Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

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„ „, Round trip .40 .80 .90 1.00

Between MountHope pumping station and any point in Cristo- Oneway... .50 1.00 1.30 1.60

bal or in Colon south of 11th strret Round trip 1.00 1.70 2.20 2.50

Between Mount Hope pumping station and any point in Colon Oneway... .70 1.40 1.80 2.20

north of 11th street, including Colon Hospital Round trip 1.40 2.50 3.00 3.30

Between Mount Hope pumping station and any point in Colon Oneway... .80 1.60 2.00 2.40

», i?l y 5 nd or ea3t of Colon Hospital Round trip 1.60 2.80 3.50 4.00

NOTE — For the purpose of this tariff the town of Cristobal

shall be considered as including all Zone area north of the

southern shore of Folks River.

GATUN.

Between any two points in Gatun, including the Panama rail-
road station on the south and the residence of the Division Oneway... .30 .60 .80 1.00
Engineer, the I. C. C. quarters, and labor barracks on the Round trip .60 1.00 1.30 1.50

north

Between any two points in New Gatun ......'...'!!! One way ... .20 .40 .50 .60

_ Round trip .40 .70 .90 1.00

Between any point in New Gatun and any point in Old Gatun. Oneway... .50 1.00 1.30 1.60

_ Round trip 1.00 1.70 2.20 2.50

Between any point in Gatun and any point in Cristobal or Oneway... 5.00 8.00 10 50 12.50

_ Co' 011 Round trip 7.50 10.00 12.50 14.00

Between any point in New Gatun and any point in Cristobal or Oneway... 4.50 7.00 9.00 10.50

Co' 011 Round trip 6.50 8.50 10.50 11.50

RATES OF COACHES BY THE HOUR.

One coach, per hour 1.50 ?.oo 2.50 3.00

M. H. Thatcher

Head of Department of Civil Administration.



SUPPLIES FOR CANAL WORK.



The following steamers with supplies for the Isthmian
Canal Commission arrived at the ports of Cristobal,
Colon and Balboa during the two weeks ending April 29,
1911:

Pennsylvania. April IS. from Fan Francisco, with
5 packages hydraulic machinery for Paci*ic Division.

Panama. April 18, from New York, with 1 drum on
skids. 5 cases shafting. 3 crates pipe couplings. 10.090
pieces conduit pipe for Atlantic Division; 5 bundles
castings, 3 ernes pipe couplings. 10,090 pieces conduit
pipe 8 cases pump material for Paci'ic Division;
16 pieces boom feet and sheaves for Central Division;
5 cases g?ar cutters. 64 casks copp?r ingots, 26 bundles
insulated copper wire, 86 cases incandescent lamps for
Mechanical Division; 53 cases machinery. 72 pieces
machinery. 10 cases plates and lamps for Tanama
railroad; 50 packages drugs and sundries for Sanitary
Department; 16 cases agate wa're. 394 pieces garbage
cans; 15 cases insulated tape. 32 pieces maple lumber.
15 cases rubb?r hose. 20 packages life preservers. 667
bundles shovels, 11 cases babbitt metal, 17 cases ink,
8 packages fittings for stock; and a miscellaneous
cargo, the whole consisting of 21,867 packages, weighing
630 tons.

Waconsta, April 19, from New York, with 12,281
barrelscementfor \tlantic Division; 60,560 bags cement
for Pacioc Division.

Abangare?, April 20, 1911, from New Orleans, with
21 packages earth spreader. 250 tons pig iron, 200 pieces
castings for Mechanical Division; 630 bales straw, 120
sacks bran, 314 pieces lumber for stock.

Lvra. April 20, from Philadelphia, with 380 pieces
angle reinforcements for Atlantic Division.

Santa Maria, April 20, from New York, with 8
bundles brooms for stock.

Axminster. April 23, from Philadelphia, with 19, SCO
cases dynamite.

