Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

Canal Record (Volume 4 no.1-52) online

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1.250








981








1,120












5,500


123.67


4






1.884


137:75


3.7


3,693


7,384


Previously








255,518
























Grand


3,693


262.902

























June 14, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



331



STEAM SHOVEL RECORDS.

Work of Central Division Shovels in May.

During the month of May the total amount
of material excavated in the Central Division
was 1,328,883 cubic yards, of which 165,897
cubic yards were classified as earth, and
1,162,986 cubic yards as rock. Of this quan-
tity, 1,298.240 cubic yards were removed by
steam shovels, 360 cubic yards by bucket
cranes, and 1,863 cubic yards by hand. Con-
tractors removed 24,904 cubic yards by
sluicing, and 3,516 cubic yards by hand.

The high record for the month was made
by shovel No. 206, working 24§ days in the
Culebra district, which excavated 54,556
cubic yards of rock. The second best record
for the month was made by shovel No. 208,
working 26 days in the Culebra district, which
excavated 48,908 cubic yards of rock and
earth.

The best record for a shovel of the 70-ton
class was made by shovel No. 109. working
21 days in the Culebra district, which exca-
vated 30,045 cubic yards of rock and earth.

Shovel No. 218, working in the Empire dis-
trict, made a high record for one day by exca-
vating 2,945 cubic yards of rock and earth on
May 8.

Except where noted, monthly reports are
computed by place measurement, while the
daily reports are based on car measurement.
The best records for the month and for one
day are shown below:

BEST RECORDS FOR THE MONTH.

EMPIRE DISTRICT.







Cubic


Yards.




Shovel
No.


Earth.


Rock.


Total.


No. of
days at
work


263




44.264

1 40.748
1 37,268


44,264
40.748
37.268


26


221




26


209




26









CULEBRA DISTRICT.



206

208

205


I 29,345


54,556
19,563
41,714


54,556 |
19,563
41,714 1


24J

26

23





PEDRO


MIGUEL.






231


4.000


24.613


28,613


21







BEST RECORDS FOR ONE DAY.



-








Cubic








Character of


yards.


o


Location.


| Date.


material




tn






excavated.





218 Empire

253 Empire

222 Empire

253 Empire

206! Culebra

Culebra

Culebra

Pedro Miguel
Pedro Miguel
Pedro Miguel
Pedro Miguel



205
206
231
231
231
231



May 8,
May 23
May 25

May 2
May 16
May 4
May 23!
May 6
May to;
May 9
May 8!



Rock and earth.

Earth

Earth

Earth

Rock and earth .
Rock and earth .
Rock and earth.

Rock

Rock

Rock

Rock



2.945
2,755
2.620
2,610
2,831
2.793
2.755
2,660
2,166
2,109
1.900



Accident in Cristobal Railroad Yard.

Passenger train No 3 on the Panama rail-
road, due to leave Colon at 5:25 daily, was
struck by a line of moving freight cars while
passing through Cristobal yards on Friday,
June 9, resulting in injuries to four or five
people and damage to four of the coaches.
The accident occurred a short distance from
the coal chute, at a point where there is a
crossover from the yard tracks to the main
line. As the passenger train neared this
place, a switching engine, pushing a number
of freight cars, began to move over one of the
yard tracks in the opposite direction. A mis-
placed switch caused the train to take the
crossover instead of continuing on its proper



track, and, as a result, the end freight car
struck the side of the third first-class coach
obliquely, sheared along its entire length,
collided with the end of the next car, the
baggage coach, more nearly end on. over-
turning it, and, before coming to a stop, raked
the side of one of the second-class coaches.
The passenger cars involved in the accident
contained comparatively few people. Among
the injured were H. P. Warren, assistant
construction engineer of the Panama railroad,
who had a leg crushed and broken, and M. B.
Connolly, superintendent of construction on
the Panama railroad relocation, who was
severely stunned and bruised. The baggage-
man was buried under a pile of trunks, which
became lodged in such a manner as to protect
him from serious injury.



machines and pieces of equipment, in order
that they may be available for exhibition at
the Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Fran-
cisco in 1915.



In the collecting of old French machinery
for sale in the States as scrap, care will be
taken to preserve a number of typical



Improvements at Cold Storage Plant.

