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soul.]

Riga.
[Going over to the sink and tugging at Bistone* s
jacket.]
Leave everything to Oliva. You don't know a
thing about it. Take these pails. Just see how they
glisten! [She puts two pails into his hajids.] Gigi!
Are you asleep there, too? Mother of mine, save
him! Take the pails!

Bistone.

[Placing the two pails on the floor.]

Wait a bit. I want to warm my hands a little.

I'm cold this evening. It must be the years piling up.

[Gigi, ivho had half risen, sinks comfortably

down upon the stone again. Leopoldo,

leaning against the door-jamb, turns to gaze

upon Oliva, who lowers her head sadly.]



Water Upon Fire 71

Leopoldo.

Oliva . . . [Somewhat louder.] Oliva . . . Why-
don 't you look at me any more? [Fingering the
little basket upon the table,] Did you make this
beautiful basket?

Oliva.

[Hurriedly raises her eyes. A brief rebirth
of hope brings a fleeting smile.]

Yes ... I made it . . . But I couldn't finish
it . . . You see, I lost my knife . . .

Leopoldo.

Poor Oliva! . . . Take this one. [Unpocketing his
Catalonian knife.] See how beautiful it is ! I bought
it in America . . . Who could have guessed that
I was buying it for you! . . . It'll be a souvenir
of me. [He opens it. The three springs cause Bistone
and Riga to turn about at the same time.]

Bistone.

What are you doing there? . . . Do you want to
cut her throat?

Riga.
Heaven forbid ! . . .

Leopoldo.

[To the parents.]
No, no ... I won't touch your little goat. I was
showing Oliva how these Catalonian knives are
made.

Riga.
Ah! . . .



72 Water Upon Fire

Leopoldo.

[To Oliva.]

And this is how you close it. [He closes it.]

Oliva.

[Looks at the knife in infinite despair.]

Couldn't you give me something else to remember
you by? . . . Something less pretty . . . and less
expensive? . . .

Leopoldo.

Don't say that, my dear Oliva. Why do you talk
that wa}^? ... If you only knew what pleasure
it gives me to think that this big knife of mine will be
in your soft little hands! And that you'll be working
away at your reeds, quietly, far up in these moun-
tains, and thinking of me every time you use it!
Winter's coming on. Ugly weather at sea. Many
sailors lose their lives! [The tinkling of a coal-
man's hell, like that in the early part of the act,
becomes more and more distinct.]

De^te Di Legno.

[Outside.]

Whoa-a-a-! [The hell stops tinkling.] Ho, there,
Bistone! Here we are! . . .

Bistone.

[At the sound of the hell he has risen from his
seat hefore the hearth. He takes the four pails
in his left hand.]



Water Upon Fire 73

Dente di legno! [To the coalman, who enters.]
Here's your gentleman. Have you remembered to
polish up your best saddle?

Dente Di Legno.

You rascally devil! . . . Whom do you take me
for? . . . I've even put a new package on it, into
the bargain !

Leopoldo.

[Goes to take his cap from under the fireplace.]
Bravo! And can we reach the Quattro Strade by
ten?

Dente Di Legno.

If we leave at once . . .

Leopoldo.
Then will you be securing this valise in the mean-
time?

Dente Di Legno.

Right away. [Takes the valise and is about to leave.]

Leopoldo.

[To the coalman.]

We don't dismount during the journey, do we?
Do I have to wear these boots?

Dente Di Legno.
No stops! You leave here and dismount at the
Quattro Strade. [Exit.]



74 Water Upon Fire

Leopoldo.

[To Bistone.]
Then will you take these boots, eh, Bistone?
What? . . . Do you really mean it? ... A pair
of new boots? I don't want them . . . They may
come in handy to you.

Riga.
K Signor Leopold© has no use for them . . .

Leopoldo.
Yes, yes . . . Take them . . . You'll please me
very much by accepting them as a remembrance

of me.

Bistone.

Really? . . . Why this is too much . . .

Riga.

So you're going back to your saiUng, Signor
Leopoldo? To your sailing over the sea? Lord
knows how many years we'll keep remembering
you . . . and you, on the other hand, in two or
three days, will have forgotten all about us!

Leopoldo.

Why should I forget you? If we sailors shouldn't
recall folks, how could we live? We'd die of mon-
otony !

Riga.

