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Annual reports of the officers of state of the State of Indiana online

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Bloodf Mam us to traoo briefly tke history of a blind cblld» es iMi li

ordinarily woiimstanced. Bom with bis infirmity, or losing h1i»

•igiii ia childhood, he is eariy taught the lesson of dependence by hk

anxious and too indulgent parents, who, while his nK>re fortilnais

Gompaniaos are allowed to ro^tm the fiolds and woods in gleesome

frdic» or join in the woatedt invigoratiii^ sports of youth* confine

him to the chimney corner, or at most the liiuited range of the door

yard, lest some barm may befal him. Ue is seldom allowed to act or

eren to think for himaelf, for bis every waat iis anticipated^ He is

eonstmutly reminded of his misfortune by being told ia |4tying ae-

eenlB, of the beauty and subUmity of the earth bMeaitb with lis

endless vsuriety and combioations of form and color, upon which all

may gaze but hinisel( or of the heavens above, whose myriads of

diiniag worlds shed in vain for him their brilliant rays, and traverse

the limitless regions of space in matchless harmony ; and rendeivd

oiorbidly sensitive by the ill judged remarks made in bis presence by

those who forget that he tias ea^ to hear, or a: heart to feel. He is

indulged in every whim or caprice, and ilUowed to commit with im*

punity, a thousand acts for which another child wouU be puaished.

While the com panioAs of his youth are sent to sdiool, oraree»-

g^ed in aome useful occupation, he is taught 10 regard himself ae

incapacitaled for ^iher, anid ia left to brood over hb deprivation with

serious distrust of the justice and mercy of a God, ^ho permits him

to be thus afflicted without apparent cause.

He is at last sent, with many misgivings on the part of his pai«att,
as to the kind of treatment he is likely to meet with from the hands
of Btraagsrs, to an iastltution for education, whero it is oKpeoted thai
he will be fitted for successful competition with his early aseooialsfe
ia the strtiggle for iadepeodetice. And need we say, that be isosa-
Bienees his school career in a condition far different from that of the
seeing scholar t That his bodily and mental powers are comparaUy^
dormant, if not potttively injured from want of exercise, that he is
a prey to despondency, with sensibilities painfully acute, and dispo-
sition soured by excessive indulgence, and that be lacks that sturdy
selt«reliance which belongs to other youths of the same age? The
truth is, he has learned to regard himself as a poor unfortuaale,
who must not put forth a single effort of body or mind to help hioir
ssli; and therefore feeU that it is the busiaeas of the rest of the woild



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lo minifftflr to bis comfort tad pbasora. And allow tur to amy in tlw
»^ami«etiont tiiai in the rtCbrniatHNi of hb clMiimetor in this raspeeli
JtonmtM the most diiBcull and laborous part of his iMtraetor^s laboia.
Jt U moreover, Uie moet important; for until this Is ofibctody bat lil*
tie progress can be nuida in the acquisition of knowledge.

But to return, in doe course of time our hero has completod iw
stiidies; his intellect has been cultivated and stored with knowledge,
he has learned a trade; he has acquired better use of his physical
powers and is comparatively independent ; he is no longer the de-
spondent bein^ that he was, but Ms heart is cheered and elated with
hope. He is in truth transformed, and such a reaction has takes
place in his feelings under the influence of his institution associatioBs,
that he has forgotten his affliction, and even dreams that his depriva-
tion gives him superiority over other men — Happy being! WouM
that this spell were destined never to be broken by the stem reality
of thy situation.

Pidl of confident expectation, be bids adieu to the happy scenes
and associates of his late home, and launches his bark upon the sea
of life, but alas I It founders in the first billow that intercepts its
oourse. He has failed just where almost any other person with
even inferior education and skill in his trade, would have been sac-
eessful, and must fall back disconsolate upon his friends or upon his
I*' Alma Mater," thus assisting to create a necessity for the estsUisb*
4nent spoken of above; or V neither of these resources is open to
him, adopts some itinerant profession for which he is but poorly
jltted, and which ia still less adapted lo him*

