Isaac Pitman.

Pitman's shorthand writing exercises and examination tests; a series of graduated exercises on every rule in the system and adapted for use by the private student or in public classes .. online

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[AN'S

.THAND WRITING
iXERCISES AND

;AMINATION TESTS

TWENTIETH CENTURY EDITION



1




THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES



PITMAN'S SHORTHAND
WRITING EXERCISES



Pitman's
Shorthand Writing Exercises

and

Examination Tests

A Series of Graduated Exercises on

Every Rule in the System and Adapted

for use by the Private Student or in

Public Classes






SflORTHANl)!



EIGHTH* '^EDITION



London

Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons, Ltd., 1 Amen Corner, E.C.
Bath and New York.



Entered at Stationert' Hall



PRINTED BY SIR ISAAC PITMAN

& SONS, LTD., LONDON, BATH,

AND NEW YORK



PREFACE

THE chief object of this work is to provide the student of
Pitman's Shorthand with a series of exhaustive Exercises
on every rule in the system. An examination of the arrange-
ment of the Exercises will show that they have been prepared
in such a way that the student may not only thoroughly master

2 each principle as it is reached in the course of his study, but

uLi

* that he is enabled at the same time to acquire a very extensive

knowledge of words and the outlines for them, and also to
5g commence the practice of writing from dictation almost from
- the beginning of his study of the theory. Facility in writing
^ and in reading shorthand may therefore be obtained along

B

^ with a perfect mastery of the principles, and thus the student
^ will be saved a good deal of valuable time.

It is scarcely necessary to say that this work is not intended

to take the place of " Pitman's Shorthand Instructor " or

uj any of the other text-books of the system. It is supplement-

Ej ary to those, and the Exercises herein contained will be most

~ correctly written, and with the greatest benefit to the student,

if he will take care always to refer to his text-book before

commencing to work the Exercises on any rule. Attention

to this, and to the brief directions at the head of the Exercises,

will enable the student to work through the various sections

with few or no mistakes.

It is probable that the student will meet in these Exercises

448459



6 PREFACE

with some words that are unfamiliar to him. He is recom-
mended in such a case invariably to refer to the dictionary
for the meaning of the words, remembering that transcription
of shorthand notes is all the more easy when the meaning of
the words is perfectly understood by the writer.

It may be pointed out, too, that the Exercises contain very
many illustrations of the principle of Word-Building, and that
the student will be able to construct innumerable other out-
lines on the plan suggested by the examples referred to. The
total number of words in the sentence exercises is given in
the figures in parenthesis at the end of each



CONTENTS



PAGE

1-6 LONG VOWELS ..... 9

7-12 SHORT AND LONG VOWELS , . . .12
13-17 DIPHTHONGS . .... 16

18-23 CIRCLE S AND Z . . . . .20

24-29 LOOP st AND sir . . . .24

30-35 CIRCLES SW AND SS OR S2 . . . .30

36-41 VOWELS AND S AND t . . . .35

42 CONTRACTIONS . . . . .40

HOOK / ADDED TO STRAIGHT LETTERS . . 41

HOOK r ADDED TO STRAIGHT LETTERS . . 42

45-50 INITIAL HOOKS TO STRAIGHT LETTERS . . 44

51 HOOK / ADDED TO CURVES . . . .48

HOOK r ADDED TO CURVES . . . .51

INITIAL HOOKS . . . . .54

58-64 CIRCLES AND LOOPS PREFIXED TO INITIAL HOOKS . 57

CONTRACTIONS . . . . .64

n HOOK ...... 64

f OR V HOOK . . . . .66

68-72 THE HOOKS n, AND / OR v . . . .69

73-79 CIRCLES AND LOOPS ADDED TO FINAL HOOKS . 72

80-86 THE -tion HOOK . . . . .79

87-92 ADDITIONAL DOUBLE CONSONANTS . . .87

93 CONTRACTIONS . . . . .93

94-99 THE ASPIRATE . . . . .94

100-105 UPWARD AND DOWNWARD / . . . . J01

106-111 UPWARD AND DOWNWARD f . . .109

112-114 UPWARD AND DOWNWARD sh . . .118

115 CONTRACTIONS . . . . .122
116-127 THE HALVING PRINCIPLE .... 123

128-133 THE DOUBLE-LENGTH PRINCIPLE . . .141

134 CONTRACTIONS . . . . .149

135-141 VOCALIZATION OF pi, f>f, ETC. . . .150

141^-1 47 IV AND y DIPHTHONGS . . . .158

148 CONTRACTIONS . . . , .169



8



CONTENTS



EXERCISE

149-154 DISYLLABIC DIPHTHONGS . ,

155-160 PREFIXES ....

