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cured and pickled meats.

Ham — German, Westphalia, per pound 36

Sugar cured, per pound 18

Sliced, per pound 20

Half, for boiling, per pound 19

Boiled, per pound *22

Hocks, per pound 18

Picnic, Winchester, per pound 15

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound *22

Breakfast, sliced, per pound *23

Beef, salt, family, per pound 9i

Pork, salt family, per pound 14

Ox Tongues each 75

Pigs' feet, per pound 9

Tongues, per pound 14

Sliced bacon In 1-pound tins, per tin 30

In 1-pound jars, per jar 30

DAIRY PRODUCTS.

Butter — Creamery special, per pound 32

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound 38

Philadelphia cream, small cake 10

large cake IS

Youdk America per pound. . 18

Swiss, per pound 26

Edam, each . - - 1.00

Camembert, in small tins, tin 14

Neufchatel. cake 6

Gouda. per pound 34

Milk (Inspected or certified), per bottle **25

(Pasteurized), bottle **18

Buttermilk, bottle **15

Icecream, quart J25

i-gallon 150

vegetables and fruits.

Beets, per pound 3

Celery, per head 8

Carrots, per pound 3

Cabbage, per pound 2

Cucumbers, per pound 10

Egg plant, per pound flO

Lettuce, per pound 10

Onions, per pound 5

Potatoes, white, per pound 2 \

sweet, per pound 2

Parsnips per pound 3

Peppers green, per pound 10

Rhubarb, per pound 5

Spinach, per pound 6

Squash, per pound 6

Tomatoes, per pound 6

Turnips, per pound 3

Yams, per pound 3

Apples, fancy table, per pound 10

Grapefruit, each 4

Lemons, dozen 24

Limes, per 100 80

Oranges, per dozen 12

Pineapples, each 20

Pears, per pound 10

♦Indicates reduction from last list.
♦♦Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle.
tlndicates advance on last list.

|Sold only from commissaries; no orders taken for
delivery.

Price of Coal.
Panama Railroad Company.
Office of General Superintendent.
Selling figures of coal effective May 1, 1911:
at colon.

I. C. C, on cars, lighters, tugs, barges, etc $4.05

U. S. wai ships and warships of Republic of Pan-
ama, on cars 5.65

U. S. warships and warships of Republic of Pan-
ama, alongside in lighters 6.65

Other warships and steamers delivered on cars . . 6.40
Other warships and steamers, delivered alongside

in lighters 7.40

Parties taking carload lots 6.00

Parties taking small quantities from cars or bins. 7.40

AT PANAMA.

U. S. and Panamanian warships, alongside in

lighters 8.40

P. M. S. S. Co., delivered to their lighters from

cars 7.15

P. M. S. S. Co., on cars on dock 7.15

C-A. S. S. Co., on cars on dock 7.15

C-A. S. S. Co., lightered on P. R. R. lighters. . . 8.15

P. S. N. Co., delivered to their lighters from cars. 7. IS

P. S. N. Co., on cars on dock. . . 7.15

C. S. A. de V., on cars on dock 7.15

C. S. A. de V., lightered on P. R. R. lighters 8.15

Kosmos Line, on cars on dock 7.90

Kosmos Line, lightered on P. R. R. lighters 8.90

Other warships and irregular steamers, alongside

in lighters 8.90

Parties taking carload lots 7.35

Parties taking less than one carload at a time on

cars 8.90

Santo Tomas Hospital, Panama. . . . 6.00

MISCELLANEOUS.

U. S. Marine Corps, Camp Elliott 6.90



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.

The following Is a list of the sailings of the Panama
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg- American
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
change:

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.

Advance P. R. R. . .Friday May 12

Colon P. R. R. ..Thursday. ..May 18

Allianca P. R. R . . . Wednesday . May 24

Panama P. R. R Wednesday. May 31

Advance P. R. R . . . Tuesday June 6

Colon P. R. R. ..Monday June 12

Allianca P. R. R. . .Saturday. . .June 17

Panama P. R. R. . .Saturday. . .June 24

Advance P. R. R. . .Friday June 30

Colon P. R. R . . . Friday July 7

Allianca P. R. R . . .Thursday . . . July 13

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.

