Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

Canal Record (Volume 4 no.1-52) online

. (page 155 of 168)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook

14.6
14.3


16.4
16.0
15.6
15.2
14.8
14.5
14.3


Height of low


125.0


92.0


44.0







Tide Table.

The following table shows the time of high and low
tides at Panama for the week ending August 2, 1911,
(75th meridian time):



Date.


Low.


High.


Low.


High.


Low.


July 27. .


A.M.


A.M.
4.31
5.20

6.06
6.51
7.37
8.25
9.14


A.M.
10.46
11.35
P.M.
12.22
1.10
1.58
2.50
3.43


P.M.
4.48
5.37

6.25

7.12
7.59
8.50
9.45


P.M.


July 28






July 29






July 30. .


12.43
1.30
2.18
3.08




July 31. .









Lost — One gold cuff button, bearing the mono-
gram "O. M.E." Reward offered for its return to the
office of the Superintendent, Ancon Hospital.



The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
changes.

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.

Advance P. R. R... .Tuesday. . . .July 25

Cristobal P. R. R. . .Thursday. . .July 27

Colon P. R. R... .Monday July 31

Allianca P. R. R. . . Saturday . . . Aug. 5

Panama P. R, R... .Saturday. . .Aug. 12

Advance P. R. R.. . .Friday Aug. 18

Colon P. R. R... .Thursday.. .Aug. 24

Allianca P. R. R... .Wednesday. Aug. 30

Panama P. R. R.. . . Tuesday Sept. 5

Advance P. R. R.. . .Monday. . .Sept. 11

Colon P. R. R. . .Monday.. .Sept- 18

Allianca P . R. R . . . Saturday . . Sept. 23

Panama P. R. R Friday Sept. 29

Advance P. R. R Thursday. .Oct. 5

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.

Panama P. R. R... .Monday July 31

Advance P. R. R Sunday. . . .Aug. 6

Color P. R. R... .Saturday. . .Aug. 12

Allianca P. R. R... .Friday Aug. 18

Panama P. R. R... .Thursday.. .Aug. 24

Advance P. R. R... .Wednesday .Aug. 30

Colon P. R. R... .Tuesday Sept. 5

Allianca P. R. R.. .Monday. .-.Sept. 11

Panama P. R. R.. .Sunday Sept. 17

Advance P. R. R. ..Saturday. . .Sept- 23

Colon P. R.R.... Saturday.. .Sept. 30

Allianca P. R. R... .Friday Oct. 6

Panama P. R. R.. .Thursday. . .Oct. 12

NEW YORK TO COLON.

Zacapa U. F. C. . . .Thursday. . . July 20

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. .H.-A Friday July 21

Atrato R. M Saturday. . July 22

Almirante U. F. C. . .Thursday.. July 27

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm.. .H.-A Saturday. . July 29

Santa Marta U. F. C. . .Thursday. . .Aug. 3

Prinz Sigtsmund H.-A Friday Aug. 4

Thames R. M Saturday . . . Aug. 5

Metapan U.F. C Thursday.. .Aug. 10

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday.. .Aug. 12

Zacapa TJ- F. C . . .Thursday. ..Aug. 17

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. .H.-A Friday Aug. 18

Almirante U. F. C.. . .Thursday. .Aug. 24

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. . .H.-A Saturday. ..Aug. 26

COLON TO NEW YORK.

Metapan U. F. C. . .Thursday. . July 27

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday. . . . Aug. 1

Zacapa U. F. C Thursday.. .Aug. 3

Prinz Eitel Friedrich . . H.-A Saturday . . .Aug. 5

Almirante U. F. C Thursday.. .Aug. 10

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm.. .H.-A Tuesday . . .Aug. 15

Santa Marta U. F. C. . .Thursday. . .Aug. 17

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Saturday . . .Aug. 19

Metapan U. F. C Thursday.. .Aug. 24

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday. ...Aug. 29

Zacapa U. F. C. ..Thursday. .Aug. 31

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.

Turrialba U. F. C. . .Saturday. .July 22

Abangarez U. F. C Saturday. . July 29

Atenas TJ. F. C Saturday . . . Aug. 5

Turrialba U. F. C... .Saturday. . .Aug. 12

Abangarez U. F. C Saturday . . .Aug. 19

Atenas U. F. C Saturday . . .Aug. 26

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.

