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as between departments and divisions of the Com-
mission and Panama Railroad Company. This rate
was based on the operation of the engine by a "gold"
engineer.

A rate of $2.50 an hour for switch engine service,
when the engine is operated by hourly silver employes,
is hereby established. Geo. W. Goethals,

Chairman and Chief Engineer.

Misdirected Letters.

Ancon, C. Z., August 2. 1911.
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi-
nating in the United States and its possessions, have
been received in the office of the Director of Posts,
and may be secured upon request of the addressee:



Blake. A. O.
Bockins. W. H.
Bray. Mrs. Walter
Clark. E. E.
Connor, John (pkg.)
Croft, Mrs. Florence
Demeis, Tomasso
Erwin. James
Gilmour. Joseph H.
Keough, John W.
McGonagle. Miss Rose M.



McPeek, W. J.
Moyer, Mrs. R. E.
Papadogna. B.
Prior, B. T.
Russ, Michael
Schull, Lewis
Smith, Carl F.
Souders, H. L.
Wilkinson, Hugh R.
Wise, George
Worrell, Oreleah



Married.

BEYER -McNULT Y— At the parish house in Ancon,
on July 25, 1911, Nellie Anna McNulty of Marquette.
Mich., to Walter F. Beyer of Detroit, Mich., the Rev.
Father Collins officiating. Canal Zone residence,
Culebra.

On Tuesday. August 2, 1911, at 2 p. m., in the Com-
mission chapel, Cristobal. Dr. Charles Martin Strotz
of Philadelphia, Pa., and Estella Erwin of McVeytown,
Pa.. Rev. Carl H. Elliott officiating. Canal Zone
residence. Colon Hospital.



Auction Sale of Dairy Cows and Bull Calf.

Ancon, C. Z., July 18. 1911.
On Saturday, August 19, at 10 a. m., there will be
sold at public sale to the highest bidder at the Ancon
Hospital dairy, two dairy cows, ranging in age from
seven to ten years, and one bull (calf) aged two and
one-half years. The dairy is located near the insane
asylum buildings in the rear of the hospital grounds.
The terms of the sale will be cash.

Chas. F. Mason, Superintendent.



Leasing of Government Building.

Ancon, C Z., July 13. 1911.
Bids will be received by the Collector of Revenues
up to and including August 10, 1911, for the leasing to
the highest bidder, from August 16, 1911, for a period
of not more than three years, of building No. 17 at
Empire, owned by the Canal Zone Government. Rent
to be payable monthly. The building is of French
construction, two stories, and contains, in all, fifteen
rooms, with a small outhouse. Bids should be in an
envelope marked. "Bids for a lease to building No. 17
at Empire."

Tom M. Cooke, Collector of Revenues.



392



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 49.



COMMISSARY "DEPARTMENT.



"Keep Kool" Clothing.

The Commissary department has received a supply
of "Keep Kool" clothing for men. These suits are made
of feather-weight fabrics for tropical wear. Owing to
limited stock, which is in the nature of a trial order, it
is not possible to place them on sale in line stores.
They will be sold in the gents' furnishing department
of the retail store at Cristobal only.

The open hours at Culebra commissary are from

8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and from p. ra. 3 to 7 p. m.
All other commissaries are open from 8 a. m. to 1
p. m., and 3 p m. to 7 p. m. with the exception of the

Cristobal commissary, which is open from 8 a. m. to
12.30 p. m., and from 2 p. in. to 7 p. m.

Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week
beginning August I.

fresh MEATS. Price.

Mutton — Stewing per pound 6

Shoulder, neck trimmed off, (4 pounds

and over) , per pound 9

Entire forequarter (not trimmed) 10

pounds and over, per pound 8

Leg (8 to 10 pounds), per pound 17

Cutlets, per pound 18

Short cut chops, per pound 20

Lamb — Stewing, per pound 6

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed off,

per pound 9

Leg (5 to 8 pounds), per pound 20

Chops, per pound 24

Cutlets, per pound 24

Veal — Stewing, per pound 10

Shoulder, for roasting (not under 4

pounds), per pound 12J

Chops, shoulder, per pound 16

Chops, per pound 24

Loin, for roasting, per pound 24

Cutlets, per pound 28

Pork — Loin chops or roast, per pound 14

Beef — Suet, per pound 2

Soup, per pound 5

Stew, per pound 8

Corned, No. 1, per pound 12

Corned, No, 2, per pound 10

Chuck roast (3 pounds and over), per

pound 12

Pot roast, per pound 12i

Rib roast, second cut (not under 3J

pounds) , per pound 16

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds),

per pound 18

Sirloin roast, per pound 19

Rump roast, per pound 19

Porterhouse roast, per pound 20

Steak, chuck, per pound 12 J

Round, per pound 13

Rib, per pound 18

Sirloin, per pound 19

Rump, per pound 19

Porterhouse (not less than lj

pounds) . per pound 20

Tenderloin (Western), per pound . 24

MISCELLANEOUS.