But why did he not succeed? Simply because, despite his school
education and qualifications as a mechanic, he is still a child in
knowledge of the ways of the world, his character is yet undeveloped,
so fiir as concerns those faculties which produce energy, self-reliance
and endurance. His institution training has been but little better
in this respect, than his home training. Cut off from all business
connection with the ontward world, during the years precedti^
maturity, when the character should be forming, and all his wants
being supplied without the cost of a single thought on his part, what
means has he had for the cultivation of those traits which constitute
true manliness t There are doubtless but few, who reflect upon the
depressing influences of eleemosynary aid upon the characters of rb
sedpieBts. The experienced directors however, of cliaritable iastK



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39

tutioQs of anj kiivdy will recognize in it the source of nearly all the
diacaatont and insubordination of tbeir inmates.

It has not been our design in the foregoing remarks, to discourage
the •flforta now bttng made for the founding of these supplementary
iDatitutions. We have wished, simply* to direct your attention to
the cause, which in the present state of things, makes snoh a step
desirable, in the hope that some way may be devised to overcome
this difficulty, at least in part* Could thb be done, all must agree
that it would be incalculably better than to take measures for aug*
menting the evil, which would be the inevitable result of such es*
tablish meats. Asa member of the class whose cause the writer is
advocating, he would say, most emphatically, give us independence,
though it may be in a sphere the most humble ; enable us to feel our*
selves as men amongst men, though it may cost us many a discom*
fort, to pass through the ordeal which is to confer this ability. Life
is at best, but a wearisome pilgrimage, and he who has the heaviest
burden to bear, roust nerve himself the stronger for the task, and
meet his destiny with resignation. Those of our class who have
succeeded in surmounting the heavy pressure of their surrounding
circumstances, have not been able, you may be assured, to do so
without indomitable perseverance. It is truly no easy task to over-
come the natural inward misgivings, and stem the torrent of public
distrust.

Before dismissmg this subject, permit us to express more fully the
conviction hialed at, in the course of the foregoing remarks, thai
tb^re has hitherto been manifested, in some, at least, of our institik
tions, as well as with the parents of their pupils, too much slackaeas
of discipline. It is, withoot doubt, difficult for instructors to over*
come their natural sympathies, and equally hard for pupils to submil
cheerfully, to rigid government; but if such is essential to thoroogd
education, there must be no flinching from duty on the part of either
teachers or scholars. If it is necessary for others to bend their en*
tire energies to the pursuit of some one definite object, in order to at*
tain to proficiency, it is clearly so, in a higher degree, for Blind per*
sons. This yielding to their desire to change from one thing to an*
other, is the most fruitful source of the inefficiency complained of.
Likewise the attempt to take those through a literary course, who
enter institutions after arriving nearly or quite to maturity, however
aiuch it may accord with our feelings of kindness, is another source



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40

of inofficieacy ; because more is undertaken than can be accomplish-
ed. It is tMy as much as such can do, to learn a trade in tb^ abort
tintie they are willing to remain at school. Wero more attenticm
l^ven to these matters^ we would have among our gradualaB» more
industrious meohanics* and fewer solicitors of alms,, under cover cf
concert-giving, lecturing and autobiography-wfiung. Allosiaii is
made to those only who are unfit for these occupations*

The practice which prevails in most of the institutions, of keeping
some of their pupils during the vacations, instead of returning them
to theirfriends, also comes in for its share of the responsibility of per-
petuating the evil under notice. It undoubtedly has its origin in be-
nevolence, as this class are mostly destitute of comfortable homes,
compared with those afforded by the institutions ; but we cannot,
with justice, call that benevolence which produces evil, rather than
good, to its object. Instances are not unfrequent, however, in which
pupils are permitted to remain, because their friends fail to proiide
a way for Xhetti to go home. Our own practice has hitherto been, to
require all to leave, even though we have been obliged in some cases
to bear their tiavelling expenses. Where they are without parents,
we send them to some near relative; or where they have been coun-
ty charges, we return them to the county officei*s, to be provided for
during the vacations. Even though we should be obliged to pay for
the boarding of such out of the institution, we would conceive it to
be better for them, than to retain them in it. The design of our in-
^Mittitions is not to provide atyloms for the Blind, but to edoeate
Ihenn with the expectation that they will i*eturn to the hoUom of so-
^ety, and take their places as useful citizens, so far as possible. Is it
not better then, that they should keep up their acquaintance with the
outward world ? It most certainly is, and particularly with that part
of it which is to be their future home. There are many other rea-
tons why this practice is objectionable, but they are too obvious to
Heed mention here.

