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the superintendent of the asylum to admit
the patient into the institution for the purposes
of observation, there to remain until the
observation is concluded; and the judge shall
direct in said order that if the observation
shall show that the patient is not insane he
shall be set at liberty at once, and the medical
officer in charge of such observation shall
forthwith report his action thereon to the
judge who issued the order.

The observation of the alleged insane per-
son shall be made in suitable quarters within
the asylum grounds, by the chief medical
officer thereof, or under his direction, and
shall be for a period of not more than thirty
days, and the judge who issued the order for
the detention of the patient may require the
medical officer in charge of the case to make
reports thereon to him from time to time.

Section 8. The observation provided for
in this law may be carried on at the residence
of the alleged insane person, when, in the
opinion of the judge, that may be done with
safety to the patient and the public; and. in
such cases, the judge may impose such limi-
tations and conditions as, in his judgment,
the interest of the patient and the safety of
the public demand.

Section 9. It shall be the duty of the
physician in charge of the observation to
examine the patient and observe the symp-
toms of the case. Within thirty days after
the patient is placed under observation, the



medical officer in charge of the case shall make
his report thereon in writing, and shall state
whether the patient is sane or insane. The
report shall contain a statement of the facts
upon which it is based, and shall be sent to
the court having jurisdiction of the case,
within twenty-four hours after the same has
been subscribed by him.

Section 10. It shall be the duty of the
judge having jurisdiction of the case, within
twenty-four hours after the receipt of the
report provided for in the preceding section,
to render judgment therein, either commit-
ting the patient to the asylum for the insane,
or directing that he be turned over to his
relatives, able and willing to take care of
him, or to order his discharge, in accordance
with the findings of the medical officer in
charge of the case.

Section 11. The relatives of the person
alleged to be insane, or the public prosecutor,
may appear and contest the report of the
medical officer, and in such cases, the judge
shall hear the evidence presented by the
parties and render judgment thereon, either
committing the patient to the asylum, or
directing his discharge as the law and the
facts in the case may justify.

Section 12. From the judgment of the
court rendered in accordance with the pre-
ceding section, either of the parties may
appeal to the Supreme Court of the Canal
Zone, which Court shall hear and dispose of
the case with all reasonable despatch, giving
it precedence over all other matters pending
therein.

When an appeal is taken the trial court
shall issue such orders as it may deem neces-
sary and proper for the custody and safe-
keeping of the patient during the hearing of
the appeal.

Any person interested in an inmate of the
asylum, who believes he is improperly
detained therein, may make application to
the circuit judge of the First Judicial Circuit
for the discharge of such patient. Upon the
receipt of such application, the judge shall
issue an order to the superintendent of Ancon
Hospital to make a report on the patient's
condition, and upon the receipt of such report,
the judge shall consider the same, and, in his
discretion, may grant or deny the application.
Should the judge be in doubt as to the proper
action to take, he may cause the patient to
be examined by two competent physicians,
who shall report to the judge in writing as to
whether the patient should be released or
detained in the asylum. It the physicians
recommend the detention of the patient, the
court may deny the application; should they
recommend his release, the judge may grant
the petition and discharge the patient at once.

The relatives or friends of the patient, or
the public prosecutor, if dissatisfied with the
ruling of the judge, may appeal therefrom to
the Supreme Court of the Canal Zone, which
Court shall dispose of the appeal as in ordinary
cases provided for under this Order; and,
pending the appeal, the trial court may make
such orders relating to the custody of the
patient as may best subserve the interests of
the patient and the public.

If the insane person shall be serving a
sentence for the violation of the criminal
laws, the circuit court of the circuit, wherein
the conviction shall have been had, shall have
jurisdiction of the petition for the discharge
of the patient from the asylum.

Section 13. The order of the judge,



324



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 41.



directing the patient be admitted to the
asylum for the insane for care and treatment,
shall also provide that the marshal, or police
officer acting as marshal of the court, shall
convey the patient promptly under proper
escort to the asylum.