Caviare, Russian per tin 47, 89

Livers — Beef, per pound 7

Calf, each 60

Half, each 30

Steak, Hamburger, pkg 13

Sausage — Bologna, per pound 10

Frankfurter, per pound 12

Lieberwurst, per pound 10

Devonshire Farm 17

Sweetbread — Veal, per pound 1.20

Beef, per pound 25

Eggs, fresh, dozen j27

one-half dozen only 14

Bluefish, fresh, per pound 14

Halibut, fresh, per pound 15

Shads, fresh, each 70

Shad roes, freBh, per pair 35

POULTRY AND GAME.

Chickens — Fancy roasting, milk fed, large, each 1.25

Fancy roasting, milk fed, med., each 1.00
Fancy roasting, corn fed, about 4J

pounds, each 90

Fowls, each 60, 70, SO, 90, 1 .00

Ducks, Western, about 4i pounds, each 1.00

Broilers, milk fed, each 60

corn fed, each 55

Turkeys, per pound 26

Squabs, each 35

Capons 2.10

Fryers, corn fed 60

Partridges, each SO

Grouse, each 50

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS.

Ham — German, Westphalia, per pound 36

Sugar cured, per pound 18

Sliced, per pound 20

Half, for boiling, per pound 19

Boiled, per pound |26

Hocks, per pound J8

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound 22

Breakfast, sliced, per pound 23

Pork, salt family, per pound 14

Ox Tongues each 1 .00

Pig's feet, per pound * 9

Tongues, per pound 14



Price.

Sliced bacon in 1-pound tins, per tin 30

In 1-pound jars, per jar 30

DAIRY PRODUCTS.

Butter — Creamery special, per pound 30

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound 38

Philadelphia cream, cake 18

Young America, per pound 18

Swiss, per pound 26

Edam, each 1.00

Edam, in tins, tin 25

Neufchatei, cake 6

Gouda, per pound 34

Milk (Certified), per bottle **25

Icecream, quart J25

i-gallon J50

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS.

Beets, per pound 6

Corn, green, per doz 24

Cabbage, per pound 4 \

Cucumbers, per pound 10

Lettuce, per pound fl2

Onions, per pound 5

Potatoes, white, per pound 4 J

sweet, per pound 2

Pears, Alligator, each 6

Rhubarb, per pound 3

Tomatoes, per pound 8

Turnips, per lb 3

Yams, per pound 3

Apples, fancy table, per pound 10

Cantaloupes, each 10

Grapefruit, each 4

Lemons, dozen 24

Limes, per 100 80

Oranges, California, per dozen f42

Watermelons, each 30

♦Indicates reduction from last list.
♦♦Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle,
tlndicates advance on last list.

JSold only from commissaries; no orders taken for
delivery.

Rainfall from July 1 to July 29, 1911, Inclusive.



Stations.



Pacific Section —

Ancon

Balboa

♦Miraflores . . . .

Pedro Miguel . .

Rio Grande. . . .
Central Section —

Culebra

♦Camacho

Empire

Gamboa

♦Juan Mina . .

Alhajuela

*E1 Vigia

*Gorgona

San Pablo

Tabernilla

Bohio

*Monte Lirio . .
Atlantic Section —

Gatun

♦Brazos Brook .

Cristobal

Porto Bello



a




I'

03 o


V


s


Q


Ins.




2.06


23


3.33


3


1.70


6


1.50


6


1.45


b


1.29


6


1.11


6


.77


A


1.95


8


2.40


6


3.92


5


4.20


5


1.64


X


1.68


6


1.01


ft


2.28


5


2.93


5


1.60


5


3.97


5


3.88


5


3.85


28



-1

it



Ins.

