Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

Canal Record (Volume 4 no.1-52) online

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committee on prizes, G. M. Fechtig. Cristobal;
subcommittee on athletics, L. G. Thorn,
Gatun.



Sailing of the "Cristobal."
The sailing of the Cristobal has been set
for Saturday, August 12, at 5 p. m.



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS.



Over 59 per cent of the concrete for all the locks is in place, the amount at the close of
the work on August 5, being 2,542,308 cubic yards, out of a total of approximately 4,284 400.
A total of 31 ,913i cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the week ending August 5.

GATUN LOCKS.

Over 72 per cent of the concrete for the system of three twin locks at Gatun has been
laid, the amount in place at the close of the work on August 5, being 1,512 655 cubic yards, out
of a total of 2,085,000.

A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each working day for the week
ending August 5, and of the total, follows, and a similar statement for the work in the Spillway
of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The construction plant works 12 hours
daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours.



Total.




*The 4285 yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days:
July 31st, 87J; August 1st, 585; August 2d, 56!; August 3d. 75; August 4th. 76; August 5th. 75.

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS.

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 83 per cent completed, 698,220 cubic
yards, out of a total of 837,400, having been placed at the close of work on August 5. The
record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows:



Date.



Auxiliary Plant.



2-cubic yard mixers.



i-cubic yard mixer.



Concrete
placed.



Hours I No. of Concrete
worked. I mixers placed.



Hours
worked .



No. of
mixers



Large
stone.



Total.



July 31


C«. Yds.
676
664
396
584
586
622


1 7 . 00
20.00
12.00
15.00
18.00
18.00


3
3
3
3
3
3


Cu. Yds.
148
138
143
145
95
219


11.83
8.30

10.00
9.50
6.00

13.67


3
2
2
3
2

2


Cu. Yds.




Cu. Yds.
824






















Total


3,528


100.00


3


888


59 30


2.33


4,441


4,416
693,804




















4,441


698,220

















MIRAFLORES LOCKS.

Over 24 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was in
place on August 5, the total amount on that date being 331,433 cubic yards, out of a total of
approximately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week,
follows:



Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.



Auxiliary Plant.



2-cubic yard mixers.



i-cubic yard mixer.



Concrete Hours No. of Concrete Hours No. of Concrete Hours No. of Large
placed, worked, mixers! placed. | worked. ' mixers placed, worked, mixers stone.



Total.



July 31..
August 1
August 2
August 3
August 4
August 5

Total . .
Previously
reported .

Grand
total. . .



\Cu. Yds.\
1.170
1,246
960
508
1.150
1 .000



19.83


5


24. 17


J


18.08


.i


11.17


5


20.17


5


22.00


5



Cm.



Yds.

598

558

622

766

744

834



6,034 I 115 42



1 2 . 50
12.00
14.00
14 00
14.00
12.00



78.50



Cu. Yds
90
89
135
138
156
165



9.75
7.00
12.00
14.00
15.00
15.50



73.25



2.17



Cm. Yds.] Cu.



Yds.

1,858

1.893

1,717

1,412

2.050

1,999



10,929
3.693 320,504



3.693



331,433



August 9, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



395



LOCK CULVERT VALVES.



Conditional Award Made — Description of the
Appliances and their Use.

Award has been authorized to the Mc-
Clintic-Marshall Construction Company, pro-
viding certain modifications are agreed upon,
for the rising stem gate valves, guard gate
valves, lateral culvert valves, bulkhead gates,
and screens for the locks, according to the
following schedule. There were two bidders,
and the award is to the lower, the price being
3.2 per cent below that estimated by the
Commission.



will weigh 15,726 pounds, 15,200 pounds of
which will be of nickel steel. The seats and
seals on the sides and top of the valves will
be of wood.

Lateral culvert valves — These valves will be
10 feet 7 inches wide and 10 feet 9 J inches
high, and will follow in construction the rising
stem gate valves. Their use will be to regu-
late the flow of water between the safety and
lower gates, at the lower end of the upper lock
in each flight of locks. Each valve is designed
to operate in a rectangular concrete chamber,
32 inches deep and 1 1 feet 3 inches wide, and



Number of Valves, Gates, etc.



Description.



Total. Gatun. Pedro Miraflores.

Miguel.



Total
Weight.



Rising stem gate valves

Lower guard gate valves

Lateral culvert valves

Bulkhead gates to middle wall culvert

Bulkhead gates for side wall intakes

Bulkhead gates for middle wall intakes and outlets..

Screens for side wall intakes

Screens for middle wall intakes



130
12
6
12
9
18
18
18



58
■1
2
6
3
6
6
6



Total weight of metal.



