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hours of 6 a. m. and 10 p. m., the district judge cannot
be located, and upon any arrest upon a misdemeanor
charge without a warrant between the hours of 10 p. m.
and 6 a. m., the bonded police officer in charge of the
station where the defendant is held is authorized to
accept from the defendant cash deposit in lieu of bail in
said case, to insure defendant's appearance before the
proper district judge at the next sitting of the district
court, according to the classification of misdemeanor
offenses and bail thereon as follows:

Bail may be

Misdemeanor. taken in sum

not exceeding.

Assault $ 25

Assault and battery 125

Carrying concealed weapons 50

Cruelty to animals 50

Disorderly conduct 50

Disturbing the peace 50

Intoxication 25

Intoxication and disorderlyconduct 125

Petit larceny 125

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 25

Loitering 10

Malicious mischief 125

Selling liquor without a license 125

Unlawful possession of weapons 10

Carrying abroad weapons without permit 10

Vagrancy 15

Violating license regulations other than

liquor 10

Violating sanitary regulations 25

Minor misdemeanors not herein enumer-
ated 25

(3) In the more serious cases of misdemeanor arrests
where defendants desire to give bail, and the sum is not
provided for in the above classification, the arresting or
commanding officer of police shall communicate with the
district judge of his district at the first possible moment
after the arrest is made and said judge shall thereupon
fix the amount of bail and direct in what manner same
may be taken.

(4) In all bailable felony cases where the defendant
desires to give bail, the arresting or commanding police
officer shall, at the earliest practicable moment, com-
municate with the district judge of the district wherein
the arrest is made, advising said judge of the arrest and
character of the offense, and said judge will thereupon
fix the amount of bail the defendant may give, if any,
and direct how the same shall be taken, or shall direct
such other action as may seem to him proper.

(5) Every cash deposit taken by any police officer
in lieu of bail must be promptly delivered to the district
judge having jurisdiction of the offense for which such
cash deposit was taken to insure the defendant's appear-
ance.

Obituary.

Fred B. Haven died at Colon Hospital on
September 22, 1910. He was S3 years of age,
a widower, and had lived on the Isthmus five
years, residing at Empire. His father, C. C.
Haven, lives at Port Orange, Fla.

William Siegle, an employe of the Atlantic
Division, died at Colon Hospital on Septem-
ber 23, 1910. He was 27 years of age, and
had lived on the Isthmus, at Colon, for seven
months. His wife, living at Colon, survives
him. Death was caused by an accident while



he was at his work at Cristobal dry dock. He
was cutting wedges at a saw and a piece of
wood flying from the saw struck him on the
chest directly over the heart. He died within
three hours after the accident.



White Slave Law in Canal Zone.

The Act of June 25, 1910, forbidding the
transportation in interstate commerce of
women and girls for immoral purposes, known
as the White Slave Traffic Act, applies to the
Canal Zone by special provision of Section 7
which says — "The term 'Territory' as used
in this Act, shall include the district of Alaska,
the insular possessions of the United States,
and the Canal Zone."

The law provides in part as follows:

That the term "interstate commerce," as used in this
Act, shall include transportation from any State or
Territory or the District of Columbia to any other State
or Territory or the District of Columbia, and the term
"foreign commerce," as used in this Act, shall include
transportation from any State or Territory or the Dis-
trict of Columbia to any foreign country and from any
foreign country to any State or Territory or the District
of Columbia.

Section 2. That any person who shall knowingly
transport or cause to be transported, or aid or assist in
obtaining transportation for, or in transporting, in
interstate or foreign commerce, or in any Territory or
in the District of Columbia, any woman or girl for the
purpose of prostitution or debauchery, or for any other
immoral purpose, or with the intent and purpose to
induce, entice, or compel such woman or girl to become
a prostitute or to give herself up to debauchery, or to
engage in any other immoral practice; or who shall
knowingly procure or obtain, or cause to be procured
or obtained, or aid or assist in procuring or obtaining,
any ticket or tickets, or any form of transportation or
evidence of the right thereto, to be used by any woman
or girl in interstate or foreign commerce, or in any
Territory or the District of Columbia, in going to any
place for the purpose of prostitution or debauchery, or
for any other immoral purpose, or with the intent or pur-
pose on the part of such person to induce, entice, or com-
pel her to give herself up to the practice of prostitution,
or to give herself up to debauchery, or any other im-
moral practice, whereby any such woman or girl shall
be transported in interstate or foreign commerce, or in
any Territory or the District of Columbia, shall be
deemed guilty of a felony, and upon conviction thereof
shall be punished by a fine not exceeding five thousand
dollars, or by imprisonment of not more than five
years, or by both such fine and imprisonment, in the
discretion of the court.

