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10.50




11.32







Stages of the Chagres.

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week
ending midnight, Saturday, September 10, 1910. All
heights are in feet above mean sea level.





Station.


Day and Date




CO


rt
o








Vigia


'rt


a


o
2









3


o


o
05


62


Sun. Sept. 4


130.6


96.3


50.3


21.0


18.4


Mon. Sept. 5. . .


130.7


96.4


51.8


21.6


19.5


Tues. Sept. 6. . .


128.7


95.0


49.6


20.2


19.4


Wed. Sept. 7. . .


131.1


96.5


49.8


19.5


19.0


Thurs. Sept. 8..


130.9


96.3


50.2


19.2


18.5


Fri. Sept. 9. . ..


136.9


100.2


54.2


20.0


18.5


Sat. Sept. 10. . .


131.3


97.6


54.3


21.4


19.2


Height of low














125.0


92.0


46.0











LOST — Gold cuff button, initials "A. J. C."
ward if returned to room 4. house 88, Gorgona.



Re-



The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama
■ Railroad Steamship Company, of the Royal Mail Steam
Packet Company, of the Hamburg-American Line, and
of the United Fruit Company's Line, the Panama Rail
road Company's dates being subject to change:

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.

Ancon P. R. R. Saturday Sept. 10

Allianca P. R. R. Saturday Sept. 10

Colon P. R. R. Saturday Sept. 17

Advance P. R. R. Friday Sept. 23

Panama P. R. R. Thursday Sept. 29

Allianca P. R. R. Wednesday... Oct. 5

Colon P. R. R. Tuesday Oct. 11

Advance P. R. R. Monday Oct. 17

Panama P. R. R. Saturday Oct. 22

Allianca P. R. R. Friday Oct. 28

Colon P. R. R, Friday Nov. 4

Advance P. R. R. Thursday Nov. 10

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.

Panama P. R. R. Friday Sept. 16

Allianca P. R. R. Thursday Sept. 22

Colon P. R. R. Thursday Sept. 29

Advance P. R. R. Wednesday. . .Oct. 5

Panama P. R. R. Tuesday Oct. 11

Allianca P. R. R. Monday Oct. 17

Colon P. R. R. Sunday Oct. 23

Advance P. R. R. Saturday Oct. 29

Panama P. R. R. Friday Nov. 4

Allianca P. R. R. Thursday Nov. 10

A fortnightly service of the Cristobal and Ancon will
be maintained as nearly as possible, leaving Cristobal
on or about the 4th and 25th of each month. Due
notice of the sailings of these ships from the Isthmus
will be given. On the outward voyage these ships sail
from the pier at the foot of 12th street. Hoboken, N. J.

NEW YORK TO COLON.

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday Sept. 8

Prinz Joachim H.-A. ...Saturday . . . .Sept. 10

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday Sept. 15

Clyde R.-M. . .Saturday Sept. 17

Almirante U. F. C. Thuisday Sept. 22

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. ...H.-A. . .Saturday Sept. 24

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday Sept. 29

Atrato R.-M. . .Saturday Oct. 1

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 6

Prinz Joachim H.-A.. . . Saturday Oct. 8

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 13

Tagus R.-M. . . Saturday Oct. 15

Almirante U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 20

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm . . . H.-A. . . . Saturday Oct. 22

COLON TO NEW YORK.

Santa Marta. U. F. C. Friday Sept. 16

Atrato R.-M. . .Welnesday. . .Sept. 21

Metapan U. F. C.Friday Sept. 23

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Sept. 27

Zacapa U. F. C.Friday Sept. 30

Tagus R.-M . . .Monday Oct. 3

Almirante U. F. C. Friday Oct. 7

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. . .H.-A Tuesday Oct. 11

Santa Marta U. F. C. Friday Oct. 14

Oruba R.-M. . .Monday Oct. 17

Metapan U. F. C. Friday Oct. 21

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday Sept. 10

Abangarez U. F. C. Saturday Sept. 17

Atenas U. F. C. Saturday Sept. 24

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 1

Abangarez U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 8

Atenas U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 15

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.

