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Baron. F. A.
Barton, R. C.
Brown. Warren E.
Burrow. J. O.
Coleman. Miss Mabel
Cunningham, J. A.
Curtis, Karl P.
Dauphine, E. C.
Donir, C. L.
Droughom, Coar
Duncan, Charles
Fitzgerald, Joseph S.
Flaherty, Michael
Hamilton, A. H.
Healey, S. W.
Higley, Homer L.
Hoggatt, Anthony N.
Holman, F. R.



Hurtado. Ismael
Jasper, Grover R.
Kent, Mrs. T. L.
Langford.W. H.
Lissis. John
Lutz, Mrs, Chas. A.
Malsby.L. W.
Mayland, Jerome
Moeller., Leonard
Myers, Walter S.
O'Donnell. Ambrose
Oliver, Emil A.
Perkins, Mrs. S. (2d class)
Pierson, Harry W.
Pringle, W. A., Jr.
Scott, A.
Stroebel, Louis



Tide Table.

The following table shows the time of high and low
tides at Panama for the week ending July 19, 1911,
(75th meridian time) :



Date.


High.


Low.


High.


Low.


High.


July 13


A.M.
5.02
5.35


A.M.
11.15
11.52

12.05

12.43

1.22

2.03

2.50


P.M.
5.08
5.45
A.M.
6.10
6.47
7.27
S.08
8.55


P.M.
11.30


P.M.








12.30
1.10
1.51
2.38
3.25


6.21


July 16




7.00






7.42






8.28


July 19




9.20



The following vessels arrived at or departed from the
port of Balboa during the week ending July 8:

Arrivals — July 2, Belle of Spain, from San Francisco;
Newport, from San Francisco; Lansing, from Port
Harford; July 3. Ucayali, from Callao; July A.Ecuador,
from Guayaquil; July 5. Manavi, from Buenaventura;
Aysen, from Valparaiso.

Departures — July 2, Henry Vitlard. to San Francisco;
G. W. Fenwick, to San Francisco; July 3. Guatemala,
to Valparaiso; July 5, Belle of Spain, to south ports;
Lansing, to Port Harford.



The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama
P. uiroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
changes.

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.

Ancon P. R. R. . .Monday. . . July 10

Allianca P. R. R... .Thursday.. July 13

Panama P. R. R... .Wednesday. July 19

Advance P. R. R... .Tuesday July 25

Colon P. R. R... .Monday July 31

Allianca P. R. R.. . . Saturday . . . Aug. 5

Panama P. R. R... .Saturday. . .Aug. 12

Advance P. R. R... .Friday Aug. 18

Colon P. R. R... .Thursday.. .Aug. 24

Allianca P. R. R... .Wednesday .Aug. 30

Panama P. R. R... .Tuesday Sept. 5

Advance P. R. R... .Monday. . .Sept. 11

Colon P. R. R. . .Monday. ..Sept. 18

Allianca P. R. R. . . .Saturday. .Sept. 23

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.

Colon P. R. R... .Wednesday. July 19

Allianca P. R. R... .Tuesday July 25

Panama P. R. R... .Monday July 31

Advance P. R. R.. . . Sunday* . . . Aug. 6

Colon P. R. R... .Saturday. ..Aug. 12

Allianca P. R. R... .Friday Aug. 18

Panama P. R. R... .Thursday. . .Aug. 24

Advance P. R. R... .Wednesday. Aug. 30

Colon P. R. R... .Tuesday Sept. 5

Allianca P. R. R.. . Monday. .-. Sept. 11

Panama P. R. R.. .Sunday Sept. 17

Advance P. R. R. ..Saturday. ..Sept. 23

NEW YORK TO COLON.

