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I



ANNUAL REPORTS



OFFICEES OF STATE



STATE OF INDIANA,



AND OF THE



TRUSTEES AND SUPERINTENDENTS OF THE SEVERAL BENEVOLENT, RE-
FORMATORY AND EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS, AS REQUIRED
BY LAW TO BE MADE TO THE GOVERNOR,



YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31. 1890.



B~5r -A.TJXI€:OPlIT~5r.

pTATE LlBRiKH

INDIAN APOr^ ■ "' - "^

fDlllvfAPOLIS: "'^''■'^

■«"M. E. BUEFORD, CONTRACTOR FOR STATE PRINTING AND BINDING
1891.



7



i- ^'^^■•.^^•^



PREFACE



STATE OF INDIANA,

Office of Secretary of State,

Indianapolis, April 1, 1891.

In accordance with the requirements of an act approved February 3, 1853,
(1st G. & H., p. 538), the several administrative officers of the State and the
Trustees and Superintendents of the Benevolent, Reformatory and Educational
Institutions thereof, have submitted to the Governor, and filed in the Executive
Department, the reports required of them for the fiscal year ending October 31,
1890, and the calendar year ending December 31, 1890, respectively, which have
been entered of record in the order of their reception, and delivered to the Secre-
tary of State for publication under the order of the Boatd of Commissioners of
Public Printing and Binding.

Sixteen hundred copies of reports are now bound and issued to the officers and
persons designated by law to receive them. The usual number of copies of each
report have also been bound in pamphlet form, and delivered to the responsible
officer or Superintendent of each institution for distribution in such manner as
they may deem for the best interests of the State.

CHRIS H. STEIN,

Clerk Bureau Public Printing.



,f~^.



n



CONTENTS.



FIRST VOLUME.



Secretary of State.
Auditor of State.
Attorney-General.
Treasurer of State.
State Mine Inspector.
Indiana University.
Purdue University.
State Normal School.
Soldiers' Orphans' Home.

SECOND VOLUME.

Central Hospital for Insane.

Northern Hospital for Insane.

Eastern Hospital for Insane.

Southern Hospital for Insane.

Institution for Deaf and Dumb.

Institution for the Blind.

Institute for Feeble-Minded Youth.

Reformatory for Girls and Women's Prison.

Reform School for Boys.

State Prison South.

State Prison North.



FORTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT




FISCAL YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1890



TO THE. OOVERNOR.



INDIANAPOLIS:

■VTM. B. mTRrORB, CONTEACTOH FOR STATE PB.7NTING aNIi BINrnNG.
189D.



THE STATE OF INDIANA, \

Executive DErAKTMENT, I

Ikdianapolis, December 17, 1890. j

Keceived by the Governor, examined and referred to the Auditor of State for
yerification of the financial statements.



Office of Auditor of State, \

Indianapolis, December 18, 18'JO. J

The financial part of the within report, so far as it relates to moneys drawn
from and paid into Treasury, has been examined and found correct.

BEUCE CARR,

Auditor of State.



Returned by the Auditor of State, with the above certificate, and transmitted
to the Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board of Commis-
doners of Public Printing and Binding.

WILLIAM B. ROBERTS,

Private Secrelarif.



Filed in the ofiice of the Secretary of State of the State of Indiana, December
17, 1890.

CHARLES F. C4RIFFIN,

Secretary of State,



OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTIO



J. L. CARSON, President.
Z. H. HAU3ER, Treasurer.
THOS. MARKET, Secretary.

STJPEEINTENDENT.

C. E. WRIGHT, M. D.

ASSISTANT PHYSICIANS, DEPARTMENT FOE MEN

P. J. WATTERS, M. D.
J. E. CURTIS, M. D.

ASSISTANT PHYSICIANS, DEPARTMENT FOR WOMEN-

A. M. ADAMS, M. D.
F. M. WILES, M. D.
J. D. SIMPSON, M. D.

PATHOLOGIST.

F. A. MORRISON, M. D,

STEWARD.

S. p. NEIDIGH.

MATRON.

ANNA H. WRIGHT.

PRIVATE SECRETARY.

F. C. HEEB.

RECORD CiERK.

EVA M. SMITH.

BOOK-KEEPER.

WM. H. Vv'ILHELM.



STORE- KEEPER.