5.29

6.87

6.79

6.00

6.67

5.62
6.26
3.66
7.24
S.44
8.84
8.76
6.45
5.35
4.36
7.29
10.53

6.66

14.03
14 4S
14.43



*Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. m.
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations-
midnight to midnight.

To 5 p. m.i July 28.



daily,
-value



Stages of the Chagres.

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week
ending midnight, Saturday, July 29, 1911. All heights
are in feet above mean sea level.





Station.


Day and Date.


Vigia.


"3

3
'rt

X!

<


o

a

O


o

a

o

m


c .

3 V


Sun., July 23.. .
Mon.. July 24. .
Tues., July 25. .
Wed., July 26..
Thurs., July 27.
Fri., July 28. . .
Sat., July 29. . .


128.7
.126.8
126.3
126. 1
126. 1
127.3
126 6


94.5
93.1
92.8
92.7
92.6
93.6
93.3


47.5
46.6
46.0
45.5
45.4
46.2
46.2


14.4
14.4
14.3
14 1
13.9
13.8
13.7


14.2
14.2
14.1
14.0
13,8
13.7
13.6


Height of low


125.0


92.0


44.0







Notice to Mariners.

The master of the steamship Trinculo reports that
on June 11 his ship struck on a submerged rock, or
other obstruction. The bearings taken at the time
were: East end Taboguilla Island S. } E. San Jose
Rock, N. W. x W. } W.

Masters of all vessels should exercise great care in
passing this vicinity.



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.



The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
changes.

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.



Cristobal..

Colon

Allianca. . .
Panama. . .
Advance. . .

Colon

Allianca. . .
Panama. . .
Advance-. .

Colon

Allianca. . .
Panama. . .
Advance . .
Colon



R. R.. .Thursday..
R. R... .Monday...

.Saturday. .

.Saturday. .

.Friday. . , .

.Thursday. .

. Wednesday

. Tuesday. . .

. Monday. ,

. Monday. .

.Saturday.

.Friday. . .

. .Thursday

. .Thursday.



R. R.

R. R„

R. R„

R. R„

R. R..

P. R. R..

P. R. R„

P. R. R

P. R. R

P. R. R.

.P. R. R.

P. R. R



.July 27
July 31
.Aug. 5
.Aug. 12
.Aug. 18
Aug. 24
Aug. 30
.Sept. 5
Sept. 11
Sept. 18
.Sept. 23
Sept. 29
.Oct. 5
..Oct 12



CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.



Advance. . . .

Color

Allianca

Panama

Advance. . . .

Colon

Allianca

Panama

Advance. . . .

Colon

Allianca

Panama

Advance. . . .



.P. R.
.P. R.
.P. R.



P. R.
.P. R.

. P. R



R... .Sunday. . .
R.. , .Saturday. .
R.. . .Friday.
R... .Thursday..
R... .Wednesday
R.... Tuesday. ..
R-. .Monday. .-.

R. . . Sunday

. R. ..Saturday. .
R.. . .Saturday. .

R... .Friday

R.. .Thursday. .
R. . Tuesday . .



Aug. 6
Aug. 12
Aug. 18
Aug. 24
Aug. 30
Sept. 5
Sept. 11
Sept. 17
Sept. 23
Sept. 30
Oct. 6
Oct. 12
Oct. 17



NEW YORK TO COLON.



Almirante

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. .

Santa Marta

Prinz Sigismund

Thames

Metapan

Prinz Joachim

Zacapa.

Prinz Eitel Friedrich .

Trent

Almirante

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. ,
Oruba



.U. F. C.
.H.-A.. ..
.U. F. C.
.H.-A....
.R.M....
.U.F. C.
■ H.-A....
.U. F. C.
.H.-A....
. R. M....
. U. F. C.
.H.-A...
.R. M.. .



.Thursday..
.Saturday. .
.Thursday..
. Friday ....
. Saturday . .
.Thursday..
. Saturday. .
-Thursday.
Friday. . ..
. -Saturday.
. .Thursday.
. .Saturday.
. -Saturday. .



.July 27
July 29
.Aug. 3
.Aug. 4
.Aug. 5
.Aug. 10
.Aug. 12
..Aug. 17
.Aug. 18
Aug. 10
.Aug. 24
.Aug. 26
Sept. 2



COLON TO NEW YORK.



Metapan U

Prinz Joachim H

Zacapa U.

Prinz Eitel Friedrich . . H.

Trent R.

