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for each of the five 8-hour working days of last week, follows:





Auxiliary Plant.


Large
stone.


#


Date.


2-cubic yard mixers.


i-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete
placed .


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers




July 3


Cu. Yds.
634


15.00


3


Cu. Yds.
235


12.00


2


Cu. Yds.


Cu. Yds.
869


July 4 (Holiday). . .










670
498
710
954


17.00
13.00
17.00
21.00


3
3
3
3


195
121
128
113


10.17
6.75
7.17
6.00


2
1
1
1


4


865


July 6


619


July 7


838


July 8


1.071






Total


3,466


83.00


3


792


42.09


1.4


4
4,202


4,262




675,266




















4,206


679,528



















MIRAFLORES LOCKS.

Over 21 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was in
place on July 8, the total amount on that date being 290,673 cubic yards, out of a total of
approximately 1,362,000. The record for each of the five 8-hour working days of last week,
follows:









Auxiliary Plant.




Date.


2-cubic yard mixers.


2-cubic yard mixers.


i-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete Hours
placed, worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours No. of
worked. 1 mixers


Large
stone.




July 3. . . .
July 4.. .
July 5....
July 6. . . .
July 7....
July 8. . . .


Cu. Yds.


4


Cu. Yds.
358


28 00


4


Cu. Yds.






Cu. Yds.


Cu. Yds.
1,204


Holiday
















4
4
4
4


234
315
348
299


16.00
21.50
23.50
22.50


2
3
3
3










910


680

1,004

696


21.17
23.17
19.00










995










1,352










995














3.902


105.76


4


1,554


111.50


3.2










5,456


Previously
reported.








3,693


285,217






















Grand


3,693


290.673

























July 12, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



363



STEAM SHOVEL RECORDS.



Work of Central Division and P. R. R. Reloca-
tion Shovels in June.

During the month of June, the total amount
of material excavated in the Central Division
was 1,433,304 cubic yards, of which 140,605
cubic yards were classified as earth, and
1,292,699 cubic yards as rock. Of this quan-
tity, 1,399,458 cubic yards were removed by
steam shovels, and 1,558 cubic yards by
bucket cranes. Contractors removed 29,856
cubic yards by sluicing, and 2,432 cubic yards
by hand.

The high record for the month was made
by shovel No. 207, working 24 days in the
Culebra district, which excavated 49,409
cubic yards of rock and earth. The second
best record for the month was made by
shovel No. 219, working 26 days in the Culebra
district, which excavated 49,172 cubic yards
of rock and earth.

The best record for a shovel of the seventy-
ton class was madebyshovel No. 109, working
21 days in the Culebra district, which exca-
vated 37,072 cubic yards of rock and earth.

Shovel No. 230, working in the Culebra
district, made a high record for one day by
excavating 3,097 cubic yards of rock on
June 24.

Except where noted, monthly reports are
computed by place measurement, while the
daily reports are based on car measurement.
The best records for the month, and for one
day, are shown below:

BEST RECORDS FOR THE MONTH.





EMPIRE


DISTRICl








Cubic Yards.


Shovel
No.


Earth.


Rock.


Total.


No. of
days at
work.


215




40,468
39.074

.59,054


40,468
39,074
39,054


26


228




25


253




26





CULEBRA DISTRICT.




207

219


| 1,453 i 47,956 49.409
19.669 1 29,503 ' 49,172


24
26


230


1 | 48,773 I 48,773


24





PEDRO MIGUEL.






231


27,585


27,585


185











BEST RECORDS FOR ONE DAY.




■-

O

■u


Location.


Date.


Character of

material
excavated.


Cubic
yards.


>s;


Empire

Empire

Culebra

Culebra

Pedro Miguel
Pedro Miguel
Pedro Miguel
Pedro Miguel


June 13
June 14
June 6
June 26
June 24
June 22
June 26
June 5
June 7
June 2
June 10


Rock


2,356


?in


Rock


2.280


"t,


Rock. ..