Atenas U. F. C. Thursday Sept. 15

Turrialba U. F. C. Thursday Sept. 22

Abangarez U. F. C. Thursday Sept. 29

Atenas U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 6

Abangarez U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 13

Atenas U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 20

COLON TO BARBADOS. CALLING AT TRINIDAD.

Clyde R.-M... Tuesday Sept. 27

Atrato R.-M. . .Tuesday Oct. 11

The next sailing of the Leyland Line will be as fol-
lows: Barbadian, on or about September 23, for
New Orleans, via Kingston, Ja.

Hamburg-American steamers leave for New York at
10 a. m., and for Port Limon every Tuesday or Wednes-
day.

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alter-
nate Wednesdays at 10 a. m.; for Southampton on
alternate Tuesdays at 10 a. m.

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans leave
on Thursday at 3 p. m., and for New York on Friday
at 10 a. m.

Sailings of the French Line (Cie Generale Trans-
atlantlque) for Venezuelan porta, Martinique and Guad-
eloupe on the 3d and 20th of each month.



CANAL




RECORD



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1910. No. 4.



Volume IV.



The Canal Record

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of
the Isthmian Canal Commission,



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers ca7i be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five
cents each.

Address all Communications

THE CANAL RECORD

Ancon, Canal Zone,

Isthmus of Panama.

No communication, either for publication or requesting
information, will receive attention ujtless signed with the
full name and address of the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.



Chairman's Monthly Report.

The report of the Chairman of the Isthmian
Canal Commission for the month of August
is published in full in other columns of this
issue of The Canal Record. It gives a
detailed account of the progress of Canal work
in all departments and divisions.



Cucuracha Slide Again Active.

The mass of rock and earth that is sliding
gradually but surely into Culebra Cut from
the east bank of the Canal at Cucuracha re-
ceived a new impetus on the night of Septem-
ber 16, and when the men went to work on the
morning of the 17th all the railroad tracks on
the east side of the drainage ditch had been
covered or pushed out of place, and the ma-
terial had filled the ditch itself and covered
one track on the west side. On the following
day one track had been opened on the east
side of the center line and all west side tracks
were in operation. The inconvenience caused
by the new movement will continue for ten
days or more.

No new material broke from the bank; the
movement was merely that of the old slide,
estimated as containing 500,000 cubic yards,
described in The Canal Record of May 25.
A steam shovel had been excavating at the
toe of the slope several days prior to the move-
ment and had removed earth and rock in
sufficient quantity to give the slide a new start.
The policy in regard to these slides is to con-
tinue excavating them as they move into the
Canal, and steam shovels are constantly at
work to that end. The amount of material
in motion at Cucuracha is nearly one-half
the total excavation in Culebra Cut in August,
and represents a little more than one-half of
one per cent of the total excavation in Culebra
Cut.

River Diversion.

The plan of diverting the water from the
Rio Grande and the Cardenas River into the
Canal at Station 2100, a point near the Agua
Dulce pumping station, opposite Corozal,
has been approved, and the change will
probably be made when the Canal is comple-



ted below Miraflores Locks. At present, the
flow from these streams is carried off by the
Rio Grande diversion, which parallels the
Canal from Miraflores to a point between
Corozal and Balboa, where the water wastes
into the swamps inundated by the tides.
The principal purpose to be served in chang-
ing the diversion is to remove the point of
discharge outside the area of the proposed
terminal harbor operations at Balboa.



Steam Shovel Record in Culebra District.

On September 15th, 16 shovels of the 200-
class, working in the Culebra construction
district of the Central Division, excavated
27,797 cubic yards in an 8-hour day, an aver-
age of 1,737 cubic yards for every shovel in
the district on the date in question. During
this period, the shovels were under steam 128
hours; were actually at work 100 hours and 10
minutes; were waiting for cars 25 hours and
10 minutes, the rest of the time being lost in
moving back, repairing shovels, cleaning
track, mining, etc.



