Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

Canal Record (Volume 4 no.1-52) online

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Sweetbread — Veal, per pound 1.20

Beef, per pound 25

Eggs, fresh, dozen 23

J-dozen , only 12

Halibut, fresh, per pound 15

Oysters, in 1 -quart kegs, keg 50

Oysters in J-gallon kegs, keg 1.00

POULTRY AND GAME.

Chickens — Fancy roasting, milk fed, large, each 1.25

Fancy roasting, milk fed, med., each 1.00
Fancy roasting, corn fed, about 4£

pounds, each *90

Fowls, each 60, 70, 80, 90. 1.00

Ducks, Western, about 44 pounds, each 1.00

Long Island, each 1,30

Ducklings, Long Island, each 1.10



8
17
18
20

6

9

20
24
24
10

12*
16
24
24
28
14
2
5



12
12*



18
19
19
20
12*
13
18
19
19

20

24
30



Broilers,, milk fed, each,
corn fed, each .

Turkeys, per pound

Squabs, each

Capons

Rabbits, dressed, each .,

Pheasants, each

Partridges, each ,

Grouse, each



CURED AND PICKLED MEATS.



Ham — German, Westphalia, per pound

Sugar cured, per pound

Sliced , per pound

Half, for boiling, per pound

Boiled, per pound

Hocks, per pound

Picnic, Winchester, per pound

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound

Breakfast, sliced, per pound

Beef, salt, family, per pound

Pork, salt family, per pound

Ox Tongues each

Pigs' feet, per pound

Tongues, per pound

Sliced bacon In 1-pound tins, per tin

In 1-pound jars, per jar

DAIRY PRODUCTS.

Butter — Creamery special, per pound

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound

Philadelphia cre&ra, cake fri



60
55
*26
35
2.10
40
50
50
50



36
18
20
19
25
18
15
23
24
9i
14
75
9
14
30
30



53

38
10



Price.

Cheese — Young"America, per pound *18

Swiss, per pound 26

Edam, e;tch 1.00

Camembert, !n large tins, tin 38

Camembert, m small tins, tin 14

Neufchatet. take 6

Gouda. per pound 34

Port de Sa'ut, per pound 1.20

Milk (Inspected or *. 'rtified). per bottle **25

(Pasteurized! , bottle **18

Buttermilk, bottle **15

Ice cream, quart 125

^-gallon t50

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS.

Beets, per pound 3

Celery , per head 6

Carrots, per pound 3

Cabbage, per pound *

Cucumbers, per pound i

Kale, per pound

Lettuce, per pound f!2

Onions, per pound 3i

Potatoes, white, per pound 2 j

sweet, per pound 2

Parsnips Der pound 3

Romaim per pound 10

Spinach, per pound 8

Tomatoes, per pound 8

Turnips, per pound 3

Yams, per pound 3

Apples, per pound 6

Grapefruit, each 4

Lemons, dozen 24

Limes, per 100 80

Oranges, per dozen 12

Tangerines, each 2

♦Indicates reduction from last list.
♦♦Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle,
tlndicates advance on last list.

tSold only from commissaries; no orders taken for
delivery.

Misdirected Letters.

Ancon, C. Z., April 5, 1911.
The following insufficiently addressed letters origi-
nating in the United States and its possesions have been
received in the office of the Director of Posts and may be
secured upon request of the addressee:
Coley, John John, Florence (3d class)

Cross, William P. Kellner, Miss C.

Errington, Mrs. A. C. Maloy, Dr. E. S.

Ferdinand, Miss Marie Milford, T. D.

(3rd class) O'Berle, Mrs. R. B.

Higley, Charles Pettys.Mrs. William N.

Holder, Norel Hoda Russell, Wm. G. (3d classK

Hurt, W F. Scholder, Mrs. H.

James. Mrs. Clara (pkg.) Solomon, S.
Jenkins. J. B. Templeton, H. L.



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS-



Supplies for Canal Work.

Thefollowing steamers with supplies for the Isthmian
Canal Commission arrived at the ports of Cristobal,
Colon and Balboa , d uring the week end i ng Apri 11,1911:

Stanley Dollar, March 27, St. Helens, Ore.; with
462.570 feet, B. M., Douglas fir lumber for stock.