Panama P. R. R. . .Thursday... May 18

Advance P. R. R . . . Wednesday . May 24

Colon P. R. R . . . Wednesday . May 31

Allianca P. R. R. . .Tuesday June 6

Panama P. R. R. . .Tuesday June 13

Advance P. R. R. ..Sunday June 18

Colon P. R. R. ..Saturday... June 24

Allianca P. R. R . . . Friday June 30

Panama P. R. R. . .Thursday... July 6

Advance P. R. R. . .Wednesday. July 12

Colon P. R. R... Wednesday. July 19

Allianca P. R. R . . . Tuesday .... July 25

Panama P. R. R. . .Monday. . ..July 31

NEW YORK TO COLON.

Santa Marta U. F. C Thursday . . May 1 1

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Friday. . . . May 12

Thames R. M Saturday. .May 13

Metapan U.F. C Thursday.. May 18

Pnnz Joachim H.-A Saturday . . May 20

Zacapa U. F. C Thursday. May 25

Prinz Eitel Friedrich . H.-A Friday May 26

Trent R. M Saturday. .May 27

Almirante U. F. C. .. .Thursday. June 1

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. .H.-A Saturday. June 3

Santa Marta U. F. C. . . .Thuisday.June 8

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Friday .... June 9

COLON TO NEW YORK.

Almirante U. F. C. . .Thursday. . .May 18

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm.. H.-A Tuesday May 23

Santa Marta U. F. C. . .Thursday.. .May 25

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Saturday. ..May 27

Oruba R. M Tuesday May 30

Metapan U. F. C Thursday... June 1

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday June 6

Zacapa U. F. C. . .Thursday... June 8

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Satutday. ..June 10

Almirante U. F. C . .Thuisday. .June 15

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. .H.-A Tuesday. . .June 20

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. .H.-A Saturday... June 24

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.

Heredia U. F. C. . Wednesday .. May 10

Atenas U. F. C. ..Saturday .... May 13

Cartago U. F. C . . . Wednesday . May 1 7

Turrialba U. F. C . . . Saturday . . . May 20

Parismina U. F. C . . . Wednesday . May 24

Abangarez U. F. C. . .Saturday. . .May 27

Heredia U. F. C. . . Wednesday.May 31

Atenas U. F. C. . .Saturday.. .June 3

Cartago U. F. C . . . Wednesday .June 7

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.

Abangarez U. F. C. . .Thursday. . .May 18

Herediat U. F. C. . .Thursday. . .May 18

Atenas U. F. C. . .Thursday. ..May 25

Cartagot U. F. C. . .Thursday. ..May 25

Turrialba U. F. C. . .Thursday. .June 1

Parisminat U. F. C . . . Thursday . .June 1

Abangarez U. F. C . . . Thursday . .June 8

Herediat U. F. C. . .Thursday. .June 8

Atenas U. F. C Thursday ..June 15

Cat tagot U. F. C Thursday . June 15

The Hamburg-American steamers Prinz August
Wilnelm and Prinz Joachim leave Colon for New
York via Kingston and Santiago, Cuba at 10 a. m. on
sailing dates.

A local run from Colon to Bocas del Toro and Port
Limon will be made on Wednesday May 31; June 14
and 28.

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alternate
Tuesdays, at 12 noon; for Southampton on alternate
Tuesdays at 10 a.m.

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans direct
leave on Thursdays at 3 p.m.; ships designated (t) for
New Orleans via Port Limon and Puerto Barrios on
Thursday at 4 p.m.; ships for New York via Kingston
on Thursday at 1 1 a. m. ; for Bocas del Toro on Monday
at 6 p. m.