Oliva! [Oliva is caressing the goat convulsively.]
Why don't you stand up and say good-bye to the
gentleman! Or have you lost your head, too, with



Water Upon Fire 75

this little creature? Come and bid Signer Leopoldo
farewell! [Oliva still strokes the animal. Then she
arises in confusion. Without raising her glance she
approaches Riga.]

Leopoldo.
Good-bye, Oliva . . . May heaven send you
all that you desire, and make you happy!

Riga.
Thank the gentleman! . . . What do you call
this? . . . Have you caught the goat's illness?

Oliva.

[With infinite sadness.]
Thank you!

BiSTONE.

And don't ever come back to these parts, under-
stand. They're not for you.

Dente Di Legno.

[Returning.]
We're ready, master.

Leopoldo.

Good-bye, Bistone . . . Good luck to you, and
thanks. Good-bye, Gigi.

Riga.

[To Gigi.]

Listen, you beast! He's talking to you! Come
here !



76 Water Upon Fire

GiGI.

[Takes two or three steps forward with the two
pails in his hand. Murmurs.]
Till we meet again. [Oliva eijes him strangely.]

Riga.

*'Till we meet again!" What are you talking
about? Do you think that Signor Leopoldo's a coal-
man like Pippo, who comes back when he's sold
his load? Say "Good-bye" to him, can't you?

BiSTONE.

Good luck, and long life to you!

Riga.
Good health to you, and plenty of money! [All
leave through the hack door except Oliva, who seems
petrified. — Pause, while Leopoldo, who can no
longer he seen, mounts his horse.]

BiSTONE.

[In the doorway.]
Are you comfortable on that saddle?

Leopoldo.

[From outside.]

Excellent!

Dente Di Legno.

[Outside.]

We're off, then! [Shouting loudly. ] Aiuuuu . . .
Furia . . . [The hell hegins to tinkle; the horses start.]



Water Upon Fire 77

Riga.

Come, folks. Hurry. Get busy with the milking.

BiSTONE.

[To Riga.]
Put out the fire, won't you, Riga? And go to bed,
for tomorrow we've got to get up an hour earlier.
[To Gigi.] Get a move on. [They leave. Gigi passes
behind the window; Bistone stops behind the window,
and turning toward the direction in which Leopoldo
disappeared, he shouts " Good-by-y-y-y-y-ye! ^^

Leopoldo.

[From the distance.]
Good-by-y-y-y-y-ye !

Riga.

[Returns and hastens to the fireplace, speaking
half to herself.]

Let's put out the fire, then. [She empties the jug of
water upon the brands, which, sputtering and smoking,
are soon extinguished. At this moment Oliva leaves
the doorivay, from where she has been ivatching the
departure of their guest. She throws herself down upon
the pallet, beside the sick little goat, and bursts into
a desperate weeping. Riga, in frightened amazement,
turns around.] What does this mean?



CURTAIN.



PERSONS

Gastone, An animal trainer,
FiFi Rapetta I ^ .^^^^^^ ^^^
Nenne Rapetta J Marchionesses.
Baroness Angelica Del Branco.



GASTON E
THE ANIMAL TAMER

Scene: The room of the animal trainer, inside one
of those huge circus wagons that make up the rear of
the menageries. The stage is lighted only by two moon-
beams that come in through the little open windows in
the back wall. At each side wall, a closed door. To
the left, along the back wall, a small, low bed, and
nearby, a night-table upon which are placed a golden
watch in its case and a tiny shaving mirror. Next to
the bed, along the rear wall, a wash-stand, chairs, then
a corner table with letters, papers, post-cards and an
inkstand upon it. On the wall at the right, a medicine
chest. All around the walls, whips, guns, pistols,
photographs of women and of wild animals.