Disposing of Wet Clay Excavation.

Excavation in the Chagres section of the
Central Division is almost entirely confined
to earth, and much of the material is clay.
Wasting material on a clay dump is expensive
during the wet season, because under pressure
it slides from under the tracks. Throwing
the tracks is also difficult. Three plans have
been adopted to dispose of the spoil economi-
cally, and all are possible because of the prox-
imity of the excavation to the Chagres River,
which carries the clay down stream.

At Gorgona, a high trestle has been built
on the bank of the river back of the shops and
the spoil is dumped from this trestle along the
edge of the stream. Water drawn from the
river is turned on it through hose and the
clay is thus sluiced into the stream or wetted
sufficiently to make it move slowly into the
current from its own weight. The pumps for
this dump have been run by compressed air,
but an old French locomotive has been in-
stalled and steam will be used henceforth.
The pump discharges through a 6-inch main
laid along the bank beneath the trestle, from
which at regular intervals there are branches
to which the sluicing hose may be attached.

At San Pablo and Juan Grande, the method
of wetting the clay so that it will slide out into
the stream is used. The dumping trestles are
built at points where the current in the river
is especially strong, so that the clay, when it
strikes the stream, is carried rapidly away.

At East Mamei, a low trestle has been built
out into the stream, and the plan of cleaning
the spoil away from this trestle by sluicing is
being tried. This is in the experimental stage
and it is not believed it will be so econom-
ical as the two plans outlined above, unless
the portable sluicing plant can be used at
several dumps. The portable sluicing plant
is erected on two standard flat cars, and is



shifted from place to place by a locomotive
which also furnishes steam to run the pumps.
On one car are mounted two pumps 14 by 10
by 8 inches, and a boom by which the suction
pipe is let into the river. These pumps are
old stock and, being of the reciprocating
type, cannot handle muddy water so advan-
tageously as centrifugal pumps. From the
pumps the water is forced through a pipe to
a second car on which the sluicing monitors
are mounted. A 3-inch nozzle directed over
the end of the car can throw a stream directly
down and on either side. A 2 1 ,2-inch nozzle
carried over each side by a flexible hose can
throw a stream in any direction, even so as
to wash out under the car itself. A third
2V4-inch nozzle is used to wash out the dump
cars.

Pedro Mlguel-Miraflores Highway.

The laying of a spur track from the Panama
railroad relocation, for use as a dump track in
connection with the building of the highway
between Pedro Miguel and Miraflores, has
been begun. The construction of a section
of this road involves the crossing of the valleys
of the Caimitillo and Camaron Rivers, near
Miraflores. It is proposed to construct a
trestle across these two valleys, extend the
construction track along it, and make the
fills with spoil from the Canal prism. The
material will be supplied by the Central
Division, but the dirt trains, which will have
to be run over the relocated line from Paraiso,
will be handled by the Panama railroad.

The section of the trestle over the Caimitillo
River valley will be about 500 feet long, and
that over the Camaron River valley, between
250 and 300 feet. The height of the embank-
ment will be about 60 feet above sea level,
and its width across the top will be either 16
or 24 feet. If the width is fixed at 16 feet,
guard rails will probably be erected along the
sides for protection. The culverts, through
which the water from the streams will be
diverted, will consist of old French iron pipe,
nine feet in diameter. Two lines of this pipe,
running parallel, will be placed at the Caimi-
tillo River crossing, and one at the Camaron
River, which is a small stream emptying into
the Caimitillo. In order to procure a solid
bed for these culverts, they will be located on
natural benches at one side of the streams,
about 20 feet above the present channels, and
a special fill will be made around them. This
will cause the water to back up into the valleys
for some distance, and possibly may necessi-
tate the removal of a few native houses from
the area that will be submerged.