Santa Marta U. F. C. .. .Thursday. . July 6

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Friday July 7

Clyde R. M Saturday. .July 8

Metapan U. F. C. . .Thursday.. July 13

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday. . July 15

Zacapa U. F. C. . .Thursday.. July 20

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. .H.-A Friday July 21

Atrato R. M Saturday. . July 22

Almirante U. F. C Thursday.. July 27

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. . .H.-A Saturday. . July 29

Santa Marta U. F. C Thursday.. .Aug. 3

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Friday Aug. 4

Thames R. M Saturday . . . Aug. 5

Metapan U.F. C. . . .Thursday.. .Aug. 10

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday. . . Aug. 1 2

COLON TO NEW YORK.

Almirante U. F. C. . .Thursday. . July 13

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm.. .H.-A Tuesday.. . July 18

Santa Marta U. F. C. . . . Thursday. .July 20

Prinz Sigismund ...... H.-A Saturday . . . July 22

Thames R. M Tuesday. . . July 25

Metapan U. F. C. . .Thursday. . July 27

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday. . . . Aug. 1

Zacapa U. F. C — Thursday.. .Aug. 3

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. .H.-A Saturday. ..Aug. 5

Almirante U. F. C. . .Thursday.. .Aug. 10

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. . . H.-A Tuesday . . . Aug. 1 5

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.

Abangarez U. F. C Saturday. .July 8

Atenas U. F. C. . .Saturday. . July 15

Turrialba U. F. C. . .Saturday . . July 22

Abangarez U. F. C Saturday . . . July 29

Atenas U. F. C Saturday . . . Aug. 5

Turrialba U. F. C Saturday. . .Aug. 12

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.

Turrialba U. F. C. . .Thursday. . July 13

Abangarez U. F. C. . .Thursday.. July 20

Atenas U. F. C. . Thursday.. July 27

Turrialba U. F. C. . Thursday. . .Aug. 3

Abangarez U. F. C. . .Thursday. . .Aug. 10

Atenas U. F. C. . .Thursday.. .Aug. 17

Hamburg-American steamers leave Colon for New
York via Kingston at 10 a. m. on sailing dates. The
Prinz August Wilhelm and Prinz Joachim call at
Santiago de Cuba, on both outward and homeward
voyages. A ship will leave Colon for Bocas del Toro
at 5 p. m. on July 12, and August 9; and for Port
Limon at 5 p. m., on July 12, July 26, and August 9.

TheLeyland line steamer William Cliff sails for New
Orleans, via Port Limon, on or about July 29.

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alternate
Tuesdays, at 12 noon; for Southampton on alternate
Tuesdays at 10 a. m.

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans
direct leave on Thursdays at 3 p. m.; ships for New
York via Kingston on Thursday at 11 a. m.; for Bocas
del Toro on Monday at 6 p. m.



CANAL




RECORD



Volume IV.



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 1911.



No. 47.



The Canal Record

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of
the Isthmian Canal Commission.



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold rolL
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five
cents each.

Address all Communications m

THE CANAL RECORD,

Ancon, Canal Zone,

Isthmus of Panama.

No communication, either for publication or requesting
information, will receive attention unless signed with the
full name and address of the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.

Chairman's Report.

The report of the Chairman of the Isthmian
Canal Commission for the month of June is
published in full in other columns of this issue
of The Canal Record. It gives a detailed
account of the progress of Canal work in all
departments and divisions.



Work North of Gatun Locks.

Work has been begun on a coffer-dam which
will be built across the north end of the lower
lock at Gatun to prevent water from entering
the lock pit during the removal of an earthen
dike, containing about 500,000 cubic yards
of material, which now serves as the only
barrier. The arrangement will also permit
of an uninterrupted continuance of operations
within the lock while the removal of the dike
is in progress. The site of the dam will be
at the caisson sill of the lock, and the struc-
ture will be built of sheet piling, caulked and
battened, supported by concrete piers, 43
feet high and 18 inches thick, spaced 10 feet
from center to center It will be of sufficient
strength to resist a 40-ioot head of water,
which is about the depth of the existing
artificial basin, north of the lock- When the
dam is completed, a suction dredge will be
brought up the French canal and through a
small channel connecting it with the basin,
and set to work on the dike, the material
being wasted to one side. When the dredge
has finished operations, it will be removed,
the open water channel closed, and the pit
unwatered and cleaned out, after which, the
work of constructing the approach wall can
be started. There will be no further use for
the coffer-dam after the water has been
pumped out of the basin, and it will be taken
down, the piers being blasted to pieces.



