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22. A statement of the amount laid each
day last week and of the total in place, fol-
lows:



Date.


Concrete
Laid.


Hours
worked.


No.
Mixers.


April 1 7


Cm. Yds.
156

144
220
136
163
49


14:00
14:00
14:00
10:00
12:00
4:15


2


April 18


2


April 19


2




2


April 21


2




2








868
132.598


68:15


2


Previously reported . . .






133.466





Record Excavation in Culebra Section.

On April 20th, 45 steamshovels, working
in the Culebra r section of the Central Division,
excavated 67,749 cubic yards.of rock and earth



274



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 35.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.



{Continued.)



during the working day of eight hours, an
average per shovel of 1,505 cubic yards for
the day. The next highest record for the
Culebra section was made on March 31, 1911,
when 66,660 cubic yards of rock and earth
were excavated.



Porto Bello Crusher.

A statement of the work done at the Porto
Bello crusher, by days, for the week ending
April 22, follows:



Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
Yards.




6:58
6:42
7:30
7:09
7:11
6:50


2.624




2.567




1,935




2,686




3,060




3,370










42:20


16,242









Ancon Crusher.

A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon
quarry during the week ending April 22, fol-
lows:



Date.



Cubic
Yards.



April 17
April 18
April 19
April 20
April 21
April 22

Total.




15.202



Family Quarters.

The Canal work at Tabernilla is completed
and that at San Pablo is as nearly so as it can
be until the relocation of the Panama railroad
is in regular use. Employes will be trans-
ferred to other points convenient to their
work, but all houses suitable as family quar-
ters will be reserved for that purpose and
assigned to married employes who are unable
to secure family quarters near their work.
A statement of the applications for family
quarters on file on April 1, follows:



PLACE.


No. 1
List.*


No. 2
List.






50




2
3


5




37 (8)




34 (3)






126 (3)




4
3
6
16
2


(2)
(2)


33




59 (21)




157 (60)




133 (31)




27 (5)




1




3


51 (19)




14 (2)




3
1


59 (2)




9








43


(4)


775(152)



Note. — Figures in parentheses represent occupants
of non-housekeeping quarters.

♦Employed prior to January 1. 1908.



College Entrance Examinations.
The College- Entrance Examining Board
has included Ancon among the places at which
examinations for entrance to American col-
leges and universities will be held on June 19
to 24. The certificates of this board admit
the holder to any college or university in the
United States without further examination.
Any person may take the examination, and



applications for information should be ad-
dressed to F. A. Gause, Superintendent of
Schools, Ancon.



Canal Medals.

Canal medals earned during the years

1908-10 will be distributed about September

of this year, and those earned during the

years 1909-11 will not be ready for distri-



bution until approximately a year later. The
list of persons who have earned the medal
service bar will be published in the issue of

May 3.

Sailing of Cristobal.
The sailing date of the Cristobal from Pier
No. 11, Cristobal, has been changed to Wed-
nesday, May 3, at 3 p. m., instead of Tuesday,
May 2, as shown heretofore on the schedule.



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS.



GATUN LOCKS.



Over 61 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been laid,
the amount in place at the close of work on April 22, being 1,286,032 cubic yards, out of a
total of 2,085,000.

A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each day for the week ending
April 22, and of the total, follows; and a similar statement for the work in the spillway of
Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The construction plant works 12 hours daily,
and the auxiliary plant 9 hours.





Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Large
stone.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours 1 No. of
worked, mixers.




April 17


Cu. Yds.
2.122
2,098
2,042
2,494
2,318
2,048


29:48
32:30
34:21
38:20
38:24
35:46


6
6
6
6
6
6


Cm. Yds. i

404 ! 7 :40


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
152}
145}
126
195*
75}
112


Cu. Yds.
2,6781


April 18


350
586
592
618
396
455 i


7:40
8:40
8:40
8:40
7:40


2,593}


April 19


2,754




3.28U


April 21


3,0111


April 22


' 2.556




455i




















13,122


209:09


6


3,401 i


49:00


2


806 i


17,329*




1,268,7021






























'Mi,' 4551 yanls shown foi the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days:
April 17, 73 yards; April 18th, 65J yards; April 19th, 95 yards; April 20th. 97 yards; April 21st, 74 yards; April
22d. 51 yards.

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS.

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is about 75 percent completed, 627,909 cubic
yards, out of a total of 837,400, having been placed at the close of work on April 22. The
record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows:







Auxiliary Plant.