The Leyland line steamer Jamaican sails for New
Orleans, via Port Limon, Costa Rica, on or about
May 22.



CANAL




RECORD



Volume IV.



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 1911.



No. 39.



The Canal Record

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of
the Isthmian Canal Commission.



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five
cents each.

Address all Communications

THE CANAL RECORD,

Ancon, Canal Zone,
Isthmus of Panama.

No communication, either for publication or requesting
information, will receive attention unless signed with the
full name and address of the writer.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.

Chairman's Report.

The report of the Chairman of the Isthmian
Canal Commission for the month of April
is published in full in other columns of this
issue of The Canal Record. It gives a
detailed account of the progress of Canal work
in all departments and divisions.



Contract for the Emergency Dams.

The contract for the six emergency dams
for the locks at Gatun, Pedro Miguel, and
Miraflores has been let to the lowest bidder,
the United States Steel Products Company
at $2,23S,9S8.40. Three bids were received.
The subbidders with the contractor are the
General Electric Company for the electrical
machinery, and the Otis Elevator Company
for the hoisting machines. A description of
the dams was published in The Canal
Record of March 8, 1911. The total amount
of material required is about 12,000 tons.
The contract calls for the material, erection,
and test of the dams in place by January 1,
1913, at Gatun and Pedro Miguel, and Sep-
tember 1, 1913, at Miraflores.



Panama Railroad Apartment House.

Plans have been approved for the erection,
by the Panama Railroad Company, of a
three-story apartment house of fireproof con-
struction on the corner of Front and Eleventh
streets in Colon, replacing the one-story
wooden store building, and the frame cottage,
now on the premises. The drawings provide
for a building made of terra cotta hollow tile,
50 feet wide by about 120 feet long, with a
9-foot passageway extending north and south
through the center. The lower floor will
be divided into five stores, two, each 26 by
55 feet, facing Front street, and three, each
18 by 50 feet, facing Eleventh street. The
floors will be of hollow tile filled in between
with reinforced concrete, covered with a thin
layer of concrete, and overlaid with pine
flooring. The second and third floors will rest
on I-beams supported by reinforced concrete
columns reaching to the roof. The stores on



the first floor will have modern plate glass
fronts, and all window and door casings in
the building will be of metal work. The walls
will be of 6-inch, and the roof of 4-inch,
hollow tile, the latter to have a 2-foot coping
all around. The second and third floors will
be fitted up for 5-room flats, four to each floor.
A veranda will surround the building on both
floors, ranging in width from 12 feet on the
Eleventh street side, to 10 feet on Front street,
6 feet 6 inches on Bottle alley, and eight feet
on the side north.



Test of Concrete Spraying Machine.

A pneumatic spraying machine for coating
surfaces with concrete mortar has been sent
to the Isthmus by the General Cement
Products Company, and it will be tested for
a period of 30 days in coating the surface of
rock in Culebra Cut, for the purpose of pre-
venting deterioration. Much of the rock in
the Cut, which is hard and firm when first
excavated, crumbles rapidly on exposure to
the air.

Excavation at Mindi.
Three steam shovels are at work in the
excavation below sea level at Mindi, and the
material dug is used for back fill at Gatun
locks, or dumped on the dam. Part of the
excavation which can be much more econ-
omically handled by the sluicing method is
washed into a sump from which it is raised
out of the excavation by three 8-inch French
pumps which form part of the plant installed
for keeping the pit dry. About 15,000 cubic
yards have been handled by this method,
and there remain about ten thousand yards
more. The steam shovel work will be com-
pleted in about six months.



Long Suction Dredge Line.

Dredge No. 86, which is making the fill of
Colon, is now pumping through the longest
line of discharge pipe ever laid on the Isthmus,
and one of the longest, without relay, of record.
By actual chaining, the pipe from the dredge
to the fill at Colon hospital is 7,150 feet long.
The material is delivered by the 20-inch
pump without a relay. The pipe is laid on
level ground, and the pressure required runs
up to 70 pounds.