2.246


263

> 111


Rock and earth . .
Rock


2.219
3.097


208

JOS

231

"Ml


Rock

Rock

Rock

Rock


2,964
2,755
1,900
1,843


'il


Rock


1,824


231


! Rock


1.748



STEAM SHOVELS ON RELOCATED LINE.

The total excavation on the relocated line
of the Panama railroad, in June, amounted to
394,665 cubic yards. Of this amount, 137,-
205 cubic yards were classified as earth,
24,010 cubic yards as loose rock, and 233,450
cubic yards as solid rock. Company forces
removed 385,435 cubic yards, and 9,230 cu-
bic yards were removed by the contractor.

Steam shovels excavated 370,440 cubic
yards. Pan car task gangs took out 21,835
cubic yards, and 2,390 cubic yards were
excavated for culvert foundations.

The best record was made by steam shovel
No. 257, working on the Gatun section,



which excavated 58,850 cubic yards of rock.
This shovel has held the record on the Isthmus
for the past five months.

In the 70-ton class, the best record was
made by steam shovel No. 110, working near
Paraiso, on the Gold Hill line, which excavated
26,790 cubic yards of earth, and 16,450 cubic
yards of rock, a total of 43,240 cubic yards.

The best day's record for shovels with
5-yard dippers was made by steam shovel
No. 262, working at Monte Lirio, which took
out 3,130 cubic yards of earth and rock on
June 14.

The best day's record for 70-ton shovels
was made by steam shovel No. 110, working
near Paraiso, which excavated 2,260 cubic
yards of earth on June 12.

Month's records are place measurement,

and day's records are car measurement. All

material is loaded in 10-yard Western dump

cars.

BEST RECORDS FOR THE MONTH.



6


Cubic Yards by Cross Section.


> Location.

o

X


Days
worked.


Earth


Rock. Total.


257 Gatun

262 M. Lirio..
110 Paraiso . . .
105 M. Lirio.. .


26
26
26
26


26.790
28,700


58.850 58,850
51,700 51,700
16.450 1 43,240
12,300 41,000



Total output during the month of June, 370.440
cubic yards.

Total number of steam shovel working days, 252 \.
Average output per working day, 1,467 cubic yards.



Saved a Spanish Laborer.

Under date of July 6, the Senior Traveling
Engineer made the following report:

"While handling engine No. 657 on train
No. 133, on July 4, and while engine was
passing the passenger station at Las Cascadas
at 6.40 p. m., a Spanish laborer walked over
from the left side of the train, and stopped
directly in front of the engine. Edgar Girdner,
craneman on crane No. 36, attached to the
Las Cascadas wrecker, without thinking of
the danger to himself, jumped out of the
crowd standing on the station platform,
and, grasping the man by the coat, pulled
him clear of the engine, which was just about
to strike him."

Water Pressure in City of Panama.

Work has been completed on the 10-inch
main to connect the high pressure reservoir
at Ancon, with the 16-inch main which carries
water from the Rio Grande reservoir to the
city of Panama. By simply opening a valve,
this main can be made to feed into the city
system, raising the pressure at once to 85
pounds. With the old 8-inch main from the
reservoir, also feeding into the city system,
the pressure can be increased at once to 100
pounds.

Steam shovel No. 266. at work in the bor-
row pit in the Brazos bottom, on the reloca-
tion of the Panama railroad on July 2, was



caught in an unexpected slide of earth and
heavy rock, which broke and bent several I-
beams.and damaged the engine. The opera-
tors were not injured.



Accident in Culebra Cut.

Locomotive No. 316, drawing a flat car
loaded with coal for the steam shovels in
Culebra Cut, ran upon a piece of track under-
mined by a slide on the west incline into
Culebra Cut, near Las Cascadas, on the night
of July 8. The track gave way, and the loco-
motive and car were thrown into the Cut, a
distance of about 40 feet, carrying eight men
with them. Harold Springer, Barbadian,
brakeman on the train, I. C. C. check No.
121,606, was killed. The injured were George
L. Jenkins, American, conductor; George
Lewis, Panamanian, brakeman; Nathaniel
Rollins, Barbadian foreman; Joseph Will-
iams. St. Lucian, laborer. They will recover.