At the rise of the curtain there comes, from nearby,
the strident, raucously discordant music of brass
instruments. Suddenly the music ceases in the very
m,idst of a phrase. The profound silence that follows
is broken by two or three feminine cries of terror,
which are suddenly hushed. Then, a revolver shot, a
furious crack of a whip, a clanking of chains, and at
last, a vast round of frantic, fairly interminable
applause, mingling with shouts from a deeply moved
audience: '^ Bravo! ^^ "Evviva!^'

While the applause is dying out, the little door at the
right is thrust open, a7id Gastone, the anvnal trainerj

79



8o Gastone the Animal Tamer

appears. He turns on the electric lights. He is sweating
freely, his manner portraying the strain he has just
gone through; his reddened face is almost the color of
his flaming garb in the Russian manner, with its large
black frogs. His long dark hair has fallen across his
eyes, which roll flashingly in their sockets. He is still
trembling with rage in every muscle. Strong, trium-
phant, he bursts into, rather than enters, the room and
the boards of the floor creak beneath his glittering boots.
Behind him, through the door that he has left open, and
unseen by him, come Fifi and Nenne hand in hand,
sisters of sixteen and fifteen respectively. They are
dressed in white, all laces and ribbons; blushing
furiously, eager, and quivering with laughter, they
remain standing upon the threshold.

Gastone.

[As he enters, grumbles, among other unintel-
ligible words.]

That damned Fifi! . . . She'll pay for it! Tonight
she'll get a supper of fork prongs instead of meat!
[He throws the revolver and the whip upon his bed, and,
in the mirror upon the night-table, he looks at the
scratches on his shoulder.]



Fifi.

How handsome he is!

Nenne.

How handsome he is!



[To Nenne.]



[To Fifi.]



Gastone the Animal Tamer 8i

Gastone.

[Touching one of the scratches, and grumhling,
as above.]

I had that plagued beast so well trained to jump on
me without mussing me up so ! . . . Bah! [Returns
around. Beholding the young strangers he stares at
them in wonderment.]

FiFI AND NeNNE.

[Embrace each other tightly. The first moves as
if to escape.]

Gastone.

[With the politeness of an athlete.]

My dear young ladies! You needn't run away!
Why? I don't eat little girls!

FiFI.

[Turns back, still clasping Nenne's hand.]

Gastone.

And what did these noble young ladies desire of
the animal-trainer Gastone?

FiFI AND NeNNE.

[Look at each other and lav^h.]

Gastone.
But won't you come in?

FiFI.

[To Nenne^ looking about.]
How charming everything is in here!



82 Gastone the Animal Tamer

Gastone.

[To Fifu]

Really? . . . But perhaps. . . . For the first five
minutes, everything is charming!

FiFI.

Even we! Who have come to bore you! [Nenne
laughs.]

Gastone.

Ah, but you would be charming ... for all
eternity !

FiFI.

Don't exaggerate!

Gastone.
Please make yourselves comfortable. . . .[Offering
cJmirs.] Is there any one with you?

FiFi AND Nenne.
No, no! We are alone!

Gastone.
Ah!

FiFI.

There isn't the slightest thing wrong about this.

Gastone.
Quite the contrary!

FiFi and Nenne.
For we've come to. . . .



Gastone the Animal Tamer 83

Gastone.

[Laughing.]

To . . , ? The rest is easy to guess: To look at
close range upon a man who was on the point of
being devoured. Isn't that so? [Fifi and Nenne
clasp each other in admiration of his prowess.] But,
my dear young ladies, it's no easy matter to devour
Gastone the animal-trainer! . . . My hair's a bit
rumpled, and there are a few rips in my jacket. But
here I am, no parts missing, as you can see!

Fifi.
Heavens, what an eternal minute that was!

Nenne.
What a horrible minute!

Fifi.

You were simply magnificent! I was the first one
to shout ''Bravo!" too.

Nenne.
No. I was really the first.

Fifi.

That's not at all so!

Nenne.
You're a story-teller!

Gastone.

Peace, peace, peace! You were both the first.
There ! I saw you perfectly.



84 Gastone the Animal Tamer

FiFI AND NeNNE.

Uh! Really? You saw us?

Gastone.

Yes . . . yes, indeed. . . . And I also caught
sight of a crowd of women nearby. . . .

FiFi AND Nenne.

Ah! That was our stupid mamma. . . . She
fainted. . . . She's always fainting. . . . They must

have taken her out. . . .

I

Gastone.
Oh! This is not at all to my liking!

FiFI.

Why?

Gastone.
Eh?

FiFI

If mother hadn't swooned, how could we ever
have come to you here?

Gastone.

[To Fiji.]
Ah! Looking at the matter in that light ! . . .

FiFI.

Do you know, we have a terrible mother? We
have!

Nenne.
Awful!



Gastone the Animal Tamer 85

Gastone.
An animal-trainer of the old school, I suppose!

Nenne.

