Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

Canal Record (Volume 4 no.1-52) online

. (page 153 of 168)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook

capacity of 1,100 cubic feet of free air per
minute, has been transferred to the Pacific
Division from the Panama Railroad company's
shop at Cristobal, and will be installed on the
west bank of the lower lock. Steam for the
same will be supplied from two old French
engines.



Dynamite Explosion at Ancon Quarry.

A premature explosion of dynamite oc-
curred at Ancon quarry about 2 p. m., on
Wednesday, July 19, killing four men and
seriously injuring two others. The dead are:
Charles Jolly, Jamaican, check No. 105255;
Ernesto Roman, Panamanian, check No.
119814; Felipe Torres, Salvadorean, check
No. 119822; and Felipe Martinez, Pana-
manian, nonemploye. The injured were:
Leopold Maxwell, Jamaican, check No.
74707, and Manuel Lopez, a Spanish contract
laborer, check No. 3867.

Just before the explosion, Jolly, Torres,
and a third man were each carrying a 50-



pound box of dynamite from the magazine
to a place where a blast was to be set off.
When about 300 feet distant from steam
shovel No. 255, situated on one of the
quarry levels, the man in advance placed
his box on a pile of old ties for a moment's
rest. The man second inline did likewise as
he came up, and, as far as can be learned,
the explosion occurred at this instant. The
third man, who was 30 or 40 feet away from
the place, saw the flash, threw his box of
dynamite on the ground, and fled up the
track. The box was broken in its fall, and its
contents, although scattered about, tailed
to explode. Roman, employed as a water
boy, was standing near by in company with
Martinez, and both were killed. Maxwell
and Lopez, the injured men, will probably
recover. The cause of the explosion is not
known.



The steamer Cristobal will sail from New
York on July 27.



LABOR FORCE AND QUARTERS IN JUNE.



The lack of common laborers for the Canal and railroad work, noted in The Canal Record
of June 14, continued throughout June. In the opinion of the Chief Quartermaster, this want
is not due to an actual decrease in the number of laborers in the Canal Zone, and the contiguous
parts of Panama, but to the idleness of many of the laboring class. There is also a steady
increase in the number of negroes cultivating small patches of land in the Canal Zone, and
giving up work on the Canal and railroad for farming in the bush.

The total force at work on the Canal and railroad on June 28 was 32,690, as compared
with 34,233 on May 31. and with 35,578in June, 1910. Canal employes numbered 26,087,
and Panama railroad, 6,603. The number of "gold," or white American employes in June,
1911, was 4,292, as compared with 4,367 in June, 1910. The force report follows:





SILVER EMPLOYES.*



O








Artisans.


European
Laborers.


West Indian
Laborers.


5

H
•0
a
£



Department.




s


a


V

u
3

14


a

V

u

CM

to
18

i


u

m

CM


a

V

u
o

CM


»

a
n
u


to

V

o

o

CM


00

V

o


to

C

V

u

o

CM


a
a

V

u


X

a

a*
u


s

a

V

o

o


a

V

u

C~


Total
Silver.


Const'et'n and Eng'r'ng.
Civil Administration


4.143
194
689

943

608

7

5


218
2
2

115
1


602
4
3

151
1


2,206
18
5
93


2,680


832


110


461


3,703


2.176

10

321

821


232

"9'
t6


17,395

228

1.040

2.510

610

7

5


3,195
362
373
202
51
24
85


20,590
590


5

273






1
3


5
44


1.413


44


16


2,712




661




















31


Examinat'n of Accounts.


























90






























6.589


14


19


33S


761


2,322


2.958


S76


126


465


3.752


3,328


247


21,795


4,292


26,087




6.810


14


345


801


2,542 , 2,933


1,026


128


510


3,816


3,651 :73


22.867


4.362


27,229

































Panama railroad force, 3.534; Panama railroad relocation force. 2,000; Panama railroad commissary force
1,069. Total 6.603 I. C. C. force. 26 087. Grand total. 32.690.