Section 14. If any person confined in a
prison or penitentiary under the sentence of
a court becomes insane he shall be committed
to the asylum for the insane by the judge
of the circuit court of the circuit wherein
the patient received his sentence of con-
viction. In all such cases, the provisions of
this Order, relating to the period of observa-
tion of the patient, and the trial of the issue
as to his insanity, shall be observed, provided,
however, that the period of observation shall
be carried out in the infirmaryof the prison or
penitentiary, unless the judge, on the advice
of the Department of Sanitation, is of the
opinion that it should take place elsewhere.
Whenever a person is committed to the insane
asylum under the provisions of this section,
the order of commitment issued by the court
shall include a statement of the offense of
which the person was convicted, the term of
his imprisonment and the date upon which
said term is to expire. Should such person be
discharged from the insane asylum before the
date of the expiration of his term of imprison-
ment he shall be returned to the penal in-
stitution from which he was taken, in order
that he may finish his term; and shall be set
at liberty if his discharge from the asylum
takes place subsequent to the date of the
expiration of his term of imprisonment.

Section 15. All expenses connected with
cases of insanity, including the cost of obser-
vation, transportation, care, treatment, and
maintenance of the patients, shall be borne
by their respective estates, to be paid in due
order of administration of their estates in
accordance with the probate laws of the Canal
Zone, and if the patients are insolvent, then
the expense shall be borne by the relatives
responsible for the care and maintenance of
such patients under the law to be recovered
by the Isthmian Canal Commission against
such relatives in any court of competent
jurisdiction; and if the relatives of the patient
are also insolvent, then such expenditure shall
be paid out of the public moneys appropriated
for such purposes.

Section 16. Nothing contained in this
Order shall be construed to repeal or modify
the provisions of the Code of Criminal Pro-
cedure of the Canal Zone, relating to the
inquiry into the insanity of the defendants
before trial or after conviction.

Section 17. Insane patients from the
Republic of Panama may be admitted into
the asylum for the insane, herein provided
for, in accordance with the existing agree-
ments between the Canal Zone authorities
and the Panamanian authorities, or under
such changes and modifications of said agree-
ments as may be made from time to time.

Section 18. The Canal Commission is
hereby authorized to establish rules and regu-
lations from time to time as may be deemed
necessary for the government of the asylum
for the insane herein provided for, subject
to the approval of the Secretary of War.

Section 19. This Order shall take effect
thirty days from this date.

Wm. H. Taft.

The White House, May 10, 1911.

[No. 1351.]



COLON FIRE RELIEF.

Work Done by Red Cross for Government of
Panama.

Culebra, C. Z., May 29, 1911.
Excellency:

I have the honor to enclose herewith,
copy of financial statement rendered by the
treasurer of the Canal Zone Chapter of the
American National Red Cross, showing
receipts and disbursements on account of the
sufferers of the Colon fire, up to and including
May 27, 1911. It will be observed there has
been disbursed a total of $5,658.64.

The work of the Red Cross in connection
with this disaster began on the morning of
March 24, 1911, the day succeeding the fire,
and practically ended on May 1, 1911, when
the Cristobal relief camp was closed down.
Mr. William T. Bennyhoff, chairman of the
Cristobal district, was placed in charge, and
gave a greater portion of his time and atten-
tion to this work, until the breaking up of
the camp on the date indicated.

His Excellency, Governor Rafael Neira,
gave every assistance to Mr. Bennyhoff, both
in regard to police protection and information
as to the status of those requiring assistance,
and materially aided in the general work.

The $5,000 contributed by the Government
of Panama very nearly accomplished the
entire work, leaving but $658.64 to be applied
from the amount received from other sources,
as indicated by the report herewith.

There were about 3,000 people rendered
homeless by the fire. About 500 people were
given shelter in the camp daily, and a total
of 17,818 rations were issued, both to people
living in the camp and people living outside.
The approximate cost of rations was 12 cents
per ration.

In addition to housing and feeding the
destitute, a systematic issue of the necessities
of life was inaugurated, including clothing,
dry goods, hardware, tools, cooking utensils,
etc. One month's rental was also supplied
in many cases, and also first payments on
sewing machines; the general idea being to
furnish practical charity.

For your information, I furnish herewith a
list of the beneficiaries, 1,711 in all, which
will show in detail how this aid was rendered.

The Y. M. C. A., at Cristobal, Commissary
Department at Cristobal, Quartermaster's
Department, Mount Hope, and Cristobal
Health Office at Cristobal, all rendered valu-
able assistance, and I cannot close this report
without testifying also to the work of Mrs.
P. T. Murphy, who gave a large part of her
time, and a great deal of most intelligent help
to this work.