Chame Light Service.

Lightning struck the lighthouse at Cham6
Point on the night of July 3, and shattered
the light and substructure. This was one of
the five 8-day coal oil lights established
between Balboa and the sand boats at
Chame to guide the tugs in the Pacific
Division sand service. It was a white light
on a wooden tower 30 feet high, and the
range of visibility was 20 miles.

At Melones Island, the Commission has a
double white light on a post; on Tortolita a
single fixed white light and house; off Torto-
lita, a double horizontal white light on
floating buoy; on Changarmi Island, a double
white light on a post.



Installation of Officers.

At a meeting of Local Union, No. 677, I. B.
E. W., held at Gatun, Sunday, July 9, the
following officers were installed: President, W.
E. Mitchell; vice-president, Sam King; record-
ing secretary, A. M. Harle; financial secre-
tary, C. J. MacNelley; treasurer, A. Wool-
nough; first inspector, W. E. Kemper;
second inspector, C. F. Smith; foreman, F.
Metzger. President Mitchell delivered a
short lecture on "Multiple unit control,"
after which refreshments were served.



Obituary.
Marie Emile Pierre Gey, French vice-
consul at Colon, died at Ancon Hospital on
Thursday, July 6, from a stroke of paralysis.
He was a native of France, born April 8, 1852,
and had been connected with the French
consular service on the Isthmus, in various
capacities, since June 1, 1892, with the excep-
tion of about six years, during which period
he was consular clerk at Sierra Leone, and
later, vice-consul, at Las Palmas, Spain. He
was an employe of the first French Canal
Company in the '80s., and later became in-
terested in one of the contracts for canal
excavation at Pedro Miguel.



WEATHER CONDITIONS, CANAL ZONE, JUNE, 1911.





3 cm

fii

tfl fa 3


Temperature.


V

> .

■3 >.

ii
r

90
93
91


Precipitation.


Wind.


Stations.



S

s

79.3
79.4
80.0


a

a

'S

Ed

s

88
91
94


u

Q

8
26
20


a

B

a

S

ii

72
71
71


a

23
24
10


IB
V

A
u

S
o


ft
u
>

a
s
.2 C

~ at
3 *


Is

a "3

3 8


Total move-
ment 1 in
miles.)


a.


il

la

s


a


u

V

1-

5


a




29.848
29.838
29.834


15.58
4.25
3.40


13.29
8.92
8.32


24
22
16


4,146
3,802
4,235


S.E.
N.W.
N.W.


25
28
20


w.

N.E.
W.


25




24




30







364



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 46.




f" I n£> 5 *- G 5 ^ M a— > o

W ? "S °S 33 3 SZ ° S



^£ C £ 33 = £o ° a



July 12, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



365



SPILLWAY REGULATING GATES.



Description of Gates for Controlling Surfaces of
Gatun and Miraflores Lakes.

Twenty-two spillway gates to regulate the
surface of Gatun and JVliraflores Lakes, and
caissons to ensure a means of repairing these
gates, are part of the material advertised for
in Circular 636, bids on which will be opened
at the Washington office on July 24. These
gates will be mounted on the spillway dams
at Gatun and Miraflores. Delivery is desired
by October 1, 1912.

The Spillway of Gatun Dam is a concrete
lined channel, which runs through a hill about
midway between the ends of the dam. It is
280 feet wide, but at the upstream, or lake
end, widens much as a flat bottle does at the
point where the neck joins the body. Across
this wide part, at the south end of the channel,
a concrete dam is being built in ogee form,
with its crest on the arc of a circle. This dam
is 630 feet long on the crest line across the
channel, 93.04 feet wide from heel to toe, and
the crest will be 69 feet above sea level, or
16 feet lower than the normal level of the
lake. On the top of this dam will be the
regulating works, the main part of which are
the sluice gates of the Stoney type. An
article in The Canal Record of September
8, 1909. gave details of Gatun Spillway, with
drawings, showing the location of the regu-
lating works.