30
4
2
2
3
6
6
6



42
4
2
4
3
6

6



Pounds.
2,807,610
al88,712
b 51.642
c 49.920
(2248.400
■T424.800
176.040
161.640



4.108.764



a — Plus 5,280 board feet of timber.

b — Plus 840 board feet of timber.

c — Plus 660 board feet of timber.

d — Plus 855 board feet of timber, and 2,790 square feet canvas.

e — Plus 1,710 board feet of timber, and 5,040 square feet canvas.



Rising Stem Gate Valves — These valves will
be 10 feet 8 inches wide and IS feet 10
inches high, and their office is to control the
flow of water through the large culverts in
the walls of the locks in the filling and tin-
watering of the lock chambers. Each one will
weigh 21,597 pounds, of which 16,000 pounds
will be nickel steel, 2,340 pounds structural
steel for roller tracks. 3,160 pounds cast steel,
and the balance, bolts, pins, and rubber.
The valves are arranged in pairs, separated
by a pier 4 feet 3 inches wide in the middle
of theculvert, dividing it into two rectangular
culverts 8 feet wide by 18 feet high. Each
valve is designed to operate in a well, and
to travel on two live roller trains having a
span of 10 feet, from center to center of bear-
ings. The trains travel on two tracks, which are
fastened to the downstream face of the wall
castings, which are set in the masonry. In
operation, the valve will have an average
range of motion of 18 feet in a vertical plane,
but will be so constructed as to permit its
being raised to the bottom of the machinery
pit, and removed entirely from the well for
repairs. It will have a play of only J-inch
upstream, and a lateral play of only f inch
either way, making a total lateral play of
j-inch. Each valve will be connected near
the center to a stem operated by a motor
situated near the top of the lock wall. During
ordinary operation, the valves will be under
a head of about 60 feet, but in certain cases,
they may be required to operate under a
76-foot head, making the 18-foot travel in
about one minute.

Lower guard gate valves — These valves will
be 10 feet 7 inches wide and 19 feet 3 A inches
high, and their use will be to control the flow
of water in the culverts in the side walls of
the locks, when it becomes necessary to un-
water the culverts. Each will operate in a
rectangular concrete chamber, 32 inches deep
by 1 1 feet 3 inches wide, and will close an open-
ing 8 feet wide and 18 feet high. In general
construction, these valves will conform to
that of the rising stem gate valves. Each



to close an opening 8 feet wide by 8.5 feet
high. The seat and seal on both sides and top
of both upstream and downstream faces of
the valve will be formed by wooden strips
fastened on the valve seating against the
masonry. The bottom seat and seal will be
formed by a wooden strip, fastened to the
bottom beam of valve, seating against the
masonry floor of the culvert. This valve is
designed to take a pressure head in either
direction, but will never have to be operated
while under a head. Each will weigh 8,607
pounds, of which 8,300 will be nickel steel.

Bulkhead gates to middle wall culverts —
These gates are to close an opening 12 feet
high and 5 feet wide in the tunnel opening
from the lock chamber to the middle wall
culvert, two in each lock chamber. The pur-
pose of this tunnel is to provide a means of
access to the middle wall culvert to facilitate
the installation and repair of cylindrical
valves in the middle wall, by giving free access
to the culvert from the lock chamber. The
gates are to be placed in cast iron frames set
in the masonry, and are to be held in place by
cast iron brackets bolted to the sides, top,
and bottom of the frames. The wooden strips
on the back of the gates are to form the seats
and seals of the gate. Each will weigh 4,160
pounds, and will be of structural steel.

Bulkhead gates for side and middle wall
intakes and middle wall outlets — These gates
are to form bulkheads at the entrances to
the side and middle wall culverts at the upper
ends, and also the middle wall outlets at the
lower ends of all the locks on the Canal.
They are to be used only when it is desired
to unwater the side and middle wall culverts
between the upper operating valves and the
intakes, and the middle wall culverts from
the outlets to the lower operating valve.
They close an opening 8 feet wide by 18 feel
high in the side walls and 8 feet wide by 15
feet high in the middle wall; are arranged in
triplets with piers between the openings, and
seat directly against the masonry in grooves
provided for that purpose. They are never



operated under a head, but provision is made
for removing them when not in use. The
gates consist of a number of I-beams placed
one on top of the other, being fastened to-
gether by means of long rods running the
full length of each section of the gate. There
will be two sizes- of these gates, 13 feet
10J inches by 26 feet 8 21-32 inches for side
walls, and 13 feet 10| inches by 23 feet
8 21-32 inches for middle walls.