Prinz Sigismjijid, April 23. from New York, with 23
cases paper, 282 barrels sulphate aluminum, 69 barrels
lump alum.

Nordpol, April 24, from New York, with 20,004
barrels cement for Atlantic Division; 47,640 bags
cement for Pacific Division.

Cristobal. April 26. from New York, with 16,935 bar-
rels cement, 4 cases electric machinery, 21 cases lubri-
cating oil for Atlantic Division; 28 cases castings for
Central Division; 72,260 bags cement. 29 cases fire
brick for Pacific Division; 5 cases leather for Mechanical
Division; 22 bales hose, 21 barrels glassware, 9 cases
Babbitt metal, 9 cases wire, 10 cases belt dressing. 126
bundles wheelbarrows. 15 bundles lumber, 8 kegs steel
washers, 20 cases motor oil, 349 bales hay for stock;
and a miscellaneous cargo, the whole consisting of
90,016 packages, weighing 7,905 tons.

Atenas, April 27, from New Orleans, with 66 cases
for Atlantic Division; 1.562 bales hay. 1.606 bags
oats. 275 pieces yellow pine lumber for stock; 2,176
bundles lumber for Panama Railroad Company.

Metapan, April 27, from New York, with 3 life boats
and 6 life rafts for Pacific Division.



CANAL




RECORD



Volume IV.



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 10, 1911.



No. 37.



The Canal Record

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of
the Isthmian Canal Commission.



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five
cents each.

Address all Communications

THE CANAL RECORD,

Ancon, Canal Zone,

Isthmus of Panama.

No communication, either for publication or requesiing
information, will receive attention unless signed with the
full name and address of the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.



Canal Medals and Bars.

At the close of the last year over four
thousand Canal medals had been earned by
employes of the Canal and Panama railroad.
The medal is awarded to American citizens
who complete two years of service on the
Canal or Panama railroad, and a bar is award-
ed for each two years' service additional.

On January 1, there were 93 employes in
the Canal and railroad bervice who were
employed in 190-1, and were therefore entitled
to the second two-year service bar; 707 who
were entitled to the first two-year bar, and
860 to the medal. The following statement
shows the total number of medals and service
bars earned up to January 1:



Years.


Medals
earned.


Bars
earned.


1904-08


2,264
1,363


146


1907-09








860
















Total . .


4,487


1,388













Canal Work in April.

The grand total of Canal excavation to
May 1 was 137,750,520 cubic yards, leaving
to be excavated 44,787,246 cubic yards, or
less than one-fourth of the entire amount for
the completed Canal.

The total for April was 2,691,753 cubic
yards, as compared with 2,632,468 cubic
yards in April, 1910, and 3,454,649 cubic yards
in April, 1909. Of the total, 2,661,088 cubic
yards were "work excavation," and 30,665
cubic yards were "plant excavation."

The dry excavation amounted to 1,701,919
cubic yards and was principally by steam
shovels. The dredges removed 929,357 cubic
yards, and 60,477 cubic yards were sluiced, in
addition to the amount pumped into Gatun
Dam by auction dredges. The progress on
the locks at Gatun, Pedro Miguel and Mira-
flores is referred to elsewhere in this issue.



In the Atlantic Division, the total excava-
tion was 600,396 cubic yards. Of this total,
86,578 cubic yards were dry excavation, and
the remainder was removed by the dredges
in the Atlantic entrance.

The total excavation in the Central Divi-
sion was 1,516,439 cubic yards, of which
all but 10,336 yards were from the prism.

In the Pacific Division, the total excavation
was 574,918 cubic yards, 415,539 cubic yards
of which were taken out by the dredges at
the Pacific entrance, and 33,509 by the sluic-
ing plant.

A detailed statement of the excavation, and
a summary' of the work on the locks and dams,
follow:

ATLANTIC DIVISION.



Locality.


"Work."
Excava-
tion.


"Plant."
Excava-
tion.


Total
excava-
tion


Dry excavation —
Locks, Dam and Spill-


Cu. yds.