Hardwood Ties.
About 8,000 hardwood ties have been
received by the Panama Railroad Company
to date, for use on the permanent line. These
ties are purchased in Colombia, and are
shipped via the Royal Mail Steam Packet
Company's vessels from the ports of Sa vanilla



and Barranquilla. The majority of the ties
are hewn from guaiacum.or lignum vitae,but
three other classes of hardwood are accepted,
namely, polvillo, corteza, and balsamo. On
account of the hardness of the wood, the ties
have to be bored for the spike. A special
tie-boring and gaining machine is used,
which adzes two parallel faces to form the
seat for the tie plate, and bores a hole to
receive the spike. A patent tie plate and
screw spike are used. This equipment holds
the rails to absolute gage, and guards
against a tendency for the rails to spread.
A good many of the softwood ties on the
permanent track between Panama and Co-
rozalhave been replaced with hardwood, and
the same equipment has been extended to
other sections of the permanent, or relocated
line, where 90-pound rails are being laid.



Dredge No. 6 to be Raised.

After raising, an attempt will be made to
repair ladder dredge No. 6, which sank on
June 19, in the Canal channel, near its inter-
section with the French canal. In going
down, the vessel turned over on its side, and
now lies in such a position that its tumblers
are lower down than the hull, making its
raising a difficult matter. The dredge has
been in service for the greater part of 26 years,
and many of the plates in its hull were in
bad condition. It was valued at S35.000.



Widening Stalls in Panama Railroad Corral.

One hundred and forty-four stalls, out of a
total of 256, in the Panama Railroad Com-
pany's corral on the Mount Hope road, will
be widened from four feet to five feet four
inches, by removing every fourth post and
partition. The change is made to furnish
better accommodation for the larger animals,
and it will reduce the number of stalls in this
part of the corral from 144 to 108, a loss of 36.
This is partly offset by an increase in the
monthly rental from $2.50 to S3, the net
monetary loss, providing all the enlarged
stalls are occupied, being S36 monthly. The
remaining 4-foot stalls, to the number of 112,
are principalis rented by East Indian and
colored cartmen, whose animals are uni-
formly undersized, and have plenty of room
in their present a commodations.



Visit of the Secretary of War.
The Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson,
accompanied by Mrs. Stimson, his secretary,
W. R. Pedigo, and Brigadier General Clarence
Edwards, Chief of the Bureau of Insular
Affairs, arrived on the Isthmus on the Santa
Marta, July 13, and is the guest of Col.
Goethals at Culebra. On July 13, he walked
through the south half of Culebra Cut from
Pedro Miguel Locks to Empire, and climbed
the 106 steps that lead from the excavation
to the hill on which the division office is
situated. That afternoon, he made a formal
call on President Arosemena in Panama.



On July 15, he walked through the north half
of Culebra Cut from Empire to Matachin,
and that evening attended the benefit for
the sufferers from the wreck of the steamship
Taboga at the National Theatre in Panama.
On July 17, he spent the morning at Gatun
Locks and Dam, and in the afternoon
attended a reception in honor of himself and
Mrs. Stimson, tendered by President Arose-
mena at the Presidencia in Panama. On
July 18, he inspected the work at the Atlantic
entrance to the Canal, and in and about
Colon. On July 19, he will inspect the work
of the Pacific Division. It is planned to leave
the Isthmus on the battleship North Carolina,
now at anchor in Limon Bay, on Sunday,
July 23, for Porto Rico, whence the Secretary
and his party will go to Havana, making a
short stop en route at Santo Domingo.
Brigadier General E. H. Crowder, Judge
Advocate General of the Army, who arrived
on the Isthmus on July 18, will accompany
Secretary Stimson to Porto Rico and Cuba.