Transfer of Equipment.

Material for the construction and mainte-
nance of the Panama railroad telephone lines
will be transferred to the Quartermaster's
Department, and kept in stock at the Empire
store. In addition, all repairs to telephone
equipment will be made at that store, and a
shop for the purpose is being installed in the
space allotted to the telephone department.

The upkeep of all steam shovel repair
parts at the Empire store has been assumed
by the Quartermaster's Department. Here-
tofore, this class of material has been requi-
sitioned by the Central Division, when re-
quired, and held in stock subject to order.



Under the new plan, it will become part of
the regular stock in store.

Four of the 10 Model 60 Marion steam
shovels on the Isthmus have been returned to
stock at Empire, there being no place where
they can be used to advantage at present.
Five Bucyrus shovels, employed in the Chagres
section, north of Gorgona, up to the time of
the suspension of work in that locality, have
been hauled to the shop yard at Empire,
where they will be placed in thorough repair.



Map of P. R. R. Relocation.

A large map, showing the route of the Pan-
ama railroad relocation from Mount Hope to
Bas Obispo, is being made in the offices of
the railroad company at Colon. It is on a
scale of 400 feet to the inch, and will show all
the surveys that have been made for the
relocated line, and also, the two surveys for
the freight line which may be built between
Monte' Lirio and the Cristobal railroad
yards, following as direct a line as possible, to
avoid the detour into Gatun. The earliest
of the surveys, as shown on this map, will
be that of July, 1906.



Derrick Barges for Colon Breakwater.

Two derrick barges, to be used in placing
rock in the work of facing the new breakwater
at Toro Point, are under construction at the
Cristobal drydock shops. The hull of one is
more than 65 per cent completed, and will
be finished early in June, and construction of
the second has been begun.

The hull is of wooden construction, with a
length over all of 96 feet, beam 42 feet, depth
8 feet 6 inches, and is divided into four single
water-tight compartments. The derrick is
provided with a 75-foot boom, is of the stiff-
legged type, having two A-frame legs and two
stiff back legs. The height to the top of the
A-frame is about 48 feet. The cast iron bull
wheel is 16 feet in diameter, operated by
double swinging lines. A friction brake will
hold the boom at any desired position along
the line of its horizontal movement. The
boom hoist will have a vertical movement of
about three-fourths of a foot a second, and
will be rigged with a seven-part line; the load
hoist will have a vertical movement of about
one and one-half feet a second, and will be
rigged with a four-part line. The turntable,
on which the derrick will revolve, is of the
dredge type, will weigh about 10,000 pounds,
and will be cast in six segments. The total
weight of the material entering into the der-
rick is about 75,000 pounds.

The machinery equipment of each barge
will consist of a Scotch marine boiler 11 feet
6 inches in diameter by 9 feet in length, and
125-pound pressure; a double drum hoisting
engine of the Lidgerwood type, with 14 by 18-
inch cylinders, and an 8 by 8-inch compound
geared swinging engine, with the necessary
equipment of pumps, etc. An oil-burning sys-
tem will be installed in the boiler, and tank



306



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 39.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.



{Continued.)



capacity for 2,000 gallons of oil will be pro-
vided in the hold of the vessel. The machinery
will be enclosed in a wooden deck house, 27
feet wide, 30 feet long, and 16 feet high, built
so that the sides can be thrown open for
ventilation. Mounted on top of the deck
house will be the operating room, 8 by 10 feet
in size, from which point the operator will be
in control of all machinery-

In operation, the derrick barges will be
stationed at desired points along the break-
water. Barges, loaded with rock from the
Porto Bello quarry, will be towed alongside.
The derrick will lift the pieces of rock, and
place them on the outer or inner side of the
breakwater, as the case may be.



Sale of Old Buildings.