You laugh! Because you don't know what it
means to be continually spied upon by two eyes as
big as this [Distends her eyes].

FiFI.

. . . That see everything!

Nenne.
For twenty-four hours a day !

Gastone.
And . . . suppose your mother were right?

FiFi and Nenne.

No, no! She's wrong! Damned wrong! For it's
all useless!

FiFI.

. . . Because we're not made like all the other
young ladies!

Gastone.
Oh! Hear, hear!

FiFI.

We weren't born to do what all the rest do!

Gastone.
Eh!

Nenne.

Indeed! For we. . . .



86 Gastone the Animal Tamer

FiFI.

We're of the kind that are destined to great things.
That's why! . . .

Nenne.

One of those careers that gets your name in the

papers! . . .

Gastone.

Eh!

FiFI.

. . . and then in the novels!

Nenne.
It's no use. These are things that are felt inside.

FiFI.

And you can understand us!

Nenne.
Yes! You can!

Gastone.

I?

FiFI.

Yes, for you're not like all those imbeciles of the
summer colon}^ [Gastone bows.]

Nenne.
What a strange life yours must be!

FiFI.

What a wonderful novel your life must make!



Gastone the Animal Tamer 87

Nenne.

Who can tell what adventures led to your becom-
ing an animal-tamer!

FiFI.

If we could only find out!

Gastone.
Animal-tamer? Why, I can tell you right away!
Because my father, heaven rest his soul, was an
animal-trainer, and I. . . .

FiFi AND Nenne.
Oh dear! Really? Oh! What a sin! [Disillusioned.]

Gastone.
What a sin? . . . Why?

FlFI.

But . . . simply that? . . .

Nenne.

If you only knew what stories we've read . . ,
about tamers! ...

FiFI.

Marvellous tales! . . .

Nenne.

Just imagine. There was one who was nothing
less than an American millionaire. . . .

Gastone.
Lucky dog!

FiFI.

... and through love . . .



88 Gastone the Animal Tamer

Nenne.
. . . through love of a French princess . • •

FiFi AND Nenne.
... he became an animal trainer!

Gastone.
Oh! There's a strange fellow for you! I'd prefer
the contrary!

FiFi and Nenne.

What do you mean?

Gastone.
Through love of a princess . . . I'd like to become
a millionaire!

FiFi AND Nenne.

[Disgusted.]

Oh! What horrid things you say!

Gastone.
Horrid?

FiFI.

[To Nenne.]

But do you believe him? Do you thmk he's speak-
ing seriously? How silly we've been!

Gastone.
Why?

FiFI.

[To Gastone.]

No, no, it's all our fault! You are perfectly right!
One doesn't tell one's most intimate secrets to the
first person who happens to come along!



Gastone the Animal Tamer 89

Gastone.
Why, nothing of the sort!

Nenne.

[Pouting.]

We . . . are . . . the first to come along! . . .

FiFI.

True enough! And we should have understood it!

Gastone.

But I assure you . . . that you're mistaken?
How can I help it if I'm not an amateur, a dilettante,
but a born animal-tamer, who grew up among wild
beasts, have lived among wild beasts all my life and
will die among wild beasts. . . .

Nenne.
. . and decollete women!

FiFI.

Nenne !

Nenne.

Can't you see that the walls here are covered with
pictures of wild beasts and bare-necked women?

FiFI.

Very well. But you oughtn't to say such things,
because you're a baby. . . .

Gastone. ^

Ha, ha, ha! [To Fiji, laughing.] This woman's
air really becomes you!



90 Gastone the Animal Tamer

FiFI.

[Interrupts him, in a rage.]
^'This woman's air!" Then you imagine I'm not
a woman!

Gastone.

But! . . . [Laughing.] So so!

FiFI.

[More furious than ever.]

Aha! '' So so "? It's very evident that you under-
stand only beasts and . . . women of that sort
there! . . . [She turns her back childishly upon him
and stands near the table.]

[A note enclosed in an envelope comes flying in
through one of the open windows and falls
at Nenne's feet.]

Nenne.
Uh ! [Jumps back in fear.]

Gastone.

[Very quickly dashes to pick it up, agitated.]

Ah! You'll pardon me, won't you? This is, er, a
very important message. . . .

FiFI.

You can tell that from the way it came in!

Nenne.

. . . and you can scent it from the perfume it
exhales.



Gastone the Animal Tamer 91

Gastone.