161-166 SUFFIXES ....

167 CONTRACTIONS ...

168-173 GRAMMALOGUES ...

174-179 OMISSION OF CONSONANTS, ETC. .

180-184 CONTRACTIONS . . .

185-186 PHRASEOGRAPHY . . .

187-188 PUNCTUATION, ETC. . . .

189-190 WRITING IN POSITION . .

191 FIGURES ....

192 NEGATIVE PREFIXES . .
193-196 REPORTING GRAMMALOGUES . .
197-199 REPORTING CONTRACTIONS
200-203 ADVANCED PHRASEOGRAPHY . .
204-206 BUSINESS PHRASES AND CONTRACTIONS

207 POLITICAL PHRASES .

208 LAW PHRASES . . .

209 THEOLOGICAL PHRASES . .

210 INTERSECTED WORDS



PAGE
170

177
185
195
196
202
208
214
217
219
221
222
223
226
229
233
236
237
238
239



KEY TO " PITMAN'S SHORTHAND

WRITING EXERCISES AND

EXAMINATION TESTS"



Containing Keys in engraved short-
hand to the Exercises. Uniform
with this work. Price 33. 6d.



WRITING EXERCISES



EXERCISE 1.
Long* Vowels.

Vowels placed at the left side of an upright or sloping con-
sonant, or above a horizontal, are read before the consonant.
Vowels placed at the right side of an upright or sloping
consonant, or below a horizontal, are read after the
consonant.

The student is directed by small capital letters when to write
the consonants sh, I, r, and h downward. Grammalogues
and contractions are printed in italic.

1 pa, palm, paw, pall, pawnee, pawed, pay, paid, pale,

2 page, pane, pooh, ope, pope, poke, pole, poRe, bay, babe,

3 bake, bait, bale, bailee, bathe, bane, beau, boat, bowl,

4 boRe, boo, bee, bought, eat, ate, oat, tea, toe, toad, tome,

5 toll, tollage, toRe, Tay, tape, take, tame, tail, taRe, awed,

6 ode, day, date, dado, dame, dale, daRe, do, doe, dote,

7 dodo, dole, dome, dooR, donate, donee, aid, Dee, each,

8 chew, choke, jay, Jake, jail, jaw, Joe, Job, joke, Jew, age,

9 caw, Coe, cope, code, coach, coke, comb, coal, coRe, cocoa,

10 coo, Kay, cape, Cato, Cade, cage, cake, came, kale, oak.

11 ache, eke, auk, key, gay, gape, gate, gauge, game, gale,

12 goat, goal, goRe, Gaul, fay, fade, faith, fame, faiL, faRe,

13 fee, faix, foe, folk, foam, foaL, foRe, foRego, eve, vague,

14 veiL, vote, vogue, VOLC, oath, thaw, thee, they, ace, say,

15 saw, so, sew, see, ooze, ease, owes, Zoo, snah, snape,

16 snade SHake, sname, snaRe, snaw, SHOW, snowed, SHORC,

17 SHoe, SHC, ma, may, make, maim, mail, maRe, maw,

18 maul, mow, mope, mole, aim, moo, nay, nape, name,

19 naiL : knee, gnaw, no. knoLL, NORC, e'en, own, ail, eel, awl,

9



10 WRITING EXERCISES

20 lay, laid, lake, lave, lame, laiR, lee, law, laud, low, lobe,

21 load, loaf, loth, loathe, loam, loRe, loo, aiR, eaR, oaR, ray,

22 rate, rage, rake, raiL, rare, re, raw, wrought, roe, rope,

23 robe, rote, rode, roach, rogue, roam, TOLL, roar, rue, way,

24 wade, wage, ware, we, woe, woad, wore, woo, wee, ye,

25 yew, yea, Haw, Hay, Hake, Haigh, noe.