Prinz Sigismnnd, March 27, from New York, with
133 cases electric fuzes for stock.

Mathilda, March 28, from Tacoma, with 493,771
feet, B. M., Oregon pine lumber for stock.

City of Para, March 28, from San Francisco, with
10.002 feet, B. M., sugar pine lumber for stock.

Allianca, March 30. from New York, with 20 cases
drugs and sundries for Sanitary Department; 12 cases
tubing for Mechanical Division; 2 cases ball joints for
Pacific Division; 25 cargo trucks, 25 bundles cork life
preservers. 13 cases printing paper. 50 cases water
coolers, 50 pieces switches for stock; and a mis-
cellaneous cargo, the whole consisting of 185 packages,
weighing 53 tons.

Abangare , March 30, from New Orleans, with 13,854
feet, B. M.. creosoted lumber for Atlantic Division,
13,860feet, B. M., yellow pine lumber, 390 bales alfalfa
hay, 249 sacks cotton seed meal for stock.

Melapan, March 31, from New York, with 50 coils
manila rope, 25 bundles brooms, for stock.

Ancon, March 31, from New York, with 22,595 bar-
rels cement for Atlantic Division; 94,160 bags cement
for Pacific Division.

Banes, March 31, from Bridgeton, N. J.; with 18,000
cases dynamite for stock.



The following vessels arrived at or departed from
the port of Balboa during the weekending April 1, 1911:

Arrivals — March 26, Yorktown, from Central Amer-
ican ports; Stanley Dollar .from San Francisco; March
27, Mantaro, from Callao; March 28. City of Para,
from San Francisco; Mathilda, from San Francisco;
Peclan, from San Francisco; March 29, Loa, from Val-
paraiso; March 30, Manavi, from Guayaquil; March
31, San Juan, from San Francisco; April£l. Santa
Maria, from San Francisco.

Departures — March 25. Vicksbnrg, to'Central Amer-
ican ports; March 27, Chile, to Valparaiso; Arica, to
Guayaquil; March 28, Rupanco, to Guayaquil; March
29, AcaPulco, to San Francisco.



The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg- American
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
change:

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.



Advance

Panama

Cristobal

Ancon

Allianca

Colon

Advance

Panama

Allianca

Colon

Advance

Panama

Alliance

Colon

Advance



. P. R. R . .
. P. R. R . .
.P. R. R. .
.P. R. R. .
.P. R. R. .
.P. R. R. .
.P. R. R. .
.P. R. R. .
.P. R. R. .
.P. R. R. .
.P. R. R..
.P. R. R. .
. P. R. R . .
.P. R. R. .
.P. R. R. .



Thursday..,
Wed nesday ,
Tuesday...
Monday. . .
.Saturday. .
Saturday. .
.Friday. . . .
.Thursday. .
. Wednesday
.Wednesday
.Tuesday.. .
. Monday. . .
.Saturday
.Saturday. .
. Friday



April 6
April 12
April 18
.April 24
.April 29
. May 6
.May 12
.May 18
.May 24
.May 31
.June 6
.June 12
.June 17
June 24
June 30



CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK. '

Allianca P. R. R . . . Thursday . . . April 6

Colon P. R. R. . .Wednesday. April 12

Advance P. R. R. . .Tuesday April 18

Panama P. R. R. . .Tuesday April 25

Cristobal P. R. R. . .Tuesday May 2

Ancon P. R. R . . . Monday May 8

Allianca P. R. R . . . Friday May 12

Colon P. R. R. . .Thursday. ..May 18

Advance P. R. R . . .Wednesday. May 24

Panama P. R. R. . .Wednesday. May 31

Allianca P. R. R. ..Tuesday June 6

Colon P. R. R. . .Tuesday June 13

Advance P. R. R. . .Sunday. . . .June 18

Panama P. R. R. . .Saturday. . .June 24

Allianca P. R. R. . .Friday June 30

Colon P. R. R. . .Thursday.. July 6

Advance P. R. R. . .Wednesday July 12

NEW YORK TO COLON.