Fifteen of the 143 old buildings advertised
for sale on competitive bid have been sold, as
follows: Cristobal, house 99, W. W. Wilson,
$100.50. Bohio, house 66, E. Sardi, $12;
house 75, Geo. Clarke, $10. Tabernilla,
houses 34 and 35 at §20.50 each; house 36,
$18.50; house 37, $20.50, all to J. L. Flowers.
Mamei, house 209, A. J. Pareira, $10. White-
house, house 161, W. H. Decker. $55. Cuca-
racha, houses 186, 187, 188, 189, at $50 each,
all to Alex. A. Spence; house 191, Wo Kee, $55.
One bid of $3,003 was received for, all the
buildings, but since this was only about fifty
per cent of the appraised value of the build-
ings to the Commission the bid was not
considered.

Gatun Dam Spillway.

The concrete work in the spillway of Gatun
Dam is over 60 per cent completed, 135,987
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having
been placed at the close ot work on May 20.
A statement of the amount laid each day
last week, and of the total in place, follows:



Date.


Concrete
Laid.


Hours
worked.


No.
M beers.


May 15


116
164
152
148
88
108


5:00
7:00
8:00
8:00
6:30
8:00


' 1




1


May 17.. .


1




1




1




1






Total

Previously reported. . .


776
135.211


42:30


1




135,987









Ancon Crusher.
A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon
quarry during the week ending May 20, fol-
lows:



Date.



Cubic
Yards.



May IS
May 16
May 17
May 18
May 19
May 20

Total




2.829
2.368
2,179
2,570
2,578
2.320



14,844



A contract for 230,000 feet of long leaf
yellow pine cross-ties has been let to William
P. Cook & Company of New York at 78.8
cents a tie.

Transients at Washington Hotel.

The ground floor of the Bennington House,
which adjoins the Washington Hotel at Colon,



has been turned into rooms for transient
guests. It contains ten rooms and two baths.
The Bennington now has twenty -two rooms,
with beds for from 35 to 40 people, for which
a charge of from $2 to $3 a day is made for
one person in a room, and from $4 to $6 a
day for two persons. A monthly rate is made



to employes of the Commission or Panama
Railroad of $30 for one person, and $45 for
two; for transients, $45 for one person, and
$60 for two. Nonemployes who occupy a
room regularly will be given a rate of $30 a
month for the regular meals at the Wash-
ington Hotel.



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS.



GATUN LOCKS.

About 65 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been laid,
the amount in place at the close of work on May 20, being 1,352,928 cubic yards, out of a total
of 2,085,000.

A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each day for the week ending
May 20, and of the total, follows; and a similar statement for the work in the spillway of Gatun
Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The construction plant works 12 hours daily, and
the auxiliary plant 9 hours. The small output for the past week is accounted for by the
fact that slides at the north end of the lower lock prevented the moving of the steel forming
into that lock.





Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Large
stone.


Total.




Concrete Hours
placed, i worked.


No. of

mixers


Concrete Hours | No. of
placed, worked, mixers




May 15


Cu. Yds.
1,266
1,822
1.768
1.846
1,496
1.214


24:36
34:55
29:36
33:00
27:56
21:52


6
6
6
6
6
6


Cu. Yds.
644
610
558
604
424
100
436*


9:40
9:40
7:30
7:35
7:40
2:40


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
161}
265
249
241}
151}
1141


Cu. Yds.
2.071}




2.697




2.575


May 18


2.691}




2,071}


May 20


1,428}




436}





















9,412


171:55


6


3.376}


44:45


2


1,183


13.971}




1,338.957























1.352,928}



*The 4365 yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days;
May 15th, 58} yards; May 16th, 37} yards; May 17th, 59 yards; May 18th, 99 yards; May 19th, 82 yards; May
20th. 100} yards.

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS.

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is about 78 per cent completed, 651,080 cubic
yards, out of a total of 837,400 having been placed at the close of work on May 20. The
record for each of the six eight-hour working days of last week, follows.





Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.


Large
stone.