Atenas U. F. C. . .Thursday-. July 27

Turrialba U. F. C. . .Thursday.. .Aug. 3

Abangarez U. F. C Thursday.. .Aug. 10

Atenas TJ. F. C Thursday.. .Aug. 17

Turrialba U. F. C. . .Thursday. . .Aug. 24

Abangarez U. F. C Thursdnv . .Aug. 31

Hamburg-American steamers leave Colon for New
York via Kingston at 10 a. m. on sailing dates. The
Prinz August Wilhelm and Prinz Joachim call at
Santiago de Cuba, on both outward and homeward
voyages. A ship will leave Colon for Bocas del Toro
at 5 p. m. on August 9; and for Port Limon at 5
m., on July 26, and August 9.

TheLeyland line steamer William Cliff sails for New
Orleans, via Port Limon, on or about July 29.

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alternate
Tuesdays, at 12 noon; for Southampton on alternate
Tuesdays at 10 a. m.

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans
direct leave on Thursdays at 3 p. m.; ships for New
York via Kingston on Thursday at 11 a. m.; for Bocaa
del Toro on Monday at 6 p. m.



CANAL




RECORD



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2, 1911. No. 49.



Volume IV.



The Canal Record

Published weekly under the authority and supervision oj
the Isthmian Canal Commission.



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five
cents each.

Address all Communications

THE CANAL RECORD,

Ancon, Canal Zone,

Isthmus of Panama.
No communication, either for publication or requesting
information, will receive attention unless signed with the
full name and address of the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.



Ralls for Lock Towing Machines.

A contract for about one-half of the total
amount of steel rail required for the track of
the towing machines along the walls of the
locks has been let to the Bethlehem Steel
Company, the lowest bidder, which offered
open hearth rail at S31.35 a ton. The amount
of the contract is 1,250 gross tons of 90-
pound steel rail. 85 per cent in 30-foot, and
15 per cent in 33-foot lengths. The original
bids were opened on May 10, but on account
of high prices new bids were asked for, and
foreign competition was invited. The second
bids were opened on July 18, and the lowest
prices offered were 50 cents per ton less for
open hearth, and 35 cents per ton less for
Bessemer rail. No bids were submitted by
foreign manufacturers.



Cranes and Skips for Breakwater Quarry at Por-
to Bello.

A contract for three locomotive cranes, to
be used in loading rock from the quarry at
Porto Bello upon barges for transport to the
breakwater at the Atlantic entrance to the
Canal, has been let to the Industrial Works
at Bay City, Mich., for $28,800. These
cranes are to have a maximum radius of 30
feet, and a minimum of not more than 12
feet, a capacity with outriggers at 20-foot
radius of at least 80,000 pounds, and at 25-
foot radius of 60,000 pounds; and without
outriggers at 15-footradius of at least 40,000
pounds, and at 30-foot, at least 16,000 pounds.

They must be mounted on a steel car,
carried on two four-wheel trucks, so construc-
ted as to be handled easily on a 30-degree
curve, and to propel itself on a 3 per cent
grade. The cranes are to be used at Porto
Bello in quarrying large rock for the armoring
of the breakwater in Colon Harbor. Their
work will be to lift loaded skips, weighing
approximately 15 tons, from the ground to
flat cars, empty skips from cars to ground,
and to load stones of over one cubic yard into
the skips by means of hooks. For this latter
purpose, a single line rapid running auxiliary
hoist is provided, the rope to run over the
sheave at the extreme end of the boom, and



the arrangement such that the hoist may be
operated alone, or at the same time as the
main block. The hoist must have a capacity
of at least five tons.

A contract for 32 skips, to be used in the
work of quarrying above described, has been
let to the Kittoe Boiler and Tank Company
of Canton, O., at $246 each. These skips are
to be of steel plate, angles and rail, outside
dimensions 10 by 8i feet by 29 J inches. The
plate is to be 5-8 inch steel, bottom and side
rails of 70-pound standard steel rail, con-
tinuous in length over bottom and sides; top
edge of plate to be reinforced with 6 by 6
by f-inch steel angles; back and front
slinging chains hung on a single link.



Materials for Relocation of Panama Railroad.

A requisition has been made for the fol-
lowing materials for use on the relocation of
the Panama railroad: Two thousand gross
tons of 90-pound open hearth steel rail; 8,000
pairs of 4-hole slice bars; 1,000 extra special
track bolts; 160,000 "Economy" No. 9 rolled
steel, 4-hole tie plates; 400,000 screw spikes,
five inches long under flange and 7-8 inch
diameter; 8,000 special joint tie plates;
17,000 special joint screw spikes, 5 15-16
inches long.



Colon Breakwater.