From the Pedro Miguel station to the river
valleys the land is favorable for road building,
and this section is now under construction
with prison labor. South of the Caimitillo
River, the road passes through a cut in the
hill east of the railroad tunnel, which is
already finished. From this point it will
continue over the Miraflores dumps to the



26



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 4.



NOTES OF PROGRESS



(Continued .}



crossing of the Cardenas River, but no work
can be done on this stretch until the Central
Division abandons these dumps. South of
the Cardenas River, the road is completed
into Corozal, and thence into Panama.



Testing the Hydraulic Plant.

The new hydraulic plant of the Pacific
Division is in partial operation, but the work
so far has been principally in the nature of
tests. The dredging pump on one of the
barges has been excavating a sump in which
the barge can settle down, the material being
forced through the pipe into the core of the
west dam at Miraflores. One of the monitors
has also been in service washing down the bank
at this point. The dredging equipment on
the second barge is nearly ready for duty.



Concrete In Gatun Locks.

The placing of concrete in Gatun Locks
is advancing in the upper or lake-level locks,
and in the east side wall, center wall and floor
of the middle locks. A statement of the con-
crete laid during the week ending September
17, and of the total to that date, follows:



Date.


Concrete
placed.


Large
stone.


Hours
worked .


No. of
mixers


Total.


Sept. 12
Sept. 13
SepU 14
Sept. 15
Sept. 16
Sept. 17


2,980
2.894
2.790
3,026
2,512
2,530


365

3W4

357J4

357J4

349 V,

274


92:00
89:00
102:40
87:00
80:30
92:00


8
10

10
8
8
81


3,345

3.205K

3.147JJ

3.383K

2,861 M

2,804


Total..

Previ-
ously

reported


16,732


2.014K


543:10




18,7463/}
708.666K












Grand


727,413 K



The construction plant at Gatun was shut
down from 12.25 to 2.15 o'clock on the after-
noon of September 16, on account of a lack of
water due to a break in the water main.



Concrete Work in Gatun Spillway.

The amount of concrete placed in the Spill-
way of Gatun Dam in the week ending Sep-
tember 17, with the total placed to that date,
is shown in the following statement:





Cubic Yards.


Date.


Concrete


Large
rock.


Total.




162
186
190
124
188
204


8

10

12
12
18


170




186




200




136




200




222








1,054


60


1,114




91,876












92,990











New P. R. R. Time Table.

Time table No. 7, which appears on another
page of this issue of The Canal Record, goes
into effect on the Panama railroad on Sunday,
September 25. The cutting off of the stops
at Lion Hill and Ahorca Lagarto, and the
use of the new line between Paraiso Junction
and Corozal Junction has enabled a shortening
of the schedule in the case of the weekday
trains, Nos. 2, 4, 5, 6 and 7. No change is
made, however, in the time of trains Nos. 3
and 5, or of any of the Sunday trains.

Train No. 2 leaving Panama at 6.30 a.m.



will be due to arrive in Colon at 8.45, twenty
minutes earlier than usual. Train No. 4
leaving Panama at 10.45 a.m., is due at Colon
at 1 p.m., instead of 1.15. Train No. 5 leav-
ing Colon at 10.30 a.m., is scheduled to reach
Panama at 12.45 p.m., instead of 1 o'clock,
as at present. Train No. 6 leaving Panama
at 1.30 p.m., will be due in Colon at 3.45, five
minutes earlier. Train No. 7 leaving Colon
at 4.35 p.m., will reach Panama at 6.50 p.m.,
shortening the time by 10 minutes.

New Gatun has been added to the list of
stations and a new depot for that point has j ust
been completed. The regular daily passen-
ger trains will not stop there, but provision
has been made for running a shuttle train
five times each way daily, except Sunday,
when two of the south bound trains, one
leaving Colon at 10 a. m., and the other at 7
p. m. will stop on flag. The time of the
shuttle train has been made a part of the
regular train schedule.

Pedro Miguel Concrete Laying.