12.54S
74.030


Cu. Yds.


Cu. yds.






74 030








Total


86,578




86,578












Atlantic entrance

Locks. Dam and Spill-


492,579


21.239


513.S1S










Total


492.579


21,239


513.818










Total wet and dry


579.157


21.239


600.396



CENTRAL DIVISION.



Dry excavation —
CulebraCut


1.404,000
75.135
10,336

26.968




1 .404 000






75.135


Obispo Diversion




10.336
26 968


Wet excavation —










Total


1.516.439




1.516,439



PACIFIC DIVISION.



Dry excavation —
Locks, Dams and Spill-


80,006




80,006






Prism, south of Pedro


45,864












Total


125,870




125,370




439.622


9,426


449,048


















Total


439.622


9.426


449.048




Total wet and dry


565.492


9.426


574.918



TOTAL CANAL EXCAVATION




Dry excavation


1.701,919
959,169


"'30.66s'


1.701.919
939,834


Total


2.661.088


30.665


2.691,753



Mean rainfall along Canal (twelve stations) 4.86
inches.

By "Work" Excavation is meant excavation actu-
ally made for one of the constituent parts of the Canal ,
such as Prism. Diversions, or Locks, etc.; that is.it
represents material taken from the area to be occu-
pied by the Canal, and constitutes excavation useful
for the completed Canal.

By "Plant" Excavation is meant excavation outside
of any of the constituent parts of the Canal, such as
Prism, Diversions, or Locks, etc. It includes mate-
rial necessary to be excavated for construction pur-
poses only and is chargeable against the particular



plant item for which it is performed, such as Prism.
Diversions, Locks, etc.

DAM AND LOCK CONSTRUCTION.



Material.



Concrete laid in locks.
Concrete laid in darns

and spillways

Fill placed in dams. . .



Atlantic.



Cu. Yds.
67.361



4.169
573.788



Pacific.



Cu. Yds.
67,393



Total.



Cu. Yds.
134,754



4,159
655.148



Erecting the Lock Gates.

The first shipment of material for the gates
of Gatun Locks has arrived on the Isthmus,
and the work of erecting the south guard
gates in the upper or lake level locks will be
begun this week. The gates are built up of
steel girders, covered with steel plate, forming
water tight compartments. Each leaf, of
which there are two in a gate, is 7 feet
thick, 65 feet long, and range in height from
47 feet 4 inches to 82 feet, the total num-
ber for all locks being 92.

One method will be used in erecting all of
them. It consists of lowering the material
by locomotive crane, operating on a bridge
over the lock chamber, and assembling it in
false work, after which the gate will be moved
into place, as a door would be set on its
hinges. The false work, between which the
leaves will be assembled, consists essentially
of four steel columns, which not only carry
the weight of the gate leaf, varying from 300
to 700 tons, but also act as a brace to prevent
the leaf from overturning during erection.
These columns rest upon a lowering device,
which, in turn, rests upon rollers. The
leaves are assembled on a radial line,
four feet out from their true position, and
swung partly open, leaving a 12-foot pas-
sage between their miter ends. After the
quoin, or hinge end, of the leaf is com-
pleted, the whole structure will be rolled
back against the hollow quoin, and lowered in-
to position over the pintle.

The lowering device on which the columns
rest has been used by the contractors in
bridge construction in the States. It
consists of two steel bars shaped like a
broad "V," with the apexes facing one
another. A steel plate passing through the
apex of each bar joins them together,
and yet permits free vertical movement
of the upper bar. Between the adjacent
faces of these triangular bars two steel wedges
are placed. These wedges are bored and
threaded, one right handed and the other
left handed, and are moved toward or away
from each other by turning a continuous
threaded shaft passing through them, the
first movement having the effect of for-
cing the triangular bars apart, and the
second, that of drawing them together, the
consequent effect on the columns being to
raise or lower them. The device has been
tested by the Bureau of Standards, and in
actual service, for heavier loads than it will



290



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 37.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.