Screens for side and middle wall intakes. —
These screens are to guard the inlets in both
^ide walls and middle walls at the upper end
of all the locks on the Canal. They guard
an opening 8 feet wide by 18 feet high in the
side wall, and 8 feet wide by 15 feet high in
the middle wall; are arranged in triplets
with piers between the openings, and seat
directly against the masonry in grooves pro-
vided for that purpose. The screens consist
of a skeleton frame, composed of I-beam
verticals and channel cross frames, inclosing
bays of round-edge flats, properly spaced to
form the required opening for the waterway.
There will be two sizes of screens — 13 feet
by 24 feet 11 inches for side walls, and 13 feet
by 22 feet 1 inch for middle walls.

The Six- Year Men.

A meeting of employes interested in the
formation of an association of employes and
exemployes of the Isthmian Canal Commis-
sion and Panama Railroad Company, who
have completed six years' continuous service
on the Isthmus, will be held at the University
Club, in Panama, on Saturday evening.
August 12, at 8 o'clock. About 400 persons
are now eligible for membership in the pros-
pective association, or will become eligible
prior to November 1, 1911. It is impracticable
to assemble all of these but it is proposed that
about 80 shall meet and perfect an organiza-
tion. It has been suggested that the associa-
tion adopt as its device a button to be worn in
the lapel of the coat. This button would
represent the Canal medal with the two bars,
which is too large and heavy, as well as too
valuable, to be worn on ordinary occasions.
Beyond this, the objects of the association
have not been outlined, but it is intended to
make it serve useful purposes.

Gatun Dam Spillway.

The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun
Dam is over 66 per cent completed, 149,696
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having
been placed at the close of work on August
5. A statement of the amount laid each work-
ing day last week, and of the total in place,
follows:



Date.



Concrete ' Hours
Laid. I worked.



No.

Mixers.



July 31

August 1

August 2

August 3

August 4 ,

August 5

Total

Previously reported

Grand total



244
228
264
218
296
210



1,460
148.236



149.696



8.00
14.00
14.00
14.00
16.00
14.00



.XI) llll



Electrical Workers.

At the meeting of Local Union, No. 677,
I. B. E. \Y. of Gatun, on August 13, at 2
p. m., Baxter R. Grier will lecture on "Wiring
diagrams and formulas."

Lost — On Sunday morning. July 30. between
Paraiso railroad station and the Church of the Holy
Redeemer, Culebra. a bracelet of Costa Rica gold coins.
A reward will be given for its return to Mr. E. B.
Healey, Paraiso. C. Z.



396



NEW WASHINGTON HOTEL.



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. JO.



Plans for Concrete and Hollow Tile Building —
Grounds and Sea Wall.

Plans have been approved for a new hotel
building of the Spanish colonial style, modi-
fied to fit local conditions, to be situated on
Colon Beach, and to cost not over five hundred
thousand dollars. It will be built by the
Panama Railroad Company. The plan of the
ground floor, published herewith, shows also
the location. It is in front of the present
hotel, which will be used during construction,
and will look out across Limon Bay. About a
year will be required in the construction, and



present hotel is in process of improvement,
and the plan contemplates an extension of
the present plaza in Colon up to the entrance
of the new hotel. With this idea in view, the
axis of the hotel is on that of the plaza, so
that there will be a broad open space of park,
about one-fourth of a mile in extent, between
the entrance to the hotel and the buildings
of the town.

Work on the beach improvement includes



900 feet long, and from 140 to 170 feet wide,
will be added to the grounds. The wall is
nearing completion. It has a base 5J feet,
top, one foot, which rises to 6 feet above mean
sea level, and is anchored to the coral rock
by a double row of iron rail. Along the top




work mi the foundation was begun this week.
The plans arc by Cram, Goodhue, and Fer-
guson, architects, of New York, and the work
will be done under their direction. Incidental
to the construction, the beach in front of the



GROUND, OR FIRST FLOOR PLAN.

the constructing of a sea wall in front of the
hotel site and the filling of the rock shelf,
which now shows above water at low tide.
In this way, the sea will be kept from further
washing of the shore, and a strip of land about



of the wall will be built a concrete balustrade
two and one half feet high, with concrete
posts 3 feet 3 inches high, spaced 10 feet
from center to center. At its east end, the
wall will be blocked out to provide a swim-



August 9, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



397



ming pool 125 by 100 feet, and from 3 to 9
feet deep, which will be open on the sea side,
with a baffle wall in front to protect it from
rough water. At present, there is no good
bathing place on Colon Beach, because a ledge
of coral rock extends along the water front,
and is just awash at low tide. So far as pos-
sible, the cocoanut palms, which adorn the
grounds in front of the present hotel, will be
preserved, and, where their removal is neces-
sary, an effort will be made to transplant
them. The monument to the Panama railroad
pioneers, Aspinwall, Chauney, and Stephens,
will be moved from its present site, part of
which is included in the northeast corner of
the new hotel, to the semicircular flower
bed at the city entrance to the new hotel.
It is the intention to lay out the grounds
around the hotel with plants and trees.