After study of the maximum flow to be
cared for, and the probable rate of discharge
over the dam, it has been determined that
14 gates, each 45 feet wide, with sill elevation
at 69 feet above sea level, will give absolute
control of the lake under all possible condi-
tions. The top of these gates, when closed,
will be 88 feet above sea level, and the
bottom, when they are open, will be at 92
feet. Since little drift will have to be taken
over the spillway dam, owing to the large
size and irregular outline of the lake, and the
prevailing direction of the winds, the opening
at elevation 92 will allow any drift that may
reach the dam to pass over.

At Miraflores, there will be a straight
concrete dam of ogee section, 432 feet
long on the crest, connecting the east wall
of the upper locks with the rock in the side
hill. The crest will be 38.67 feet above sea
level, 16 feet below the ordinary level of
Miraflores Lake. On this dam, as at Gatun,
the regulating gates will be erected between
concrete piers, eight gates being required,
each closing an opening 45 feet wide. The
gates may be lifted 23 feet, allowing a maxi-
mum flow of 92,000 cubic feet per second.
An article, with drawings illustrating the
structure of Miraflores spillway, and showing
the location of the regulating gates, was
published in The Canal Record of Sep-
tember 28, 1910.

gates.

The gates will be identical in size and
construction for both spillways, and will be
of the Stoney type, traveling on two
roller trains, which will run on a track
located in a niche 15j inches deep in the sides
of the piers. Each will consist essentially of
a system of horizontal girders, vertical end
posts, cross frames, and intercostals, forming
a skeleton, and of steel plate sheathing,
extending from top to bottom on the up-
stream side of the gate. In each gate there
will be three vertical frames, built in between
the horizontal girders, and extending from



the bottom to the top of the gate. Each will
be 46 feet 3^ inches long. 19 feet high, and
will weigh 42 J tons. It will have a range of
motion of 22 feet 6 inches, and. while in
operation, must stand a maximum head of
18 feet. At each end, on the downstream
side of the posts, the gates will be provided
with a rocker-bearing device to equalize the
distribution of pressure on the roller train
bearings. The gates will have a play of from
j to 3-8 inch upstream from bearings, and
of J inch lengthwise of the leaf. A water-tight
seal will be accomplished by vertical seals of
the spring type moving along finished sur-
faces on castings in the walls of the piers, and
on the bottom, by the lower edge of the face
of the gate sheathing and bottom angle
coming in contact with a babbitt strip, placed
in a casting across the crest of the wiers.

In both the spillways, the operating
machinery will be erected in a tunnel in the
concrete dam. This machinery forms a sep-
arate contract. Two valves of the Stoney
type, but of the size to be used in the locks,
are being tested at Gatun to determine their
efficiency, and the tests will be completed
before the construction of the spillway gates
is begun.

CAISSONS.

Two caissons will be required, one for each
spillway, but they will be interchangeable,
and may be towed through the Canal, so that
both may be used at one place, if desired.
Their office is to form a dam across the aper-
tures on the upstream side of the gates, and
to this end, a proper bearing for them will
form part of the construction of each pier
and the sill. Each caisson will consist of a
framework of vertical frames and horizontal
steel girders, which will support a system of
intercostals to form the skeleton, and, over
this framework, steel sheathing plates will be
riveted to form a water-tight box. The deck
will be of yellow pine, and the keels and sills
of white oak. In the bottom of each caisson,
there will be a monolith of concrete for bal-
last, 2 feet 65- inches thick, with a sump for
the suction pipe of the pump. On this per-
manent ballast will be a layer of concrete
blocks, 8 inches square by 6 inches, which
can be moved as required to provide suitable
adjustment of amount and position of ballast.
The caisson will be filled through one 10-inch
and two 4-inch pipes fitted with valves.
Each caisson will be fitted with a horizontal,
hand-operated force pump, 6-inch stroke,
3-inch diameter bottom suction, 2^-inch
discharge, and will be brass lined throughout.