U. F. C . . . Thursday . . . April 6

H.-A Saturday. ..April 8

U. F. C. . .Thursday... April 13

.Friday April 14

.Saturday. . .April 15
.Thursday... April 20

H.-A Saturday. . .April 22

U. F. C . . .Thursday . . . April 2 7

.Friday April 28

Saturday. . .April 29



Almirante

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm

Santa Marta

PrinzSigismund. . . .

Magdalena

Metapan

Prinz Joachim*

Zacapa

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. . H.-A

Clyde R. M

Almirante



H.-A....

R. M . . .
. U. F. C .



.U. F. C. . .Thursday... May 4

COLON TO NEW YORK.

Metapan U. F. C . . . Thursday . . . April 6

Prinz Joachim* H.-A Tuesday April 1 1

Zacapa U. F. C. . .Thursday... April 13

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. . H.-A Tuesday. .. .April 18

Clyde R. M Tuesdiy April 18

Almirante U. F. C .. .Thursday. . .April 20

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm*. .H.-A Tuesday April 25

Santa Marta U. F. C . . .Thursday.. .April 27

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Tuesday May 2

Thames R. M Tuesday May 2



Metapan.

Atenas

Cartago.
Turrialba. . .
Parismina.. .
Abangarez. .

Turrialba.. .
Parisminaf. .
Abangarez . .

Herediaf

Atenas

Cartagot. . ■ .
Turrialba. . . .
Parisminaf. .



. U. F. C . . .Thursday . . . May 4

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.

U. F. C. ..Saturday... April 1

U. F. C... Wed nesday. April 5

U- F. C. . . Saturday . . . April S

U. F. C. .Wednesday.. April 12

U. F. C. ..Saturday. . .April 15

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.

U. F. C. . .Thursday.. .Mar. 30

U. F. C. . .Thursday... Mar. 30

U. F. C. .Thursday... April 6

U. F. C... Thursday... April 6

U. F. C... Thursday... April 13

U. F. C. ..Thursday... April 13

U. F. C . . . Thursday . . .April 20

U. F. C. . .Thursday... April 20

COLON TO BARBADOS. CALLING AT TRINIDAD.

Oruba R. M Tuesday. .. .April 11

Magdalena R. M Tuesday April 25

Hamburg-American steamers leave Colon for New
York via Kingston every Tuesday at 10 a. m., and those
designated (*) call at Santiago, Cuba; for Bocas del
Toro and Port Limon on alternate Wednesdays, by
ships designated (*).

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alternate
Tuesdays, at 12 noon; for Southampton on alternate
Tuesdays at 10 a. m.

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans direct
leave on Thursdays at 3 p. m. ; ships designated (t) for
New Orleans via Port Limon and Puerto Barrios on
Thursday at 4 p. m.; ships for New York via Kingston
on Thursday at 1 1 a. m.

The Leyland Line ship Californian will sail from
Colon for New Orleans via Port Limon on April 21.



CANAL




RECORD



Volume IV.



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12, 1911.



No. 33.



The Canal Record

Published weekly under the authority and supervision o}
the Isthmian Canal Commission.

The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five
cents each.



Address all Communications

THE CANAL RECORD,

Ancon, Canal Zone,

Isthmus of Panama.

No communication, either for publication or requesting
information, will receive attention unless signed with the
full name and address of the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.



Colon Breakwater.

The high tides in Limon Bay during the dry
season have interfered somewhat with the
construction of the Colon breakwater, although
it has not been necessary to suspend opera-
tions at any time. Piles for the trestles from
which rock is dumped are towed out to the
end of the trestle and there lifted from the
water to the pile driver, and this part of the
work has been rendered difficult by the heavy
seas. At times men working on the outer
end of the trestle have been forced to suspend
operations entirely, and on one day recently
six men were washed off by heavy waves.
This emergency had been anticipated, how-
ever, and the men were immediately rescued.
From this time on the bay will be more calm,
and this part of the work will advance with
less difficulty. The end of the trestle on
March 1 was 3,598 feet from the shore line.