Atlantic Terminal Work.

Two lines of trestle have been started, the
work of filling has been begun, and the first
of the steel cylinders for the dock foundation
is being driven in connection with the con-
struction of the Atlantic terminal at Cristobal.
One of the trestles has been extended for a
distance of about 1,000 feet into the harbor,
following the line of the proposed mole; the
other parallels the water front, and extends
along the site of the first of the five reinforced
concrete docks.

The material for the fill is obtained from
one of the small hills, east of the Mount Hope
road, where a borrow pit was recently opened.
One steam shovel is now at work there, and
another will be added as the filling increases.
Three trains are employed in transporting the
material, and about 1,400 cubic yards are
excavated and dumped daily, the greater
part of it at present, however, being used in
making the fill back of the new sea wall on
Colon beach. The material procured from the
hill is a mixture of earth and argillaceous
sandstone.

The work of sinking the preliminary steel
cylinder was begun on Monday, July 10, on
the site of the first dock. The method em-
ployed is to sink a 25-foot section of the
cylinder into the bottom of the harbor, then
to bolt on a 5-foot section, driving it down
until the top is about two feet above water
level, and repeating the operation. The
cylinder is forced downward by the blows
of a pile driver hammer striking a hardwood
buffer placed over the top of it. The steel
sections, now used, are put together at Gor-
gona shops, but the greater part of this ma-
terial will be purchased in the States, as-
sembled there, and shipped to the Isthmus
ready to be bolted on. The present cylinder
is being driven through a coral rock formation,
and will reach solid bottom at a depth of about



370



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 47.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.



(Continued.)



46 feet. When sunk, the material from the
inside will be removed, and the space filled
with concrete.

A track system in connection with the dock
construction work has been laid from the
Cristobal yards, through a section of the
settlement, to the beach, where the track
branches off, one line going out on either
trestle. A temporary track has also been laid
along Roosevelt avenue, thereby closing it
to traffic, for the purpose of removing the
concrete blocks, which formed a protection
wall along the Cristobal water front. Some
of these blocks are being put to temporary
use in front of the proposed sea wall on Colon
beach, to form a barrier against heavy seas
while the work is going on. They will be
returned, after they have served their pur-
pose, and used with the others in making a
facing on the land side of the new docks.

A new 13-lever interlocking plant, which
will operate five switches, three locks, and six
signals, has been installed at Cristobal, in
connection with the track system, and
another 8-lever plant will be established near
the line leading out from the borrow pit.



Gatun Dam Spillway.

The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun
Dam is over 64 per cent completed, 145,542
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having
been placed at the close of work on July 15.
A statement of the amount laid each working
day last week, and of the total in place,
follows:



Date.


Concrete
Laid.


Hours
worked.


No.
Mixers.


July 10


306
156
220
220
221
226


8.15
6.00
8.00
7.10
7.30
7.30


j


July 11


1


July 12.


1


July 13




July 14


2


July 15


1






Total

Previously reported . . .


1,349
144,193


44.25


1.17




145.542





Ancon Crusher.

A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon
quarry during the week ending July 15,
follows:



Date.



Cubic
Yards.



July 10.
July 11.
July 12.
July 13.
July 14.
July 15.

Total




Stowaways Become Canal Laborers.