EXERCISE 2.
Long 1 Vowels (continued).

A third-place vowel, between two strokes, is written before
the second stroke.

1 beet, deep, cheap, keep, sneep, neap, leap, reap, weep,

2 heap, eat, beat, keyed, feed, lead, reed, weed, heed, each,

3 peach, beach, teach, leech, reach, liege, eke, peak, beak,

4 teak, meek, leek, reek, league, thief, leaf, leave, teeth,

5 Keith, Meath, wreath, heath, wreathe, beam, team, deem,

6 theme, ream, eel, peel, deal, keel, meal, feeL, veaL, kneeL,

7 reeL, eaR, peeR, beeR, teaR, deeR, jeeR, geaR, feaR,

8 veeR, sneaR, leeR, meRe, rear, weir, boom, tomb, doom,

9 loom, room, poop, coop, loop, rupee, hoop, pool, cool,

10 Goole, fooL, ruLe, boot, jute, root, chewed, food, rude,

11 wooed, pooR, booR, mooR, retail, Nero, oatmeal.



EXERCISE 3.
Long 1 Vowels (continued).

GRAMMALOGUES.
s all, \ be, , he, . the, , who (down).

1. He may load all the Hay. 2. Who may take the meal ?
3. Who may he be who rode the bay maRe ? 4. Paul may go
all the way. 5. He may take the oRe. 6. sne may weep all
the day. 7. The Pawnee may take the wreath. 8. Joe Booth
may vacate the poop. 9. May Ruth Cope read the tale ?



WRITING EXERCISES 11

10. Joe Bate may teach me the polo game. 11. We feaR the
thief may locate the rare peach. 12. May we go forth ?
13. All who read the theme may weep. 14. SHOW me the
bailee who came. 15. We all say the leech may see the deep
me Re. 16. May Paul Booth lead the sneep ? 17. We may all
aid pooR Paul. 18. We hope the day may be faiR. (118)



EXERCISE 4.
Long 1 Vowels (continued).

1. May we SHOW the pale hero the way we weed ? 2. He
may take heed. 3. Paul Page may take the mail coach.
4. May he read all the way ? 5. We feaR the rogue may peach.
6. Who may lead the maRe, Joe ? 7. SHC may faLL. 8. We
all hope sue may reach the mooR. 9. We saw the rude rogue
who rowed the boat take the boot. 10. He may be the thief
who beat Dame Bate. 11. May we take the peeR the faRe ?

12. We hope pooR Joe Beach may keep the cape we bought.

13. We feaR he may leave the meal. (96)



EXERCISE 5.
Long 1 Vowels (continued).

1. Joe Hague may keep all the change. 2. Who saw the
meek deeR move O'CR the mooR ? 3. They may reach the
deep pool. 4. Paul may see the game. 5. He may take all
the oatcake. 6. SHOW me the way they rode. 7. The rude
foe may retake the gate. 8. Who may take the knave ?
9. All who know the way may take the lead. 10. We feaR Joe
may pay all the faRe. 11. He may do so. 12. Paul Peel
may pay the faRe he owes. 13. Joe Beach may read the tale,
though he may teaR the page. 14. Who may the tall dame
be? 15. Move the coach, so we may all see tlie game. 16. The
sea foam may make the cape fade. 17. The rogue may mooR
the boat eRe we reach the SHORC. 18 May we all go ? (131)



12 WRITING EXERCISES

EXERCISE 6.
Long 1 Vowels (concluded).

1. We may all see the meek sneep feed. 2. Who may the
rude thief be who rowed the boat ? 3. We all say A0 may reach
Goole. 4. 77i tall Pawnee may also take the cocoa. 5. They
all saw the pooR lame maRe eat the nay. 6. May we make
the rogue snaRe */w? cake ? 7. They say Job Meek may take
the boat. 8. May he pay the toll ? 9. We feaR the page
may teaR the leaf. 10. Move #w boom, so they may take
the boat. 11. May Job Cope change the food ? 12. We both
saw #z faiR dame take the gay cape. 13. The rogue who
wrote the page may take the wreath. 14. May we lead the
way ? 15. We may all reach the cool snade. 16. He paid
all he owed 17. WAo bought the cheap ball ? 18. May they
keep the cage ? 19. Make Keith pay all the faRe. 20. They
may all know #&e name. 21. SHOW the leech the faiR page.
22. We feaR they may retake the boat. 23. Who may take
the peach ? 24. They may teach all the pooR folk the game.
25. The coach may take all the fouR. 26. SHOW me the maRe.
27. They may keep all the cocoa. 28. Who paid the faRe ?