R. N. SMITH.



pTATE imml

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES
OF THE CENTRAL INDIANA HOS-
PITAL FOR THE INSANE,



To Hon. Alvin P. Hovey, Governor:

Sir — The Board of Trustees for the Central ludiaua Hos-
pital for the Insane respectfully submit the foHowing report for
the fiscal year ending October 81, 1890 :

Estimated value of real estate |1, 450,000 00

Inventoried value of personal property 186,347 75

Total $1,636,347 75

Appropriation for maintenance i$:260,000 00

Expense of transfer of patients to other hospitals,

reimbursed from State Treasury 403 70

Total $260,403 70

Expended from maintenance fund 251,037 44

Balance in State treasury $9,36^6 26

Appropriation for repairs ^ $15,000 00

Expended 15,000 00

Appropriation for clothing $12,000 00

Expended '. 12,000 00

Received from sales of discarded property and

paid to State Treasurer $1,607 83

Keceived for maintenance of patients and paid to

State Treasurer $1,336 10



The following table shows the amounts expended from the
several funds for each month of the iiscal year :



Months.



Maintenance



Repairs.



Clothing.



November
December.
January....
February .,

March

April

May

June

July........

August

September
October ....

Total.



$22,626 37
19,422 54
19,494 95
18,925 89
18,953
19,855
20,739
19,195
20,199 57
19,410 22
25,118 56
27,095 46



94
GO
32

62



$251,037 44



11,493 84

1,447 88

592 12

1,298 79

1,353 05

783
1,312
1,583
1,615

2,303 92

962 98

253 11



51
35
01
44



$15,000 00



524 65

403 10

1,136 92

625 31

619 96

236 85

1,011 25

602 15

1,375 17

1,032 74

3,972 12

159 7'8



$12,000 00



The daily average numlDer of patients in the Hospital during
the year was 1,540.5. Taking the entire sum of $251,037.44,
expended from the maintenance fund as having been used for
the purpose of maintenance, the average per capita cost for
maintenance during the year was $162.96.

The following table shows the per capita expense of mainte-
nance for the past ten years :



1879 $191 31

1880. 184 64

1881 184 97

1882 194 00



1888 $194 00

1884 177 02

1885 173 43

nsS6 163 95



1887 $169 68

1888 170 00

1889 164 20

1890 162 96



Exclusive of amounts expended for clothing and repairs,
charged in maintenance, the per capita cost was $159.46.



•= In former calculations of per capita cost, debts incurred in 1886 and left unpaid were
not included. The true per capita cost was S163.95.



We think it proper to say, however, that of the amount
charged as expended from the maintenance account, the sum of
•15,387.63 was expended for items that were properly chargeable
to the clothing and repair accounts. These items are embraced
in maintenance account vouchers Nos. 425, 444, 452, 469, 474,
475, 476, 477, 485, 490, 491, 492. It was found during the latter
part of the fiscal year that the boilers which furnished the
entire supply of steam and heat for the hospital buildings were
in such a condition that there was great danger that they would
become entirely useless, unless extensive repairs were made
upon them at once, no repairs of any consequence having been
made for several years. Of the |5,387.63 above named, nearly
three thousand dollars were used in paying for labor and ma-
terial in making these repairs, and the boilers are now in such
a condition as to require very little work on them in the near
future. To neglect this work until a special appropriation could
be made for it by the Legislature was to jeopardize the safety of
the patients in the hospital.

The transfer of patients to other hospitals, and from the
county poor-houses, has made necessary an extraordinary ex-
penditure for clothing, and this expense is also included in
the $5,387.63 above named. Each item in the vouchers hereto-
fore given will be found to be for an expenditure that was
essential to the comfort and welfare of the inmates of the hos-
pital, and we are confident our action in the matter will meet
your approval, and that of the members of the General As-
sembly.

Deducting from the $251,037.44 expended from the mainte-
nance fund the sum of |5, 387. 63, the amount properly chargeable
to the maintenance fund is $245,649.81, and upon that basis the
actual per capita cost of maintenance for the year was $159.46.

The estimate of the per capita cost for maintenance of patients
has always been based upon the average number of patients
whose names were upon the rolls of the hospital. As a matter
of fact, there are at all times a number of patients absent from
the hospital on furlough. During the last fiscal year the aver-
age number so absent has been 98.7, showing the average num-
ber actually present in the hospital to be 1,441.8, and upon this
basis the per capita cost of all expenses has been $192.84.