Large
stone.






2-Cubic yard mixers


2-cubic yard mixers.


J-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete Hours
placed, worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete Hours , No. of
placed. | worked, mixers


Concrete
Placed.


Hours
worked


No. of

mixers




April 17. .
April 18. .
April 19. .
April 20 . .
April 21. .
April 22 . .


Cu. Yds.
614
702
626
632
544
558


16:00
12:00
12:00
10:00
10:00
10:00


2

2
2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
400
496
516
278
420
350


10:00
12:50
11:00

6:50
12:00

8:00


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
33


2:50


1


Cu. Yds.
8


Cu. Yds.
1,055
1,198


33
115
20
33


2:25
7:00
1:50
4:50


1
1
1

1




1.175

1.025

984

941


Total
Previously


3,676


70:00


2


2,460


60:40


2


234


18:55


.83


8

4,179


6,378
621,531
























Grand


4,187


627,909



MIRAFLORES LOCKS.

About 15 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at MiraBores was in place
on April 22, the total amount on that date being 202,943 cubic yards, out of a total of approxi-
mately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows:





Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.




Date.


2-cubic yard mixers.


J-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete Hours No. of Concrete
placed. 1 worked. ' mixers! placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of

mixers


Large
stone.




April 17. .
April 18. .
April 19. .
April 20 . .
April 21. .
April 22 . .


Cu. Yds.
832
958
954
858
1.004
996


24:40
26:00
25:50
24:17
27:25
26:67


4
4

4

4
4


Cu. Yds.
176
228
230
164
208
252


4:00
5:00
4:75
4:00
4:00
5:00


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
661
806
834
750
879
716
*135


46:00
51:50
48:25
50:00
45:00
41:42
22:35


7
7
7
7
7
6
.67


Cu. Yds.


Cu. Yds.
1.669
2,036
2,060
1,814
2,098
1,964




















Total

Previously


5,602


153:99


4


1,258


27:15


2


4,781


305:32


5.95


3,693


11,641
191,302


Grand




















3.693


202,943
























■1 ,n At



♦This 135 yards was mixed by a {-yard mixer, the amounts for each day being: April 18. 44 yards; April 19. 42
yards; April 20, 42 yards; April 21 7 yards.



April 26, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



275



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE.



Women's Clubs.

The annual meeting of the Canal Zone
Federation of Women's Clubs was held at
the Gatun clubhouse on Friday afternoon,
April 21, when there was a full attendance of
delegates and club members. The visitors
were welcomed by the president of the enter-
taining club, Mrs. V. V. Sessions. In her
annual report, Mrs. Thomes E. Brown, Jr.,
the president of the Federation, reviewed
briefly the work of the organization for the
past two years during which time she has been
its chief officer, and in closing, she urged women
to work in the home and in the care of chil-
dren.

From the reports of the club presidents it
was seen that the differences in the efforts of
the several organizations are marked; Cris-
tobal, with its 60 odd members, is the only
club doing department work; Gatun is inter-
ested in civic work and is preparing to take
up a study course; Gorgona continues its
social meetings and the art embroidery class
is one of its features; Paraiso has varied inter-
ests and is developing club programs; Pedro
Miguel holds business and social meetings
alternately. The most notable efforts for
the year have been the initiative steps taken
by the Cristobal club in the establishing of a
systematic campaign against disease in the
city of Colon, and by the Gatun club in
placing a playground equipment in the village.

The education committee recommended
the establishment of self supporting vacation
schools. The library extension committee
reported the addition of 50 new books to the
library in Cristobal, and the exchange of books
with the Gatun library. These two juvenile
libraries are the property of the Federation,
having been presented to the organization
in 1909. These libraries will be lent to the
public schools which have no libraries for
certain portions of the school year.

The following changes in the organization
of the Federation were adopted: In place of
three meetings a year, there will be one general
meeting of the Federation in January, to be
held either in Colon or Ancon and the expenses
to be met by the federated clubs. The
meeting will be divided into two sessions:
The business meeting in the morning, and a
formal program, followed by a reception in
the afternoon. At this time the officers for
the year will be elected. The standing com-
mittees are abolished ; such committees as are
necessary for carrying on the work of the
organization being appointed. There will be
a reciprocity committee, the chairman of
which will keep in touch with the clubs and
have filed a list of names of speakers and
papers that shall be available for the clubs
upon application. A custodian will be ap-
pointed to take charge of the Federation
property. The officers of the Federation,
with the presidents of the several clubs, will
c mstitute the executive board, and meetings
o! this board will be held in October and
April, and at such other times as is considered
needful.