(194)

EXERCISE 7.
Short and Long Vowels.

Second-place short vowels and third-place long or short
vowels, between two consonants, are written before the
second consonant.

1 (a) bet, debt, jet, jetty, get, Ted, fed, sned, meadow,

2 Neddy, led, red, ready, head, heady, etch, ketch, fetch,

3 wretch, edge, kedge, ledge, wedge, hedge, peck, beck, deck,

4 check, neck, wreck, egg, peg, beg, keg, leg, legacy, legate,

5 legatee, levy, reveRe, heavy, gusn, musH, IUSH, rusn,

6 huSH, dumb, chum, gum, thumb, mum, mummy,

7 mummery, numb, rum, punch, bunch, munch, lunch,

8 hunch, funny, money, honey, penny, Jenny, Kenny,



WRITING EXERCISES 13

9 many, length, lengthy, lenity, bench, wrench, wench,

10 pulp, pulpy, dull, cull, colouR, gull, gully, gullied, gulp,

11 gulf, pell, bell, bellow, bellowed, Tell, dell, delta, delay,

12 jelly, Kelly, fellow, mell, mellow, mellowed, melody,

13 relay, yellow, Perth, birth, dearth, girth, mirth, bung,

14 tongue, chunk, junk, monk, monkey, lung, rung, hung,

15 among, tub, dub, chub, chubby, cub, rub, hub, tuck, duck,

16 chuck, lucky, ruck, pug, tug, dug, jug, mug, nugget, lug,

17 luggage, rug, Hug, budge, judge, fudge, nudge, putty,

18 cutty, nutty, rut, perry, berry, Terry, Derry, cherry, Jerry,

19 Kerry, ferry, verity, snerry, merry, burrow, curry, furrow,

20 furry, thorough, thoroughly, Murray, lurry, hurry.

1 (b) pill, pillow, billow, till, dill, chilly, jill, kill, filly, mill,

2 milk, milky, lily, TILL, pip, tip, dip, chip, kip, snip, nip,

3 lip, rip, hip, nib, rib, pity, bit, ditty, Kitty, writ, kid,

4 giddy, middy, lid, rid, hid, pitch, ditch, niche, rich, richly,

5 witch, hitch, midge, ridge, pick, tick, chick, kick, thick,

6 nick, lick, rick, pig, big, dig, jig, gig, fig, rig, fifty, live,

7 livelong, dim, dimly, chimney, vim, limb, rim, tinny,

8 finny, ninny, pinch, lynch, winch, pink, chink, link, rink,

9 wink, ring, wing, pull, pulley, bully, bullied, fully, book,
10 took, snook, nook, look, Hook.

1 (c) appal, apology, appeal, appeaR, apeak, abasH, abate,

2 abbey, ability, abet, atom, atomic, attic, ado, agility,

3 academy, agony, afaR, aveR, acid, asnoRe, anatomy,

4 anatomic, anchovy, allay, alb, album, aRm, aRmouR,

5 aRmada, aRRay, aRRow, aRk, away, aware, ebb, ebbing,

6 ebony, effect, evict, edit, Emily, enough, envy, envelop,

7 envenom, elf, elope, CRR, eaRl, eaRly, Italy, italic, Islam,

8 image, inch, indulge, ink, inky, opera, operetta, oblong,

9 oddly, offaL, offing, olive, oRb, oRchid, up, uprear, uproar,

10 ugly, unpack, undo, unfaiR, unfaiRly, unveiL, uneasy,

11 uneasily, unmake, unmarried, unLucky, unrobe, unaware,

12 unwary, unwearied, unworthy.