Almirante U.

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. . . H.

Santa Marta U.

Prinz Sigismund H.'

Oruba R.

Metapan U.

Prinz Joachim H.-

Zacapa U.

Clyde R.



F. C.

-A

F. C.

,-A

M....

F. C.

-A

F. C.

■A

M....

F. C...

•A

F. C.
M. . .



.Thursday.
.Tuesday..
.Thursday.
.Saturday.
.Tuesday. .
.Thursday.
. Tuesday . .
.Thursday..
.Saturday.
Tuesday. .
.Thursday. .
.Tuesday. .
.Thursday.
.Tuesday. .



.July 27
..Aug. 1
. .Aug. 3
..Aug. 5
Aug. 8
.Aug. 10
.Aug. 15
.Aug. 17
.Aug. 19
.Aug 22
.Aug. 24
.Aug. 29
.Aug. 31
.Sept. 5



NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.



Saturday. . July 29
.Saturday. . .Aug. 5
.Saturday. . .Aug. 12
.Saturday. .
.Saturday. .
.Saturday. .



.Aug. 19
.Aug. 26
..Sept. 2



COLON TO NEW ORLEANS

U. F. C

U. F. C

U. F. C

.U. F. C

U. F. C.

U. F. C.



Thursday. . .Aug. 3
Thursday.. .Aug. 10



. .Thursday.,
. .Thursday..
. .Thursdnv .
.Thursday..



.Aug. 17
.Aug. 24
Aug. 31
Sept. 7



Abangarez U. F. C.

Atenas U. F. C.

Turrialba U. F. C,

Abangarez U. F. C. .

Atenas U.F. C.

Turrialba U. F. C.

Turrialba . . .
Abangarez. .

Atenas

Turrialba. . .
Abangarez . .
Atenas

Hamburg-American steamers leave Colon for New
York via Kingston at 10 a. m. on sailing dates. The
Prinz August Wilhelm and Prinz Joachim call at
Santiago de Cuba, on both outward and homeward
voyages. A ship will leave Colon for Bocas del Toro,
also for Port Limon at 5 p. m. on August 9.

The Leyland line steamer Anlillian sails for New
Orleans, direct, on, or about August 5.

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alternate
Tuesdays, at 10 a. m.; for Southampton on alternate
Tuesdays at 10 a. m.

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans
direct leave on Thursdays at 3 p. m.; ships for New
York'via Kingston on Thursday at 11 a. m.; for Bocas
del Toro on Monday at 6 p. m.



CANAL




RECORD



Volume IV.



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1911.



No. 50.



. The Canal Record

Published weekly under the authority and supervision oj
the Isthmian Canal Commission.



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five
cents each.

Address all Communications

THE CANAL RECORD,

Ancon, Canal Zone,

Isthmus of Panama.

No communication, either for Publication or requesting
information, will receive attention unless signed with the
full name and address of the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.

Steam Shovel Excavation in Culebra Cut.

On Saturday, July 29, there were excavated
from Culebra Cut, 61,896 cubic yards, car
measurement, which is the highest daily
record for any wet season month, and was
only 2,838 cubic yards less than the highest
record ever made in one day for any dry
season month in Culebra Cut. Ten shovels,
working in the Culebra district, averaged
2,160.2 cubic yards.



Contract for Spillway Gates, Bridges, and Cais-
sons.

Award has been authorized to the Mc-
Clintic-Marshall Construction Company for
22 regulating gates for the spillways at Gatun
and Miraflores, two steel caissons to ensure
a means of repairing the gates, and 22 bridges
to connect the piers in which the gates will
be erected, thus forming a bridge across the
crest of each spillway. An article, describing
the use of the gates, caissons, and bridges,
was published in The Canal Record of
July 12. Only two bids were received, and
award was authorized to the lower bidder,
the price, §102,930 being 3s per cent less
than the estimated cost.

The gates will be of the Stoney type, con-
sisting of a system of horizontal girders,
vertical, end posts, cross frames, and inter-
costals, forming a skeleton, upon which will
be placed steel plate sheathing, extending
from top to bottom on the upstream side of
the gate. Each will be 46 feet 3 \ inches long,
19 feet high, and will weigh 42J tons. It will
have a motion of 22 feet 6 inches, and must
stand a head of 18 feet. The office of the
gates is to control the water level in Gatun
and Miraflores lakes.