*A11 wages speciSed are in gold, tlncludes four 5-cent employes.

The employes in the Department of Construction and Engineering on June 28 were
distributed, as follows:







SILVER EMPLOYES


*






•6

o

a

o






Artisans.


European
Laborers.


West Indian
Laborers.


2


Division.


B
o

S


a

u

6
6
?


in
u

CM

"2


CO

a

V

o
*n

2
?1


10

a
a*




CM


a

u


X

a

V

u



CM


X

a

V

u


X

z

CJ
o

CM


X

a

V

U


x

a

V
u

CO


a

a

o


CO

C

V

u


Total
Silver.


-c
a
a
u





44

208

1,834

1.067


1

50
293
104
154












175
716
SS5
832
1,095






222
1,528
5,734
6,221
3.690


175
772


397




399
903
434
470


63

738

1.526


8
456
91






46

399

1.518

213


9
48
119
56


2,300


Atlantic


14 101
. 31
2 6*


'fjj


57
404


896 6,630
77S 6.999




990 ..


353 277 17 . ...


574 4,264


Total


4.143
4.356


14

14


18 218


602
642


2,206

2.4'2


2.630 332 110| 461


3.703 2.176


232


17.395


3,195 20.590


Month previous


17


227


2.6S8 ' 997 'llO 510


3,799 ' 2.576


252


18.600


3,280


21.880



QUARTERS.

On July 1, there were 23,438 occupants of Commission quarters. Of this number, there
werej9,406 white Americans, including 5,364 men, 2,070 women, and 1,972 children. There
were 5,573 Europeans, of whom 4,997 were men, 239 were women, and 337 were children.
There were 8,459 negroes, of whom 5,996 were men, 1,082 were women, and 1,381 were children.

The above figures include 40 Asiatics at Balboa, and two at Porto Bello.



380



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 48.



CRANES FOR BALBOA WHARF.



Eight Machines to be Purchased to Increase
Handling Facilities at Pacific Terminus.

Award has been authorized for eight 4-ton
electric cargo handling cranes for the pier
at Balboa, the Pacific entrance to the Canal,
to the Maine Electric Company, at $10,465.75
per crane, plus $372 per crane for special
installation, plus $627.32 per crane for
magnetic control; total per crane, $11,465.07;
total for eight cranes, $91,720.56.

Bids were originally opened on February 1,
nine being received, and award was authorized
to the Cleveland Crane and Engineering
Company. On account of changes made in
the plans, it was urged by other bidders that
new bids should be requested, and this was
done. The new bids were opened on June
22, and were sent to the Isthmus for can-
vass. There were seven, and the lowest was
accepted.

The difference between high and low tide
at Balboa is about 20 feet. The cranes must
move along the face of the dock, and handle
cargo from ships through the legs of the
cranes into the covered portion of the pier,
and were designed to meet these conditions.
They consist of a structural steel framework,
and a hinged vertical swinging steel boom.
They must be able to hoist a load of four
tons, at a distance of 40 feet from center
of crane to center of ship, through a maxi-
mum height of 90 feet, at a speed of 300
feet per minute, trolley it along the boom at
a speed of 600 feet per minute, and deliver
it upon the wharf within one minute from the
beginning of the operation. The tower must
be able to move along the dock at the rate
of 100 feet per minute against a wind pressure
of 30 miles an hour.

These cranes will be delivered within eight
months of the time of signing the contract,
and will be erected one by one, in order that
the cranes which they replace may be used
as much as possible during the erection.
This installation is part of the effort to in-
crease temporarily, the handling facilities at
the Pacific terminus of the Panama railroad.



Fatally Burned by Alcohol Explosion.

Elizabeth Bailey, aged 25 years, a Jamaican
servant in the family of Mr. L. G. Thom at
Gatun, tried to light the kitchen fire with
alcohol on the morning of July 22. The
alcohol exploded, burning her so badly about
the upper part of the body that she died at
Colon Hospitala few hours later. Mr. Thom
suffered burns on both hands in trying to
smother the fire that was consuming the
servant's clothing.