The increased space for cold storage of
meat at the plant in Cristobal has made it
possible to store 800 quarters of beef more
than heretofore, bringing the capacity up to
2,400 quarters. Tanks for corning 2,000
pounds of beef a day have been installed.
Kettles for the boiling of hams and making
of soup stock have been ordered, and when
they are installed, soup stock will be added
to the list of cold storage supplies. A power
meat chopper has also been installed, and
Hamburg steak, and possibly some sausage
will be made. These improvements will
allow beef to be bought by the whole carcass,
and in this way, the best beef will be obtained
at the lowest possible price.



LABOR FORCE AND QUARTERS IN MAY.

There has been a lack of common laborers available for the Canal and railroad work
for the past month, and recruiting in the West Indies will probably be necessary to increase
the supply.

The total of the Canal and Panama railroad force at work on May 31 was 34,233, as
compared with 35,259 in April, 1911, and with 36,796 in May, 1910. Of the total in May,
1911, Canal employes numbered 27,229, and Panama railroad, 7 004. The force report follows:





SILVER EMPLOYES.


*






3

O

3







Artisans.


European
Laborers.


West Indian
Laborers.


3


t-

■a
a

e



Department.


3

s
o

s


B

a

if
o

;4


in
=

V

u

CM

17

i


2

a

V

u
iri
cm


a

Of
u
o

CM


2

a

01

u


BB

a

3
U

O
eg


a

V
u
M3


X

e
u

O
CM


c

Of

u


BD

=
V
o

r*5


•j

P

u
o

o


2

a

Of
CI


Total
Silver.


ConsfctnandEng'r'ng.
Civil Administration


4,356
193
682
946
621
7
5


227
2
2

113
1


642

4

4

150

1


2.412

17

4

109


2.688


997


110


510


3.799


2.576

6

309

760


252

"'9'

12


18.600

222

1.015

2.395

623

7

5


3,280
354
364
205
51
24
84


21.8S0

576










5
12


1.379


245


29


18




2,600




674


















31


Examinat'n of Accounts.

























89




is

18






















Total


6.810


14
15


345


801


2,542


2,933


1.026


128


510


3,816


3.651 273


22.867


4,362


27,229




6.914


337


806


2.640


3,222


1,177


124


557


3,926


3,707 279


23,722


4.507


28,229












-104


-1




+8


-5


-98


-2S9


-151 +4


-47


-110


-56


-6


-855


-145


-t.ooo



Panama railroad force, 3,773; Panama railroad relocation force. 2.174; Panama railroad commissary force
1,057. Total. 7.004 I. C. C. force. 27.229. Grand total. 34.233.

*A1I wages specified are in gold.

The employes in the Department of Construction and Engineering on May 31 were dis-
tributed, as follows:





SILVER EMPLOYES.*


•6

o
O

3








Artisans.


European
Laborers.


West Indian
Laborers.


3


Division.


1


"9

01

u


so

z

u

CM


to

a
u
o

CM


tri

a
ot
u

o

CM


a

Ol

u


cii

a

Ol
Of

o


on

a

Ol

u


tq

=

Of

u

O
CM


tn

a

01

u


BB
0>
t*5


tn

C
Of
U

o


a

s


Total
Silver.


a

03

»-

o




42

197

2,008

1.057

1,052

4.356


6
5
3

14


2

13

2

17

IS


2
24
98
25
78

227


1

50
309
106
176

642












175
673

1,081
858

1.012






220
1,498
6,213
6.857
3.812


173
803
939
780


393




429

1.001

438

544

2.412


63

481

1.789

355


8
625
86






39
446

1,864
227


7
48
130
67


2,301


'm


98
41*


7.152
7,637




273 1 21 . ...


585 , 4,397


Total


2.688


997 110 510


3.799 ,2.576


252


18,600


3.280 21.880


Month previous


4.496


\>


231


665


2.558


3.033


1 .165 Il06 557


3.910 12.712


260


19.776


3.397 23.173



QUARTERS.

On May 31, there were 23,386 occupants of Commission quarters. Of this number, there
were 9,336 white Americans, including 5,395 men. 2,043 women, and 1,898 children. There
were 5,538 Europeans, of whom 4,944 were men, 253 were women, and 341 were children.
There were 8,512 negroes, of whom 6,002 were men, 1,126 were women, and 1,384 were children.
The above figures include 26 Asiatics at Balboa, and two at Porto Bello.