At the close of the meeting the Federation
cook book was placed on sale at auction and
more than 50 copies were sold at popular
prices. The remainder of the books are still
in the hands of the chairman of the committee,
Mrs. E. H. Colip, Cristobal, and may be
obtained from her, at a price greatly reduced
from the" original.

Tea was served by the Gatun club, during



which time Miss Neville played several
selections on the piano.

The following officers were elected to serve
until the next annual meeting which will take
place in January, 1912: President, Miss J.
Macklin Beattie; fi.' t vice-president, Mrs.
Frederick Mears; seccnd vice-president, Mrs.
E. M. Colip; third vice-president, Mrs. V. V.
Sessions; recording secretary, Mrs. Carl H.
Elliott; correspon ling and general federation
secretary, Mrs. Thomas E. Brown, Jr.;
treasurer, Mrs. M. E. Smith; auditor, Mrs.
S. E. Calvit.



No one should report at Culebra without such
a card of admission, or at least before having
ascertained the date on which an examination
is scheduled to be held if no card has been
received. John K. Baxter,

Secretary, Isthmian Civil Service Board.
Culebra, April 14, 1911,



PERSONAL.



Church.

The meetings of St. Luke's Altar Guild
will be held at the Hotel Tivoli on the first
and third Tuesdays in each month at 9.30
a. m. On May 2, the Rev. E. J. Cooper will
speak on his recent visit to Guatemala. The
meeting will be informal and the members are
privileged to invite their friends. The rector's
course of lectures on church history and
doctrine that was begun at the Lenten meet-
ings of the guild will be continued in St.
Luke's church on Wednesday evenings at
S o'clock.



Tabernilla Dramatic Club.

The Tabernilla Dramatic Club has elected
the following officers: President, Miss Elida
Williams; vice president, Mrs. Ray E.Courter;
secretary, Mrs. Nolan; treasurer, Mrs. Carl
Twitchell, and stage manager, O. S. Farrar.
The club will give its first play on Saturday
evening, May 6, at the I. C. C. hall, Taber-
nilla, and the proceeds will be donated
towards the American Red Cross endowment
fund.

No Staterooms on Ancon and Cristobal.

All available accomodations on the steam-
ships Cristobal and Ancon, scheduled fo sail
on May 3 and 8, respectively, having been
reserved no further requests for cabin passage
will be issued. Requests for steerage passage
will be issued until further notice.



Mr. M. H. Thatcher, accompanied by Mrs.
Thatcher and Miss Chinn, left for the States
via Cuba on his annual leave of absence on
the Prinz August Wilhelm on April 25.

Mr.W. W. Warwick, Examiner of Accounts,
who was appointed a Justice of the Canal
Zone Supreme Court under date of March 16,
1911, did not qualify for that position because
before he could do so the President decided
that he preferred to have him become a
member of the Economy and Efficiency
Commission, which is charged with the work
of coordinating the duties of the Government
departments in Washington. He has ac-
cepted the latter position, and sailed for the
States on April 25, accompanied by Mrs.
Warwick.

I. O. O. P.

The election of officers for Canal Zone
Lodge No. 3 of Culebra, held on Monday
night, April 17, to fill vacancies caused by
resignations resulted as follows: Noble grand,
Claud Peters; vice grand, Eugene W. Palmer;
secretary, Albert F. Sickler; treasurer,
Arthur E. Erickson.



Civil Service Examination.

Attention is directed to the fact that cards
of admission are sent to all applicants for
civil service examinations, if found eligible.



Spanish War Veterans.

There will be a meeting of Lieut.-Col.
William L. Sibert Camp No. 1, U. S. W. V.,
in the lodge hall at Gatun on May 10. Prior
to this meeting, at 7.30 p. m., there will be a
short meeting for all persons eligible for mem-
bership, when the object of the organization
will be explained by Commander Young, and
those who desire to do so can fill out an appli-
cation for membership. The initiation fee
is $2, and dues are 25 cents a month.

Members of Chagres Camp No. 2, United
Spanish War Veterans, are requested to
attend a meeting to be held in Kangaroo Hall,
Empire, on May 6, at 2.45 p. m.



LABOR FORCE AND QUARTERS IN MARCH.