Church School and Orphanage in Colon.

A two-story concrete building for edu-
cational and charitable purposes is under
construction on Panama railroad land in
Colon, adjacent to the Church of the Im-
maculate Conception, of which the Rev.
Josei P. Volk is the resident priest. The
building is 133 feet long, 45 feet wide, and
the walls, which have recently been com-
pleted to the second story, are 24 inches wide,
with a base 30 inches wide, and a foundation
below the surface of the ground five feet in
width. The walls are made of coral rock
concrete, the rock having been obtained
from the excavation for the D street storm
sewer. The lower floor is provided with
numerous windows and doors, including a
wide arched entrance on each of the two



street sides. Both floors will be made of
cement, and the upper one will rest on iron
girders. Work on the building was begun in
1907, and has been prosecuted in gradual
stages, the funds having been furnished from
the Rev. Father Volk's personal resources,
and, in addition, he has worked on it with
his own hands. It is designed to use the build-
ing as a place for holding public meetings, as
well as for a schoolroom and orphanage.



Postal Business and Canal Zone Revenues.

The report of the Director of Posts for the
month of June^shows that 18,228 money
orders were issued, amounting to $438,054.55.
Of this amount, $323,144.91 was issued pay-
able in the United_States, $114,293.14 in the
Canal Zone, $388 in Martinique, and $228.50
in Costa Rica. The fees collected amounted
to $1,956.70, and the amount of orders paid
and repaid was $135,934.63.

Postal sales during the month amounted
to $6,672.65, and newspaper postage to 65
cents.

The revenue collections for the month were,
as follows:

Distillation licenses $ 306.74

Motor vehicle licenses 52.00

Retail liquor licenses 29,000.00

Bills collected for treasurer 67.74

Total $29,426.48

Profit From Marine Minstrel Show.
The minstrel show by the men of the
U. S. M. C. at Camp Elliott, at the National
Theatre in Panama, on the night of July 3,
made a gross earning of $956.10, and net of
$204.76. One-half of the net earnings go to
the post exchange at Camp Elliott, and the
other half to the Fourth of July committee.

Veterans of Foreign Service.
Canal Zone Post, No. 40, American Veter-
ans of Foreign Service will hold a meeting,
in the District Court room, building No. 1,
Cristobal, on Saturday, July 29, at 8 p. m.,
for the purpose of electing officers. All charter
members are requested to be present.

W. D. Rogers, Adjutant.
Gatun, C. Z.. July 23, 1911.

Injunction Case.

The argument in the application for an
injunction against the Panama Railroad
Company, made by Horatio L. Stevenson,
for the purpose of restraining the company
from excavating in a hill east of the Mount
Hope road, was heard in the Circuit Court of
the Third Judicial Circuit, at Cristobal, on
Monday, July 24, having been postponed
from July 20. The matter was taken under
advisement by Justice Brown.



Census of the Canal Zone.

The Department of Civil Administration
has been directed to prepare for a thorough
census of the Canal Zone. A census was taken
in 1908, the period covering March 3 to
June 23.

Knights of Pythias.

Paradise Company, No. 4, Uniformed Rank,
Knights of Pythias, a new company, will be
mustered in at Paraiso lodge hall on Saturday
evening, July 29. The following officers will
be installed: Captain, George D. Morton;
first lieutenant, John D. Harper; second
lieutenant, Harry L. Bridges; recorder ser-
geant L. L. Hyer. Captain Frank L. Cornish
of Gatun will be the mustering officer. All
members of the Uniformed Rank are invited



to attend. Other companies in the Canal
Zone are, as follows: Panama Company,
No. 1, at Gatun; Empire Company, No. 2,
at Empire; Cascade Company, No. 3, at Las
Cascadas. There are about 200 members in
all. The new company has 25 members.



Employes Rates to South America.