I am, Sir, with great respect,

Yours very sincerely,

C. A. Devol,
Chairman, Canal Zone Chapter,
American National Red Cross.
His Excellency, Federico Boyd,
Secretary of the Interior, Panama.

Below is a statement of receipts and dis-
bursements on account of the sufferers from
the Colon fire:

RECEIPTS.

Received from Panama Government. $5,000 . 00

Received from Colonial Musical As-
sociation 7 . 50

Received from Cristobal Y. M. C. A.

benefit performance 146.00

Proceeds of benefit ball game. Empire
and Commissary-Subsistence ball
teams 708. 15

Received from Odd fellowslodge. Las

Cascadas 40 . 00

Total receipts $5,901 . 65



DISBURSEMENTS.

For rent $ 680.00

For food supplies 2.220.34

For clothing, dry goods and sundries 2,246.84
For hardware, tools, cooking uten-
sils, etc 126.94

First payment on sewing machines. 60.00
For meals furnished at I. C. C.

hotels and messes. 136.54

For printing and stationery (in-
cluding $34.05 on account of ben-
efit ball game) 105 . 43

For clerk hire 50.00

Miscellaneous expenses 32 . 55

Total disbursements $5,658.64

Unexpended balance, May 27, 1911 243.01

Respectfully,
John L. Phillips, Treasurer.

Fourth of July at Cristobal.

The address of the day at the Fourth of
July celebration in Cristobal, will be delivered
by the Chairman and Chief Engineer, Col,
Geo. W. Goethals.

Arrangements are in progress for the enter-
tainment of visitors on dock No. 11, Cristo-
bal, where there will be benches for every one,
and light refreshments will be served free.
Tables will also be provided for such people
as wish to bring their own food and eat it
there.

A tennis tournament in singles and doubles
will form part of the celebration of July 4.
Owing to the prospective large number of
entries, the preliminaries, including the semi-
finals in singles, will be held June 25, and in
doubles, on July 2, at courts of Tivoli and
Panama clubs, the matches being best two
out of three sets. The finals will be held on
the Cristobal courts, best three out of five
sets; singles at 9:30 a. m., and doubles at
2 p. m., on July 4. This arrangement of the
tournament will allow entry in either singles
or doubles, or both. All bona fide residents
of Panama, Colon, and the Canal Zone, are
eligible. Gold and silver medals will be given
for first and second places. There will be
no entry fee; no special entry blanks are
required. Entries may be made to Y. M. C.A.
secretaries, district quartermasters, or Pan-
ama Railroad station agents. All entries
should be reported to Chase Pulsifer, Empire,
on or before June 20, 1911.



Missing Men.

Information is requested with regard to the
whereabouts of Erwin Salomon of Milwaukee,
who is believed by his mother to be on the
Isthmus.

Any one having information regarding the
present whereabouts of Charles A. Nemitz,
who left the service of the Commission in
December, 1910, is requested to communicate
with The Canal Record, Ancon.

Any one having information regarding the
present whereabouts of Herbert W. Boddy
of Thorofare, N. J., who is supposed to be on
the Isthmus, is requested to communicate
with The Canal Record, Ancon.

Any one having information regarding the
whereabouts of Thomas E. Patterson, who
left the service of the Commission in March,
1907, is requested to communicate with the
postmaster at Ancon.

Any one having information regarding the
whereabouts of Aubrey E. Passailaigue, who
is supposed to be on the Isthmus, is requested
to communicate with The Canal Record,
Ancon.



Obituary.

Mary Enola. daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
S. M. Kent of Paraiso, died at Ancon Hospital
on June 3. She was fourteen years and seven
months old.



June 7, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



325



COASTWISE TRAFFIC.



New Arrangement Entered Into Between the
United States and Pacific Carriers.

The new terms fixed by the United States
Government for the handling of coastwise
freight by the Panama route, have been
accepted by the only Pacific carriers now in
that trade, the Pacific Mail Steamship Com-
pany, and the California and Atlantic Steam-
ship Company. They are, as follows:

1. On and after June 1. 1911. on all traffic moving
between ports upon the Pacific coast of the United
States and ports upon the Atlantic coast of the United
States upon which the annexed classified tariffs aie
charged, the division of tariff iates between the Pan-
ama Railroad Company and its steamship connections
will be, as follows:

(a) Upon traffic where the water haul on the Atlantic
side is performed by ships of the Panama Railroad
Company, the division of rates will be forty (40) per
centum to the Panama Railroad Company for joint
rail and steamship service, and sixty (60J per centum
to the connection.