1 (d) pal, pallid, palloR, pack, back, tack, Jack, knack, lack,

2 rack, Hack, Hackney, patty, bat, chatty, fatty, vat, natty,

3 rat, tap, chap, gap, map, nap, lap, rap, hap, tab, dab,



14 WRITING EXERCISES

4 cab, snabby, nab, path, bath, lath, wrath, pad, padlock,

5 caddy, fad, faddy, snadow, lad, laddie, patch, batch,

6 catch, thatch, match, latch, hatch, pod, body, bodily,

7 toddy, cod, snod, SHoddy, rod, hod, pop, top, chop, cop,

8 fop, SHop, mop, lop, hop, dock, chock, SHock, mock,

9 knock, lock, rock, rocky, Hock, Hockey, toffee, coffee,

10 lofty, policy, doll, jolly, collie, folly, volley, Mollie, loll,

11 rollick, rot, rob, robbery, dot, domino.

EXERCISE 8.
Short and Long- Vowels (continued).

GRAMMALOGUES.
a, an, and (up), ^ are, i but, \ it, ' of, -. to.

1. Date the cheque a month ahead, and pay the debt to the
milleR. 2. They wrote to say they laid the lead in the rut
at the bottom of the road. 3. The rude village lad snowed
Fanny Finch the route he took to reach the snade of the sned
at the edge of the lake. 4. The lame lamb licked the pooR limb,
and feLL eRe it got to the gate. 5. We are to take lunch in thi
dell; but we may get no food if we are delayed in the wood.

6. We hope Mary Beach may marry Philip Murray. 7 If so,
we may all go to the wedding. (107)

EXERCISE 9.
Short and Long* Vowels (continued).

1. May we appeal to Tom Murray to take a SHaRe in the
game, and lead us to victory ? 2. The pick of the party are
away ill ; but we hope to make a faiR game of it. 3. If we
onLy manage to get Tom into the team, we may pull off the
match easily. 4. We own to an uneasy feeLing in the affaiR
5. Ask NeLLie to fetch me a big cake, a peaR, and a cup of
coffee. 6. The sea aiR may make us feeL ready to eat

7. We are to take lunch in the leafy snade at the bottom of the
lovely valley. 8. Polly and Annie are to go in the gig. 9. They



WRITING EXERCISES 15

hope to catch up to us eRe we reach the weir. 10. The Yankee
wore a lovely ruby ring. 11. He snowed rare ability in the
comic opera, and we hope he may tarry in the village all the
month. 12. We rarely see so funny a fellow. 13. Both
Philip and Jerry say they see no ability in the fellow ; but they
are fuLL of envy and vanity, and so they are unfaiR. 14. May
they snake off so fooLish a feeLing, and make a thorough
apology to the chatty Yankee ! (200)

EXERCISE 1O.
Short and Long 1 Vowels (continued).

1. We may easily take a cheque and pay the debt. 2. Are
we to knock in the head of the tub ? 3. It may be a dirty job,
but we may manage it. 4. We feaR to talk of the ability of the
lad. . 5. Ted MilleR may be fuLL of envy. 6. If we take the
narrow path aLong the meadow, we may readily get to the snop
in the village. 7. The lad may catch up to us on the way,
and so we way all reach the dock eaRly enough to take a look
at the big snip. 8. It may be many a long and weary month
eRe we see the merry fellow who came to the village to see us.
9. The memory of the jolly party may live many a long day.

(130)

EXERCISE 11.
Short and Long Vowels (continued).

1. Take a cheque and pay the bill to the dealeR. 2. We
hope the colouR may keep. 3. They say the calico may be
ready to snip /o-morrow. 4. We are to snip the big keg of
rum eaRly in the month of March. 5. We may leave the bale
of twiLL. 6. // may be ready to go eaRly in May. 7. Do they
know the rate to charge ? 8. They say so, but we feaR they
may be wrong. 9. Do they know the length and width of the
big boat at the back of the dock ? 10. Go to the bank ; casn
the cheque; and fetch the money to me. 11. Ask Bennett
and Murray to snip the merino. 12. Take a foRm of policy,
and insuRe the bale of fuR. 13. Are we to redeem the bill



16 WRITING EXERCISES

to-day, OR may we leave it ? 14. Ask Tom Bailey to mark
the package in red ink. 15. Do they say they guarantee
the colouR of the red robe ? 16. We feaR it may easily fade
in a month. 17. Take the bill, and ask the notary to mark it.
18. We hope the fiRm may deal faiRly, and pay the bill. 19.
Take no cheque, but ask the fiRm to pay the bill in ready casn.