Section 3. That any person who shall knowingly
persuade, induce, entice, or coerce, or cause to be per-



suaded, induced, enticed, or coerced, or aid or assist in
persuading, inducing, enticing, or coercing any woman
or girl to go from one place to another in interstate or
foreign commerce, or in any territory or the District
of Columbia, for the purpose of prostitution or de-
bauchery, or for any other immoral purpose, or with
the intent and purpose on the part of such person that
such woman or girl shall engage in the practice
of prostitution or debauchery, or any other immoral
practice, whether with or without her consent, and who
shall thereby knowingly cause or aid or assist in causing
such woman or girl to go and to be carried or transported
as a passenger upon the line or route of any common
carrier or carriers in interstate or foreign commerce, or
any Territory or the District of Columbia, shall be
deemed guilty of a felony and on conviction thereof
shall be punished by a fine of not more than five thou-
sand dollars, or by imprisonment for a term not exceed-
ing five years, or by both such fine and imprisonment,
in the discretion of the court.

Section 4. That any person who shall knowingly
persuade, induce, entice, or coerce any woman or girl
under the age of eighteen years from any State or Ter-
ritory or the District of Columbia to any other State or
Territory or the District of Columbia with the purpose
and intent to induce or coerce her, or that she shall be
induced or coerced to engage in prostitution or debauch-
ery, or any other immoral practice, and shall in fur-
therance of such purpose knowingly induce or cause
her to go and to be carried or transported as a passenger
in interstate commerce upon the line or route of any
common carrier or carriers, shall be deemed guilty of
a felony and on conviction thereof shall be punished by
a fine of not more than ten thousand dollars, or by
imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years, or by
both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of
the court.

Sections 5 and 6 provide for procedure in
prosecutions under the Act, and place upon
the Commissioner General of Immigration the
duty of receiving and centralizing information
concerning the procuring of women for pur-
poses of prostitution.



Missing Man.

Any one having information regarding the
whereabouts of Haymond Brice Collins, 18
years of age, who is supposed to have left
his home in Pennsboro, West Va., three years
ago to come to Panama, is requested to com-
municate with the American Legation, Pana-
ma.



Cold Storage Prices.



There are no changes in the prices of cold storage
articles from those quoted in last week's isssue of The
Canal Record.



LABOR FORCE AND QUARTERS IN AUGUST.



On August 31, there were 35,867 employes actually at work on the Canal and the Panama
railroad, and of this number, 29,950 were Canal employes. The gold force on the Canal
work, composed almost entirely of white Americans, was 4,445. No labor recruiting
was necessary during the month.

The report of the Chief Quartermaster for August shows that the number of family quar-
ters occupied by "gold" employes was 1,708, which is 25 more than in July, and the occu-
pants numbered 5,180, an increase of 77. Of this number, 1,756 were women, and 1,718
children. Bachelor quarters occupied by "gold" employes numbered 1,878 and the
occupants numbered 3,282, of whom 121 were women. The family quarters, occupied by
European laborers numbered 281, and the occupants, 903; bachelor quarters, 116, and
the number of occupants, 5,610. The family quarters occupied by West Indians numbered
1,075, and the occupants, 3,564; bachelor quarters, 260, and the number of occupants, 5,077.

A statement of the force actually at work on August 31, follows:





a
o

s


Artisans.


European
Laborers.


West Indian
laborers.


Total
Silver.


2
o
O

a
5


3


Department.


a

u
u

T

15

4


■/

V

u

CM

tr>

30

3


a

a

V

10

CM


a

a

V

u
o
C*J


3

a
a
u


t/5

c

V

u

o

cm


a

a
3
u


■/.


V

u

O

CO


a

c
p
o


a
u
u
to


vi

a
u
o

O


w

a
u

U


■o

s

g

O


Const'ct'n and Eng'r'ng.


4,194

163

697

1,020

635

S

5


275

2

2

70

1


654
4
3

165
1


2,586

18

2

172


3.237


1.911


107


471


3,200


3.770

5

363

1,021


279

"s

10


20.729

192

1.085

2.849

637

8

5


3,356
301
395
226
60
24
83


24.085




3
295


2

47


27




5
15


1,480

3,075

697






















































19


33


























6.722


350


827


2,778


3.535


1.960


134


471


3.220


5.159


297


25,505


4.445


29,950





Panama railroad force, 3.29S; Panama railroad relocation force. 1,603: Panama railroad commissary force,
1.016. Total, 5.917. I. C. C. force. 29,950. Grand total. 35.867.



