two huge
bridges at San Francisco went up al-
most simultaneously. And on top of
that San Francisco, just to show its
capacity for spectacular achievement.
Is building a man-made Island for a
World's Fair In 1939."

P. HARWOOD.



12



THE ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER




Copper TuLx-s reduce resistance to flow.
Smooth interior surfaces permit 10% to
15% greater velocity of circulation with
the same head.

fy Smalhr size tubes can be used than are re-
quired with rustable pipe.

Q Heat losses are less. Usually, the heat i;iven
off by uninsulated copper lines is no more
than desirable for heating the basement.

A Cost is only a little more than nistciLle piping!
And Anaconda Copper Tubes and Fittings
are rust-proof. . . a "lifetime" investment.

The complete Anaconda line of tubes and fit-
tings in sizes from Vs" to 8" is readily obtain-
able from leading supply houses. st:sta



DEOXIDIZED



DECEMBER, 1937





HOUSE FOR RICHARD TOWNLEY,
SAN MARINO, CALIFORNIA
Harold O. Sexsmi+h, Architect



MODERN ALL-GAS KITCHEN IN
RICHARD TOWNLEY HOME,
SAN MARINO, CALIFORNIA



AN unusual, rambling floor plan which includes child's
play room and breakfast room, has been designed
into a typical California home with characteristic long,
low lines, by Architect Harold O. Sexsmith for Mr.
Richard R. Townley, San Marino, California. Outdoor
intimacy Is provided by easy access to the garden from
the living room and two bedrooms.

To erfect economical and flexible heating in a sprawl-
ing house of this type is always somewhat of a problem.
In this case, a two-section gas warm air furnace is easily
controlled to supply Instant heat to any part of the
house. Kitchen planning includes a modern gas range
and Electrolux refrigerator. Costing approximately
$7,000 to build, this Callforiia residence has attracted
wide architectural interest.



THE ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER



Built in 1700



Now re-roofed for years to come
with U'S'S Ternes




4C



o,



C'lmrcli'
ns,-,l f,„



111 l'liil;i(lc'l|ilii;i \\:is lii>
services July 2, 1700. It is now dir-
(it rlu- oldest buildings in the coim-
ri \ — :in(l is still in K"<"1 condition.

A tew \e;irs a^o, it hecrinie neces-
sar\ to install a new root, lo pre-
serve this ancient structure, de-
seendants ot the "Old Swedes"
s( arched for the best roofing avail-
able. They selected U"S'S Ternes.
I5.ised on rigid service tests and
experience with feme roofing on old
colonial homes, the present roof,
with proper care, should give this
old structure lasting and substan-
ri.il protection.

1 ernes have many other ad\ an-
tages. rhe\ are storni-proot, wind-
proof and will stand intense ln-at.
Lightning has never been known to
penetrate a propi'tK groniuled
tenie roof.

lernes arc economical, too —
lower in first cost than comparable
roofs, easier to apply and cheaper
to maintain. Being light in weight,
they do not require expensue sup-
porting construction. They can be
used in any climatic conditions for
an\' type of roof, from flat to ver-
tical.

Let us show you how 1 erne
Roofs are being applied to commer-
cial, public and residential build-
ings. Look for complete mforma-
tion in Sweet's Catalog or write to
our nearest district office.



U-S-S ROOFING SHEETS and TERNES

COLUMBIA STEEL COMPANY • San Francisco



Pacific Cousi 1)1!



■s 111 USS Ro„finS Sheets and
-niinois Steel Corporation



United Stales Steel Products Co



UNITED STATES STEEL



LCEMBER, 1937




Pholo by Gabriel Moulin Sti



APARTMENT HOUSE ON TELEGRAPH HILL, SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORf^
FOR J. S. MALLOCH AND J. ROLPH MALLOCH



Vol. 131 The Architect &l Engineer December 1937



TELEGRAPH HILL GOES MODERN

By Fred Jones



THE unique apartment house here illustrated
occupies a commanding site near the crest
of San Francisco's romantic Telegraph Hill.
Each of the nine apartments and two penthouses
overlook a panoramic view of San Francisco
Bay, with its interesting waterfront, the world
renowned Bay Bridge, and the 1939 Exposition
site. The fact that each of the units in the build-



ing has a living room and private terrace over-
looking this colorful land and marine view has
much to do with the unusual interest this enter-
prise has aroused.