The caissons will be 49 feet long and 24 feci
4 inches high. Their use will be to form a
dam across any of the apertures in the gate-
piers, thus making it possible to repair the
gates and gate tracks.

Each bridge will be 45 feet long and 3 feet
wide; and will consist of two plate steel
girders, surmounted by a floor of checkered



steel. The total weight of the 22 bridges will
be about 215 tons.

The contract for railings for the spillway
bridges has been awarded to the Vulcan Rail
and Construction Company, the lowest of four
bidders.



Colon Quarantine Station.

A type- 17 house at San Pablo will be moved
to Colon, and reerected at the quarantine
station for use as an office and living rooms
for the custodian, who is at present occupying
quarters in the main building. At times,
recently, the accommodations for persons
•held in detention, have been insufficient, and
it is expected that the additional room pro-
vided by the change will temporarily relieve
the situation.



High Daily Steam Shovel Records.

A high record for excavation was made by
steam shovel No. 253 in the Empire district
of the Central Division in Tuesday, August 1,
which loaded 190 Lidgerwood side flat cars
of 19 cubic yards each, or 3,610 cubic yards.

This is the highest record for a shovel of
this class in the Central Division, exceeding
by 125 cubic yards the previous -highest
record of 3,485 cubic yards, made by shovel
No. 265 on January 21, 1909.

The highest two daily records for the
Central Division for steam shovels of any-
class are, as follows:

4,823 cubic yards by steam shovel No. 213
on March 22, 1910.

4,009 cubic yards by steam shovel No. 213
on March 5, 1910.



Roller Trains, Seals, Bearings, and Rollers for
Valves in Locks and Spillway Gates.

Award has been authorized to the Westing-
house Machine Company, the lowest of three
bidders, for the roller trains and sealing devices
for the rising stem gate valves for the locks,
116 trains and sealing devices for Gatun, 60
for Pedro Miguel, and 84 for Miraflores; the
roller trains and sealing devices, rocker bear-
ings, and gate rollers for Stoney gates at
spillways, 44 roller trains, 44 sealing devices,
44 rocker bearings, and 176 gate rollers for
the 14 gates at Gatun spillway, and the 8
gates at the Miraflores- spillway.

The material required for the 260 roller
trains for valves consists of -54.800 pounds
of structural steel (to be finished by the Com-
mission, but fabricated and delivered by the
contractor), 50,700 pounds of east steel,
360,360 pounds of tool steel, 15,860 pounds
of steel bolts, 1,300 pounds of steel pins.
The 260 sealing devices will require 67,210
pounds of cast bronze, 24,700 pounds of bronze
bolts, and 2,470 pounds of bronze washers.

The material for the 44 roller trains will
consist of 5,100 pounds of cast steel, 45,500
pounds of tool steel, 1,700 pounds of steel
bolts, 33,100 pounds of structural steel, this
last to be furnished by the Commission, but



fabricated and delivered by the contractor.
The 44 rocker bearings and tracks will re-
quire 288,000 pounds of structural steel, and
6,700 pounds of steel bolts. The 44 sealing
devices will require 65,200 pounds of struc-
tural steel, 37,300 pounds of cast steel, 14,600
pounds of cast bronze, 3,900 pounds of rolled
bronze, 850 pounds of bronze bolts, 5,000
pounds of steel bolts. The 176 gate rollers
will require 1,400 pounds of steel pins, 12,000
pounds of cast iron, 2,600 pounds of steel
bolts, and six pounds of brass.



Sanitary Drinking Cups.

A supply of sanitary paper drinking cups
has been ordered for the Isthmus, and these
will be placed in the coaches of the Panama
railroad, substituting the public glass now in
use, as soon as they are received. Arrange-
ments have also been made for individual
drinking cups for the hospital cars.



l,CC0,CCO Vcrds cf Crushed Ec<k.

On June 26, 1911, the record of 1,000,000
cubic yards of crushed rock at the Ancon
quarry plant was passed. The plant was
first placed in operation on February 8, 1910,
but there were several interruptions during the
first six months, so that if the actual working
time between February 8, 1910, and June 26,
1911, were computed, it would probably indi-
cate that the 1,000,000 cubic yards of crushed
rock could have been produced within one
year's time, providing the crushers were
operated for a full 8-hour day every day in
the year, except Sundays and holidays. Since
June 26, there has been produced at the crusher
plant a total of about 90,000 cubic yards,
leaving about 900,000 cubic yards still to be
crushed to complete the estimated require-
ments for the Pacific locks.

