Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

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A handicap pool tournament will be started on April
24 with the following men entered : Thomas, Chambers,
Wempe, Glick, Jamieson, Benson, Cleall. Schlager,
DeCora, Prados, Ford, Jarboe.

At a special Good Friday service the Rev. Carl H.
Elliott spoke on "The badge of royalty." and special
music was furnished by the Panama railroad orchestra.

The moving pictures which were to have been here
on Monday, April 10. did not arrive. In the near
future an evening of moving pictures will be given,
showing scenes from life on the Isthmus, interspersed
with comic scenes.

Preliminary steps were taken at a meeting on Wed-
nesday night, April 12, to organize a debating club
which will take up at its meetings topics under dis-
cussion at the present time.

Gorgona won the indoor baseball game in the league
series on Saturday night by the score of 23 to 9. The
batteries were: Gorgona — Weiser and Ridge; Cris-
tobal — Russell and MacSparren.

The Easter cantata "Easter Angels" as sung by the
Union Church choir on Easter Sunday will be repeated
at a morning service at the clubhouse on April 23.
There will also be a short talk and general singing.



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS.



Rainfall from April 1 to 15, Inclusive.



Pacific Section —

Ancon

Balboa

♦Miraflores

Pedro Miguel

Rio Grande

Central Section —

Culebra

♦Camacho

Empire

Gamboa

*Juan Mina

Alhajuela

*E1 Vigia

*Gorgona

San Pablo

Tabernilla

Bohio

♦Monte Lirio. . . .
Atlantic Section —

Gatun

♦Brazos Brook. . .

Cristobal

Porto Bello

♦Nombre de Dios



.a v

3 O



Ins.
.76
1.31
1.05
1.44
2.29

1.03
1.14

.57
.76
.36
.81
.37
1.40
1.32
2.08
1.68
1.10

.76
.43
.67
.43
.87






Ins.
1.86
2.46
1.74
2.61
2.92

1.39

2.33

.87

1.12

.46

.86

.54

2.22

2.17

3.47

3.16

3.01

1.54
1.54
1.63
tl.53
3.21



♦Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. ru. daily.
Automatic rain "gage at unstarred stations— values
midnight to midnight.

tTo 5 p. m..lAprilI14.



Seeing the Canal.

Culebra. C. Z., April 12. 1911.
Circular No. 382:

If visitors to the Isthmus who wish to inspect the
Canal will communicate in advance with the Secretary
to the Chairman, Culebra, C. Z., a representative will
be detailed to conduct them to the points of greatest
interest and explain the most prominent features of the
work, according to the following schedule:

Monday, a. m. — The locks at Pedro Miguel.

Wednesday, a. m. — The models and relief maps in
the office of the Chairman and Chief Engineer at
Culebra, and the Culebra Cut.

Friday, a. m. — The locks and dam at Gatun.

Saturday, a.m. — The models and relief maps in the
office of the Chairman and Chief Engineer at Culebra,
and the Culebra Cut.

Saturday, p. m. — The locks and dam at Gatun.

Geo. W. Goethals,
Chairman and Chief Engineer.



Report of Unsatisfactory Work.

Culebra. C. Z., April 17,. 1911.
Circular No. 384:

All work of an unsatisfactory character peformed for
one department or division (including the Panama
Railroad Company) by another shall hereafter be
reported to this office on Form C. E. 298, which has
been provided for this purpose, in duplicate.

Stock of Form C. E. 298 has been ordered printed ,
and necessary supply may be obtained from the Depot
Quartermaster on requisition in the usual manner.

It is expected that before forwarding the report the
head of the department or division will make such ex-
amination as will assure him of the correctness thereof.
Geo. W. Goethals.
Chairman. Isthmian Canal Commission.
President, Panama Railroad Company.



Slaughter of Animals for Food.

Ancon. C. Z.. April 6, 1911.

Until further orders, all individuals, firms, or com-
panies, slaughtering beeves, sheep, hogs, or goats
within the limits of the Canal Zone, will be required
to secure a permit for each animal slaughtered from the
district physician of the station where the killing is to
be done. The application for the permit must specify
the time and place, when and where the animal is to
be slaughtered.