[Mumbling the letter in an unintelligible
^ manner^ and then, aloud.]

.... At half-past-eleven sharp.

FiFI.

[With lightning-like rapidity she seizes the gold
watch before her on the table and turns the
hands back.

That's done! Now I've fixed him. [Having done
this, she begins to look herself over in the mirror.]

Gastone.

[Continues to mutter other unintelligible words,
then folds the letter and puts it into his jacket
pocket.]

You will excuse me, won't you? You've heard. . . .
It's an appointment for half-past-eleven sharp. . . .
A very urgent matter. . . . [Turning toivard the
table.] And I must dress. . . . And there's only ten
minutes to spare. . . . [Takes up his watch, looks at
it, and makes a gesture of great surprise.] Eh! [He
puts the watch to his ear.] But it's going!

FiFI.

[With studied indifference,]
What's the trouble?

Gastone.
When I came in it was ten minutes to eleven.



92 Gastone the Animal Tamer

FiFI.

[As above.]
And what time is it now?

Gastone.

Eleven. . . . Can it be possible? It's surely no
less than half an hour since. . . .

FlFI.

Thanks, ever so much!

Gastone.
What do you mean?

FiFI.

It's really not very polite to give young ladies to
understand that a ten-minute visit seemed all of
half an hour!

Nenne.

I should say so. [Gastone looks from one to the
other.]

FiFI.

But if your affairs are so urgent, we'll leave just
the same.

Gastone.

You must understand. . . . Really, it's a matter
of . . . meat ... for my animals. . . . It's a very
good bargain ... I might miss it!

FiFi AND Nenne.
Ah! Meat? . . . For your animals?



Gastone the Animal Tamer 93

FiFI.

Very well. Very well. We'll leave. [Spreading her
veil across her shoulders.] We'll leave at once! [Show-
ing little desire J however, to go.]

Gastone.

[Offering his hand,]
My most noble young ladies!

FiFI.

Oh! Your hand? Not at all! You don't deserve
it! I don't forgive so soon! [She turns to the right.]

Gastone.
So cruel?

FiFI.

[Turning suddenly around.]
Don't you like it?

Gastone.

Of course I don't like it! Come now, like good
girls, tell me what I can do to win your pardon.

Nenne.

As far as I'm concerned, let me have one of those
beautiful post-cards with your picture and a flourish-
ing autograph, and I'll be satisfied!

Gastone.

[Going to the table.]
That's quickly done! Here! [Nenne claps her
hands and dances about, but Fiji remains serious.]

Nenne.
Uh! What a beautiful signature!



94 Gastone the Animal Tamer

Gastone.

And we'll put down the inscription, too. To Miss
Nenne. . . isn't that right?

Nenne.
Marchioness Nenne Rapetta.

Gastone.

[Writing.]

Very happy! . . . And do you come from here-
abouts?

Nenne.

Yes. But we spend the winter in Florence.

Gastone.
[Having signed a second card.]

And this is for your elder sister. . . . What is her
name?

FiFI.

The same as your tiger's. . . . [disdainfully.]

Gastone.
Fifi? ... Oh! I'm so glad to hear that!

FiFI.

"Yes, Fifi! And look at the fine claws I have, too!
[She thrusts her ten finger-nails in a row directly under
his nose.]

Gastone.
Perbacco!



Gastone the Animal Tamer 95

FiFI.

And let me tell you that I'm not satisfied with
that gift there! . . .

Gastone.

No?

FiFI.

No. I want a different one. . . . It's something
you're going to throw away in any event! . . .
So. . . .

Gastone.

Indeed! Tell me what. . . .

FiFI.

Oh, nothing. Simply the note you just got from
the butcher. . . . [Looking at his coat pocket, whence
protrudes the letter referred to.]

Gastone.

[Not understanding.]

The note from the butch . . . ?

FiFI.

[Who in the meantime, with feline agility, has
snatched the letter out of his pocket and
flourishes it in her hand.]

Here it is ! The gift is already made ! [Nenne hursts
with laughter.]

Gastone.

Ah! This is too much! [Rises, ill able to control
Ms consternation.] I hope this is only a joke. [Goes
to the door at the right and closes it.]



96 Gastone the Animal Tamer

FiFI.

[Evading him.]

But isn't this a letter from the butcher? VvTiat
can you do with it?