Sixty-five stowaways, 52 from Trinidad,
and 13 from Barbados, were brought into
port at Colon on Thursday, July 13. by the
Atrato of the Royal Mail Steam Packet
Company. Under the Panamanian immi-
gration law, adult immigrants, except con-
tract laborers for the Canal work, must have
S15, United States currency, or its equivalent,
in their possession before being entitled to
land. The stowaways could not comply with
this requirement, and theagent of the steamship
company gave a bond of $100, United States
currency, for each of them. In the transfer to



shore, seven managed to make their escape
unseen, and the bonds in their case, aggre-
gating $700, became forfeited. The remaining
58 men were kept in the railroad warehouse
under police surveillance until Friday after-
noon, when the Quartermaster's Department
of the Canal Commission offered to take them
over, provided all charges against them for



passage, and other expenses, were'removed.
The offer was accepted, and the^men^were
assigned to work.

The Atrato also brought 50 contract laborers,
recruited in the West Indies.fortheCanalforce.
This is the first lot of laborers to arrive on
the Isthmus under contract since January,
1910.



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS.



About 58 per cent of the concrete for all the locks is in place, the amount at the close of
work on July 15 being 2,444,131 \ cubic yards, out of a total of approximately 4,284,400. A
total of 30, 515 j cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the week ending July 15.

GATUN LOCKS.

Over 70 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been
laid, the amount in place at the close of the work on July 15 being l,461,225jcubic yards, out
of a total of 2,085,000.

A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each working day for the week
ending July 15, and of the total, follows; and a similar statement for the work in the Spillway
of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The construction plant works 12 hours
daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours.



Date.



Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.



Concrete Hours No. of
placed, worked, mixers



July 10

July tl

July 12

July 13

July 14

July 15

♦Portable mixers .



Cu. Yds
2,004
1,982
2,444
2,190
1,784
1,758



34.51
32.17
39.20
34.20
29.10
28.26



4.384J



49.50



1,263 J



Total

Previously reported

Grand total 1,461 ,225 J



A-uxiliaey Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.



Concrete
placed.



Hours ; No. of
worked, mixers



Cu. Yds.
658
762
798
552
678
594
342 1



7.56
8.44
7.40
8.40
8.40
8.10



Large
stone.



Total.



Cu. Yds.
244
188
252
170
193 J
216



Cu. Yds.

2.906
2,932
3,494
2,912
2.655J
2,568
3421



17,810i
1,443.415



*The 342J yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days ;
July 10th. 50; July 11th, S0J; July 12th, 66; July 13th, 39J; July 14th, 82; July 15th. 54}.

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS.

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is about 81 per cent completed, 684,456 cubic
yards, out of a total of 837,400, having been placed at the close of work on July 15. The
record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows:





Auxiliary Plant.


Large
stone.




Date.


2-cubic yard mixers.


1-cubic yard mixer.

Concrete Hours No. of
placed, worked, mixers


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours , No. of
worked, mixers






Cm. Yds.
648
752
644
732
400
354


16.50
12.75
16.00
18.00
12 00
10.00


3
3
3
3
3
2


Cu. Yds.
212
198
236
238
252
253


13.50
12.00
16.50
21.75
20.25
21.00


2
3
3
3
3
3


Cu. Yds.

2
7


Cu. Yds.
860


July 11.


950


July 12.


880


July 13


972




659


July 15


607








3,530


85.25


2.83


1.389


105.00


2.83


9

4,406


4,928




679,528




















4,415


684,456



















MIRAFLORES locks.
About 22 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Mirarlores was in
place on July 15, the total amount on that date being 298,450 cubic yards, out of a total of
approximately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week,
follows:



Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.



Auxiliary Plant.



2-cubic yard mixers.



1-cubic yard mixer.



Concrete Hours No. of Concrete Hours No. of Concrete Hours No. of Large
placed. I worked. ' mixers placed, worked, i mixers placed. 1 worked. I mixers



Total.



July 10.. .


Cu. Yds.

934

1.010

686

830

1,110

1,058


24.83
18.17
16.33
18.33
20.50
20.17


4
4
4
4
4
4


Cu. Yds.






Cu. Yds.
207
241
165
118
222
238


16.00
20.00
13.00
10.50
20.50
19.50


2
3
3
2
3
3


Cu. Yds.