The district physician will be present when the car-
casses are opened and satisfy himself that the animals
did not have anthrax or any other infectious diseasr.
Should the characteristic lesions of an infectious disease
be found in any animal, the district physician is in-
structed to thoroughly disinfect theficorof theslaughttr
house and see that the sanitary inspector of the distru t
at once thoroughly bums up the entire carcass together
with the hide and offal of any animal so infected.

Persons slaughtering any of the above-menticr.ed
animals within the Canal Zone, without complying
with the provisions of this circular. shall be subject to
criminal prosecution as provided for by law.

Adopted by the Board of Health, the 6th day of
April. 1911. W. C. Gokgas,

Chief Sanitary Officer and Chairman Board of Health.
Approved : Geo. W. Goethals,

Chairman and Chief Engineer.



Acting Chief Clerk, Mechanical Division.

Gorgona, C. Z.. April 11, 1911.
All Concerned:

During the absence of Mr. William Taylor on leave,
Mr. H. C. Dew will, in addition to his regular duties,
act as Chief Clerk of the Mechanical Division.

A. L. Robinson.
Superintendent. Mechanical Division.



Tide Table.

The following table shows the time of high and low
tides at Panama for the week ending April 26, 1911
(75th meridian time):



Date.



April 20 .
April 2 1 .
April 22.
April 23.

April 24 .

April 25 .
April 26.



Low. High. Low. High. Low.



A. M.
1.55
2.40
3.36
4.41

5.57



A. M.

7.53

8.38

9.38

10.50

Noon

12.00

A. M.

12.31

1.29



P. M.
2.15
3.06
4.13
5.28

6.32

A. M.
6.54
7.45



P. M.
8.01
8.50
9.58

11.20



12.58
1.50



P. M.



7.25
8.13



LOST — At Empire, in or near circus grounds, on
Saturday night. April 15. an oval shaped locket set
with one large amethyst and six pearls; baby's picture
inside. Return to Mrs. H. F. Stevens, house No. 143.
gmpire,



272



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., JSo. 34.



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT.



The hours during which commissaries are open are
as follows:

Cristobal and Culebra, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m.; 2 p.m.
to 7 p. m.

All other commissaries, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 3 p. m. to
7 p. m.

Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week
beginning April IS.

FRESH MEATS.

Price.

Mutton — Stewing, per pound 6

Shoulder, neck trimmed off, (4 pounds

and over) , per pound 9

Entire forequarter (not trimmed) 10

pounds and over, per pound 8

Leg, (8 to 10 pounds), per pound .... 17

Cutlets, per pound 18

Short cut chops, per pound 20

Lamb — Stewing, per pound 6

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed off,

per pound 9

Leg (5 to 8 pounds), per pound 20

Chops, per pound 24

Cutlets, per pound 24

Veal— Stewing, per pound 10

Shoulder, for roasting (not under 4

pounds) , per pound 12$

Chops — Shoulder, per pound 16

Chops, per pound 24

Loin for roasting, per pound 24

Cutlets, per pound 28

Pork, loin chops or ro\st, per pound 14

Beef — Suet, per pound 2

Soup, per pound 5

Stew, per pound 8

Corned, per pound 12, 14, 16

Chuck roast (3 pounds and over), per

pound 12

Pot roast, per pound 12 J

Rib roast, second cut (not under 3$

pounds), per pound 16

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds),

per pound 18

Sirloin roast, per pound 19

Rump roast, per pound 19

Porterhouse roast, per pound 20

Steak, chuck, per pound 12£

Round, per pound 13

Rib, per pound 18

Sir. Mn , per pound 19

Rump, per pound 19

Porte, house (not less than 1J

pounds) , per pound 20

Tenderloin (Western) per pound . . 24

Tenderloin (Native), per pound... 30

MISCELLANEOUS.

Caviare, Russian in i-lb. jars, per jar 85

Livers — Beef, per pound 7

Calf, each 60

Half, each 30

Sausage — Pork, per pound 15

Bologna, per pound 10

Frankfurter, per pound 12

Lieberwurst, per pound 10

Sweetbread — Veal, per pound 1.20

Beef, per pound 25

Eggs, fresh, dozen 23

i-dozen, only 12

Bluefish, fresh, per pound 14

Halibut, fresh, per pound 15

Oysters in i-gallon kegs, keg 1.00

POULTRY AND GAME.