The building will be 300 feet long, will have
foundations of gravel concrete; walls of
reinforced columns and beams, with hollow
tile curtain walls, white cement stucco finish
outside, and rooms plastered within; floors of
concrete beams, floor slabs of solid concrete,



coffee service in succession, thence to the
door of the dining room, where they take
clean linen, and are checked by the checker,
who sits there and keeps track of the
food served and of the linen. The coffee,
tea, cocoa, ice cream, and other foods
that must be served either hot or very
cold, are issued at one counter, and that, the
nearest to the dining room, so that as little
time as possible may be lost in serving them.
The reception section consists of the main
entrance with offices, parlors, and writing
rooms. The ladies' parlor is 2S by 1S-J- feet;
men's room, 14 by 15j feet; writing room,
14 by 15 feet; men's lounge or general writing
room, 41 by 43 feet; billiard room, 25 by 40
feet. All partitions that can be so constructed,
without interfering with privacy extend from
the floor about halfway to the ceiling, so that
above the height of one's head, the whole
ground floor is practically open. This insures
good circulation of air, and will add to the
coolness of the public rooms. The ballroom
is 53 by 37 feet, and is entered from the
street by a side door, which gives access to



directly from the bedrooms, and rooms
having showers are also provided with lava-
tories, piped for hot and cold water. Every'
bedroom will have either a private bath, or
a shower bath. In area, the bed rooms
.iwrage 244 square feet, as compared with
200 square feet, at the Hotel Tivoli.

A comparison of the area of the principal
rooms with those of the Hotel Tivoli, follows:



Rooms.



Office

Foyer

Men's lounge

Ballroom

Billiard room

Dining room

Private dining room .

Commons

Ladies' parlor

Ladies' toilet

Men's toilet

Men's retiring room.

Ballroom toilets

Bedrooms, average . .



Hotel.



Tivoli. Washington



Sq. Ft.

466

2,435



3.219
1.665

4.SX4



444
72
72



Sq. Ft.

540
1.642
1,680
1,098
1.000
4,658

120

220

440

210

208

208

416

243.6




m



concrete and tile, or of tile, according as
cost may warrant; roof of tile. The floors in
the kitchen will be of concrete, and in the
ballroom, of maple or other hard wood.
The woodwork will be reduced to a minimum.
The building will be screened against mos-
quitoes on the leeward side, but, as there are
seldom mosquitoes on the seaward side, no
screening will be necessary there.

First floor. — The plan of the first floor shows
that it is laid out in three sections — dining,
reception, and ballroom. The a In carte
dining room is 37 by 53 feet, the private
dining room 12 by 12 feet, and the table d'
hole 65 by 40 feet, and the commons 11 by
20 feet. Back of these rooms is the kitchen
and service plant. It is so laid out that the
waiters, on leaving the dining rooms, pass
alongside a hamper, where they drop soiled
linen, next to a table in front of the dish
washer, where they leave soiled dishes, thence
to a table on which clean dishes are placed.
They pass with the clean dishes, to the
steamers, carving table, steam table, and



SECOND FLOOR PLAN.

the ballroom, without bringing the dancers
into contact with the hotel's guests. The
isolated situation of the ballroom minimizes
the annoyance of late music to guests.

Second and third floors. — On the second
and third floors are 88 bedrooms, ample in size
for two beds. All of them are provided with
clothes closets fitted with electric lights, both
for illumination and to keep the closets dry.
The dimensions of type rooms are shown on
the plan of the second and third floors.
Seventy-six of the rooms let out upon
loggias, which serve not more than three
rooms. The loggias in the north ends of the
wings, toward the sea, are also entered
from the public corridors. Practically all the
rooms are connected, making it possible to
arrange suites of from two to fifteen rooms.
In all but four instances, access from con-
nected rooms is by way of passages, not the
public corridors, and not through bath
rooms. Private baths are generally entered
from the private passages, and not from bed-
rooms. Shower baths are entered generally



PERSONAL.



Colonel S. E. Tillman of the Military
Academy at West Point, and Major E. R.
Stuart, Corps of Engineers, are on the Isthmt s
inspecting the Canal work.