But while we would fain throw out a few suggestions for the con-
sideration of the conductors of our several institutions, we would by
no means overlook the duty which devolves upon parents in this mat-
ter. They have much, very much, to do in this proposed reforma-
tion ; for, while they continue to rear their children in the erroneous
manner described, and to keep them at home in idleness during their
best days for instruction, the efforts of the educator will be compara-



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41

y

lively futile. No blind child should be kept from school after arriv-
ing at hb twelfth year ; and if he can be sent as early as nine or
ten, it will be still better. The amount of injury done by parents in
their m^^ot of ikU matter, is iocajculable. We have in our own
fchoolff and doubt not that the same is the case with all the otheiVt
BumeroiM iiistaftoes, in which pupils have been sent to us too late for
tliDrou^ education, notwithstanding our almost incessant labons
with their frieodfy from its cocnmcHfDBeinent, at which time they were
far better fitted to profit by our instruction. There ara, moreover,
many others, in different parts of the State, with whom we are still
earnestly pleading, but in vain, to accept the blessings vouchsafed to
them by an All-mercifol Providence, through the humble instrumen-
tality of the Institute.



HOUSEHOLD DBPARTMENT.

In the management of the domestic e^oonomy of the establishment,
the usual attention has been given to the promotion of the comfort
of the pupils. As the number of our family has been somewhat
greater during the past year, than that of the previous one, there has
of course been some increase in the disbvirsements of this department;
bat if we take into account the uausualiy high price of provisions of
all kinds, together with the fact that the present report embraces one
month more than the last, it must be admitted (hat there has been a
rektive diminution of expense.



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The thanks of the Institute are doe to the proprieton of the sem-
a newspapers and periodicals named below, for their kindoess is
sending us, without charge, copies of their respeetiTe pubKcatioiis.
Most of them have been received during the entire year, whib tke
rest have been regularly forwarded for a greater or lew part of tke
time.

Ihdiaha Statb JommAiii
Indiana Statb JSmTiavH
Indiana Statesman,
Fahilt VurrBK,

LOOOHOTIYB,

CouenAN Rboosd,
St. Joseph Valley Rbqutbk,
Montoombrt Jovknal,
New Albany Ledobe,

RiOHBtOND PALLADnm,
VlNOBNNBS GaIBTTB,

Dekogratig Phaeos,
Madison Weekly Coukibe,
Indiana Rboisteb,
Wayne Ooitnty Whig,
Democatio Claeion,
Dboatue Clarion,
Andbebon Gaxbtte,
Washington Dkmoceat,
Indiana Tbibune,

WEnVEN CoEIflTIAN AdTOCATE, (CiB.)

Non-Slayeholdee, (Phiiad'a.)



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In conclusion, allow me gentlemen, to ask yonr serious attention
to the foregoing remarks upon the proper training of the Blind, for
the datioB and relations of practical lire. This matter has heretofore
received too little attention. The aim has apparently been to make
prodigies, rather than sturdy, practical men. The time has now ar-
rived, bowover, for a change; and unless it shall be made, our sys-
tem must fail to realize the lofty hopes of its benevolent founders.
Look abroad in the world, and we will find that nearly all the pov-
erty and pauperism in it, are attributable to this lack of eneigeiic
training, this want of development of those powers from which it
derived the true dignity of man. How then can we expect for the
Blind, exemption from the penalty consequent upon the infringement
of thb plain, but important law of our being T
Yeiy Respectfully,

W. a CHURCHMAN.
Ikbsaiiafqus, Nov. 1, 1850.



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OQMPOSITION BY MARGARST BRI.r.Hg8t



TO ni TBB ■0—OOiW MMttt-



Tkmj rfMp itt Jasiis, etbnly, mretdy ]M«r»
No pang af tfwrow tlffilk tbe yootUU fanwl s
Hie cold, dunp earth ■ oa the ranny hmw.
And they have feoiid, at h^t, a place of iwt
Their 8avioar led them throDffa death's poitaia dte.
They tmited all in Him.