(Continued.)



be obliged to bear in the erection of the lock
gates. The maximum weight on each column
and device, including men and tools, will not
exceed 200 tons.



Sinking the Piers for Balboa Lumber Dock.

Work is in progress on nine of the 65 con-
crete foundation piers required for the new
Panama railroad lumber dock at Balboa.
The first of these piers had been sunk to a
depth of 60 feet below sea level at the close of
work on May 6, or within four or five feet of
bed rock. At this point a vein of water-
bearing gravel was struck, necessitating a
continuous operation of the pumps and redu-
cing the downward rate of progress to some
extent. The other eight piers have been
sunk to varying depths ranging from the first
joint, or section, to 50 feet.

The first step in sinking the piers, which have
an inside diameter of six feet, is to excavate
a hole with a clam-shell bucket, operated by a
locomotive crane, to a depth of about 10 feet.
The heavy reinforced base of the pier, which
somewhat resembles in form a flanged joint of
sewer pipe, is then swung into the hole. The
earth is next excavated from the bottom by
two or more workmen, and is hauled to the
surface by motive power furnished by old
drilling machines, thence carried to nearby
dumps in Decauville cars. The excavation
of material continues until the base section
has been sunk to a sufficient depth to permit
the addition of a six-foot length of the main
pier. The forms for this are then placed in
position, the reinforcing material, consisting
of steel rods arranged in circular rows, assem-
bled therein, after which the concrete is
poured, allowed to set, and the pier is then
ready for a further descent.

The material encountered in excavating for
the piers is mostly clay, and as the water is al-
ways present in the holes, it has to be removed
in the form of sticky mud. Noisome gases
frequently emanate from this mud, especially
where rotten wood is encountered, and in
these cases, the health and safety of the work-
men employed in digging below ground is
safeguarded by forcing air into the holes.
Notwithstanding these precautions, workmen
have been overcome and, in one case, tem-
porarily incapacitated.

Gatun Dam Spillway.

The concrete work in the spillway of Gatun
Dam is about 60 per cent completed, 134,657
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having
been placed at the close of work on May 6.
A statement of the amount laid each day
last week, and of the total in place, follows:



Date.



May 1

May 2

May 3

May 4

May 5

May 6

Total

Previously reported

Grand total



Concrete
Laid.



112
76

164
53
84
29



518
134,139



134.657



Hours
worked.



5:00
4:30

14:00
3:30
2:00
2:00



31:00



Cubic

Mixers.

No.



Empire-Chorrera Highway.

It has been decided to make the road from
Empire to Chorrera, a distance of six miles,
16 feet wide on the metaled part, about 32
feet from center to center of the drainage



ditches. Already the grading has been com-
pleted for a mile beyond Empire. The work is
being done by penitentiary prisoners, 117 of
whom are now employed, with headquarters
at Culebra. As soon as two miles of the
grading are completed, the prisoners will be
moved to a stockade to be built at a point
four miles from Empire, and the work will be
carried on in both directions from that point.



At a point about three-fourths of a mile out-
side Empire, there is a hill with an eight per
cent grade, but barring this, the heaviest
grades encountered on the location are not
over six per cent.

It is proposed to build a road from the
Chorrera highway to Arraijan, a distance of
three miles, but this has not yet been deter-
mined upon.



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS.



GATUN LOCKS.

Over 63 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been laid,
the amount in place at the close of work on May 6, being 1,321, 111; cubic yards, out of a total
of 2,085,000.

A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each day for the week ending
May 6, and of the total, follows, and a similar statement for the work in the spillway of Gatun
Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The construction plant works 12 hours daily, and
the auxiliary plant 9 hours.





Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Large
stone.






Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of

mixers.