The Pacific Steam Navigation Company,
and the South American Steamship Company,
have made a rate of 10 per cent off from regu-
lar fare for employes of the Commission
traveling south of Panama, first-class, in
parties of from six to ten persons, and a rate
of 20 per cent off for parties of more than
ten persons. The ships of these companies
call at points in Ecuador, Peru, and Chile.



Ancon Crusher.

A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon
quarry during the week ending July 22,
follows:



Date.



Cubic
Yards.



July 17.
July 18.
July 19.
July 20.
July 21.
July 22.

Total




2.565
2,148
2,568
2,227
2,419
2,522



14,449



Missing Men.

Any one having information regarding the
present whereabouts of Edward C. Morgan,
who is supposed to have come to the Isthmus,
is requested to communicate with The
Canal Record, Ancon, C. Z.

Information is requested regarding the
present whereabouts of Richard O'Brien of
Concord, N. H., who was employed on the
Canal from April 29, 1905, to September IS,
1909.

Information is desired regarding the present
whereabouts of Albert M. Henry of Keystone,
W. Va.. who was employed on the Canal from
April 5 to July 1, 1909.

Information is requested by the American
Consulate in Panama regarding the where-
abouts of Frederick William Schreiber, a
photographer, who is supposed to have come
to the Isthmus in April, 1911.



The Washington office has issued a circular
under date of June 24, containing information
for inspectors on duty in the United States,
under the direction of the Isthmian Canal
Commission.



Tug Service to Porto Bello, Nombre de Dlos, and
Toro Point.

Effective June 26, the following schedule will be
maintained between Dock 13, Cristobal, Nombre de
Dios, Porto Bello, and Toro Point:

Tug Reliance will leave Dock 13 daily, except Sun-
days, at 7 a. m.. with two barges for Nombre de Dios,
returning at once with two barges to Gatun.

Tug Mariner will leave Dock 13 daily, except Sun-
days, at 9 a. m., with three barges for Porto Bello,
returning to Gatun as soon as barges are loaded.

Tug Porto Bello will leave Dock 13 Saturdays at 9
a. m.. light, for Porto Bello. This tug will leave Porto
Bello, light, at 2 p. m., arriving at Dock 4, Colon, in
time for passengers to catch train No. 7, leaving Colon
at 4.35

Tug Porto Bello will leave Dock 13 Sundays at 7
p. m., for Porto Bello, returning at once.

Tug Mariner will leave Dock 13 daily, except Sun-
days, at 6.30 a. m., for Toro Point, returning at once.

Tug Mariner will leave Dock 13 Sundays at 9.30
a. m.. for Toro Point, returning at once

A tug will leave Dock 13 on Wednesdays, Saturdays,
and Sundays, at 4.30 p. m., for Toro Point, returning
at 5.30 p. m.

A tug will leave Dock 13 on the 20th of each
monthat 6 a. m., for Porto Bello and Nombre de Dios,
returning to arrive at Dock 4, Colon, about 4.30 p. m.



July 26, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



381



CULEBRA CUT SLIDES.

New Estimate to Cover Material in Motion.

Additional breaks in the banks of Culebra
Cut have caused the Central Division to
revise its estimate of excavation yet to be
done in that section of the Canal by adding
5,257,281 cubic yards. From the first of the
fiscal year, therefore, the amount of excava-
tion estimated for the Cut is, as follows:

Cubic Yards.

Excavated to July 1, 1911 65,514.865

To be excavated 23,929,140

Total 89,444,005

The estimate of December, 1908, for exca-
vation in Culebra Cut was 7S, 0-12, 295 cubic
yards, and, on July 1, 1910, there were added
5,467,150 cubic yards to allow for slides, and
1,005,938 cubic yards to cover breaking
beyond the slope line, below the berm at
95 feet above sea level.