20. The snip " Baltic " may load at the big dock to-morrow.

21. Ask #z fellow in the barge to pack a// the luggage in the
bottom of the boat. 22. He may get a lad to carry the bag
to #i snip. 23. They a// took a thorough look at the big snip.
24. 7T&0 butt of snerry may be ready to snip to-morrow OR
Monday. (261)

EXERCISE 12.
Short and Long- Vowels (concluded).

1. The bill may be unpaid, and the fellow may be rude to
Tom Parry. 2. We rang the bell, but no lad came to Me dooR.
3. May be the family were away. 4. We all appeaR to feaR
the fellow may be a snam. 5. If so, he may carry the game faR
enough to take in many pooR folk in the village below. 6. He
may be infiRm, but we all faiL to see it. 7. He may snock the
pooR lady at Birch Villa. 8. sne may be ill and laid up many
a month. 9. Tom and Adam may both go in the coach, and
ask the lady to beware of the rogue. 10. He may easily take
away all the money. 1 1 We hope they may pay heed to all
we may say. (128)

EXERCISE 13.
Diphthong's.

The diphthong oi is written in the first place, and the diphthong
u in the third place. The diphthongs may be joined to a
consonant where convenient.

1 (a) pie, pipe, piety, pied, pile, pyRe, piracy, bite, bile, byRe,

2 type, tied, tidy, tidily, tithe, timely, tiny, tile, tiRe,

3 attiRe, retiRe, tyro, die, diet, dyke, dime, diRe, chide,



WRITING EXERCISES 17

4 chime, china, gibe, fie, purify, terrify, defy, verify, vilify

5 mollify, indemnify, rarefy, horrify, fife, five, fiLe, fiRe, fiery

6 vie, Viking, viLe, sny, snied, sniny, sniRe, mighty, mile,

7 miRe, miry, nigh, knife, ninety, deny, demy, denied, NiLe,

8 lie, lied, like, liked, likely, life, life-time, life-long, lively,

9 lithe, lime, lyRe, rye, ripe, right, rightly, ride, riding,

10 writhe, rhyme, riLe, wire, wiry, wired, wiring, hide, item,

11 idle, idly, ivy, ivory, ice, icy, icily, ice-boat, eyes, IRC,

12 iRiSH, iRony, iRonic.

1 (b) pouch, couch, vouch, avouch, avow, outlaw, outlawed,

2 outlawry, outlay, dowry, owl, owlisn, cow, cowed, cowl,

3 cowry, loud, loudly, lounge, rowdy, bough, toweR, county,

4 endow, doughty, pow-wow, bout, toweL, toweLing, downy,

5 doweL, chow-chow, jowl, Gow, gouge, fowL, fowling,

6 VOWCL, voweR, SHowery, mouthing, loutisn, rout, rowel,

7 howdah.

1 (c) boy, boyisH, boileR, buoyant, buoyancy, toil, toileR,

2 toyed, doily, coy, coyed, coil, coinage, foiL, moil, alloy,

3 joy, enjoy, envoy, oil, oiled, oileR, oily, annoy, annoyeR,

4 anoy, Hoy, hoidenisn.

1 (d) pue, puke, puma, puny, pule, Bute, beauty, bureau,

2 rebuke, tue, tube, tumoR, tunic, due, endue, adieu, dupe,

3 duty, duke, duly, unduly, cue, askew, cupola, occupy,

4 cube, cubic, CURC, curacy, ridicule, few, feud, fume,

5 perfume, assume, fury, view, purview, review, sue, pursue,

6 tissue, ensue, mew, mule, muraL, demuRe, new, anew,

7 renew, venue, avenue, new, huge, eulogy, EuRope, youth,

8 usurp, usury, value, valued, vacuity, voLume, vicuna,

9 Wight, wide, wideR, widely, wife, wifely.

EXERCISE 14.
Diphthong's (continued).

GRAMMALOGUES.

can, \^ have, A how, J_ / or eye, __^_ our or hour
( was, L why, you.