At the close of work on July 31, the double
track trestle for the Colon breakwater had
been extended for a distance of 5,972 feet,
or over one-half of its ultimate length, and
406,069 cubic yards of material had been
dumped for the embankment fill, most of
which has so far been used in making the
fill under water, so that a comparatively
small portion appears above the surface. The
record of operations at the quarries on Toro
Point shows that a total of 453,791 cubic
yards of material had been excavated up to
the above date. It is planned to begin the
work of armoring the outer sides of the
breakwater with rock from the Porto Bello
quarry about September 1.



Intake Bridges and Decking Material.
Bids will be opened at the Washington
office on August 7 for material for four
intake bridges, and the structural material
for decking over the operating machinery
chambers in the locks. The bridges are for
the locks at Pedro Miguel and Miraflores.
They are to be built of steel plate girders,
three in each bridge, and are designed to
carry 500 pounds live load per square foot,
or a 15-ton locomotive crane. They will
connect the side walls of the locks with the
wing walls, and their purpose is to carry the
electric towing locomotives. Each bridge
will have a clear span of 50 feet, will be 27j
feet wide, and the girders will be six feet
deep. The steel will be encased in concrete,
to protect the metal and to make the bridges
harmonize with the other concrete work of



the locks. Each bridge will weigh about
fifty tons. The decking referred to consists
of steel I-beams, which will be riveted
together to form the support for the concrete
decking over the chambers in which the
machinery will be installed.



Canal Legislation.
A bill was introduced in the House of
Representatives on July 12 by the Hon.
Robert C. Wickliffe of Louisiana, providing
for the disposal of Canal equipment after
it is no longer needed in Panama.

Addition to Hotel Tivoli.

Plans are being prepared in the office of
the Constructing Quartermaster for a new
wing to be built immediately in the rear of
the brick, or fireproof, section of the Hotel
Tivoli. It will be 102 feet long, and 38 feet
2 inches wide, of the same type of construc-
tion as the other two wings, surrounded with
10-foot verandas on the first, second, and
third floors. The side of the hill, on which the
foundation piers for the addition will stand,
slopes at the rate of about one foot in five,
and advantage will be taken of this slope by
building a basement, which will occupy about
SO feet of the outer end of the wing. The
billiard room and barber shop, now on the
first floor in the old part, will be moved to
this basement, which will also furnish room
for the storage of baggage and other effects.

The completion of the extension will con-
siderably alter the present first floor arrange-
ments. The sun parlor will be taken out, and
the greater part of the space in the new wing
on this floor will be a new ballroom and may in
times of congestion be devoted to additional
dining room accommodations. The present
stairway will remain, but the men's toilet
in the rear of it will be removed, and, in its
place, there will be a basement staircase.
This stairway will descend into a passage,
formed by tunneling from its foot to where
the basement wall begins. On the other side
of the basement staircase, or about where the
west wall of the office floor is now, will be the
elevator shaft extending from the third floor
to the basement. Midway between the base-
ment and first floors, there will be a landing
where people in the billiard room or barber
shop can take the elevator by ascending a
short flight of steps.

The space on the first floor, formerly occu-
pied by the barber shop and billiard room,
together with the present ballroom, will
be partitioned off, and fitted up as rooms
for guests, giving about 18 rooms for the
purpose on that floor. The second and third
floors in the new part, will be entirely con-
verted into first-class rooms for guests, 10
on a floor, each provided with a private bath.
A private bath, 4 by 8 feet, has recently been
added to each of the rear rooms on the second
and third floors in the old part of the hotel.
The heights between floors in the new wing,
which correspond with those in the other parts



386



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 49.



NOTES O F PR OGRESS.

{.Continued.^

of the building, with the exception of the
proposed basement, will be, as follows:
Basement, 14 feet; first floor, 15 feet; second
and third floors, 12J feet each.

Upon completion of the addition, the Tivoli
will have added about 16,000 square feet
of floor space; a total seating capacity in
dining rooms of between 700 and 750, as
compared with 400 at present, and a total of
218 rooms for guests, as compared with 180
at present. The estimated cost of the new
improvements is §60,000.

Gatun Dam Spillway.

The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun
Dam is about 66 per cent completed, 148,236
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having
been placed at the close of work on July 29.
A statement of theamount laid each work day
last week, and of the total in place, follows:



July 24.
July 25.
July 26.
July 27.
July 28.
July 29.



Total

Previously reported.




1,414

146.822



Grand total I 148,236



Hours
worked.



8.00
8.30
8.00
8.00
8.00
8 00



No.
Mixers.



48.30



!