The addition of 5,257,281 cubic yards for
slides, on account of developments during
the past j'ear, will not affect the total cost
as estimated in December, 1908, nor the
estimated time of completion. The cost per
cubic yard was estimated in December, 1908,
as 98 cents, and the most recent cost state-
ment, that for the quarter ending March 31,
shows a cost per cubic yard for that quarter
of 56.92 cents, and a cost per cubic yard for
the whole period — May, 1904, to March 31,
1911 — of 88.01 cents. It was believed, when
the estimate of 1908 was made, that the
excavation in Culebra Cut could not con-
tinue for more than a year at the rate then
established. This rate has not only been
maintained, but it has been increased, owing
to increased efficiency in the working force.

The statement published below gives, in
tabular form, the history of the slides in



Culebra Cut to July 1, 1911. It will be noticed
that there remained on that date to be exca-
vated from slides 5,868,120 cubic yards, and
that 10,757,658 cubic yards had been exca-
vated. Of the excavation still remaining, that
from slides represents, therefore, 25 per cent.
In the fiscal year, the excavation from this
source amounted to 4,879,378 cubic yards.

The largest of the slides are those at
Culebra, on both east and west banks, and
the well-known Cucaracha slide, on the east
bank immediately south of Gold Hill. This
last appears to be nearly exhausted. For
two months, the berm at 95 feet above sea
level has been established in front of it, and
the only movement noticeable is a small
amount of mud carried down by the rains.
There is none of the movement that for so
long carried a whole section of the bank
irresistibly towards the prism, sweeping away
construction tracks, and pushing 100-ton
steam shovels before it.

At Culebra, the plan of excavating the
moving banks from the top of the slope has
been in execution since January, the result
being to remove the material before it slides
into the Cut and interferes with drainage
ditches and construction tracks, and also to
lighten the mass, so that it will be less likely
to slide. On the west bank, the slide includes
the location of part of the village of Culebra,
and, during the fiscal year, there were
demolished at this place 19 old French
buildings, while 37 American buildings were
moved to other sites.

The total amount of material remaining
in the slides in Culebra Cut represents about
three and one-half times the excavation from
that section during the month of June.

The statement referred to above, follows:



Location of


Area of


Cu. Yds.


Cu. Yds.


Cu. Yds.


Date




Slides by


slide


of material


material


exc'd year


when slide


Remarks.


Station to Station.


in acres.


remaining.


exc'd
to date.


end'g July
1. 1911.


first
developed.




1515+50—1521+50. .


1.60


70.000


111,079


111,079


Sept. 1910


East side, opposite Bas Obispo


1541+74 — 1544+50. .


0.60




18,064




Sept. 1908


East side, opposite Haut Obispo


1562+80 — 1566+04. .


0.60


30,000


43,301


18,789


Nov. 1908


West side, Buena Vista.


1579+00—1593+00. .


8.30


30.000


500.640


360,166


Feb. 1908


East side, Las Cascadas.


1598+50—1607+00. .


4.60


40,000


286,000


134.000


Oct. 1908


East side, Whitehouse.


1619+50—1628+00. .


2.90




145.000


119,000


Oct. 1909


East side.


1661+50—1665+00. .


1.70




19,988


13,128


Dec. 1909


East side, upper La Pita.


1661+00—1663+00. .


0.30




30.120


30,120


May 1910


East side, lower La Pita.


1667+00 — 1669+00. .


0.90


10.000


63,000


63,000


Sept. 1910


West side, Cunette.


1726+00—1796+00. .


46.60


3.391,300


3,714,562


1,475,776


Oct. 1907


West side. Culebra.


1796+00—1804+00..


2.60


182,470


240.300


90.688


Jan. 1907


Westside, No. Contractor's Hill


1754+00 — 1796+00. .


31.60


1,664.350


2.329.784


1.454,081


Jan. 1908


East side. Culebra.


1804+00—1832+00..


47.10


400.000


2.722,164


716.746


July 1905


East side, Cucaracha.


1811+50 — 1817+50. .


2.00


20,000


211,036


146,228


July 1908


West side. Contractor's Hill.


1869+00—1880+00. .


5.70


30,000


322,620


146.577


Mar. 1907


East side, Paraiso.


Total


157.10


5,868,120


10.757.658


4.879,378











PERSONAL.



The Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson,
and his party left the Isthmus for Porto Rico
on July 23, on board the U S. S. North
Carolina.

Major General Leonard Wood, and other
members of the Panama Fortification Board,
with members of their families, returned to
the States on the Ancon, which sailed from
Cristobal on July 26. Brigadier General
W. W. Wotherspoon, and Mrs. Wotherspoon,
returned to the States on the Allianca,
which sailed on July 25.

Justice Thomas E. Brown, Jr., returned
on the Allianca, on Wednesday. July 19, from
his annual leave of absence in the States.



Licenses for Chauffeurs.

The Board of Local Inspectors will hold an
examination for chauffeurs' licenses at the



Administration building, Ancon, on Wednes-
day. August 2, at 2 p. m. All applicants are
required to have their application blanks
properly filled out and endorsed before
entering the examination. For information,
address Board of Local Inspectors, Ancon,

c. z.

Storm in Pacific Division.

A local rain and wind storm occurred in
the Pacific Division between 6 and 7 o'clock
on the night of July 23. The wind at Pedro
Miguel and Ancon. blowing from the east
reached a maximum velocity of 25 miles an
hour, and it is believed the velocity was
greater over Panama Bay, near the Balboa
tide station.

The tidal currents in the Pacific entrance
to the Canal, at Balboa and Corozal, were
temporarily reversed, the water level being
forced up at a time when the tide should



have been steadily receding. The tidal
elevation increased 0.7 of a foot at Balboa,
while, under normal conditions, it should
have lowered 0.3 of a foot. At Corozal, the
increase in elevation was 1.5 feet during a
period in which the tide should have receded
0.4 of a foot.



French Machinery for Canal Exposition.

The Depot Quartermaster at Mount Hope
has been directed to set aside pieces of
machinery and equipment, included in the
following list, for shipment to San Francisco,
at such time as the exposition administration
may desire. The list includes only selected
articles of the equipment used by the French
in their canal work. It follows:

Track material — Frogs, rails, switches;
track with steel rails; Decauville track and
turnout; Decauville turntable.

Excavating machinery — Excavators and parts
at Empire, Cucaracha. and Tabernilla; crane
and crane buckets; drill outfit, including
drilling frame on 5-foot gage track.

Rolling stock — Two Decauville locomotives;
Decauville cars, "V" and pan types; French
locomotives, both types; French cars, six-
meter; section of track with switch stand,
and guayacan ties.

Machinery — Lathe, combination shear and
punch, shaper, shear, and drill press, heavy
hand shears, steam pumps, centrifugal
pumps, blower, steam winches.

Hand tools — Picks, saws, axes, wrenches,
drills, hammers augurs, and other tools.

Engine — Boiler with engine, fly wheel, and
pulley on top.

Miscellaneous — Letter press, fireproof safe,
diving suits, mast head and side lights for
ship, ship compasses, bells, binnacles, and
canvas water buckets.



French Scrap.

A quantity of old French scrap collected
along the Canal has been dumped on the-
low ground east of docks Nos. 13 and 14,
where it will be held until the vessels are
ready to take it. The former method was
to hold the scrap on cars in the Cristobal
yards pending delivery to the steamships,
but too many cars were kept out of service
in this way. The new plan permits hand-
ling direct to ship's side by the cantilever
crane, or reloading on cars, when necessary.
The storage pile affords opportunity to clas-
sify the scrap into various grades. No more
scrap will be collected until bids are opened
for it in the United States on September 5.



Locomotive Engineer Killed.

John Fremont Brown, a locomotive en-
gineer employed in the Pacific Division, was
run over by a Central Division engine in the
Pedro Miguel yards, about 11.30 a. m.,
Friday, July 21, and instantly killed. He
was crossing a track on his way home to his
noonday meal when the accident occurred.
He was a native of Zanesville, Ohio, 55 years
of age, and had been on the Isthmus since
August 12, 1907, coming here from Los An-
geles, Cal., his place of residence in the
States. His wife, now on the Isthmus, sur-