A large number of married quarters have been vacated during the month, and a corre-
sponding number of applications filled. The number on the No. 1 waiting list has dropped
from 77 to 27, and the No. 2 list from 752 to 685.

Bachelor quarters at Gorgona, which were so congested a few months ago, show 110
vacancies, and arrangements are being made to use some of the houses as nonhousekeeping
married quarters.



332



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 42.



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June 14, 1911



THE CANAL RECORD



333



WORK IN GORGONA SHOPS.



Sand Blast Cleaning and Pneumatic Painting of
Cars — Foundry and Car Shop Work.

After a test of one month, the sand blast
method of cleaning steel cars, and the pneu-
matic painters in use at Gorgona shops have
demonstrated the economy of this method over
the one formerly employed, viz., removing
the scale by hammering the cars and painting
them by brush. The steel dump cars in use
on the Pacific and Atlantic Division work are
subjected to excessive oxidization from the
salt air and, on all the work, the cars are
continually subject to rust, consequent upon
hauling wet material and being subjected to
the continuous rainy weather.

The sandblast machine installed attheshops
about a month ago consists of a reservoir in
which dried sand is placed, and three leads
to which hose may be attached. An air
pressure of SO pounds forces the sand from
the reservoir into the leads, where a pressure
of 80 pounds is applied to drive it
forcibly against the cars. Only two leads
are commonly used, and the sand is projected
through a |-inch nozzle. At present,
Chame' sand is used, but this is so fine that
it is not thoroughly effective, and an order
has been placed for some coarser quartz sand,
which occurs in small deposits at Chorrera.
Six cars can be cleaned of scale in one day.
The cars are run on a switch alongside the
sand blast plant, and, after cleaning, are
pushed forward a few feet to the place where
the pneumatic painting is done. Coal tar
paint is used, and it is ordinarily applied
through two nozzles, thus making it possible
to work on two cars at one time. Twelve
cars may be painted by this method in an
S-hour day.

One of the items of work in the car shop
that is little appreciated is the placing of
680 new car wheels a month on the cars.
These wheels are brought from the States
and are bored and mounted at the shops.
An average month's work includes 300 new
wheels on 20-yard flat cars, 200 on steel dump
cars, and about 180 on other equipment.
When cars come into the shops for repairs,
the wheels are tested, and if they are flat
beyond 2\ inches from normal, have a chipped
or worn flange, or are worn through the chill,
they are replaced with new wheels. Some old
wheels are utilized by placing them on an axle
on which is another old wheel, not sufficiently
worn to be taken from service. From two
to three tons of the old wheels are used each
month in the cupola, being melted over into
castings that do not require machining, such
as counterweights for the spillway gates, and
the balance are sent to the States as scrap.

From 420 to 450 wood cars of all classes are
repaired each month, an average being about
150 twenty-yard flat cars rebuilt, 230 given
light repairs, and from 10 to 20 cars of various
kinds repaired or rebuilt. As high as 500 steel
dump cars are repaired each month, the
majority of these being for use of the Central
Division. The cars that need it badly, and
such others as can be expeditiously handled,
are scaled and painted. Others are merely
painted after the repairs arc made, the object
being, at all times to keep the cars in the
shop as short a time as possible.

Last week, the foundry completed an order
for 955,000 pounds of caisson seats for the
locks at Gatun, Pedro Miguel, and Miraflores.
These castings are made of gray iron; are
"L" shape with stiffening webs, and will be



placed on the ends of the walls and on the
caisson sill at the upper and lower ends of
all the locks, occupying a position on the wall
and sill such as the jam and sill of a door.
Upon them the caissons will rest when it is
necessary to unwater the locks for examina-
tion or repair. They will be situated in front
of the movable dams, and their use will also
permit examination of the sill of the dam.
There are 300 of these castings, 100 for Gatun,
1(14 for Miraflores, and % for Pedro Miguel.
The foundry is now at work on an order of
345 tons of gray iron castings to be used as
plates to face the baffle piers in Gatun spill-
way. There will be 73 of these plates, 31 of
them 10x6x1 foot, and 42, 10x4x1 foot. The
planer in the shops is too small to take the
larger plates, and in machining the joints it
will be necessary, therefore, to fix the plates
on the floor of the shop, fix the tool on the
bed of the planer, and machine them in this
manner. An order for 3,888 stationary, and
4,888 movable, buffers for use in the guide
walls of the locks has been placed by the
Pacific Division. The stationary parts will
be fixed in the wall, and the movable parts
will form a cap to fit upon the fixed portions,
a spring between the two absorbing the force
of any blow that may be dealt by a ship
bumping against the walls.