Under an act passed at the last session of the General As-
sembly, it was made the duty of the Boards of Trustees of the



8

several hospitals for the insane to enforce, collection of cost of
maintenance from patients who were found to have estates com-
petent for that purpose. In pursuance of this law we have
so far made investigation in seventy counties of the State, and,
in addition to the amount paid to the State Treasurer as here-
tofore shown, have tiled petitions in a number of cases to en-
force collections. From the exammation made we are satisfied
that not more than 8 per cent., probably less than that, of the
patients in the hospital have sufficient estates to pay for their
maintenance.

As no charge has heretotore been made against patients it has
been difficult to convince guardians or others who had charge
of estates, that we were merely discharging a legal duty in
seeking to make these collections, and very considerable dis-
satisfaction has grown out of our attempts in this direction.
It has been by no means an easy task to decide when an estate
should be considered sufficient to pay the cost of maintenance ;
but we have made it a rule not to attempt to enforce collection
when doing so would deprive any dependent members of a pa-
tient's family of that support to which they would be entitled
from the patient if a person of sound mind, and in control of
Lis or her own estate. Where, however, there was no one de-
pendent upon the patient, and the insanity was of such a char-
acter as indicated that the patient would continue, during life,
to be a charge upon the State, we have thought that whatever
estate the patient had was, under the act of 1889, subject to
charge for maintenance.

We call especial attention to the report of the Superintend-
ent as to the repairs and improvements that have been made to
the Hospital buildings and grounds during the past year, and
to the suggestions made in this report as well as those made in
the report for the prior fiscal year relative to improvements
and additions necessary to be made.

The appropriation already made for the fiscal year commenc-
ing November 1, 1890, will be ample for all the ordinary ex-
penses of the Hospital ; and we recommend that appropriations
of the same amount be made for the two succeeding years.

In addition to the appropriations for ordinary expenses we
make the following recommendations:

That an appropriation be made to build a wash-house. The
building now used for that purpose at the Department for



Women is iu very bad condition, has insufficient space, and is
in every way unfit for the purpose. An appropriation of |10,-
■000 will probably be sufficient to put up a building that will be
ample for the laundry work of both departments, and we rec-
ommend an appropriation of that sura.

An appropriation is also recommended to build a tunnel be-
tween the two departments, connected with the boiler-house.
The necessity for this is fully shown by the Superintendent's
report. We are not now prepared to estimate the cost of this
work; but will do so before the next session of the General
Assembly.

The annual cost of illuminating gas for the Hospital is $5,000.
As a matter of convenience, safety and economy an electric
light plant should be provi'led of sufficient capacity to supply
the demand for ail the buildings and grounds; and we urgently
recommend an appropriation for this purpose. An estimate of
the cost of such a plant will be hereafter submitted.

The question of insurance against loss by fire ihat may hap-
pen to the Hospital buildings is an important one. To replace
and refurnish these buildings would cost the State over $1,-
000,000. For a great many years at least, no insurance has
been carried upon any part of the property. Every provision
within our power has been made to guard against danger of
fire and to minimize the danger, should any occur. Yet we
can not shut our eyes to the fact that no precautions that may
be taken can be sufficient to guarantee immunity from danger.
As it has, however, so long been the policy of the State to as-
sume this risk, we have not felt at liberty to expend the amount
necessary to secure a reasonable amount of insurance upon the
property without first having some expression upon the subject
from the General Assembly, and we ask that its attention be
called to the matter.

In the discharge of our duties as Trustees, our first object
has been to secure such care and provision for the patients iu
the Hospital as would bring about the best results to them,
physically and mentally; and, secondly, to accomplish this as
economically to the State as was possible. In these elibrts we
have had the hearty support and co-operaLion of Dr. C. E.
Wright, Superintendent; and we take a great deal of pleasure
in saying that whatever degree of success has been attained is
chiefly attributable to his untiring labor in the interests of the



10

Hospital. When Dr. Wright was appointed Superintendent it
was with the understanding that he was to have absolute con-
trol of the internal management of the Hospital, with full
power to employ and discharge subordinates as his individual
judgment dictated, and without let or hindrance from any
source. This policy has been strictly adhered to. The result&
have, we believe, been perfectly satisfactory, and we confidently
submit them to your consideration, and through you to the
General Assembly and the people of the State.