A statement of the concrete laid in the locks
at Pedro Miguel for the six 8-hour working
days of the week ending September 17, and the
total to that date, follows:



Date


Concrete


Large


Hours


No. of


Total.




placed.


stone.


worked.


mixers




Sept. 12. .


1.960


17


24:50


4


1,977


Sept. 13. .


1.966


3


25:00


4


1,969


Sept. 14. .


1,858


19


24:25


4


1,877


Sept. 15. .


2,080


12


28:42


4


2.092


Sept. 16. .


1,988


5


28:00


4


1,993


Sept. 17..


1,936


62


28:00


4


1,998


Total...


11,788


118


158:17


4


11,906


Previously












reported




3,050






277.909








Grand






total.




3,168






289,815



Concrete Work at Miraflores.

A statement of the concrete laid in the locks
at Miraflores for the six 8-hour working days
of the week ending September 17, and the
total to that date, follows:





\uxiliary Plant.


Date


^-Cubic

yard
mixers.


H-Cubic
yard
mixer.


2-Cubic

yard
mixers.


Large
stone.


Total.


Sept. 12
Sept. 13
Sept. 14
Sept. 15
Sept. 16
Sept. 17


202
277
387
251
413
397


26
43
58
63
68
32


410
408
388
420
408
328


20
8
10

12
15


658
736
843
734
901
772


Total..

Previ-
ously

reported


1,927


290


2,362


65
344


4.644
15,454










Grand








409


20,098













Porto Hello Crusher.
A statement of the work done at Porto
Bello crusher, by days, for the week ending
September 17, follows:



Date.



Cubic
Yards.



September 12
September 13
September 14
September 15
September 16
September 17

Total




2,604
2,279
1,137
2,969
3,388
3,267



15,644



Sailing of the Ancon.

The steamship Ancon will sail from dock
No. 11, Cristobal, on Monday, September
26, at 3 p. m.

LOST — A Kappa Alpha Theta fraternity pin, in-
scribed "Camilla Stewart, April, 1909. A. Z." Return
to Paymaster, Ancon.



OPENING OF SCHOOL.

Children Entitled to Free Tuition — Assignment
of Teachers.

The public schools of the Canal Zone will
open on Monday, October 3, at 9 a. m.

All children of the Canal Zone, whether
of employes or nonemployes, and all non-
resident children of employes of the Isthmian
Canal Commission are entitled to free school
privileges. Patrons desiring railroad passes
for their children should apply at this office
immediately.

For further particulars call on, or address
Frank A. Gause,
Superintendent of Schools.

Ancon, C. Z., September 13, 1910.



Teachers of the Canal Zone schools are
assigned as follows for the school year begin-
ning October 3, 1910:

Ancon — Miss Jessie E. Daniels, principal;
Miss Emma Cobban, Miss Clara L. Voyles,
Miss Georgia T. Munroe, Miss Mildred O.
Bates, Miss Jessie S. Wilson.

Pedro Miguel — Mrs. Gertrude Hoffman,
principal; Miss Florence A. Schofield.

Paraiso — Unassigned.

Culebra — -Mrs. Mamie Miracle, principal;
Miss Lina Tozer, Mrs. Cornelia H. Ellsworth.

Empire — Mrs. Jesse J. White, principal;
Miss Alberta Hawley, Miss Mary M. Shea,
Miss Helen Daniels, Miss Grace Yarborough.

Gorgona — Miss Annie Irvin, principal; Miss
Marion Patterson, Miss Elise Cage; unas-
signed.

Tabernilla — Miss Jessie Pontius.

Gatun — Carl C. Carr, principal; Miss
Ida Boles, Miss Jennie Bogner, E. D. Chris-
topherson; Miss Ena Robb, Miss Hattie Haw-
ley, Miss Elise Stone, Miss Wenonah Whiting.

Cristobal — Miss Odina J. L. Frost, prin-
cipal; Miss Edith Anderson, Miss Natalie
Hine, Miss Edith Mclntyre, Miss Jean
McGill.

