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Documentary journal of Indiana 1905 (Volume 1905 vol. II) online

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ANNUAL REPORTS



Officers of State



STATE OF INDIANA



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS, TRUSTEES AND SUPERINTENDENTS OF THE

SEVERAL BENEVOLENT AND REFORMATORY INSTITUTIONS, AS

REQUIRED BY LAW TO BE MADE TO THE GOVERNOR,



Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1905



BY AUTHORITY



INDIANAPOLIS :

WM. B. BURFOED, CONTRACTOR FOB STATB PBINTIKG AND BINDING
1906



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PREFACE.



STATE OF INDIANA, l

Office of Secretary of State, [-

Indianapolis, October 1, 1906. )

In accordance with the requirements of an act approved February 3,
1853 (1st G. & H. , p. 538), the several administrative officers of the Sftate,
and the Trustees and Superintendents of the Benevolent, Reformatory and
Educational Institutions thereof, have submitted to the Governor an^ filed
in the Executive Department the reports required of them for the fiscal
year ending October 31, 1905, and the calendar year ending December 31,
1905, respectively, which have been entered of record in the order of their
reception and delivered to the Secretary of State for publication under the
order of the Board of Commissioners of Public Printing and Binding.

One thousand copies of reports are now bound in two volumes, and
issued to the officers and persons designated by law to receive them. The
usual number of copies of each report have also been bound in panfihlet
form and delivered to the responsible officer or Superintendent of each
Institution for distribution in such manner as they may deem for tl^ best
interests of the State. •, ,

HARRY SLOUGH, ®

Clerk Bureau of Public Printing.



CONTENTS.



VOL. II.



i. Board of State Charities.
J^ Department of Inspection.
3 State Board of Forestry.
if Central Indiana Hospital for Insane.
^Eastern Indiana Hospital for Insane.
^ Southern Indiana Hospital for Insane.
"^ Indiana State Normal School.
9 Purdue University.
^ Indiana Boys' School.
)0 Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home.
/ ( Blind Institute.

I ^Industrial School for Girls and Womans Prison.
igSchool for Feeble-Minded Youth.
IliEducation of Deaf and Dumb.



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT



BOARD OF STATE CHARITIES



OF INDIANA.



From November i, 1904, to October 31, 1905



TO THE GOVERNOR.



INDIANAPOLIS:

WM. B. BURFORD, CONTRACTOR FOR STATE PRINTING AND BINDING
1905



THE STATE OF INDIANA,

Executive Department,

December 18, 1905.

Received by the Governor, examined and referred to the Auditor of
State for verification of the financial statement.



Office of Auditor of State, i

Indianapolis, December 21, 1905. j

The within report, so far as the same relates to moneys drawn from the
State Treasury, has been examined and found correct.

WARREN BIGLER,

Auditor of State.



December 21, 1905.

Returned by the Auditor of State, with above certificate, and trans-
mitted to Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board
of Commissioners of Public Printing and Binding.

FRED L. GEMMER,

Secretary to the Governor.



Filed in the office of the Secretary of State of the State of Indiana,
December 21, 1905.

DANIEL E. STORMS,

Secretary of State.



Received the within report and delivered to the printer December
21, 1905.

HARRY SLOUGH,

Clerk Printing Bureau.



CONTENTS.



Page.

Members and Standing Committees 5

Letter of Transmission 6

General Report of the Board 7

Recommendations to the Legislature 21

The State Institutions 28

Population and Per Capita Cost, 1891-1905 49

The Indeterminate Sentence 62

The Epileptics 63

The Insane 65

Official Outdoor Relief in 1904 66

Report of the Secretary 69

Compulsory Education ... 78

County Poor Asylums 80

County Jails " 86

State Agent's Report 102

Orphans' Homes 128

Homes for the Aged 155

Hospitals 158

Roster of State Institutions 165

Financial Exliibit 168



-4-



BOARD OF STATE CHARITIES.



GOVERNOR J. FRANK HANLY, President, ex officio.

Term Expires.