The 20-yard steel dump cars assigned to
the breakwater work have not stood up well
under the dumping of heavy rock required
for the jetty, and on this account some of them
have been transferred to the Central Division
in exchange for 20 wooden flat cars to be used
with a Lidgerwood unloader. One unloading
machine and two plows accompany these
cars, and the equipment in service will con-
sist of 20 flats and 23 steel dump cars serving
two steamshovels. In March 42,192 cubic
yards of rock were quarried and dumped, and
50,105 cubic yards of rock dredged from the
Canal prism were also dumped on the break-
water. With the heavier equipment it is
believed that better results will be obtained
each month.



Canal Work In March.

The grand total of Canal excavation to
April 1 was 135,089,432 cubic yards, leaving
to be excavated 47,448,334 cubic yards.

The total for March was 3,327,443 cubic
yards, as compared with 3,067,479 cubic yards
in March, 1910, and 3,SS0,337 cubic yards
in Mc->rch, 1909. Of the total, 3,259,996
cubic yards were "work excavation," and
67,447 runic yards wprp "plant excavation."



The dry excavation amounted to 2,210,7S8
cubic yards and was principally by steam
shovels. The dredges removed 996,838 cubic
yards and 109,668 cubic yards were sluiced, in
addition to the amount pumped into Gatun
Dam by suction dredges. The progress on
the locks at Gatun, Pedro Miguel, and Mira-
flores is referred to elsewhere in this issue.

In the Atlantic Division, the total excava-
tion was 543,938 cubic yards. Of this total,
104.S78 cubic yards were dry excavation, and
the remainder was removed by the dredges
in the Atlantic entrance.

The total excavation in the Central Divi-
sion was 2,032,523 cubic yards, of which
2,012,469 yards were from the prism, the
best record for any month in the Canal his-
tory.

In the Pacific Division, the total excavation
was 750,982 cubic yards, 557,778 cubic yards
of which were taken out by the dredges at
the Pacific entrance.

A detailed statement of the excavation, and
a summary of the work on the locks and dams,
follow:

ATLANTIC DIVISION.



Locality.


"Work."
Excava-
tion.


"Plaut."

Excav.i

tion.


Total
excava-
tion


Dry excavation —
Locks. Dam and Spill-


Cu. Yds.

51.431
49.734


Cu. yds.


Cu. ids.
51,431




3.713


53.447






Total


101.165


3.713


104.878












Locks. Dam ami Spill-


391,736


47.324


439.0E0










Total


391.736


47,324


434.060


Total wet and dry


492.901


51.037


543.938



CENTRAL DIVISION.




Dry excavation—
Culebra Cut


1.715.130

279.628

13.61S

17.711


840
5,596


1.715.970

285,224

13.618


li't't excavation —




17.711








Total


2.026.0S7


6.436


2.032.523



PACIFIC DIVISION.



Dry excavation —
Locks. Dams and Spill-


73,413




73.413






Prism, south of Pedro


27.834




27 S34








Total


101.247




101.247


Wet excavation —




639.761


9.974


649.735


















Total


639.761


9.974


649.735










Total wet and dry
excavation


741,008


9.V74


750.982



TOTAL


CANAL EXCAVATION




Dry excavation ..
Wet excavation ..


| 2.:"

1 .049.208


10,149
57.298


2.220.937

1.106,506


Total


j 3.259.996


67.447


3 327,443



ally made for oue of the constituent parts of the Canal,
such as Prism. Diversions, or Locks etc.: that is. it
represents material taken from the area to be occu-
pied by the Canal, and constitutes excavation useful
for the completed Canal.

By "Plaut" I^ccava tion is meant excavation outside
of any of the constituent oarts of the Canal, such as
Prism. Diversions, or Locks, etc. It includes mate-
rial necessary to be excavated for construction pur-
poses only and is chargeable against the particular
plant item for which it is performed, such as Prism.
Diversions. Locks, etc.

DAM AND LOCK CONSTRUCTION.



Material.



Concrete laid in locks.
Concrete laid in dams

and spillways

Fill placed in dams. . .



Atlantic. Pacific



Cu. Yds.

86,884



8.704
597.847



Cu. Yds.
75,889



Total.