Few kindied'a mileo fllomed their daAaome way ;

Lone pilgrima all la life's diear wildernem.

Their father amiled in realme of eadlem day,

And beekoaed them to hemea of fadelem biim

Homaa, where the hearts' foad breathiafi kaow ao blj^,

la ereilaitiBf light

We BUM them, whea at hoar of pnyer we moel :
We hear aot bow, whea hymae of praiae arim,
Tlieir tnaefal toaea ; aad oa eaeh vacaat aeat
We maae with qaiioriaf lip aad teaifnl eyaa
Bat wherefore weep, to meet them here ao men t
Hiey are bat goae before.

We thaak thee. Lord, that ia eaeh atriekea heart.
The radnat star of hope doth brightly ahiae ;
Aad while we weep that thaa we oariy part.
We bleoi the chait'Biag head, for it la Thine ;
We kaow Thy Meroy, Lord— Thy righteooa waya ;
Aad while we moara, we i



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4S«



COMPOSITION BY ALICE HOLMES.



f TOBK iiffrmrnoN roR tiuc bund.
msTrFonoN.



AdRm, adieu, my lon^ lor^ tiomttt

Wbera gpaul spirita dwell,
For I mast bid thy hearth and halb.

This dayj a sad farewell.
Thy vesper bell will peal at eve.

Bat not, alas ! for me ;
For I shall be alone and sad.

Far, far away from thee !

Adiea, adiea, my guides beloved ;

]
Yi toil.

Fa 11.

J
Ba



Adiea, adiea, ooropanioiis tfetf ;

My siste
Hiisday C(

This da]
Batoh! bi

To hear
Thatbidsi

Frqpith

Adiea, adieo ! It'mast be so ?

Thei
TbatU

My I
When

Te^
Oh,bif

WIM



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fbw foraMd ft plNi. tiMl t'Mi the au
Mfty iMurm Iht watel ftitk

SipmiioM fit jonr iini» to i|Mftk,
I knew Bot wImto to flad s

May God nwud yosr effMti i
Tvftdaflttatebliail



AdiftSiftdiea ! too happy hoan

That learning did employ.
And gave for eiory momonfs tell.

A eweet lewaid of joy :
Forthoywillbe uoloBcerMiM.

My echool-day joya are o'er .
Far dearar riioftld I priie them now.

Could they retmni onoemore.

Adieu, adieu to morning walks

Along the HadMm'a aide,
Wheio oft amid the rocka we heard

Hio murie of the tide :
Aad waadoringa al twilight hoar,

Through giore, by hiO and atream.
Thai I hftfo oTor fondly prised.

Bui dealer now thoy aecm.



Adieu, adieu to moac'a charm.

From it,too, Imnat part;
Much ihatt I miaa ita magic power.

To cheer my lonely heart
Adieu, ye bbrda, at eariy dawn

Hwt near my caeemeni aung.
While aP aiuund the waUng floweia

Their aoft. aweet odom flu^g.

Adieu, adieu, ye treea and flowera.

And pleaaant play-groanda, all ;
A Toioe for me la calling now,

From yonder front-door hall.
Theatot^y domidl demanda

ApartingfaraweU,too;
But oh! »tiaaad,toaUwe*Tolore4.

At onee to bid adieus

Adiau, adttau, my doiater homo.

With all thy hallowed tlea ;
The precepts thou hast giToa me.

Meat deariy I shall prise.
Tkiala. perchance, await ma a«w»

IkaowBoiyetmyloi; .



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47

Bat be it ireit], or U Him,
Thou ihalt not be foi^pet

Adiev» onoe more, jt Icfred onet all ?

Foiyire theae goehiiif tewi.
And all the wrooge I yev have doae*

Throagfa eeran by-gima jean^
BtDl in yoar faaarla, oh, let na Uva»

TOlyeaMaaUadtadle^- .
Oh»Boir tiiay leadma lo the gala !

Larad lioina-*good*by— goad-by !



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ADMISSION OF PUPILS.