The total of the Canal and Panama railroad force at work on March 29 was 35,806, as
compared with 35,955 in February, and with 38,676 in March, 1910. Of the total in March,
1911, Canal employes numbered 28,850, and Panama railroad, 6,956. The force report for
March, follows:







SILVER EMPLOYES


*




•6

"3

O
3






Artisans.


European
Laborers.


West Indian
Laborers.


3


Department.


o


u

?

15


cy
u

18
3


2
u

94


2
B
V

u

o


a
v
u


a

V
u

o


O

u


BO

V
(J

O


n

V

u


to

a

0J

U
CO


■5

o

o


S

s

u


Total
Silver.


a
2
o


Const'ct'n and Eng'r'ng.
Civil Administration


4,512
190
660
959
671
7
5


246
2
3

104
1


662
4
3

143

1


2,601

18

2

75


3.270


1,271


112


553


3,568


3.060

3

270

723


268
"9"

10


20,156

217

954

2.120

673

7

5


3.5(59
367
376
224
55
25
102


23.725
584


1
73


1
10


10




5
10


1,330
2,344




72S




















32


Examinatu of Accounts.


























107




21
























Total


7,004


15


356


813


2.696


3.344


1.282


122


553


3,583


4,056


2S7


24.132


4.718 1 28,850




















Panama railroad force, 3,464: Panama railroad relocation force, 2.4S5; Panama railroad commissary force.
1.007. Total. 6 956 I. C. C. force. 28.850. Grand total. 35.806

*AU waees specified are in gold.

The occupants of Commission quarters in March were divided as follows: Gold force or
white Americans, 9,506; of whom 5,518 were men, 2,087 women, and 1,901 children. European
laborers, 5,867; of whom, 5,243 were men, 268 women, and 356 children. West Indian negroes,
8,842; of whom, 6,369 were men, 1,134 women, and 1,339 children.



276



THE CANA'L RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 35



LOCK GATE OPERATING MACHINES.




Gates Will Be Opened or Closed in Two Minutes.

Bids have been requested in the United States for the machinery to
operate the lock gates. It consists of three distinct parts — the machinery
for opening and closing the gates, the machines for locking the gates when
they are closed, and the motors to operate these machines.

The machinery for opening and closing the gates was invented in the
office of the Assistant Chief Engineer by Edward Schildhauer, electrical
and mechanical engineer, and a patent has been issued on it. It is the
subject of the illustration herewith. It consists essentially of a crank or
"bull wheel" to which is fastened one end of^a strut or connecting rod,
the other end of which is fastened to a lock gate. The wheel, moved
through an arc of 197 degrees, closes or opens the gate leaf, according to
the direction in which it is turned. One operation takes 2 minutes. It
is a combination gear and crank, is constructed of cast steel, is 19 feet
2 inches in diameter, and weighs approximately 35,000 pounds. It is
mounted in a horizontal position on the lock wall; turns on a large center
pin, and is supported at the rim in four places by rollers. The center pin
is keyed into a heavy casting anchored securely to the concrete. The

crank gear or "bull wheel" has
gear teeth on its rim and is
driven by a single pinion on a
vertical shaft. The vertical shaft
is driven by a bevel gear and
pinion, the pinion being fast on a
horizontal shaft passing through
the bullkhead, which separates
the motor chamber from the bull
wheel chamber. This shaft car-
ries a gear with spring center
which is driven by a pinion on
the back shaft of the motor.
L The strut pin is fastened on
the wheel in a boss near the rim
of the crank gear. The opposite
end of the strut or connecting
rod is fastened to the gate at a
distance of 17 feet from the pin-
tle by means of the strut anchor.
The connecting rod consists of
a built-up structural member
with flexible connection at either
end, and a spring shock absorber
at the gate end. The purpose
of the shock absorber is to pre-
vent undue strain on the crank
gear from wave action on the
gate, or other causes. It consists
of six nests of two springs each,
capable of exerting, when solid,
a force of about 184,000 pounds
j and assembled with an initial
\* i compression of about 50,000
v pounds. The springs are in com-

I pression for a force acting in
;l either direction on the strut. A

,| || slip joint allows for lengthening

II or shortening the strut within
,M fixed limits.
■ ' The strut is supported at the

slip joint by a pair of rollers,
which are intended to relieve the
joint of undue bending strains.
These rollers are supported in
spring bearings, which allow for
variation in the distance from
the center line of the strut to
the roller track. The roller track
is riveted to the top girder of the
miter gate.