Cu. Yds.
162.773



S.7H4
64S.918



High Tide at Pacific Entrance.

High tide in the Pacific entrance to the Canal
on April 1, broke through the dam across
the Rio Grande at Corozal, and since then
the hydraulic excavating plant at Miraflores
locks has not been able to run during extreme
low water. The dam was thrown across the
river to impound water at high tide so that
the hydraulic excavating plant could con-
tinue work at all stages of the tide. The high
water of April 1 made a gap about 100 feet
wide, and a trestle is now being driven in
order that a rock fill may be made and the dam'
may thus be restored. The same high water
in the Pacific threatened to wash out the dam
across the mouth of the Corundu River at
Balboa, behind which caissons for the cement
dock are being sunk. By prompt measures
taken to strengthen this dyke a washout was
averted.



Mean rainfall along Canal (twelve stations) 0.54
Inches.
By "Work" Excavation is meant excavation actir



Machinery for Operating Gate Valves.

Awards have been authorized for sample
machines to be used in operating the Stoney
gate valves, which will control the water in
the main culverts of the locks, and to operate
the cylindrical valves, which will control the
water in the lateral culverts. These machines
will be tested on the Isthmus under conditions
approximating those of actual use, and upon
the results of the tests the contracts for the
whole quantity, costing about §905,000 will
be made.

Tenders for this machinery under a pre-
vious advertisement were opened on Septem-
ber 16, 1910, but the bids for the principal
items were so high that no award was made.
At the price then offered, the material now
to be furnished would cost more than SI, 400-
000. New bids were requested to be opened
on February 25, and the attention of foreign
manufacturers was invited to the advertise-
ment. Twenty-two bids were received on
the second advertisement as compared with
seven on the first, and the difference in the
prices offered represents a saving of about
§500,000. The lowest bid received for one
item was from a European manufacturer, and
an order may be placed with him. One of



258



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 33.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.



(.Continued.)



the awards provides for the use of foreign
made tubes for the valve stems, the price
asked for domestic material being deemed
exorbitant.

The awards authorized, are as follows:

Two Stoney gate valve machines and two
cylindrical valve machines complete, except
motor and limit switch, with hot rolled
thrust screws and Mannesmann (foreign)
screws for valve stems, to Wheeling Mold and
Foundry Company. The total number of
machines to be purchased under this contract
is 114 Stoney gate machines and 118 cylin-
drical valve machines, provided the test
machines prove satisfactory.

Two motors for Stoney gate valve machines;
two sample motors to be purchased from each
of the following bidders: Allis-Chalmers Com-
pany, Westinghouse Electrical and Manu-
facturing Company, General Electric Com-
pany, two from the General Electric Company
on an alternative bid, and two from the
Allmanna Svenska Elektriska Aktiebolaget,
the last award being conditional. Total
number of motors to be purchased after test,
114.

Two motors for cylindrical valve machines;
two sample motors to be purchased as in
preceding paragraph. Total number of motors
to be purchased under this contract after test,
118.

Two limit switches for Stoney gate valve
machines and two for cylindrical valve ma-
chines to be purchased from each of the fol-
lowing bidders: Cutler Hammer Manufactur-
ing Company, Westinghouse Electrical and
Manufacturing Company, General Electric
Company, and two from the Allmanna Sven-
. ska Elektriska Aktiebolaget, the last award
being conditional. The total number of
limit switches to be purchased under this
contract is 1 14 for Stoney gate valve machines,
and 118 for cylindrical valve machines, the
award of the contract to be let after the
machines have been tested.



Unloading In Central Division.

A statement of Lidgerwood cars unloaded
in the Central Division during the month of
March, follows:



Location.


No. of
unloaders.


No. of
trains.


No. of
cars.




3
3

4


1.148

796

1,292


22,960




15.920




27,147


Total


10


3.236


66.027



Dredging at Atlantic Entrance.

In the dredging at the Atlantic entrance
the rock excavation in the eastern half of the
ledge farthest from the shore line has been
completed. This contained 312,856 cubic
yards, and the dredges have been working on
it since July 1908. This amount has been
handled by the following dredges:

Cu. Yds.