Cu. Yds.
2.246
2,196
2,064
1.946
1.761
1.826


39:02
36:34
31:32
39:54
37:03
32:48


6
6
6
6
6
6


Cu. Yds.
536
434
630
576
638
802
407


8:40
7:40
8:40
8:40
8:40
9:40


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
234}
178
216
172
262}
203


Cu. Yds.
3.016}
2.808


May 2


May 3


2,910




2,694




2.661}
2.831






407


















Total


12,039


216:53


6


4,023


52:00


2


1,266


17.328




1,303.783}






















1...


1,321.111}











*Power off at 5.30 p. m. on May 5, due to broken water main.

* *The 407 yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days:
May 1st, 23 yards; May 2d, 107 yards; May 3d. 72} yards; May 4th. 76} yards; May 5th. 56} yards; May 6th,
71} yards.

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS.

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is about 77 percent completed, 642,182 cubic
yards, out of a total of 837,400, having been placed at the close of work on May 6. The
record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows:





Construction Plant.


Auxiliary Plant.


Large
stone.




Date.


2-Cubic yard mixers


2-cubic yard mixers. | }-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete 1 Hours
placed, worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of! Concrete
mixers i Placed.


Hours
worked


No. of
mixers




May 1

May 2

May 3

May 4. . . .
May 5. . . .
May 6. . . .


Cu. Yds.
694
238
166
272
290
378


12:00
6:00
4:00
6:00
6:00
8.00


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
552
684
598
420
648
650


11:50
13:00
11:50
8:00
13:50
14:00


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
120
118
55
152
136
136


7:75

7:50

3:50

12:75

12:25

14:25


1
1

2
3
2
3


Cm. Yds.


Cu. Yds.
1,366
1,040
819
844
1.074
1.164


Total

Previously


2,038


42:00


2


3,552


71:50


2


717


58:00


2


4,187


6.307
635.875
























Grand






4,187


642,182



MIRAFLORES LOCKS.

Over 16 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was in place
on May 6, the total amount on that date being 224,381 cubic yards, out of a total of approxi-
mately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows:







Auxiliary Plant.




Date.


2-cubic yard mixers.


2-cubic yard mixers.


}-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete Hours
placed, f worked.


No. of

mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Large
stone.




May 1 . . . .
May 2

May 3

May 4. . . .

May 5

May 6


Cu. Yds.

P52

776

1,002

674

1,266

1.222


17:08
15:92
14:17
10:25
21:67
22:25


4
4
4
4
4
4


Cu. Yds.
92
192
200
252
258
210


2:00

4:00
4:00
5:33
5:00
4:30


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
506
583
628
635
508
245
*231


22:50
23:00
34:00
30:25
2 7:75
14:75
23:50


4
3
5
5
4
3
1


Cu. Yds.


Cu. Yds.
1,625
1,615
1,880
1,603
2,032
1,677




















Total .

Previously


5,892


101:34


4


1.204


24:63


' 2


3,336


175:75


4.17


3,693


10,432
213,949
























Grand


3.693


224,381



*The 231 yards were mixed by a $-yard mixer, the amounts for each day being: May 1st, 75 yards; May 2d,
64 yards; May 3d, 50 yards; May 4th, 42 yards.



May 10, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



291



STEAM SHOVEL RECORDS.



Work of Central Division and P. R. R. Relocation
Shovels in April.

During the month of April the total amount
of material excavated in the Central Division
was 1,516,439 cubic yards, of which 271,650
cubic yards were classified as earth and 1 ,244 -
789 cubic yards as rock

Of this quantity, 1,470,752 cubic yards were
removed by steam shovels, 2,788 cubic yards
by scrapers, 8,956 cubic yards by bucket
cranes, and 2,543 cubic yards by hand. Con-
tractors removed 26,968 cubic yards by sluic-
ing, and 4,432 cubic yards by hand.

The high record for the month was made
by shovel No. 212, working 24 days in the
Culebra district, which excavated 49,563
cubic yards of rock. The second best record
for the month was made by shovel No. 206,
working 24 days in the Culebra district
which excavated 49,290 cubic yards of rock.