Mr. Edward Schildhauer, accompanied by
Mrs. Schildhauer, will sail on the Cristobal on
August 12, on his annual leave of absence.



Transfer of Odd Fellows Lodge.

Canal Zone Lodge, No. 3, 1. O. O. F., has
received authorization from the sovereign
grand lodge, through the district deputy grand
sire, B. F. Sisson of Gatun, to transfer the
seat of its jurisdiction from Culebra to
Empire. The move, which is actuated by the
fact that many of the lodge members reside
at Empire, and that the location will be more
central for the members in general, will take
place the latter part of August.

The following officers of Canal Zone Lodge
were recently installed: Noble grand, Eu-
gene W. Palmer; vice-grand, Edward A.
Putnam; secretary, Arthur D. Moore; trea-
surer, Arthur E. Erickson.



398



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 50.



STEAM SHOVEL RECORDS.



Work of Central Division and P. R. R. Reloca-
tion Shovels in July.

I )uring the month of July, the total amount
of material excavated in the Central Division
was 1,360,117 cubic yards, of which 158,901
cubic yards were classified as earth, and
1,201,216 cubic yards as rock. Of this quan-
tity, 1,337,833 cubic yards were removed by
steam shovels, and contractors removed
16,928 cubic yards by sluicing, and 5,356 cubic
yards by hand.

The high record for the month was made
by shovel No. 208, working 25 days in the
Culebra district, which excavated 54,866
cubic yards of rock and earth. The second
best record for the month was made by shovel
No. 207, working 25 days in the Culebra
district, which excavated 54,356 cubic yards
of rock.

The best record for a shovel of the seventy-
ton class was made by shovel No. 109, working
25 days in the Culebra district, which exca-
vated 30,631 cubic yards of rock.

Shovel No. 260, working in the Culebra
district, made a high record for one day by
excavating 3,040 cubic yards of earth on
July 26.

Except where noted, monthly reports are
computed by place measurement, while the
daily reports are based on car measurement.
The best records for the month, and for one
day, are shown below:

BEST RECORDS FOR THE MONTH.

EMPIRE DISTRICT.







Cubic


Yards.




Shovel
No.


Earth.


Rock.


Total.


No. of
days at
work.


253




38,704


38,704
36,008
30,128


25






36.008
30.128


25






25



CULEBRA DISTRICT.



208


| 10.973


43,893
54.356
47,840


54,866 |

54.356

47,840


25
25




::::!::::::::


25



PEDRO MIGUEL.



21,260



21.260



185



BEST RECORDS FOR ONE DAY.



Location. ; Date.



w



Character of

material
excavated.



215

253
2531
203



Empire.
Empire.
Empire.
Empire.



260 Culebra.

208

256

231

231

231

231



Culebra
Culebra
Pedro Miguel
Pedro Miguel
Pedro Miguel
Pedro Miguel



July
July-
July
July
July
July
July
iJuly
July
July
July



Rock . .
Rock . .
Rock .
Rock. .
Earth .
Rock .
Rock .
Rock .
Rock .
Rock .
Rock .



Cubic

yards.



2,454
2.413
2.280
2,223
3,040
2,926
2,879
1,900
1.672
1,634
1,520



Steam Shovels on Relocated Line.



The total excavation on the relocated line
of the Panama railroad amounted to 357,135
cubic yards. Of this amount, 212,510 cubic
yards \\\rc classified as borrow (75 per cent
solid rock,) 64,395 cubic yards as earth,
32,765 cubic yards as loose rock, and 47,465
cubic yards as solid rock.

Company forces removed 350,595 cubic
yards, and 6,540 cubic yards were removed
by the contractor.

strain shovels excavated 338,760 cubic
yards. Pan car task gangs took out 10,055



cubic yards, and 1,780 cubic yards were
excavated for culvert foundations.

The best steam shovel record was made by
steam shovel No. 262, working in the Monte
Lirio section, which excavated 10,000 cubic
yards of earth, and 50,790 cubic yards of
solid rock, a total of 60,790 cubic yards.

In the 70-ton class, the best record was
made by steam shovel No. 105, working in
the Gatun section, which excavated 16,550
cubic yards of earth, and 24,200 cubic yards
of solid rock, a total of 40,750 cubic yards.

The best day's record for shovels with 5-
yard dippers was made by steam shovel No.
257, working near Gatun. which excavated
3,310 cubic yards of rock on July 31.

The best day's record for 70-ton shovels
was made by steam shovel No. 123, working
near Empire, which excavated 2,210 cubic-