Ladder dredge No. 1 16,366

Ladder dredge No. 5 73,830

Ladder dredge No. 6 137.890

Dipper derdge Chagres 18,038

Dipper dredge Mindi 66,732

Total 312.856

The rock excavation from this lime for-



ward in the eastern half of the canal will be
from a point three and one-half miles inland
from deep water. The seagoing suction
dredge Caribbean is now attacking the earth
in the channel adjacent to that part of the
rock excavation just completed, as well as
the reach from this rock shoal to next shoal



landward to which the ladder dredge has been
moved.



A small office building has been authorized
at the Panama railroad terminal in Balboa
for the use of the California-Atlantic Steam-
ship Company.



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS.



GATUN LOCKS.

Over 60 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been laid,
the amount in place at the close of work on April 8, being 1,254,159 cubic yards, out of a
total of 2,085,000.

A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each day for the week ending
April 8, and of the total, follows; and a similar statement for the work in the spillway of
Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The construction plant works 12 hours daily,
and the auxiliary plant 9 hours.





Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Large
stone.


Total.




Concrete Hours
placed. ! worked.


No. of Concrete Hours 1 No. of
mixers, placed. : worked, mixers.






Cu. Yds.
2,196
1,496
1.868
2,122
1,728
1,916


35:08
26:45
32:12
34:58
29:30
36:32


6
6

4
6

4
6


Cu. Yds.
500
616
336
376
332
516
3931


8:40
8:40
7:40
7:40
7:40
8:40


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cm. Yds.
167}
174}
159}
247
139
124}


Cm. Yds.
2.863}




2,286}




2,363}




2.745


April 7


2,199




2,556}




393}


















Total


11,326


195:05


533


3.069J


49:00


2


1.012}


15,407}




1,238.751}


























1,254,159



*The 393} yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days •'
April3d. 62 yards; April 4th, 45 yards; April 5th, 38 yards; April 6th, 82} yards; April 7yh, 57 yards; April 8th.
!09 yards.

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS.

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 73 per cent completed, 614,926 cubic
yards, out of a total of 837,400, having been placed at the close of work on April 8.
record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows:



The







Auxiliary Plant.


Large
stone.






2-Cubic yard mixers


2-cubic yard mixers.


}-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete Hours
placed, worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours ' No. of
worked, mixers


Concrete
Placed.


Hours
worked


No. of
mixers




April 3 . . .
April 4 . . .
April 5. . .
April 6 . . .
April 7 . . .
April 8 . . .


Cm. Yds.
914
704
724
712
768
560


14:00
12:00
12:00
12:00
12:00
6:00


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cm. Yds.
476
504
410
462
520
620


10:00
14:00
14:00
10:00
12:00
13:50


2
3
3
2
2
2


Cm. Yds.
165
290
204
159
159
153


10:00
11:50
13:25
12:25
12:25
10:00


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cm. Yds.


Cu. Yds.
1.555
1.408
1.338
1.333
1.447
1,333


Total
Previously


4,382


68:00


2


2,992


73:50


2.33


1.040


69:25


2


4.179


8.414
606.512
























Grand


4.179


614.926



MIRAFLORES LOCKS.

About 14 per cent of the eoncrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was in place
on April 8, the total amount on that date being 183,520 cubic yards, out of a total of approxi-
mately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows:



Date.



April 3 . .
April 4. .
April 5 . .
April 6. .
April 7. .
April 8. .



Total...
Previously
reported



Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.



Concrete
placed.



Cm. Yds.
160
244
252
340
294
536



1,826



Hours
worked.



No. of
mixers



4:00
5:50
6:50
15:50
11.50
12:00



55:00



Auxiliary Plant.



2-cubic yard mixers.



}-cubic yard mixer.



Concrete Hours iNo. of
placed. ' worked. I mixers



Cm. Yds.
272
336
376
368
372
232



1,956



5:50


2


6:50


2


6:50


2


6:00


2


6:00


2


4:50


2



35:00 i



Grand
total 3.693



Concrete Hours No. of Large
placed, worked, mixers stone.



Cm. Yds.
845
830
857
851
902
883
*404



5,572



49:50
47:00
49:00