Chickens — Fancy roasting, milk fed, large, each 1.25

Fancy roasting, milk fed, med., each 1.00
Fancy roasting, corn fed, about 4£

pounds, each 90

Fowls, each 60, 70, 80, 90, 1.00

Ducks, Western, about 4J pounds, each 1.00

Long Island, each 1.30

Ducks, Long Island, each 1.10

Broilers,, milk fed, each 60

corn fed , each 55

Turkeye, per pound 26

Squabs, each 35

Capons 2.10

Rabbits, dressed, each 40

Pheasants, each 50

Partridges, each 50

Grouse, each 50

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS.

Ham — German, Westphalia, per pound 36

Sugar cured, per pound 18

Sliced , per pound 20

Half, for boiling, per pound 19

Boiled, per pound 25

Hocks, per pound J8

Picnic, Winchester, per pound 15

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound 23

Breakfast, sliced, per pound 24

Beef, salt, family, per pound 9\

Pork, salt family, per pound 14

Ox Tongues each 75

Pigs' feet, per pound 9

Tongues, per pound 14

Sliced bacon In 1-pound tins, per tin 30

In 1-pound jars, per jar 30

DAIRY PRODUCTS.

Butter — Creamery special, per pound 32

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound 38

Philadelphia cream, small cake 10

large cake 18



Price.

Cheese—Young America, per pound 18

Swiss, per pound 26

Edam, each 1. 00

Camembert, In large tins, tin 38

Camembert, in small tins, tin 14

Neufchatel. cake 6

Gouda. per pound 34

Milk (Inspected or certified), per bottle **25

(Pasteurized), bottle **18

Buttermilk, bottle **15

Ice cream, quart J25

i-gallon J50

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS.

Beets, per pound

Celery . per head

Carrots, per pound

Cabbage, per pound

Cucumbers, per pound

Kale, per pound

Lettuce, per pound

Onions, per pound

Potatoes, white, per pound

sweet, per pound

Parsnips per pound

Romaim- per pound

Spinach, per pound

Squash, per pound

Tomatoes, per pound

Turnips, per pound

Yams, per pound

Apples, fancy table, per pound t*0

Grapefruit, each 4

Lemons, dozen 24

Limes, per 100 80

Oranges, per dozen 12

Pineapples, each 20



3

*8
3
3

1 4

*10

*5

2*
2
3

10
8
6

*7
3
3



revindicates reduction from last list.

♦♦Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle.

tlndicates advance on last list.
MtSold only from commissaries; no orders taken for
delivery.

Supplies for Canal Work.

The following steamers, with supplies for the Isthmian
Canal Commission, arrived at the ports of Cristobal
and Colon during the week ending April 15. 1911:

Moldegaard, April 8, from Brunswick, with 41,800
pieces cross ties for stock

Prinz EitelFriederich. April 9, from New York, with
200 barrels crude carbolic acid for stock.

Oruba, April 9, from New York, with 59 cases paper
for stock.

Wanderer, April 11, from Liverpool, with 12 pieces
dredge buckets for Pacific Division.

Titrrialba, April 13, from New Orleans, with 34
crates library paste, 706 pieces lumber, 400 sacks bran
tor stock; 395 pieces creosoted lumber for Atlantic
Division; 8 pieces dipper lips for Central Division.

Advance, April 13. from New York, with 100 cases
soap, 5 cases pitchers, 117 barrels fire brick, 34 barrels
rosin; 8 casks china. 5 cases paints for stock; 8 cases
coupon books for Examiner of Accounts; 13 barrels
tower locks for Mechanical Division; 9 cases rubber
sleeves for Atlantic Division; 6 pieces castings, 20
pieces cable chains for Central Division; and a mis-
cellaneous cargo, the whole consisting of 363 packages,
weighing 134 tons.

Almirante, April 14. from New York, with 13 cases
brooms. 1S5 coils rope for stock; 5 cases electrical
material for Atlantic Division.