All four floors are individually planned, and
while this arrangement may have added mate-
rially to the cost of the building, the 100 per
cent rental of apartments, even before the




LANDSCAPED APPROACH TO MAIN ENTRANCE OF APARTMENT HOUSE
AT 1360 MONTGOMERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO



DECEMBER, 1937




REAR ELEVATION OF APARTMENT HOUSE AT 1360 MONTGOMERY STRi
SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING UNIQUE STEP-BACK ARRANGEMENT
WHICH PROVIDES UNUSUAL OUTDOOR COMFORT

THE ARCHITECT AND ENC B




MAIN ENTRANCE OF APARTMENT HOUSE AT 1360 MONTGOMERY STREET,
SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING CLOSE UP OF SANDBLASTED GLASS PANEL,
ILLUMINATED AT NIGHT BY CONCEALED LIGHTS



DCEMBER, 1937







■ PtMT ■ Hov^lt.5






1


r




1 1






1


•t-NTB-Y qAKLCILN-




q KO.K'i.t. ■ Ae.t»


^^^-^




• Sub- B«iE.A;ii.MT-


^ppeox .<je^Dc-


^


. X F-. r, T r o rTT





D.iAWING SHOWS CLEVER ARRANGEMENT
OF FLOORS TO COMPLY WITH BUILDING
RESTRICTIONS AND AT THE SAME TIME GIVE
FOUR STORIES OF APARTMENTS

building was completed, would appear to have
fully justified the added cost. Telegraph Hill
offers a certain Bohemian atmosphere that the
public has found alluring, and success of this
particular venture has been an incentive for
other investors to plan similar projects in this
locality.

The steepness of the location made it pos-
sible to have below the street level not only a
concrete garage for fourteen cars but also sub-
basements for each tenant. Entrance to the
building is through a sunken garden, its tropical
plants enhanced by statuary, fountain, indirect
lighting and a supporting pillar of glass brick.
The architectural treatment is modern. The
facade is decorated with an imposing central
design in sand-blasted glass flanked by forty
foot Scraffitto carvings in two colors, the work
of Alfred du Pont who applied the same
technique employed two thousand years ago
at Pompeii.

Of particular interest to architects and build-
ers is the unusually efficient manner in which the
lot area has been utilized. The scale drawing
illustrates how it is possible to have four floors
of apartments legally in a frame building.

The interior details are simple, effective, and
In many cases completely original. Indirect
lighting is employed throughout. The bath-



rooms are finished in solid colors with Neo-
angle tubs and showers. Kitchens are all-electric
and streamlined, counter-level equipment
swinging without breaks around three walls.

Other features include circular dressing
rooms, large storage areas in each apartment,
closidor racks on the backs of the bathroom
doors, Venetian blinds, built-in bookcases, small
barrooms in some of the apartments and gener-
ous use of glass brick partitions. Mouldings,
baseboards and non-essentials generally, have
been eliminated. The dining rooms are circular,
with open built-in shelving. Color has been
used boldly, each apartment with a different
color scheme. In some of the living rooms
interesting results have been obtained by treat-
ing the ceiling and one wall in a primary color,
with the other walls in a second color.

Foundations, sub-basement and basement
are of reinforced concrete with the remainder
of the building wood frame. The entire struc-
ture was designed to meet all state and city
requirements for lateral stresses. The owners
and builders are Messrs. J. S. Malloch and J.
Rolph Malloch of San Francisco. W. H. Ellison
was the consulting structural engineer.




T V-PICAL -PLODK^ PLA.K

r* = ' ■ ■=

APARTMENT HOUSE AT 1360 MONTGOMERY
STREET, SAN FRANCISCO



THE ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER





LIVING ROOM AND CORNER OF DINING ROOM,
APAPxT^^EMT HOU3E AT 1360 MONTGOMERY
STREET, SAN FRANCISCO

NOTE GLASS BRICK WINDOWS BASED WITH
FLOWER BOXES, AND COMPLETE ELIMINATION
OF MOULDINGS AND BASEBOARDS



DECEMBER. 1937



- HAVE YOU A\M
UNCOMPLETED PROJECT?

(AN OPEN LETTER TO THE PROFESSION)

Would you like to have us depart, in some particulars, from the
customary way ot publishing a monthly magazine?

If you could find somewhere, someplace, a bit of unusual design, to
you a masterpiece in conception, yet for some reason an uncompleted
project, would it interest you to have it published?

Almost every architect has had the experience of producing a dream
in design which would be of unusual interest to his fellow craftsmen.

THE ARCHITECT and ENGINEER proposes to depart from the usual
way and invite architects, who care to contribute, to indulge in a bit of
fanciful play for an Exhibit of Ideals. No new design is desired nor expect-
ed. You are to think back (but not too far back) over your professional
career and pick out of your files the thing that interested you most and
which you believe will add to the material wealth of good design for
illustration. Due credit will be given the author.

The Architect and Engineer will devote one issue, early in 1938, to
the publication of a selected number of these designs and may, from time
to time, use others as frontispiece material.

Will you therefore deliver your selection in shape for reproduction
to the offices of the State Association of California Architects, II 01
Citizens National Bank Building, Los Angeles, or 557 Market Street, San
Francisco, for The Architect and Engineer, San Francisco. There your
design will be judged, competently, and a prominent disinterested archi-



Online LibraryIldefonso Antonio BermejoArchitect and engineer (Volume v.131-132 (Oct. 1937-Mar. 1938)) → online text (page 20 of 57)