DEMAROHUS 0. BROWN, Indianapolis March 1, 1906

CARRIE GOODWIN REXFORD, Indianapolis March 1, 1906

WILLIAM P. COOPER, Fort Wayne March 1, 1907

SARAH STOCKTON, M. D., Indianapolis. March 1, 1907

TIMOTHY NICHOLSON, Richmond March 1, 1908

SYDNEY B. DAVIS, Terre Haute March 1, 1908

AMOS W. BUTLER Secretary.



Standing Committees of the Board for the Year Ending
October 31, 1906.

On Penal and Reformatory Institutions. — Demarchus C. Brown, Sarah Stockton,

Timothy Nicholson.
On Hospitals for Insane. — Timothy Nicholson, Sydney B. Davis, William P.

Cooper, Carrie Goodwin Rexford.
On Institutions for Defectives, Soldiers'' Home, and Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans'

Home. — Sydney B. Davis, William P. Cooper, Sarah Stockton.
On County Institutions. — William P. Cooper, Timothy Nicholson, Carrie

Goodwin Rexford.
On Statistics and Publications. — Demarchus C. Brown, Sarah Stockton.
On Auditing. — Demarchus C. Brown, Carrie Goodwin Rexford.
On Children. — Sydney B. Davis, Sarah Stockton.



-5—



State Capitol, December 18, 1905.
Hon". J. Frank Hanly, Governor of Indiana:

In compliance with law, the Board of State Charities has the
honor to present to you, for the us© of the Legislature, its sixteenth
report, being for the fiscal year ending October 31, 1905.
• Respectfully,

TIMOTHY IsTiCHOLSON,
DEM^VRCHIJS C. BROWN,
CARRIE GOODWIN REXFORD,
SARAH STOCKTON,
WM. P. COOPER,
SYDNEY B. DAVIS,

Board of State Charities.
Amos W. Butlee, Secretary.



-6-



GENERAL REPORT OF THE BOARD.



The past year has been a busy one with the Board of State Chari-
ties. Under the law it is required to supervise the whole system of
public charities of the State. This extends from the great State
hospitals for the insane and the State prison to the small town
lockup. It includes the oversight of children in orphans' homes
and of the j)oor relief administered by 1,017 township trustees, who
are ex officio overseers of the poor. The Board is further required
to find homes in families for children who are public dependents,
and by frequent visits of its agents to see how they are treated and
are succeeding. Few, perhaps, appreciate the extent of this work
or how great are the responsibilities imposed upon this Board.
They may in some measure be comprehended from the following
statement of the number of persons cared for by the various benevo-
lent agencies under its supervision :

Eni-olled in State institutions 10,315

Present in county poor asylums 3,115

Present in oiijhans' liomes 1,699

Present in county jails 889

Estimated population of town and city lockups 100

Aided by township trustees 46,009

Brought into school by truant officers 22,789

Total 84,916

Another aspect of the work is presented by the expense incurred
by the various agencies just noted :

State institutions —

Maintenance .$1,555,787 17

New buildings and permanent improve-
ments 117,970 18

— $1,673,757 35

County poor asylums —

Maintenance .$387,813 86

New buildings and permanent improve-
ments 22,001 11

409,814 97

Criminals and jail expenses —

(State Statistician's report) 102,650 99

-7-



8 Board of State Charities.

Dependent children — •
Orphans' homes:

Maintenance $171,319 36

New buildings and permanent improve-
ments 8,127 04

$179,446 40

Agency of Board of State Charities 7,845 34

$187,291 74

Compulsory education (salaries of truant offi-
cers) 32,490 00

Outdoor poor relief 281,899 87

Total $2,687,904 92

These facts are presented at ^eater length hereafter in the
reports of the institutions, the State Agent, and the overseers of the
poor.

There has heen no change in the appointive memhers of the
Board the past year. With the coming of Governor J. Frank
Hanly into office he became ex officio a member of the Board of
State Charities and its President. He has shown an interest that
is keenly alive to the best welfare of public charities. In his
inaugural address he advocated many of the most needed advances
in that line. His hearty support was very helpful in securing
from the last General Assembly a number of most beneficial laws.
We have been gratified by his earnest endorsement of the nonparti-
san administration of our State institutions and his expressed belief
in the merit system of conducting them. Governor Hanly reap-
pointed Timothy JSTicholson, of Bichmond, and Sydney B. Davis,
of Terre Haute, to membership on this Board. This is a gTatifica-
tion to their fellow members.