(&) Upon traffic where no part of the water haul is
performed by the ships of the Panama Railroad Com-
pany, the rate for rait transportation across the Isthmus
will be twenty-five (25) per centum of the through rate.

2. In the event that any connection of the Panama
Railroad Company should quote a through rate less
than that set forth in the annexed classified tariffs, the
percentage payable to the Panama Railraad Company
will nevertheless be calculated upon the rates therein
9et forth, unless the Panama Railroad Company should
voluntarily consent to accept proportions upon a lower
rate.

3. The Panama Railroad Company, until further
notice, will furnish its Pacific connection on the Pacific
side, coal at the same rate as it is furnished at Balboa
to the Isthmian Canal Commission, and will make no
charge at Balboa for wharfage or cranea^s upon coast-
wise traffic carried under tariffs which the Panama
Railroad Company has or shall hereafter agree to.

The terms above stated supersede those of
the agreement of November 15, 1909, in which
the Pacific cocarrier was given 70 per cent
of the through rate, coal at cost at Balboa,
and craneage and wharfage free; and a basic
rate of $8 per net ton on enstbound, and $9 on
westbound freight was established. By this
agreement the contract might be annulled on
90 days' notice. When it was found that the
cost to the Panama railroad of handling the
freight was actually greater than the ihare it
received of the total rate, the 90 da\ »' notice
was served by the Government on January
19, but the agreement was later extended
until June 1.

Freight business by the Panama route has
increased greatly since the opening of the
service by the California and Atlantic
Steamship Company in October, 1910; and
within the last three months there has been
a decided increase in the amount of freight
from Europe for the west coast of South
America. This rapidly increasing freight
business ; s severely taxing the capacity of
the Panama railroad box cars for the haul
across the Isthmus, and of the docks to unload
and load it. A comparison of the freight
business for the nine months ending April
1, 1911, with the same period in 1910, follows:

WEST OR SOUTHBOUND FREIGHT OVER PANAMA RAILROAD
FOR THE NINE MONTHS ENDING APRIL 1.



EAST OR NORTHBOUND FREIGHT OVER PANAMA RAILROAD
FOR THE NINE MONTHS ENDING APRIL 1.







Tons.




Origin.


1911.


1910.


Increase.


Through Freight:

From New York.

Charleston, and

Philadelphia.. . .

From Gulf ports. .


118,715
17,372
88.266


86.607
16,091
83.170


32.108
1.281
5.096


Total

Local Freight:

I. C. C

P. R.R

Commercial


224.353

524,404

19.707

101,873


185,868

407.015
19.659
95.263


38,485

117,389

48

6,610


Total


645.984


521.937


124,047


Grand total ....


870,337


707,805


162,532



Class and
Origin.



Tons.



Increase.
D'crease.



Through Freight:
To N. Y.. Charles-

To Gulf ports. . . .
To Europe


119.330

2,674

44.615


67.180

31

31.316


52,150

2.643

13.299


Total


166.619


98.527


68.092






Local Freight:

I. C. C

P. R. R

Commercial


69,105

6.909

24.997


83.509
6.913

22.830


*14,404

*4
2.167


Total


101,011


113,252


*12.241






Grand total ....


267.630


211.779


55.851



*Decrease.

A comparison of the through freight
business for the fiscal years 1905-1910, with
that of the first nine months of the fiscal
y.ar 1911, follows:

WEST OR SOUTHBOUND.



Year.



From
Europe.



From
United
States.



Total.



1905


92,194
105.710
126.910
148.581
118,921
110,518

88,266


104.739
100.954
119,846
117,066
117,320
136,250
136,087


196.933


1906


206.664


1907


246.756


1908


265.647


1909


236,241


1910


246,768


1910-11 (9 months).


224.353



EAST OR NORTHBOUND.





To Europe.


T.»r. s.




1905


74.723
58,442
69,557
91,077
74.047
-tS.OSO
44.615


78.333
73.288
64,360
63,803
70.903
94.328
122.004


153.056


1906. . .


131.730


1907.. .


133,917


1908...


154,880


1903


144.950


1910


142.417


1910-11 .') months).