The best record for a shovel of the 70-ton
class was made by shovel No. 124, working
24 days in the Culebra district, which exca-
vated 39,652 cubic yards of rock and earth.

Shovel No. 215, working in the Empire
district, made a high record for one day by
excavating 2,945 cubic yards of rock on April
7. Shovel No. 128, working in the Chagres
district, excavated 1,678 cubic yards of earth
on April 4, and this is the high record for one
day for a shovel of the 70-ton class, during
the month.

Except where noted, monthly reports are
computed by place measurement, while the
daily reports are based on car measurement.
The best records for the month, and for one
day, are shown below:

BEST RECORDS FOR THE MONTH.

CHAGRES DISTRICT.







Cubic


Yards.




Shovel
No.


Earth.


Rock.


Total.


No. of

days at

work


114


15.157
14,660




15.157
14.660


12


128


14




EMPIRE


DISTRICT.




215


3,147


41.768
39,832
38.512


44,915
39,832
38,512


24


222


24






24





CULEBRA DISTRICT.




212


j ! 49,563 49,563


24


206


I 49,290 1 49.290


24


230


| 9,149 | 36.597 | 45,746


24



PEDRO MIGUEL.



231 1 24,590 24,590





BEST RECORDS FOR ONE DAY.




t\

o Location. Date.

10


Character of

material
excavated.


Cubic
yards.


12S Chagres .... April 4
114 Chagres ... April 5

215 Empire April 7

226, Empire April 20

226 Empire April 24

228! Empire April 5

205 r„1phra 'Ann! 71


Earth


1.678


Earth


1,656


Earth


1.600


Rock


2,945




2.666




2,653
2,470




2.880




Pedro Miguel. April 24
Pedro Miguel. April 22
Pedro Miguel. April 21
Pedro Miguel, i April 26




2.793






2.739




Rock


1.900


731


Rock


1.900


?11


Rock


1.862


231




1.824



days, 408,180 cubic yards were taken out,
the record until this time.

Of the April excavation, 192,269 cubic yards
were classified as earth; 27,462 yards as
loose rock, and 194,399 yards as solid rock.
A total of 400,920 cubic yards was removed
by company forces — 366,194 yards by steam
shovels, 31,180 yards by pan car task work,
and 3,546 yards by culvert gangs. The con-
tractor removed 13,210 cubic yards.

The best steam shovel record was made by
steam shovel No. 257, on the Gatun section,
which excavated 62,540 cubic yards of rock
in 24 working days. In the 70-ton class, the
best record was made by steam shovel No.
105, on the Monte Lirio section, which exca-
vated 35,330 cubic yards of earth, and 5,400
cubic yards of rock, a total of 40,730 cubic
yards in 24 working days.

The high record for one day for 5-yard
shovels was made by steam shovel No. 262,
working at Monte Lirio, which excavated
3,500 cubic yards of rock and earth on April
29. The high record for one day for 3-yard
shovels was made by steam shovel No. 105,
working near Monte Lirio, which excavated
2,200 cubic yards of earth on April 7.

BEST RECORDS FOR THE MONTH.



Relocated Line, Panama Railroad.

The total excavation on the relocated line
of the Panama railroad for the month of April
was the largest since the work began, amount-
ing to 4 14, 130 cubic yards, place measurement.
During March, which had three more working



o

z 1


Cubic Yards by Cross Section.


> Location,
o

s '
en


Days
worked.


Earth


Rock.


Total.


257 Gatun
262 :M. Lirio. .
105 M. Lirio. .
110 Paraiso . . .


24
24
24
24


21,000
35,330
25.921


62.540

33,000

5,400

12,720


62,540
54,000
40,730
38,641



Totaloutputduringmonthof April. 1911, 366, 194cu-
bic yards.

Total number st Q am shovel working days. 212.
Average output per working day. 1.727 cubic yards.

Product of School Garden.

The garden at Empire school for colored