The usual stated meetings of the Board have been held ; also,
such special and committee meetings as were necessary. The
Board has, as a whole or by committees, visited the various State
institutions under its supervision and some of the local institutions.
The Secretary has visited these more frequently and made reports
thereof to the Board.

Only one formal investigation Avas made the past year. That
was of the Southern Hospital for Insane, in December last. The
testimony taken is on file in our office. Our conclusions were re-
ported to Governor Dui'bin. Several inquiries were made where



General Report oe the Board. 9

reports were received, calling attention to existing conditions, or
where specific information was desired. The resnlt of these in-
quiries has heen helpful. It is the experience of the Board that it
is better to take up any unsatisfactory condition quietly with the
authorities in charge. Thereby the co-operation of the manage-
ment can usually be had to bring to pass needed changes, looking to
the betterment of the institutions. This is better than taking the
subject up publicly in a way wliich might result in harm to the
cause. Our advice and co-operation have been sought by the
county authorities regarding local institutions on several occasions.

There has been no change in the head of any State institution in
the past year. There have been some changes, however, in the
membership of some of the institution boards. The most notable
was at the Southern Hospital for Insane. ' Following the inquiry
above mentioned, based upon the complaint of Mrs. Clarence W.
Bennett, one member, ISTewton Kelsay, resigned ; another, J. M.
Hudspeth, was removed from office by Governor W. T. Durbin, and
the term of one member, Lee Rosenbaum, expired. An entire new
board was appointed.

The growth in the number of inmates in our great State insti-
tutions goes steadily on. In sixteen years' time, which covers the
period since the Board of State Charities was organized and has
been receiving regular reports, there has been an increase of ninety
per cent, in the daily average number actually present in these
institutions. More than half this increase is in the hospitals for
the insane and the School for Feeble-Minded Youth. There is in
this reason for congTatulation rather than alarm, since it means not
so much that mental defect is increasing as that we are more and
more seeing the advantages of State over county care for these
unfortunate persons, and instead of sending tliem to the county
poor asylums, as was done in former years, we are increasing the
capacity of the institutions especially designed for them. In this
connection it will be interesting tO' remember that in the same
leng"th of time the population of the county poor asylums has not
only failed to show the increase that tlie gTowth of the State's popu-
lation warranted, but has actually decreased four per cent.

Compared with 1904, the State institutions show an increase of
328.41 in the daily average attendance, and to this all of them con-
tributed except the Southern Hospital for Insane and the Soldiers'



10 BoAED OF State Charities.

and Sailors' Orphans' Home. The numher enrolled at the end of
the year was 10,315, the number actually present was 9,680, and
the average attendance for the year was 9,431.92. The operating
expenses for the year amounted to $1,555,787.17, and $117,970.18
was spent in the erection of new buildings and the making of im-
provements of a more permanent character. Based on the operat-
ing expenses and the daily average attendance for the year, the per
capita cost of maintenance, gToss, was $164.94. This is $2.66 per
capita less than for the preceding year.

The old practice of exchanging articles made, or of which they
had a surplus, for other things that were more needed, has practi-
cally become a thing of the past in Indiana State institutions. It
is well that it should. The law requiring the institutions to make
their purchases by competitive bids is followed. The quality of the
goods purchased is well adapted for the purpose required. The
store-room system is becoming more and more uniform, and is very
economical. Some of the institutions are establishing condemna-
tion rooms, where imperishable broken and worn supplies are con-
signed for inspection and condemnation or repair. Some of the
institutions report a list of such articles regularly to the board of
trustees, which is approved, a requisition ordered issued therefor,
and an entry thereof made on the board's record.

The employment of prisoners in the State Prison is a question
that has been up for consideration in some form at every recent
session of the Legislature. We can consider ourselves fortunate in
this State that we have been able gradually to develop laws on this
subject that are in accordance with the best experience and the most
modem thought concerning prison labor. As the law relating tr»
the State Prison now stands, four hundred prisoners and one-half
of all over eight hundred may be employed upon contracts ; pro-
vided, however, that not more than one hundred be employed upon
any one contract, and for not more than eight hours a day. ISTo
contract may extend beyond the year 1910. Those in force at the
present time are :

Cooperage 42 and 44 cents per day.