Gastone.

Ah! No, no! Be a good girl, now! Give me that
letter! . . . Marchioness Nenne, help me recover
that note!

FiFI.

But just see how fond he is of that butcher!
[Dodging him, laughingly.]

Gastone.

That letter belongs to me. I beg you! I warn you,
now, that if you don't return it I'll be compelled
to take it by force !

FiFI.

Really! Oh! How excellent! [With a mingling of
girlish and feline glee she prepares to defend her prey.]

Nenne.

Fie, Fifi! Give it . . . back! [There is a short
struggle between Gastone and Fifi.]

Gastone.
That letter, I say! [He pursues her.]

Fifi.

[Flourishing the note.]
Here it is!

Gastone.

You just wait! [Threateningly.]



Gastone the Animal Tamer 97

FiFI.

Yes! You think it's easy, don't you! [She evades
him.]

Gastone.

It won't be impossible, though! . . .

FiFI.

You'll find me worse than that other Fifi!

Nenne.
Fie! It's a shame, Fifi!

Gastone.
This little arm is mine! It won't escape again!

Fifi
[Passing the letter to her other hand.]
But the letter escapes!

Nenne.
Dear me! Fifi!

Gastone.

[Still struggling with her.]

And now we'll capture this other little arm!

Fifi.

[Trying to free herself.]
No! no! I say!

Gastone.
Here it is, caught ! . . . Ow ! Ouch ! !

Fifi.
Have I hurt you?



98 Gastone the Animal Tamer

Gastone.

[Taking advantage of the moment to snatch the
letter from her hand.

Oh! At last! [Triumphantly he conceals the
recaptured letter in his inside pocket.]

FiFI.

[Filled with scorn.]
Ah! Wicked fellow!

Nenne.

[At first uncertain, and then with confidence y
takes Gastone^ s right hand. ]

But goodness me ! She really /las hurt you ! Look!

Gastone.
It's nothing!

Nenne.

Your wrist . . . is all scratched up ! Why, Fifi!

FlFI.

Is it possible? [Runs to see.\

Gastone.
Why, it's a mere trifle!

Fifi.

[Genuinely affected.]

Oh, dear me! What a long scratch! However
could I have done it! It's always that way. I never
realize it. . . .

Nenne.

But the persons who get the scratch realize it.



Gastone the Animal Tamer 99

Gastone.

No, no, I say. Let there be peace. It will be a
souvenir that will disappear only too soon! . . .
[Glancing at the watch, and, with evident desire to he
rid of them, extendiiig his hand.] A nice handshake,
now!

Nenne.

But are you going to leave that wound as it is?

Gastone.
Wound? [Laughing.]

FiFI.

It certainly needs attention!

Gastone.

Attention? . . . What the deuce are you talking
about! I'll cure it with a little fresh water! [Again
he extends his hand and walks toward the door with
them, as if to accompany them out.] You may run
along, then, and rest easy on that score. . . .

FiFI.

[In confusion.]
No, no, no! Not at all easy!

Nenne.

Take care! Finger-nail scratches are dangerous!
We know all about it, we do ! Our mamma is a Lady
of the Red Cross! We'll make you a model bandage!
You'll see!

Gastone.

By no means!



100 Gastone the Animal Tamer

FiFI.

Yes, I say! You'll see how content you'll be after
it's done. After the accident that happened to you
this evening I thought of a beautiful bandage on your
arm!

Nenne.

It will be twice as interesting! You'll see what
an effect it will have upon the ladies ! [Runs to the
medicine chest.]

FiFI.

And also upon your . . . butcher!

Gastone.

Upon my butch . . . ! [Understanding her
insiriuation, he is somewhat provoked.] Ah! I beg
you leave me. Don't insist. [Showing his wrist.]
Can't you see, it's all better! ♦

Nenne.

[Returning with plenty of cotton, gauze, iodine
and other ingredients.]
Here's all we need!

FiFI.

Good for you, Nenne! Place the stufif there!
[Points to a chair.]

Gastone.

Oh! Here's a pretty mess! Where did you get all
that hospital?

Nenne.

Inside there! Don't you think I know a medicine
chest when I see one? At a glance!



Gastone the Animal Tamer loi

FlFI.

Get me a basin.

Gastone.


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Online LibraryIsaac GoldbergPlays of the Italian theatre → online text (page 4 of 8)