The following vessels arrived at and departed from
the port of Balboa during the week ending April 15 :

Arrivals — April &,Barracouta, from Central American
ports; April 10, Mackinaw, from San Francisco;
Ucayali, fram Callao; April 11, City of Panama, from
San Francisco; April 12, Huasco, from Valparaiso;
April 13, Pennsylvania, from San Francisco; April 14,
Chile, from Guayaquil; April 15, Ritpanco, from Colum-
bian ports; Quito, from Buenaventura.

Departures — April 9, San Juan to San Francisco;
April 10, Guatemala, to Callao; April 11, Peru, to
Guayaquil; April 13, Barracouta, to Central American
ports.

Stages of the Chagres.

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week
ending midnight, Saturday, April. 15, 1911. All
heights are in feet above mean sea level.





Station.


Day and Date.


Vigia.


"rt
3
'<?

x:
3


O
.a

B
«


6

o
pq


a .

3 V


Sun. April 9. . . .
Mon. April 10..
Tues. April 11..
Wed. April 12. .
Thurs. April 13.
Fri. April 14. . .
Sat. April 15. . .


126.2
126.3
126.2
131.5
130.6
129.6
127.9


92.8
92.8
92.8
96.4
96.4
95.2
94.4


45.3
45.2
45.4
45.4
49.0
48.1
48.1


12.4
12.4
12.5
12.6
13.4
13.2
13.6


12.4
12.4
12.5
12.6
13.1
13.2
13.4


Height of low


125.0


92.0


44.0







MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.

The following Is a Hat of the sailings of the Panama
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
change:

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.

Cristobal P. R. R. . . Tuesday

Ancon P. R. R



April 18
April 24
April 29
.May 6



Monday. .

Allianca P. R. R ... Saturday .

Colon P. R. R. . .Saturday.

Advance P. R. R . . .Friday May 12

Panama P. R. R. . .Thursday. ..May 18

Allianca P. R. R . . . Wednesday .May 24

Colon P. R. R. . .Wednesday. May 31

Advance P. R. R. . .Tuesday June 6

Panama P. R. R. . .Monday June 12

Allianca P. R. R. . .Saturday. . .June 17

Colon P. R. R. . .Saturday. . .June 24

Advance P. R. R. . .Friday June 30

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.

P. R. R... Tuesday.... April 25

.Tuesday May 2

.Monday May 8

.Friday May 12

.Thursday. ..May 18
.Wednesday. May 24
.Wednesday. May 31

.Tuesday June 6

.Tuesday June 13

.Sunday. . . .June 18
.Saturday. ..June 24

.Friday June 30

.Thursday. ..July 6
Wednesday. July 12



Panama

Cristobal P. R. R.

Ancon P. R. R .

Allianca P. R. R.

Colon P. R. R.

Advance P. R. R .

Panama P. R. R.

Allianca P. R. R.

Colon P. R. R.

Advance P. R. R.

Panama P. R. R .

Allianca P. R. R.

Colon P. R. R.

Advance P. R. R .

NEW YORK TO COLON.

Metapan U. F. C. . .Thursday.. .April 20

Prinz Joachim*t H.-A Saturday .. .April 22

Zacapa U. F. C. . .Thursday... April 27

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. .H.-A Friday April 28

Clyde R. M Saturday. . .April 29

Almirante U. F. C. . .Thursday... May 4

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm*. .H.-A. . .

Santa Marta U. F. C .

Prinz Sigismund H.-A

Thames R. M. .

Metapan U. F. C



-Saturday. . .May 6
.Thursday... May 11

.Friday May 12

-Saturday. . .May 13
.Thursday... May 18



PnnzJoachim*t H.-A Saturday. . .May 20

COLON TO NEW YORK.

Almirante U. F. C . . . Thursday . . . April'20

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm*. .H.-A Tuesday April 25

Santa Marta U. F. C. . .Thursday... April 27

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Tuesday May 2

Thames R. M Tuesday May 2

Metapan U. F. C . . .Thursday . . . May 4

Prinz Joachim* H.-A Tuesday May 9

Zacapa U. F. C Thursday ... May 11

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. .H.-A Tuesday May 16

Trent R. M Tuesday May 16

Almirante U. F. C. . .Thursday. .. May 18

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm* H.-A Tuesday May 23

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.