JOSEPH L. CARSON, President.

THOMAS MARKET, Secretary.

ZACH. H. HAUSER, Treasurer.



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT.



To the Board of Trustees of the

Central Indiaym Hospital for the Insane:

Gentlemen — There were on the Hospital roll at the begin-
ning of the present fiscal year 873 women and 684 men; total
number of patients, 1,557. There were admitted during the
year 284 women and 380 men; total number admitted, 664;
251 women and 317 men were discharged during the year;
total number, 568. There were 70 deaths, 35 women and 35
men. Total number enrolled, present at beginning and -ad-
mitted during the year, 2,221.

Percentage of deaths to total number enrolled, 3.15.

Percentage of deaths to daily average number present, 4.54.

Percentage of recoveries to total number under treatment,
6.30.

Percentage of recoveries to daily average number present,
9.09.

In compiling the statistical tables the strictest adherence to
facts has been maintained, regardless of the reputation of the
Hospital for efiecting cures, so called. If there is any error it
may be accounted as against the Hospital.

SUBSISTENCE AND CLOTHING.

The standard of excellence at first adopted by the present
management in the selection of subsistence and other stores
for the Hospital has been strictly maintained. The clothing
has been selected with special view to economical and durable
service.



12



HEPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS.



As predicted in the last annual report, a heavy draft upon
the repair fund Avas necessary in order that the property of the
State should be preserved from useless waste and decay. Nec-
essary repairs have apparently been neglected for years. The
past twelve months have been particularly busy_ ones in the
way of much needed improvement.

The boilers used for heating and power have long been in
an unsound and unsafe condition, hence a considerable portion
of our funds has of necessity been spent in replacing flues and
boiler heads and in patching and strengthening all of the bat-
teries. These repairs, while they do not afford much outward
show, were expensive and necessary in order that the domestic
and m'echauicai work of the hospital and proper heating of the
wards might not be interfered with nor human life jeopardized.

The main steam pump was badly out of repair, needing new
valves, new valve springs and new pistons. As our supply of
water is mainly dependent upon the proper working of this
pump it would be a wise provision against temporary lack of
supply, and especially in case of lire, to purchase an additional
steam pump.

Man}' of the steam pipes are old and badly rusted, and some
have given way under very moderate pressure. These will
soon have to be replaced b}' new pipes in order to insure neces-
sary supply of heat and power. The main pipes are buried in
the ground, so that in case of needed attention much time and
labor are wasted in excavating. A passage wa}" or tunnel
should be constructed in which the pipes leading from the
boiler house to both departments may be properly placed, thus
permitting of their inspection and repair.

The porter's lodge has been moved to the street car gate, im-
proved and remodeled, now affording protection against the in-
clemencies of the weather to those who may be awaiting trans-
portation to the city.

The roof of the ironing-room of the Department for Women
was composed of tar and gravel and was of very steep inclina-
tion ; it leaked and was dangerously near the heating stoves.
It has been removed and a substantial metal roof constructed
in its stead, thus making this building comfortable and sufficient
for present need.



18

The infirmary warde of both departments were formerly ex-
ceedingly cheerless and dreary, and insnfficient for the purpose
for which they were maintained. The}- have been remodeled
and painted throughout and furnished with much needed in-
struments for diagnosis and treatment.

The roofs and lightning rods of both of the main buildings.;
as well as of the store-room, were greatly dilapidated and have
received long-needed attention.

The plumbing, particularly that in the Department for Men,
to which your attention has been previously called, requires to
be carefully and thoroughly overhauled. Much of the plumb-
ing is of peculiar and obsolete pattern, the hot water pipes are
obstructed with deposits, the drainage is not of the best, and
yet with the fund so badly needed in other directions, only
present necessities have been attended to.

The old bake-oven was falling to pieces, and in order to guard
against the results of its possible sudden collapse, a new oven
has been built on the outside and at the rear of the bake-shop.

For want of proper seats in the grove many of our patients
were compelled to recline upon the ground while in the ](ark.
A number of new settees of wood and iron of the pa I tern
formerly used in the hospital have been purchased and we novv^
have sufficient seating capacity for our patients.