Advices from Washington indicate that
the House Committee on Appropriations
will visit the Canal Zone prior to the re-
assembling of Congress in December, in
connection with the estimates of appropria-
tions for the fiscal vear 1913.



Cristobal Laundry.

The laundry plant of the commissary de-
partment, Panama Railroad Company, was
opened on April 18, 1907, with a force con-
sisting of one superintendent and 37 West
Indian employes. The first month's business
amounted to $846.84. Since that time, the
business has greatly increased. Employes
of the Panama Railroad Company and the
Isthmian Canal Commission all over the
Isthmus, including those at such isolated
points as Monte Lirio, Porto Bello, Nombre
de Dios, etc., have their work done at the
Commissary laundry-

The force has grown to consist of one super-
intendent and five skilled American laundry-
men, together with a West Indian force of
139 employes, divided, as follows: Twenty-
two manglers, 5 starchers, 3 collar machine
operators, 1 hand washer, 10 assorters,
6 checkers, 6 clerks, 2 messengers, 2 watch-
men, 6 washers, 4 dryers, 3 shirt machine
operators, 2 markers, 67 ironers.

In March, 1911, 363,063 pieces were laun-
dered, and the total receipts were $9,245.79.
Prices charged in the commissary laundry
are lower than prices for similar work in the
States. In spite of the fact that prices have
been lowered several times, the laundry has
been operated at a fair profit for two years,
after it has been charged with every item of
expense involved in operation.

The plant covers an area of 14,320 square
feet, and is housed in a corrugated iron
building, with a roof of the same material,
the floor being of concrete. It is thoroughly
equipped with improved laundering machin-
ery, including washers, wringers, steam drying
rooms, mangles, starchers, collar ironers, and



electric hand irons. This machinery is oper-
ated from the central power plant of the com-
missary department.

Laundry received at the plant on Monday
or Tuesday is generally returned on Thursday,
and, in cases of emergency, is ready for
delivery the day after its receipt. Packages
are collected from the houses of customers



are
ad-



all over the Isthmus by wagons, and
delivered in the same manner without
ditional charge.

In addition to the regular work, quantities
of flat work are handled for hotels and steam-
ship lines, and rough dry work is done for
families desiring it. A cleaning and pressing
plant is successfully operated.



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS.



About 59 per cent of the concrete for all the locks is in place, the amount at the close of
the work on July 29 being 2,510,394 cubic yards, out of a total of approximately 4,284,400.
A total of 34, 123-J- cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the weekending July 29.

GATUN LOCKS.

Over 71 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been
laid, the amount in place at the close of the work on July 29 being 1, 496, 086i cubic yards, out
of a total of 2,085,000.

A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each working day for the week
ending July 29, and of the total, follows; and a similar statement for the work in the Spillway
of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The construction plant works 12 hours
daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours



Date.



Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.



Concrete. Hours No. of
placed. ! worked, mixers



July 24

July 25

July 26

July 27

July 28

July 29

*Portable mixers.



Cm. Yds.
2.222
1.696
1,812
1,986.
1,540
1,868



11,124



38.06
28.05
28.50
33.20
26.11
32.47



7.17



4,381}



48.14



1,308



Total

Previously reported

Grand total 1,496,086}



Auxiliary Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers-



Concrete
placed.



Hours | No. of
worked, mixers



Cm. Yds.
674
700
808
706
650
474
369 J



7.34
8.50
9.40
8.20
8.10
5.40



Large
stone.



Cm. Yds.
248
174
246
220
204
216



Total.



Cm. Yds.
3.144
2.570
2,866
2,912
2,394
2.558
369}



16.813}
1,479,273



*The 369} yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days '
July 24th. 65}; July 25th. 77; July 26th, 74}; July 27th, 80; July 28th, 59}; July 29th, 13.

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS.

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 82 per cent completed, 693,804 cubic
yards, out of a total of 837,400, having been placed at the close of work on July 29. The
record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows:





Auxiliary Plant.


Large
stone.




Date.


2-cubic yard mixers.


}-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers




July 24.


Cm. Yds.
710
746
628
782
884
486


20.00 3


Cu. Yds.
70
160
112
100
131
126


6.00

10.25
9 00
7 00
7.58
8.25


2
2
2
1
2
2


Cm. Yds.
3

7

12

4


Cubic Yds
783


July 25.


20.50
18.75
20.00
22.50
17.00


3
3
3
3
3


913


July 26.


740


July 27.


894


July 28.


1.015


July 29. .