U. F. C. . .Wednesday. April 19
F. C.
F. C.
F. C.
F. C.
F. C.
F. C.
F. C.



Heredia . . .
Atenas. . . .
Cartago. . .
Turrialba. .
Parismina .
Abangarez.
Heredia. ...
Atenas. . . .



. ..u.
. ..u.
. ..u.
. ..u.
...u.
. .u.



Saturday. . .April 22
.Wednesday. April 26
.Saturday. . .April 29
. Wednesday .May 3
.Saturday. . .May 6*
Wednesday.. May 10
.Saturday.... May 13

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.

U. F. C... Thursday. ..April 20

. Thursday . . . April 20
.Thursday... April 27
. Thursday . . . April 27
.Thursday... May 4
.Thursday... May 4
.Thursday... May 11
.Thursday... May 11
.Thursday. . .May 18
Thursday. . .May 18



Turrialba

Parisminat U. F. C.

Abangarez U. F. C

Herediat U. F. C

Atenas U. F. C.

Cartagot U. F. C

Turrialba U. F. C

Parisminat U. F. C ,

Abangarez U. F. C

Herediat U. F. C.

COLON TO BARBADOS, CALLING AT TRINIDAD.

Magdalena R. M Tuesday April 25

Hamburg-American steamers leave Colon for New
York via Kingston every Tuesday at 10 a. m.,and those
designated (*) call at Santiago, Cuba; for Bocas del
Toro and Port Limon on alternate Wednesdays, by
ships designated (*t).

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alternate
Tuesdays, at 12 noon; for Southampton on alternate
Tuesdays at 10 a. m.

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans direct
leave on Thursdays at 3 p. m. ; ships designated (t) for
New Orleans via Port Limon and Puerto Barrios on
Thursday at 4 p. m. ; ships for New York via Kingston
on Thursday at 1 1 a. m. ; for Bocas del Toro on Monday
at 6 p. m.

The Leyland Line Bhip Californian will sail from
Colon for New Orleans via Port Limon on April 21.



CANAL




RECORD



Volume IV.



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26, 1911.



No. 35.



The Canal Record

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of
the Isthmian Canal Commission.



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five
cents each.

Address all Communications

THE CANAL RECORD,

Aocon, Canal Zone,
Isthmus of Panama.

No communication, either for publication or requesting
information, will receive attention unless signed with tht
full name and address of the writer.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.



Chagres Section Work Suspended.

The Central Division has finished all the
excavation that it can do at present in the
section of the Cana! between Gatun Lake and
Culebra Cut, known as the Chagres section
because the line follows in general that of
the Chagres River. There remains to be
taken out a portion of a hill at Bohio, on which
a contractor is sluicing, a small hill at San
Pablo, and a part of the east bank of the river
at Gorgona, where another contractor is at
work. The hill at San Pablo will be taken
out during the dry season of 1912, after the
present line of the Panama railroad has been
abandoned. There remain about 679,000
cubic yards to be excavated. In the official
estimate an additional allowance of 600,000
cubic yards is made for silt, which will be
deposited by the river and which will be
removed after the Canal is in operation by
dredges.

The completion of work in this section had
little effect on the common labor force, because
most of the men released were absorbed on
the relocation of the Panama railroad, and
at Gatun and Miraflores. The white Ameri-
cans were utilized elsewhere, as far as possible.



Miraflores Locks.
In the upper locks at Miraflores, awaiting
its turn for further service, lies a wooden form
that has been used 20 times in making a joint
between the main culverts in the side walls and
the lateral culverts at Pedro Miguel Locks. It
is one of the "lily forms," so called because
of their resemblance to a lily, due to the fact
that they represent the joint between a
circular culvert and an elliptical one. It is
rather a complicated pattern in appearance,
and is put together in sections, so that when
concrete has set around it, the form may be
removed and then assembled again for further
use. It cost $250, so that the cost of forming
each joint so far made over it is about $12.50.
This is typical of the repeated use to which
the forms are put in concrete work, both in
the Pacific locks and at Gatun, and typical



also of the general methods that have re-
sulted in a steady lowering of the price of
concrete construction.