The crank gear end of the
strut turns through an angle of
about 197 degrees on the pin
circle and back again over the
same path. At the extreme posi-
tion the strut is on a dead center
with respect to the crank gear



April 26, 1911.



THI-: CANAL RECORD



277



and can exert a force on the miter gate de-
pending only on the strength of the strut,
crank gear, or gate.

The miter forcing machine is designed to
force the gate leaves to perfect miter and
lock them in mitered position. It consists
essentially of two box shaped castings, one
bolted to the outer end of the top girder of
each gate leaf, one casting carrying a pair of
moveable jaws and their operating mechanism
and the other carrying a large pin, which is
enclosed by the jaws when they are in the
closed position.

The jaws are connected by a series of
toggle links to a crosshead nut which is
moved by means of a revolving screw. The
end thrust of the screw is taken up by two
thrust bearings which transmit thrust in
either direction to the main frame casting.
The screw is turned by a bevel gear in mesh
with a bevel pinion on the motor driving
shaft. This driving shaft passes through a
plug bearing and is connected to the motor



Lmft t*»,* Ubc*+»




DO



Ottnft Gear
/?/ij.*if Hand '-'acnine



shaft by means of a friction cutoff coupling.
The forces acting on the jaws are transmitted
directly to the frame through pins when the
jaws are in the locking position, and there is
no strain on the screw due to forces acting on
the jaws. When in open position the jaws
allow either gate leaf to reach the mitering
position without interference from the other.

The motor is provided with a solenoid brake
for bringing the machine quickly to rest when
the current is shut off by the limit switch.
The estimated time of a single operation for
this machine in one direction is 15 seconds.

One gate moving machine will be required
for each gate leaf. 92 in all; one miter forcing
machine for each gate or pair of leaves, 46 in
all; one motor for each gate moving machine
and one for each miter forcing machine, 138
in all. Two gate moving machines, one miter
forcing machine, and three motors will be
purchased first and given a thorough test
before the contract for the whole quantitv is
let.



Mitering Lock Gates Closed Showing Relative Position of Gate Moving Machines.







• ^om



(£JCZL_










v&



■ :




CROSS SECTION THROUGH CENTER WALL OF LOCK SHOWING POSITION OF APPARATUS WITH RESPECT TO LOCK

WALL COPING AND OPERATING TUNNEL.



Cruces Anchors to be Moved to West Point.

Two large wrought iron anchors at Cruces
have been taken from the place where they
have rested for two centuries or more and
sent to West Point, where it is probable they
will be mounted above the entrance to the
library.

Various people on the Canal Zone and else-
where have sought in the literature of the
Isthmus for some reference to the time and
the circumstances under which these anchors
were brought to Cruces. If any such re-
ference is extant, it is not a matter of common
knowledge. Cruces, or as it was originally
called, Yenta Cruz, is on the Chagres River,
a distance of 36 miles by the waterway from
the Caribbean Sea, and a distance overland
from the Pacific by the main trail of 15 miles.
It is known that Nombre de Dios was
founded in 1519 and that a line of posts
was run across the Isthmus from that port to
old Panama. Soon afterwards a road was con-



structed between the two settlements along
the line of posts. In 1534, or soon after that
date, a route by water for boats and light
draft vessels was established from Nombre de
Dios along the coast and up the Chagres to
Cruces. This was accomplished by removing
obstructions which had interfered with the
navigation of the river, but the use of the
paved way was not discontinued. It is
known, also, that early in the 16th century,
ships were taken apart on the Atlantic side,
and the parts were transported across the
Isthmus and assembled again on the Pacific
side; and that other heavy freight was taken
over the trails.

There is a legend which says that the anchors
were brought up the Chagres in boats and
unloaded at Cruces for transport overland to
Panama. Forty men were carrying an
anchor when one of them stumbled and fell.
The others were unable to stand the weight
and the anchor fell, crushing seven of them.



The point at which the anchor now rests is
called Matasiete, which is Spanish for "kill
seven."

The idea of removing the anchors to West
Point originated with Lieut. Walter D.
Smith, class of 1901 at the Military Academy,
and the work of taking them to the railroad
was assigned to him. One of them stood in
the village about 300 yards from the river
and the other alongside the trail in the jungle
about 400 yards from the river. Each anchor
has a 14-foot shank and is made of wrought