Granite cutting 52^ cents per day.

Overalls factory Piece-price plan.

Shirt factory Piece-price plan.

The remainder of the prisoners may be employed in manufactuv-



General Eepoet oe the Board. 11

ing goods upon State account. For this there is a fund of
$125,000 available from the accumulated earnings of the prisoners.
Something has been done in this way and contracts have been made
to install a '^system" of machinery for the manufacture of binder
tAvine for the farmers of our State. A "system" has a capacity of
iive tons a day. This step was taken by the board of control after
investigating the work of such industries in the State prisons of
Minnesota, Kansas, South Dakota and Missouri, and learning the
results of their experience.

At the Indiana Reformatory the labor contracts run until 190G.
The last Legislature provided for the establishment of a system of
trade schools and for the- employment of the prisoners on the Stai"e
account system. The law is very broad. This, under our busi-
ness-like method of conducting institutions, is proper. It is well
to give the board of managers broad discretion in such matters.
Under this new law the board has been enabled to terminate the
three existing contracts and to establish the foundry and chain
works under the trade-school law. We believe this was a mistake,
so far as it relates to the chain works, and feel that it is desirable
to be relieved of it as soon as possible. Under the new law the
inmate will be employed in some form of industry that will, in
some measure, teach him that by which he may find employment
when he is released. The products of his industry are to be sold
to the institutions and various political subdivisions of the State,
the surplus to be sold upon the market. This system permits of
such instruction as seems necessary in the school of letters. The
new law has been favorably received, and it is hoped that needed
co-operation from the various authorities will be had.

With the beginning of the present calendar year almost all the
sheriffs' offices were filled by new men. Practically an entire new
set of township trustees assumed their duties in January last. It
is gratifying to not© that a large number of the superintendents of
county poor asylums were re-employed last June for a two-year
term. Of eighty-five chosen, fifty-eight were reappointed. The
new officials found before them new duties, and many were ham-
pered in their work because they were unfamiliar with the laws or
the requirements of their positions. However, they have almost
uniformly applied themselves to the performance of their duties to
their best ability. This is shown by an inspection of their institu-



12 Board of State Chakities.

tions and by their reports. Never have we had a set of officers
more punctual in their reports. The changes in membership on
the various boards of county commissioners have in some cases
interfered with the full co-operation we should like to have. This
has caused us some trouble and expense. As these officials are com-
ing to a better understanding of the law and the work, there is less
trouble.

At the beginning of the year several counties were not oonform-
ing to the provisions of the law regarding the administration of
outdoor poor relief. This was brought to the attention of the Gov-
ernor, who wrote the local officials. From what has been learned
it is believed that the law will hereafter be followed. The reports
of the township trustees have been given the usual study the past
year, and the statistics showing the amount of aid given in each
township, with other related facts, were published in the June
number of the Indiana Bulletin of Charities and Correction. The
total value of the relief in 1904 was $281,89.9.87, and this was
shared by 46,009 persons.

Four agents and a clerk have been kept continuously employed
the past year in the work of the State Agency created by the
dependent children law of 1897. With these doing all they can, it
has been impossible to do all that the law conteimplates, or that
should be accomplished in the visitation of children, the investiga-
tion of homes and the transfer of dependent children to private
families. The number of children in orphans' homes, supported
wholly or in part at public expense, on October 31, 1905, was 1,699.
In a number of homes there is not the activity in placing children
in family homes, or in visiting those placed, that there has been or
that there should be. The law contemplates that these orphans'
homes shall be simply temporary abiding places, from which the
children shall be transferred into families as rapidly as possible.
We regret to see that there is an increasing tendency to keep chil-
dren in the orphans' homes, rather than to seek out good family
homes for them.