166.619



Infectious Disease Among Horses.
A circular has been issued from the office
of the Chief Sanitary Officer, under date of
May 10, approved by the Chairman and
Chief Engineer, calling attention to a fatal
infectious disease of horses, known locally by
the names of morrina de cadera, murrina,
and derrengadera, prevalent among native
horses in the Republic of Panama, and in the
Canal Zone. It first came to the notice of the
authorities through an outbreak among the
animals at Ancon and Gatun corrals a little
over a year ago. The epidemic was brought
under control by the adoption of certain
methods tending to guard against the mech-
anical transmission of the disease. The dis-
ease, so far as known, is uniformly fatal to
horses and mules. It lasts from a few weeks
to several months, and may be recognized by
the following signs:

General bodily weakness, the animals fall-
ing away in flesh and their coat becoming
rough and staring. Fever is present at inter-
vals, lasting from one to six or seven days,
and, during these periods, the animals have
a droopy appearance. At these times, there
is frequently noticed a watery or mucous
discharge from the eyes; later, toward the
end of the disease, there may be some swell-
ing of the lower part of the legs, or of the
lower abdomen or sheath. At this time,
their gait is frequently staggering in charac-
ter, and there is weakness or partial paralysis
of the haunches. Little spots of redness
(hemorrhage) can be noticed on the inner
surface of the whites of the eyes, and on the
mucous membrane of the nose. A few days
before death, the animals lean again : the
stalls and fences, and at these point? of con-



tact with the body, sores break out from
which the virus of the disease escapes.

It has been noted that during the illness
of the animals, their appetites are unim-
paired; in fact, they seem to be abnormal.
The disease is carried from infected animals
to well ones by flies lighting on the sores,
cuts, and galls of the sick, and transferring
the virus to the sores, cuts, and galls of the
well animals. It may be also transmitted by
persons, who, in the act of dressing such
sores or galls, carry the virus from sick to
well animals on their hands, or any instru-
ments that may be used.

The following precautions should be taken
against the spread of the disease: All wounds,
sores, galls, cuts, or other evidences of broken
skin on suspected or infected horses or mules,
as well as on animals that are not ill, should
be thoroughly protected from flies by dress-
ings impregnated with a two to five per cent
solution of cresolin, kreso, or the larvacide
manufactured by the Commission. These
dressings should be kept in place by a
material, such as bagging. The halters,
instruments, and hands of attendants or other
persons coming in contact with infected ani-
mals should be properly cleaned and thor-
oughly disinfected, for which purpose, a
solution of some of the disinfectants men-
tioned above should be used. Stray animals
should not be impounded in or near Com-
mission corrals. All animals having a tem-
perature above 101 degrees Fahrenheit should
be isolated in a screened stable for observation
and diagnosis by microscopic blood examina-
tion, and all such animals in the Canal Zone
should be reported by telephone to the Board
of Health laboratory at Ancon, in order that
such blood examinations may be made.

Sanitary inspectors, and the police, are
required to report all native, or other ani-
mals suspected of having the disease.

Ancon Crusher.

A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon
quarry during the two weeks ending June 3,
follows:



Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
Yards.


May 22


6:15
5:45
3:35
4:45
5:20
40


2.024


May 23


2,266


May 24. . .


1,070


May 25 . .


1 070


May 26. . .


1,796


May 27


*688








26-20


8.914



*Crusher shut down, no power.




May 29

May 30. .(Holiday)
May 31
June 1
June 2
June 3

Total



Seventh Day Adventists to Rebuild.

A new building, to replace the one burned
in the Colon fire, will be erected by the
Seventh Day Adventist Conference on a lot
given for the purpose by the Panama railroad
at thecorner of Fourteenthand Bolivar streets.
The building will be a two-story frame struc-
ture, the church occupying the lower floor,
with the apartment for the resident staff of
the Conference above. No provision will be
made for printing plant and offices, as in the
former building. The church will be reerected
at a cost of $4,000 gold. There are 500 ad-
herents of the sect in the West Indian Con-
ference, which includes the Canal Zone, and
the territory surrounding.



326



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 41.



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE.



Church Notes.

The Rev. Victor M. Kennedy, agent of the
British and Foreign Bible Society for the
Isthmus of Panama, has been called to the
temporary charge of the Baptist church at
Gorgona. Mr. Kennedy has been on the
Isthmus about one year, taking charge, in