The caissons will be 49 feet long, and 24
feet 4 inches high, and will be erected on the
bank of the lake ready for launching. When
used, they will be towed light to the seats
provided for them in the piers of the regu-
lating gates. When in position, they will be
lowered by opening the valves, allowing them
to fill with water.

BRIDGES.

The bridges will connect the piers in which
the gates are erected, making a footway
across the top of the dams, thus giving easy
access to the gates and piers, and affording a
convenient means of crossing the spillway.
Each span, or bridge, will be built of two plate
steel girders, bolted to cast iron seats in the
concrete of the piers or abutments. Upon
these girders will be fastened checkered steel
plates, forming a walk, or floor. Each bridge,
or span, will be 45 feet long, and 3 feet wide,
and the heaviest member will weigh only



4,300 pounds, and will, therefore, be easily
removable. The total weight of the 22 bridges
will be about 215 tons. Across the top of each
dam. in two parallel lines, will be erected
galvanized, wrought iron railings to guard
the passageway.

Crane Accident.
On July 3, five Western dump cars were
being placed on a track in the forebay at the
Miraflores Locks, and failed to uncouple.
When the engine backed up a second time
to uncouple, a pin was drawn by the brake-
man before the cars stopped, and they struck
alocomotive crane belongingtotheMcClintic-
Marshall Construction Company, knocking
it over the mitre wall. The crane can be
repaired.

PERSONAL.

Major Edgar Jadwin has returned to the
Isthmus to await the arrival of orders directing
him to take command of the Nashville and
Chattanooga engineer districts, with head-
quarters at Nashville.



Knights Templar.

All Knights Templar and 32-degree Masons
on the Isthmus are requested to forward
their names to secretary, Panama Shriners'
Club, Gatun.

F. H. Wang, Secretary.

Empire Ladies' Auxiliary.

On Friday, July 7, the ladies' auxiliary of
the Empire Christian League held a mission-
ary meeting in the chapel, when the guest and
speaker was Miss Blackmore, who has been
engaged in missionary work in Nicaragua for
eight years. The auxiliary' held a public
meeting on Tuesday evening, July 11, when
Miss Blackmore was again the speaker.
The offerings at these meetings were pre-
sented to Miss Blackmore for use in her
work. On Sunday evening. July 30, the
auxiliary will hold a missionary meeting in
the chapel, beginning at 8 o'clock, when the
following program will be given: Hymn, by
the congregation; devotional, Mrs. H. A. A.
Smith, leader; song, "The Christian Flag,"
by Mrs. Helmer, assisted by a class of girls;
exercise, by seven little girls; review of the
study work of the year, by the leaders, Mrs.
Stephen Witt, .Mrs. A. A. Nellis, and Mrs.
Glaw; missionary hymn, by the auxiliary;
recitation, Miss Phyllis Kelly; offering; hymn,
by the congregation; closing prayer. The
offering will be devoted to missionary work
in the Canal Zone. At the recent sale held
at the clubhouse, the sum of $16 was made.
The auxiliary has completed the study of
the book "Western women in Eastern lands,"
and will begin a new work at the meeting on
August 4. The meetings of the organization
are held on the first and third Fridays in each
month; the program on the first Friday is
devoted to the study of mission work, and
on the second, the program consists of
miscellaneous papers on various topics.



Steam Shovel and Dredge Men.

Local 19, I. B. of S. S. and D. ML, will hold
their regular meeting on Sunday, July 16,
at Empire lodge hall at 12.15 p. m. AH
members are expected to attend.

A. Edmonson, Secretary and Treasurer.



Rodmen and Levelmen.

The examination to test the fitness of rod-
men and levelmen for promotion, announced
to be held at Culebra on Sunday, July 16,
has been postponed to Sunday, July li.



366



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 46.



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE.