The cooking range in the general kitchen of the Department
for Men was completely worn out, not even being of any value
as old iron. A new six-oven range of the latest and mosl ap-
proved pattern has been purchased and now furnishes sufficient
cooking facilities in that department.

New hose for the fire department and for some of the wards
has been purchased to replace much of the worthless and in-
sufficient article formerly on hand. Fire extinguishers have
been placed in all of the wards and in points of danger
throughout the buildings, and by instruction and drill we have
endeavored to teach employes their duties in case of fire.

The old, worn-out carriage and the broken-down and use-
less carriage team have been disposed of and new horses and
carriage, purchased.

A nev/ iron post and steel ribbon fence has been placed
around the cemetery. At the same time appropriate trees and



14

shrubbery have been purchased aud will be planted in these
grounds, that proper respect may be shown to the memories of
the dead.

In case of fire, if the records should be burned, there would
be no means of determining the burial places of those interred
in the Hospital cemetery. That this neglect may be remedied
an iron post will be placed at the head of each occupied grave,
and to these indestructible posts head-boards will be affixed to
indicate the name of each occupant.

In the transfers which have been made to us from the iS'orth-
ern Hospital and from the jails and poor houses of the Central
district, we have received a number of aged and very infirm
paupers. When these patients die they will have to be buried
here. Not only will our death rate be very greatly increased
within the next year or two, but the space for burial purposes
must, of necessity, be enlarged. The percentage of recoveries
will, for the same reason, be lowered.

A walk of artificial stone or cement, eight feet wide, is being
laid between the two departments.

Many of the trees in the grove are dying, or are dead, and
iidditioual trees and shrubs have been ordered, to take their
places and to ornament vacant spaces in the grounds.

Early in the summer an ornamental and substantial pavilion
was erected in the grove in front of the Department for
Women. In this structure, which will last for years, religious
exercises, amusements of various kinds, dances, dramatic per-
formances and concerts were given for the pleasure of fully
■one thousand more persons than can be accommodated in our
chapels.

That contracts for supplies may be strictly complied with, a
new sliding-beam scale of fifteen tons capacity was purchased
and placed near the store-room.

To guard against any failure, in cold weather, of the supply
of fuel gas, a quantity of coal was purchased.

TRANSFERS OF PATIENTS.

In accordance with the provisions of the law, as fast as the
Additional Hospitals for the Insane were in a condition to re-
ceive the patients belonging to their districts, we have trans-
ferred the same and yet have kept this hospital crowded to its



15

utmost capacity in order to render the greatest good to the
greatest number. To date we have received fort3^-eight men
and forty-seven women from the ISTorthern Hospital, and in re-
turn we have transferred twenty men to that Institution. We
are at present caring for one hundred and fifty-six patients be-
lonffino- to the Nortliern district.

To the Eastern Hospital we have sent seventy-five men and
seventy-five women, still retaining one hundred and fourteen
patients.

We are now caring for two hundred and seventy-three pa-
tients belonging to the Southern district.

During the coming month the transfers will be made as
rapidly as the additional hospitals vvnll receive, and as fast as i&
consistent with safety and the best interests of the patients.
Should extremely cold weather soon supervene it would prob-
ably be wiser and safer to postpone further transfers till next
spring.

I would suggest that the State be re- districted in order to ac-
commodate the capacities of the different hospitals more
efi'ectively than can be done under the present arrangement.

JAILS AND POOR-HOUSES.

We have taken all of the insane people out of the jails in
our district, where some have been languishing for years.

In order that useless expense and trouble might be avoided,
and the provisions of the law be strictly complied with, the
poor-houses of this district have been visited, and those cases
most needing and best entitled to State care have been accepted
and placed upon our wards.

INSANE CRIMINALS.

During the year a verbal request was made by the Warden
of one of the State prisons and the Governor that we should
take the insane convicts at that time confined in the peniten-
tiaries. As at present construed the law will not permit us ta
receive insane criminals, but as these people should at least re-
ceive humane care, the attention of the Legislature should be
directed to their needs.



16

INSANE AND IDIOTS.

Some of the most pitiable objects in our coantj houses, those
most dependent and in need of the protecting care of the State,
are the idiotic insane and idiots. Yet, in view of the provis-
ions of a special section of the statutes, we can not receive



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