The progress of concrete work at Mira-
flores is indicated on page 2 of this issue. Two
of the cantilever cranes are completed, and
are performing the entire operation of taking
materials from the storage piles, mixing them
into concrete, and delivering the concrete
into the forms; one to the east side wall and
the other to the west wall. There will be
four of these cranes in the completed plant;
the third is now in process of erection, and
work on the fourth will soon be begun.

Concrete laying is in progress only in the
upper locks and the north forebay, the work in
the lower locks and the south forebay being
entirely excavation. Seven steamshovels are
digging here, and streams of water from four
monitors are performing hydraulic excavation,
the material from which is pumped into the
dam across the Cocoli River. In antici-
pation of the rainy season, a sump is being
dug into which water from the steamshovel
section of the excavation will be drained,
to be lifted thence out of the lock site by two
12-inch pumps.



Gatun Locks and Dana.

The steel forms for side wall monoliths in
Gatun Locks were moved into the lower locks
on April 23 and the placing of concrete in
those locks is now in full swing. Most of the
floor has been laid with concrete from the
auxiliary plants, but two of the construction
cableways are now at work on the side walls,
four monoliths of which are completed.
The floor is 60 per cent completed and over
15 per cent of all the concrete for the lower
locks is in place. Concrete work in the middle
locks is about 80 per cent completed and in the
upper locks it is practically all done. A
statement of the concrete work in the series
of three twin locks is published on page 2 of
this issue, and it shows that over 61 per cent
of all the concrete for Gatun Locks is in place.

The hydraulic filling of the east section of
the dam was resumed on April 15. This half
of the fill had been allowed to settle and dry
out during the dry season. Two suction
dredges are working on each section. At
one point the dry fill has reached an elevation
of 90 feet above sea level. A statement of
the progress of work on the spillway is pub-
lished elsewhere in this issue.



Drainage of Culebra Cut.

Preparations for the drainage of Culebra
Cut north of the summit at Empire have been
completed, and but little trouble is antici-
pated from water on that slope during the
present rainy season. The drainage system
north of the summit consists of two diversion
ditches or canals running parallel with the Cut
on either side, to keep water from draining into
the excavation, and a ditch running through
the center of the excavation to a sump at the



north end, whence the water is pumped over
the dike into the Chagres River.

The west diversion, known as Camacho,
has given no trouble since its completion in
1908; but the east diversion ditch, the Obispo
diversion, broke in one place and was en-
dangered by a slide in another, during the
last wet season. The first break was at a
point opposite Empire, known as La Pita,
and occurred on May 7, 1910. It was due
to seamed rock sliding on rock, a movement
that was well developed before the rainy
season began. A wooden flume was con-
structed to take the drainage during the rainy
season, and this has been replaced by a rein-
forced concrete flume, completed on April
21. This flume is 370 feet long, with a wing
wall 30 feet long on the upstream end, and is
22 feet wide. It will carry 3,040 cubic feet
of water per second. The largest quantity
ever passing through the diversion is recorded
as 2,650 cubic feet per second.

The slide on the east bank opposite Las
Cascadas, which had been in motion since
April, 1908, broke so far back during Decem-
ber, 1910, that it was deemed advisable to
locate a diversion ditch farther back from the
Canal, and this relocation work has been
completed. It involved the excavation of
about 22,000 cubic yards of material, most of
which was taken out by scrapers. Two plows
and 18 scrapers were employed.

On the south end, the plan for drainage
through the center culvert of Pedro Miguel
Locks, has not been carried out, because this
would interfere with the lock work still in
progress at the north end of the locks. The
water will be drained through the old Panama
railroad culvert and the location of Pedro
Miguel dam, as heretofore, until the drainage
through the locks can be effected.



Gatun Dam Spillway.

The concrete work in the spillway of Gatun
Dam is over 54 per cent completed, 133,466
cubic yards out of a total of 225,000 having
been placed up to the close of work on April