Any person wishing to make application for the admission of a
upil into the Institute, should address either the Secretary of ibe
'oard of Trustees, or the Superintendent of the Institute, giving
definite and accurate information upon the following points, viz:

1. The name of the applicant and that of his parent or guardiaoi
toffether with the Post OfKce address of the latter.

2. The date of the birth of the applicant.

3. The cause of hb Blindness, and the age at which it occurred.

4. Whether he is of sound mind and susceptible of intellectual
culture.

5. Whether he is free from bodily deformity and infectious disease.

6. Whether his personal habits and moral character are good.
Upon the receipt of such application, it will be acted upon by the

Trustees, and the applicant informed of the result.

No pupil should be sent to the Institute until the above preliminary
step shall have been taken.

To residents of the State no charge is made for the boarding and
instruction of their children ; but pupils are in all cases expected to
come provided with a change of good comfortable clothing, which
must be replenished by their friends from time to time, as it becomes
necessary. Where parents or guardians are unable through indi-
gence to provide the necessary clothing, the commissioners of the
counties in which they reside are authorized by law to iprnish the
same in their stead.

All traveling expenses of the pupils to and from the Institute must
be borne by their friends.

All books, musical instruments and other apparatus required for
the use of the pupils during their term of instruction, are furnished
by the Institute free of charge.

The school commences its sessions on the first Monday in Octo-
ber, and closes on the last Wednesday in July, leaving a vacation of
more than two months during the warm season, which is spent by
the pupils at their homes.



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53

It is important that new pupils should enter upon their term of
instruction at the commencement of a session* and it is expected of
all the others that they shall be present at the opening of the school,
and renaain until it closes on the last day of the session.

As a general rule applicants are not admitted who are over twen-
ty-one years of age, but exceptions are sometimes made in favor of
persons who are of undoubted ability, and free from all objectionable
habits.



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Doc. No. 2.] [Part. II.

REPORT



OF TRB



AGENT OF STATE



TO TRB



GENERAL ASSEMBLY.



DECEMBER, 1850,



INDIANAPOLIS:

J. p. CHAPMAN, STATE PRINTER.

1850.
2D6



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ABSTRACT OF REPORT

ov

JAMES COLLINS, JS.,

AGENT OF STATE,

WtLOM

SEPTEMBER 30, 1849, TO FEBRUARY 1, 1850,

OOMPILED rEOM 1SS

EECORDS IN THE OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR OF STATE.



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REPORT.



Officb ov Auditor op Statb* )
Indianapolis, Dec. 21, 1850. )

To the Omorabkj the htgislalurt of Indiana:

The Report of Jas. Collins Jr., Esq., late Agent of State, submitted
to the L^islature at its session ot 1849-50, presented the operations
of his office in part to the 1st July, 1849, and in part to Sept. 30,
1849. His term of office expired after the adjournment of the
Legislature, and consequently no subsequent Report was laid before
that body.

A full report was made to this office by Mr. Collins, on his final
settlement in February, and it is thought proper, in order that the
Legislature may be kept fully advis^ of the operations of the
Agency, to publish an abstract thereof, embracing the period inter*
vening between the date of his last report to the Legislature, and
the close of his term.

This abstract, following the order of date, is prefixed to the report
of the present incumbent, and shows the following particulars:



Bofids Surrendered.

The total number of bonds outstanding at the period

of the arrangement of the Public Debt was, 11,048

The number surrendered to July 1st, 1849, was, 9,530 ^

Urnng then outstanding, 1,518



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60

There were surrendered from July 1st, 1849, to close of ColUns's
term as follows :

Internal Improvement Bonds, 92

Wabash and Erie Canal Bonds, 2

Madison and Indianapolis R. R. Bonds, 6

Bank Bonds, 7

Total, lOT

Leaving outstanding Feb. 1st, 1850, 1,411

Interest Account.

The amount of interest paid by Mr. Collins, during the period
named, was as follows:

On account of January Interest, 1848, 60 00

On account of July In'lerest, 1848, 70 00

On account of January Interest, 1849, 160 00

On account of July Interest, 1849, 796 00



Online LibraryIndianaAnnual reports of the officers of state of the State of Indiana → online text (page 22 of 40)
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