The best day's output was on December
20, 1910, when 4,290 cubic yards of rock were
crushed in 11.20 hours actual working time,
an average of over 383 cubic yards an hour.
The best month's production was in Decem-
ber, 1910, when 79,699 cubic yards were pro-
duced during the 26 working days of the
month, an average of over 3,318 cubic yards
each working day.

The principal delays in the operation of the
plant have been caused by substituting parts
of the machinery for those which experience
prove'd better fitted for the work, and in
making minor repairs. The time so lost was
partly made up by the operation of the plant
for one period on a 12-hour schedule. At the
present time, an 8-hour day is in effect, as
there is plenty of crushed rock in storage,
especially at Miraflores Locks, where the
consumption is now the greatest.

The operation of the plant has been attended
with comparatively few minor accidents to
the machinery, one of the most peculiar of
them being to the heavy iron cap over the
main crusher, which serves as a buffer for
the working parts of the machine when the



394



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 50.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.

{Continued.)

large rock is dumped into it. In some manner,
a long, thin piece of rock became wedged in
between the crusher shaft and its covering;
from there it worked its w'ay upwards, finally
forcing the cap off into the hopper, where the
jaws of the machine immediately began work
upon it. Before the power could be shut off,
it was cracked in several places.

The record of operations at the crusher
plant for the two weeks ending August 5 is,
as follows:



Date.



July 24..
July 25..
July 26..
July 27..
July 28..
July 29.

Total .



Hours
.vorked.



7.30
7.00
7.35
6.05
7.20
7.00



42 30



Cubic

Yards.



2,744
2,414
2,595
2,339
2,664
2.933



15.689



July 31.. .
August 1 .
August 2 .
August 3 .
August 4 .
August 5 .



Hours
worked .



4.15
7.50
6.55
6.40
7.25
6.25



Total I 39.30



Cubic
Yards.



2,082
2,945
2,371
2.676
2,555
2.432



15,061



Finances of Fourth of July Celebration.

A statement of amounts contributed to
the Fourth of July celebration held at
Cristobal, C. Z., follows:



Contributed by



Office of Chairman and
Chief Engineer

Quartermaster's Dept... .

Atlantic Division

Commissary and Sub-
sistence

Civil Administration. . .

Panama Railroad Com-
pany

Mechanical Division. . . .

Disbursing office

Pacific Division

Sanitary Department . . .

Central Division

Examiner of Accounts. .

Total — Employes

Received from Marine
Corps as Fourth of
July Celebration com-
mittee's part of pro-
ceeds of minstrel show
given at the National
Theatre. Panama, on
July 3

Received from others
than the above

Total — All sources. . . .



S237.

274

1.02 7.

291.

288.

519.
491.

15.
360.
191.
327.

38.



No. of
employes
on June Per
roll. capita



171
199
884

290
299

582
769

2 5
600
386
785

99



$4,061


97


102


38


1.432


85


S5.597


20



5.098



$1.40
1 38
1 17

1 . 00
.96

.89
.64
.60
.59
.40
.42
39



$0.79



Those having outstanding amounts on
their lists are requested to hasten collections,
and send the money to the chairman of the
finance committee. Empire. C. Z. The
expenditures to date aggregate over S3-.500.

Bills incurred by the entertainment and
amusement committee for the Fourth of
July celebration, 1911, should be forwarded
to the chairman of the subcommittee which
ordered the expenditure, who will approve
the same and forward to Mr. Muenchow,
Secretary, Entertainment and Amusement
committee, Gatun, C. Z. The chairmen of
the subcommittees are. as follows:

Subcommittee i in aquatics, C. J.Anderson,
Cristobal; subcommittee on decorations and
amusements. Wm. K. Shipley, Cristobal;



subcommittee on refreshments and comforts,
John Burke, Cristobal; committee on fire
department contests and exhibitions, C. E.
Weidman, Cristobal; committee on Marines,
Lieutenant Wirgman, Bas Obispo; sub-
committee on police department and stands,
Lieutenant A. S. Belknap. Ancon; subcom-
mittee on property, J. H. Humphreys, Cris-
tobal ; subcommittee on exercises, F. A. Gause,



Ancon; subcommittee on printing and pro-
grams, Captain C. Nixon, Cristobal; sub-