A night force of 200 men, 50 of whom are
on the gold roll, is kept at work in the foundry,
boiler, machine, and wood shops, on account
of the emergency repairs and manufacturing
that the shops are continually called upon
to do. Maintaining this night force acceler-
ates delivery of rush orders, and at the same
time, avoids payment for overtime, which
would be necessary if men from the day
force were detailed to night work.



Gatun Cableway Withdrawn from Service.

Concrete laying at Gatun Locks is now
being carried on with only three of the four
duplex cableways. One of the cableways
was moved to the upper lock on May 17,
where it is engaged in handling fixed steel,
and earth^for backfilling in the center wall.
It will not be returned to the concrete work,
which is going forward rapidly in the middle
and lower locks.



Reorganization in Atlantic Division.

The work now included in the Cristobal
residency of the Atlantic Division, namely,
dredging in the Atlantic entrance, steam
shovel excavation at Mindi, direction of
Cristobal marine shops, construction of Colon
breakwater, and the conduct of the quarry
and crusher at Porto Bello. and the sand



excavation at Xombre de Dios, will be placed
in charge of Major Chester Harding, Assist-
ant Division Engineer of the Atlantic Divi-
sion, upon the departure of Major Edgar
Jadwin, the present resident engineer, for
Washington. \o assistant engineer will be
assigned to the work at Porto Bello to succeed
Captain Horton \V. Stickle.



Sailing of the "Ancon."
The sailing of the steamship Ancon from pier
No. 11, Cristobal, scheduled for Tuesday,
June 13, has been postponed until 3 p. m.,
Saturday, June 17.



Gatun Dam Spillway.

The concrete work in the spillway of Gatun
Dam is over 62 per cent completed, 139,645
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having
been placed at the close of work on June 10.
A statement of the amount laid each working
day last week, and of the total in place,
follows:



Date.


Concrete
Laid.


Hours
worked.


No.
Mixers.




174
144
280
232
240
204


7:00
7:00
8:00
7:00
8:00
8:30




June 8


1
2
1
2










Total


1,274
138,371


45:30


1 33














139,645









I. B. of S. S. and D. M.
The I.B.of S.S. and D. M. will hold its
regular meeting on Sunday, June 18, at the
lodge hall in Empire at 12.15 p. m. All mem-
bers interested in the welfare of the brother-
hood are requested to attend this meeting.

ORDINANCE

Establishing Rules, Regulations, and Instruc-
tions for the Government of the Division of
Fire Protection of the Canal Zone.

Be it ordained by the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission that the rules and regulations and
instructions for the Division of Fire Protec-
tion of the Canal Zone, approved by the
Chairman and Chief Engineer on February
14, 1911, and effective April 1, 1911, are
hereby established for the Canal Zone.

This Ordinance shall take effect from and
after the date of its approval by the Secretary
of War. Geo W Goethals, Chairman.

Enacted by the Isthmian Canal Commis-
sion, April 29, 1911.

Approved bv the Secretary of War, May
19, 1911.



CLASSIFIED EXPENDITURES.



A statement of classified expenditures of the Isthmian Canal Commission to April 30, 1911,
follows:



PlEIOD.



Department Department Department of

of Civil Admin- of Sanitation. Construction
istration. and Engineering.



General Items.



Total.



Total to June 30, 1909. . $3,427,090.29

Total fiscal year 1910. . 709,351.37

July, 1910 58,474.88

August, 1910 63,887.05

September, 1910 60,586.46

Octobei, 1910 37,250.26

November, 1910 71,981.80

December, 1910 69.424.73

January. 1911 71,426 87

February, 1911 69.886.61

March, 1911 74.670.20

April. 1911 74,198,25

Total ! $4,788,228.77



9,673.539.28


$69,622,561.42


$78,022,606.10


$160,745,797.09


1,803,040.95


26.300.167.05


2,863,088.83


31,675,648.20


156.006.64


2.216.849.78


280,015.85


2.711,347.15


164.220.65