The ISTational Conference of Charities and Correction was held
at Portland, Oregon, July 15 to 21. W© were very much pleased
that several of the members of our Board could arrange to be pres-
ent, and were gratified by the large attendance from Indiana. We
believe that a helpful work was done in thus carrying the confer-



General Report of the Board. 13

ence, witli its ideals, its enthusiasm and its interest, to the Pacific
Coast. The general feeling was, we think, that this meeting was
better, both in attendance and in the standard set in the papers and
discnssions, than had been expected. The next meeting will be
held in Philadelphia, May 9 to 16, 1906, under the presidency of
Dr. Edward T. Devine, Secretary of the Charity Organization
Society of New York City.

The National Prison Association held its annual congress this
year at Lincoln, JSTebraska, under the presidency of Mr. Albert
Garvin, warden of the Connecticut State Prison, and formerly
assistant superintendent of the Indiana Reformatory. The Na-
tional Prison Association is not a large conference. It is com-
posed of prison officials and boards and persons interested in penal
and reformatory work. Considerable interest in the meeting was
shown by the people of Lincoln, and tlie attendance was good. The
next congress will be held at Albany, New York, in the fall of 1906.
The officers selected were C. V. Collins, president, and Amos W.
Butler, secretary.

The fourteenth State Conference of Charities and Coi-rection
held an enthusiastic meeting at Vincennes, October 28 to 31. The
papers and discussions were good and the attendance was large,
including notably the Governor, the Lieutenant-Governor, the
Attorney-General, and several other State officials. We were also
glad to have with us a number of visitors from other States. Their
presence was encouraging and their assistance in the program was
most acceptable. Much to the regret of the conference, the presi-
dent, Mr. Hugh H. Hanna, was too ill to attend. Vice-President
W. H. Whittaker presided in his stead. ' Governor Hanly gave an
able address at the opera house on Sunday afternoon, on the .sub-
ject, "Our State Charities and Their Needs." The building was
crowded and hundreds were turned away. The next conference
will meet at Muncie in September, 1906, Mr. W. H. Whittaker and
Mr. J. Prank Mann being selected as president and secretary, re-
spectively.

The Association of County Commissioners, formed a year ago,
held its second meeting at Vincennes at the same time, and met in
joint session with thfe conference on Tuesday, the 31st. John Mc-
Gregor, of Indianapolis, presided. There was a fairly large num-
ber of commissioners in attendance, and it is expected that the



14



BoAED OF State Charities.



association will contirme to meet annually hereafter. By resolu-
tion, the commissioners expressed their interest in the charities of
the State and their desire for co-operation in the administration of
the laws. Their next meeting will he held at South Bend in 1906,
and Mr. McGregor was reappointed president.

The State Trustees' Association held its meeting, as usual, early
in the fiscal year. One session was given to the consideration of
outdoor poor relief, which under the law is administered by the
township trustees. The next meeting occurs in December, 1905,
at Indianapolis, under the presidency' of Mr. C. C Miller.

The national conferences bring us together for an exchange of
views from all parts of the country, and even from foreig-n coun-
tries, and the State conferences give us an opportunity of learning
local conditions and requirements and the practical ways of doing
things. All are very helpful.



INSTITUTION POPULATION AND PERSONS AIDED BY
TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES.



Yeae.


Enrollment
of State In-
stitutions.


Number
Present in

Poor
Asylums.


Number
Present in
Orphans'

Homes.


Number
Present in
■ Jails.


Number
Aided by
Trustees.


1890


5,406
6,294
6,268
6,413
6,905
7,096
7,264
7,953
8,224
8,471
8,839
9,056
9,229
9,650
9,909
10,315


3,264
3,253








1891


1,015


600




1892




1893


3,459
3,731

2,976""

3,072
3,102
3,133
3,096
3,091
3,046
2,962
3,144
3,115








1894


1,289
1,300
1,395
1,401
1,596
1,605
1,626
1,690
1,565
1.527
1,591
1,699






1895






1896




71,414


1897




82,235


1898




75,119


1899

1900

1901

1902


771
709
686
801
849
949
889


64,468
46,369
52,801
48,849


1903

1904


40,012
46,009


1905









General Report of the Board.



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Online LibraryIndiana. General AssemblyDocumentary journal of Indiana 1905 (Volume 1905 vol. II) → online text (page 1 of 105)