Cu. Yds.
1,141


July 11.. .


:::::::: ::




1,251


July 12.. .






851


July 13.. .
July 14...
July 15...


92
430
436


2.50
12.00
10.00


2

2
2


1,040
1,762
1,732


Total . .
Previously


5,628


118.33


4


958


24.50


1


1,191


99 50


2.67


3,693


7,777
290,673
























Grand


3.693


298.450

























July 19, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



371



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE.



Church Work.

The quarterly meeting of the Isthmian
Sunday School Association, with an election
of officers, was held in Gorgona on Sunday
afternoon, July 9. There were present the
officers of the association and three delegates
from each of the federated schools. An address
was delivered by the Rev. Harry Compton,
and the subject discussed was the relation of
the Sunday school superintendent to the
school. Messrs. Putnam and Marsh were the
leaders. Officers were elected, as follows:
President, Rev. A. A. Nellis of Empire; vice-
president, A. H. Warner of Culebra; secre-
tary, E. G. Putnam of Cristobal; treasurer,
J. H. Marsh of Gorgona.

The Isthmian Ministers' Association held
a conference at the Methodist college,
Panama, on Monday afternoon, July 10.
Mr. Victor Kennedy was the speaker. There
were eight members of the association present.
The next meeting will be held in the Baptist
church, near the railroad. Culebra, on Mon-
day, August 7. The association distributes
literature on moral issues.

Thirty-five pupils of the Union Sunday
school, Cristobal, have been presented with
Bibles as reward for regular attendance since
the beginning of the year. The Sunday school
has a large membership, and an average
attendance of 100.

The Ladies' Aid Society of the Union
Church has taken up the study of missionary
work in the Orient. The society has 25 mem-
bers, with Mrs. W. T. Harrison as president.

The meeting of the Ladies' Aid Society of
the Methodist Episcopal Church, Panama,
will be held at the home of Mrs. E. M.
Keyser in Ancon, on Thursday afternoon,
July 20, at 2.30 o'clock.



Social Work in Colon.

The municipal authorities of Colon pro-
mulgated a decree on July 6, whereby all
minors of 18 years old and under, are
ordered to be taken to the Colon Hospital
for examination of the throat, in connection
with the current mild epidemic of diptheria
in the city. Special sanitary rules have also
been issued to insure against spread of the
disease, and the health office at Cristobal has
circulated a list of rules giving preventive
measures, prohibiting the use of common
drinking cups, and promiscuous handling of
infected articles by children. In accordance
with an order issued by the Colon authorities,
the common drinking cup is to be abolished
in the schools of the city, and each pupil will
be required to furnish an individual cup, as
in the Canal Zone schools. At the Fourth of
July dance at the Lincoln House, Colon, the
committee furnished 2,000 asceptic drinking
cups as a preventive and sanitary measure.

The next free lecture for the people of Colon
will be held in the schoolroom of Christ church
on Thursday evening, July 27. All persons
interested in these lectures on practical sani-
tation and other instructive subjects are
invited to attend. Seats are reserved for
Americans. The lecture will be delivered by
one of the physicians of the Colon Hospital
staff.



Vacation School in Gatun.

The first vacation school in the Canal Zone
was opened in the schoolroom in Gatun on
July 3, with 30 pupils. Sessions are held



every morning, with the exception of Saturday,
from 8.30 to 11.30 o'clock. On Mondays,
Wednesdays, and Fridays, kindergarten
classes are held in the afternoon. The school
will close on August 8.



Odd Fellows Installation.

The following officers of Pacific Lodge, No.
4, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, were
installed by District Deputy Grand Sire
B. F. Sisson of Gatun, on Thursday evening,
July 13: Noble grand, J. S. George; vice-
grand, A. S. Curtis; treasurer, Joseph Turrell;
warden, C. C. J. Wirz; conductor, F. T.