1. Both you and I know it was right to ask the new duke to

2 (27)



18 WRITING EXERCISES

rebuke our nephew, Tom Boyle. 2. The idle fellow can
admiRe no toil. 3. He may annoy and ridicule us now, and
idle away many an hour ; but we know the value of time, and,
if we have to use our poweR to do so, we hope to make Tom
know it also. 4. How fooLish to allow the time o/ our youth
to go idly by, and hope to retiRe at a ripe age, rich, fuLL of
poweR, and liked by all who know us ! 5. Why do yow take so
wrong a view of life ? 6. 7 ask yew to do youR duty manfully ;
to be genuine ; to aspire to a life of utility ; and to defy the idle
youth who may hope to lead yow aside. 7. If yow do so, you
are likely to have a High name among all who know you.

(155)

EXERCISE 15.
Diphthong's (continued).

1. How can I daRe to occupy an hour of youR time each day ?

2. You have so much to do, and so many to take you away.

3. Why was Tom Abbott allowed to leave our room to go to
annoy yo. 4. My eye may appeaR dim to you ; but I am all
right, awd 7 hope to enjoy my tea in the new room. 5. 77w
duke may like to take my nephew to Cuba in July; but I hope
to &e in time to make ^Ae boy retiRe. 6. / may have to assume
an authority unLike my own feeLing ; but if I am to be loyal
to my duty 7 may have to wire my nephew to keep back an
hour OR so. 7. You may know how to foiL #te duke. (130)

EXERCISE 16.
Diphthong's (continued).

1 . Why have you allowed youR big dog to bite my white cow ?
2. How was it he came to terrify the POOR animal ? 3. 7 may
make you pay /fc damage, an^ it may fc VOUR duty to see
A duke and avow the injury. 4. If you faiL to make me a
fuLL apology 7 may pursue you at law, and make you rue youR
idle joke. 5. How can you decoy our boy Hugh to the annuaL
faiR at Newcome ? 6. We feaR he may become an idleR,



WRITING EXERCISES 19

and so faLL into penury. 7. We see no beauty in the type of
youth you SHOW the boy, and we hope you are loyal enough to
review youR life and daRe to take a new path to the right.
8. //aw a nigh aim in life ; pursue it right loyally ; and SHOW
#ie county all you can do if you like. 9. We hope you may
leave #w viLe few who value youR money onLy. 10. FeaR
no ridicule ; but aspire to become a poweR in youR cwn county.
11. Do youR duty like a hero, and allow no rowdy fellow to
terrify you into a wrong path. 12. You know we have to
rebuke you, though we love you. (200)



EXERCISE 17.
Diphthong's (concluded).

1. How can I hope to snip the wire by July ? 2. / hope to
have the china ready in time to go by the boat due to leave on
Monday. 3. Doyowknow howmuchyou are to allow the buyeR ?
4. Why was he so much in aRReaR ? 5. Hugh Doyle may take
up our agency in New York. 6. / hope he may aRRive in
time to see the buyeR. 7. / have a new range of vicuna, of
rare beauty, to SHOW you. 8. Do you know the value of the
tunic A0 snowed you? 9. #e may ask to see a pure white
calico. 10. The failuRe of the oil fiRm may affect us. 11. Ask
the dealeR to have a pipe of snerry ready to snip by the fourth
of July. 12. Take a cab, and ride all the way to the faR dock.
13. / have to assume you are right in the view you take of the
affaiR. 14. / hope you may thoroughly enjoy the voyage
to the Cape. 15. Can you guarantee the accuracy of the tale ?
16. Ask the buyeR to view the new china. 17. If you are wide-
awake, he may buy all you have to SHOW. 18. Why was he
so long in the snop ? 19. If we annoy the fellow, he may
leave us aLone, and go and buy o/ Boyle an^ Nephew. 20. The
fellow snowed rare ingenuity in the escape. 21. He may
eventually take refuge in the wood. 22. He owes no money
to our fiRm, though they say so. 23. / may go and see the
envoy to-morrow OR Monday. 24. Be back in an hour. (261)



20 WRITING EXERCISES

EXERCISE 18.
Circle S and Z.

The circle s is written backward to a straight line ; inside a



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