Substitutes — Miss Ida Keys, Miss Grace
McCray.

As stated in the manual, all assignments
are subject to change when the good of the
service requires.



Panama Canal Service Medal Association.

The Canal Record:

A general meeting of the above association
will be held at the hall over the I. C. C. hotel
at Gorgona on Sunday, September 25, at
2.15 p. m., for the discussion of matters per-
taining to the welfare of the association.

All members and persons entitled to become
members are cordially invited to attend.
Attention is again called to the fact that the
charter membership period closes on October
1, after which an initiation fee of $5 will be
collected.

E. F. J. Goldsmith, Secretary.
P. O. Box 115, Ancon, C. Z.

Ancon, September 19, 1910.



Missing Man.

The American Legation in Panama is in
receipt of a letter from Mrs. John Donnley,
of 89 Fitzgerald' street, Buffalo, N. Y., re-
questing information as to the whereabouts
of her son, John Donnley, who has been away
from home eight years. According to the
last information to his mother, he was em-
ployed by the Isthmian Canal Commission.
His mother states that she is old and feeble,
and requests that her son write to her.



September 21, 1910.



TH'E CANAL RECORD



27



CHANGES IN SHOPS.



Increase of Work at Gorfiona— Cocoll Shop of the
Pacific Division Closed.

The effect of Circular No. 343 published in
The Canal Record of August 31, and of
Circular No. 349 published on September 7,
is to concentrate all manufacture of material
for mechanical equipment in the shops of the
Mechanical Division at Gorgona and Pedro
Miguel. The concentration is made in the
interest of economy during the construction
of the Canal, and is only temporary, because
the water of Gatun Lake will cover the site
of Gorgona shops by January, 1914, and the
shops at that place will therefore be aban-
doned before that time. The site for a cen-
tral machine shop, to be used after the com-
pletion of the Canal in making repairs to
marine and railroad equipment and to lock
operating machinery, will be determined later.
Cocoli shop at Miraflores Locks has been
closed, but field repair shops will not be
abandoned. Steam shovel repairs will con-
tinue at Empire shop, as heretofore, and re-
pairs to marine equipment will be made at
the Mount Hope and Balboa shops.

The work done at Cocoli shop has been the
hostling of locomotives, and light running re-
pairing to Pacific Division equipment in use
at Pedro Miguel and Miraflores Locks. The
transfer of this work to Pedro Miguel will not
necessitate the employment of additional
foremen at Pedro Miguel, and it will effect
an appreciable saving in the cost of super-
intendence, because it will make possible
the abolition of the Cocoli shop positions of
master mechanic, shop foreman, carpenter
foreman, and car repair foreman. It is
believed that it will also effect a saving in cost
of labor, power, lighting, maintenance, and
transportation of employes to and from Cocoli.
No machinery will be taken out of the Cocoli
shop, however, until it is certain that the new
plan is more economical. The changes out-
lined in Circular No. 349, do not involve the
abandoning of steam shovel repairs in the
field at Miraflores and Pedro Miguel, nor clos-
ing the small repair shop at Ancon quarry.

Gray iron castings to the amount of 607,725
pounds were made at Gorgona foundry in
August, the largest output for one month
since the foundry was opened. The castings
included all kinds of work, but the largest
orders were caisson seats, culvert liners, and
semi-steel washers for anchorage bolts for the
locks, and propellers for marine equipment.
In the brass foundry also, all records for output
were broken in August, the total weight of
the castings being 64,691 pounds.

The concentration of mechanical work has
already begun to affect the output of Gorgona
shops and foundry. In the first ten days of
September, 300 manufacturing orders were
received. The force has been increased about
ten per cent, the number now being 846 white
men, including skilled artisans and adminis-
trative force, and 1,320 laborers of all kinds,
a total of 2,166. Since the first of the month,
a night force of 200 men has been kept at work