616








4,236


118.75 | 3


699


48.08


1.67


26

4,415


4,961




688,843






,












4,441


693,804

















MIRAFLORES LOCKS.

Over 23 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was in
place on July 29, the total amount on that date being 320,504 cubic yards, out of a total of
approximately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week,
follows:





Constr
2-cubi








Auxiliary Plant.








Date.


c yard mixers.


2-cubic yard mixers. }-cubic yard mixer.


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of Concrete
mixers placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers


Large
stone.




July 24. . .
July 25...
July 26..
July 27...
July 28...
July 29...


Cu. Yds.
1,050
1,500
1,266
1.050
1,316
1.760


20.33
27.83
21.50
20.33
24.50
27 83


4
5
5
4

5


Cm. Yds.
195
210
107
149
113
169


22.00
13.00
9 00
14 50
11.50
15.45


3
2
2

5
2


Cm. Yds.
552
622
578
568
580
564


12.92
14.50
12.50
13.00
13.00
12.00


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cm. Yds.


Cm. Yds.
1.797
2,332
1.951
1,767
2,009
2.493


Total. .
Previously
reported .


7.942


142.32


4.33


943


85.45


2. 17


3.464


77.92


2


3.693


12.349
308,155






















Grand


3,693


320.504

























August 2, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



387



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE.



Women's Organizations, Clubs, Auxiliaries, and
Church Societies.

Organizations, composed of women in the
Canal Zone, date from the arrival, in larger
numbers, of the wives and families of men
employed in the construction of the Canal,
that is. from 1906. For the two years of
American occupation preceding that time,
health conditions had been unsatisfactory
commissaries were not running smoothly,
and school facilities were not good, influence?
which made it undesirable for men to bring
their families to the Isthmus. With the
construction of family quarter^, however, and
the improvement in living conditions, the
number of families increased rapidly.

On October 4, 1905. the Isthmian Canal
Commission authorized the appointment of
ministers to be attached to the line sick
camps, and to the general hospitals at Colon
and Ancon. This did not imply organized
church work, but as the family life became
established, it was found desirable to form
organizations for the purpose of providing
regu'ar church services. The Commission
authorized the construction or remodeling
of suitable buildings for purposes of public
worship, Sunday schools were started,
young people's leagues were organized, and
the need of church work was at once evident.
Outside of this work, however, there were no
formal organizations among women until
March, 1906. when Alfaretta Council, No. 1,
Degree of Pocahontas, was established at
Culebra.

A general club movement among the
women was started in October, 1907, for the
purpose of uniting women in social, phil-
anthropic, and educational effort, and to
bring them into touch with club movements
in the States by affiliation with the General
Federation of Women's Clubs. This was done
through a central organization, under the
title of the Canal Zone Federation of Women's
Clubs. For the first year the federation,
as well as the separate club of which it was
composed, followed closely in organization
and effort, the lines of the General Federation,
by its division into departments corresponding
in nature to those of the parent organization.
Matters of civic, educational, and philan-
thropic interest were dealt with; household
economics were studied, art lectures were
given, and regular lines of work were taken
up by the departments. Reaching now, the
period when the end of the Canal work is in
sight, it has been found desirable to alter
somewhat the character of the organization,
to hold the meetings less frequently, and to
merge the department work into a common
effort, the general direction of which is
toward home and educational interests.
One object of the federation has been to
develop its members for organized club work
wherever they may be, and to fit them to
take their places in any of the movements
by women in the United States.

While the influence of the federation
extends throughout the Canal Zone, meetings
being held in the different villages, each of
the separate clubs forms a center of local
interest.

Among the secular clubs, there is a branch
of the International Sunshine Society at
Gatun. The interests of this society, which
has been organized three years, center around
work for blind babies in New York. Nearly
six hundred dollars have been forwarded to



international headquarters for the furnishing
of a dormitory, known as the Gatun dormi-
tory, in the Arthur Home at Summit. New
Jersey. Donations of clothing ior special
cases have also been made by the society.
The funds are maintained by mi ans of "Sun-
shine teas," by sales of fanc\ articles, and by
entertainments.

In connection with secret orders and
friendly societies, women's auxiliaries have
been organized, beginning in 1906 with
Alfaretta Council, No. 1, Degree of Pocahon-
tas (Improved Order of Red Men,) at
Culebra, followed in 190S, by Osceola Council,
No. 2, at Cristobal. Other auxiliaries are the
Daughters of Rebekah, No. 1 (Independent
Order of Odd Fellows,) at Gorgona; the
Pythian Sisters, and the Grand International