2-cubic yard mixers. }-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked


No. of Concrete
mixeis ; placed.


Houis
worked.


No. of
mixers




May 15...
Mav 16. . .
May 17...
May 18...


Cu. Yds.
242
236
338
68
138


6.00
6.00
6 00
4.50
6.00


2
2
1
1
2


Cu. Yds.
384
340
180
410
466
488


4.50
6.00
4.00
6.00
9.00
11.00


1
1
1
1
2
2


Cu. Yds.
19

51
72


2.00
6.00
8.50


1
1
1


Cu. Yds.


Cu. Yds.
645
627
590
478










604


May 20. . .


20


2.00


1




508











Total
Previously
reported


1,022


28.50


1.33


2.268


40.50


1.33


162


18.50


.67


4,187


3,452
647,628






















Grand


4,187


651,080



MIRAFLORES LOCKS.

About 18 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was in place
on May 20, the total amount on that date being 244,936 cubic yards, out of a total of approxi-
mately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows:





Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixeis.


Auxiliary Plant.




Date.


2-cubic yard mixers.


}-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Conciete
placed.


Hours iNo. of
worked, mixers


Concrete Hours
placed, worked.


No. of

mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


1
No. of Large
mixers; stone.




\Cu. Yds.
May 15... 1.264
May 16... 1.060
May 17... 1.124
May 18... 1.272
Mav 19... 668
May 20... 1.028


23.17
23.67
20.17
20.58
10. 25
17.17


4
4
4

4
4
4


Cu. Yds.t

200 I 4.00
112 i 3.00
144 6.00
174 | 15.00
192 14.00
208 16.00


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cu. Yds.
322
382
379
412
559
490


18.00
19.00
20.50
21.50
33.25
26.00


3
3
3
5
5
5


Cu. Yds.


Cu. Yds.
1,842
1,617
1,672
1,939
1,471
1,759


Total
Previously
reported

Grand


6.416


115 01


4


1,030 1 58.00


2


2,544


138.25


4


3,693


10,300
234,636




















3,693 244,936



The 310 yards were mixed by a }-yard mixer, the amounts for each day being: May 15th, 56 yards: May
16th, 63 yards. May 17th. 25 yards; May 18th, 81 yards; May 19th, 52 yards; May 20th. 3i yards.



May 24, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



307



EXECUTIVE ORDER



Relating to the Arrest and Discharge of Deserting
Seamen.

By virtue of the authority vested in me, I
hereby establish the following Order for the
Canal Zone:

1. If any seaman who shall have signed a
contract to perform a voyage shall absent
himself from an American vessel at any port
or place in the Canal Zone, without leave of
the master, or officer commanding in the
absence of the master, such master or the
Collector of Revenues or his deputy acting
as the Shipping Commissioner may make
complaint against such absent seaman to the
judge of any Circuit Court of the Canal Zone,
who, thereupon, shall issue his warrant against
the seaman complained of, in order that he
may be brought before him to answer the
complaint; and, after a hearing before said
judge, if it shall appear that the seaman had
signed a contract to perform a voyage on the
vessel and that the voyage agreed for is not
finished or altered, or that the contract was
not otherwise dissolved, and that such sea-
man has deserted the vessel, or absented
himself therefrom without leave, the judge
shall commit him to jail to remain there until
the vessel shall be ready to proceed on her
voyage, or until the master shall require his
discharge, and then to be delivered to the
master, the latter paying all the costs of such
commitment which may be deducted by
him from the wages due to such seaman.

2. If it shall appear on the hearing herein-
before provided for that the voyage of the
vessel is continued contrary to agreement, or
that the vessel is badly provisioned, or un-
seaworthy, or that the officers of the ship have
been guilty of cruel treatment toward the
seaman, he shall be discharged and the judge
shall require the master to pay such seaman
one month's wages over and above the wages
due at the time of discharge, and to provide
him with adequate employment on board
some other vessel, or provide him with a