Women's Clubs.
The Gatun Woman's Club held a social
meeting on Thursday afternoon, July 6, when
a program was given, consisting of a piano
selection by Miss Neville, songs by Mr.
Smith, and a series of charades under the
direction of Mrs. John Murray, assisted by
Miss Teese. Following the program, refresh-
ments were served. This meeting marked
the close of the club year. Officers were
elected for the ensuing year, as follows:
President, Mrs. W. H. Allen; vice-president,
Mrs. W. M. Martin; secretary, Mrs. George
H. A. Barte; treasurer, Mrs. J. F. Hanna.
The opening meeting for the next club year
will be held on October 5.



Baptist Church Extension Work.

The new Baptist church building in Empire,
the corner stone of which was laid in April,
is completed. The building, which is located
near the market, is a frame structure, with a
seating capacity of ISO, and cost $600. It
is sufficiently furnished for the conduct of
public worship, and, as soon as funds are
available, a bell and baptistery will be added.
This is the third building to be constructed
under the pastorate of the negro representa-
tive of the National Baptist Convention.
The church in Panama will celebrate its third
anniversary on July 16. The preacher at the
morning service will be the Rev. Harry
Compton, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal
Church in Panama, and the Rev. Carl H.
Elliott of the Cristobal Union Church will
preach at 3 o'clock. The church has recently
installed a new organ, which was purchased
for $500. The Panama Baptist Church is
organized with 260 members. The second
church is located at Pedro Miguel, and has
an organized congregation of 50 members.
The new church at Empire has a membership
of 35.



Adventist Church in Colon.

The members of the Seventh Day Adventist
Church, Colon, are desirous of erecting a new
church and mission building to replace the
one destroyed by fire in March, as soon as
funds are in hand to undertake the work. An
appeal, for the purpose of raising the money,
has been issued, and it is desired that all
who are interested in the work send their
contributions to the special secretary, fire
relief fund, Room 1, House 140, Cash
street, Colon, or to the pastor of the church,
H. C. Goodrich, Colon, or to the secretary of
any Commission clubhouse, designating, in
this case, the purpose for which the contri-
bution is made.



Fourth of July Events.

Between eleven o'clock in the morning
and five o'clock in the afternoon, 4,200 lunches
were served by the committee in charge of the
free lunches at the Fourth of July celebration
in Cristobal.

In lawn tennis, the singles were won by
Fechtig of Ancon, who defeated Ross of
Ancon, by the following score: First set, 1-6;
second set, 6-4; third set, 3-6; fourth set, 4-6.

The other contests resulted, as follows:

ATHLETIC EVENTS.

Pole vault — De Cora, 10 feet 4 inches, Barcroft,
10 feet 4 inches; Sims, 8 feet 10 inches: tie jump won
by De Cora.

Discus throw — Herring, 107 feet 8J inches; Sollen-
berger, 98 feet 11 inches; Shaffer. 08 feet 24 inches.

Shot put, 12 pounds — Herring, 45 feet ?J inches;



Sollenberger, 42 feet I J inches; Shaffer, 35 feet 9|
inches.

High jump — R. A. Koperski, 5 feet 3 inches; Clark,
5 feet 2 inches; L. Koperski, 5 feet 1 inch.

Broad jump — Herring, 20 feet 9 5-8 inches; Sollen-
berger, 18 feet 9 5-8 inches; Feld, 18 feet 1 7-8 inches.

100-yard run, boys — Jadwin. Lincoln, Warner; time,
12 2-5 seconds.

Boys' relay — Won by Gatun.

100-yard low hurdles — Kenealy, L. Koperski. Robi-
toy; time, 13 2-5 seconds.

100-yard run — Fitts. Earle, Robitoy; time. 11 2-5
seconds.

220-yard run — Herring, Tupper, Fitts; time, 25
seconds.

440-yard run, less 30 yards — Edwards, Meyers
E. L. Koperski; no time taken.

880-yard run, less 60 yards — Scherzberg, Mangle,