36



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 5.



COMMISSION HOTELS.

A Year at the Hotels and Labor Messes.
The annual report of the Subsistence De-
partment of the Isthmian Canal Commission
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1910, shows
that 18 hotels, in addition to the Hotel Tivoli,
19 European laborers' messes, and 20 common
laborers' kitchens were in operation, an in-
crease of one hotel, and a decrease of one
kitchen, as compared with the previous fis-
cal year.

The total revenue derived from the line
hotels, messes and kitchens during 1909-10
was $1,350,658.05, a decrease of $168,620.08,
as compared with the preceding year. The
total expenses were $248,313.71, a decrease of
S46.602.1S from the year 1908-09. The
revenues fell off 11 per cent, but the expenses
fell off 15.7 per cent, the percentage of expense
to revenue being one per cent less for 1909-10
than for the previous year. The expense
for salaries and wages was $191,438.11, as
compared with $236,955.52 for 1908-09, a
decrease of 19.5 per cent. The proportion of
pay roll to revenue was 14.1 per cent, as com-
pared with 15.5 per cent for the year before
a decrease of 1.4 per cent.

The total number of meals served at Com-
mission hotels was 2,176,451. The cost of
supplies was 24.S7 cents and the expense was
6.23 cents a meal, an increase in cost of sup-
plies of 1.33 cents a meal, and a decrease in
expense of 0.69 cents a meal, making a total
increase of 2.02 cents a meal, which has gone
into food, and represents a total increase of
$43,964.31 in food supplies, as compared w ith
the preceding year.

The total number of rations furnished in
European laborers' messes was 1,092,487,
which cost 30.18 cents a ration for food, and
6.66 a ration for expense. The number of
rations served decreased by 78,690; the food
cost decreased 0.77 cents a ration, and the
expense decreased 0.60 cents a ration. The
number of rations served in the common
laborers' kitchens was 781,746 at a cost of
22.66 cents each for food, and 4.63 cents each
for expense. The number of rations showed
a decrease of 616,746, as compared with the
previous year. The cost of supplies was 0.14
cents a ration greater, but the cost of service
was 0.09 cents a ration less. There has been a
constant decrease in the number of laborers
taking their meals in Commission kitchens,
the attendance in June, 1910, being about
50 per cent less than for the corresponding
month in 1909. The average daily attend-
ance during June, 1910 in the line hotels was
1,915; in messes, 3,178, and in kitchens, 1,496.
The following table shows the relative
value of food consumed each day by each
person in the Commission hotels, the costs
being computed by taking periods in each
month and averaging them. The actual cost
would be about six per cent less.

Article. Cost— Cents.

Meats, fresh 25.92

Fruits and vegetables, fresh 10.66

Miscellaneous supplies 6.93

Butter 6.18

Eggs 5.91

Fruits and vegetables, canned 5.40

Meats, cured. ..." 4.47

Bread 2.73

Milk 2.37

Ice Cream 2.25

Sugar 2.19

Tea, coffee and cocoa 1.71

Flour 1.71

Meats, canned 1.05

In addition to the foregoing, the consumption of ice
amounted to 3.45 pounds each day.

The average weight of the ration supplied



each person daily in the European laborers'
messes was found to be approximately 4.91
pounds, and the average value 29.58 cents.
This does not include 1.3S pounds of ice con-
sumed per capita each day, which cost 0.56
cents. The average weight of the ration
supplied each person daily in the laborers'
kitchens was found to be approximately 4.41
pounds, with a value of 22.26 cents. It is
a coincidence that the net weight of the
ration furnished the European laborer is
exactly equal to the gross weight of the United
States Army garrison ration, and the net
weight of the ration furnished the negro la-
borer is exactly equal to the gross weight of
the United States Army field ration.

The year's operations showed a loss on
hotels of $22,168.71, a profit on the European
laborers' messes of $34,504.86, and a profit on
the laborers' kitchens of $21,211.97. The
operation of the Hotel Tivoli showed a profit
for the year of $4,574.23.

Concrete in Gatun Spillway.

The amount of concrete placed in the Spill-
way of Gatun Dam during the week ending
September 24, and the total placed to that
date, are shown in the following statement:





Cubic Yards.


Date.


Concrete


Large
rock.


Total.




254
250
260
222
104
150




254


September 20


250
260




222




104




150






Total


1.240




1,240
92.990












94,230










The plant used on
hours.


e mixer and wo


rked 46



A ii, mi Rock Crusher.
A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon
quarry during the weeks ending September 17,
and September 24, respectively, follows:



Date.



September 12 . . .
September 13. . .
September 14. . .
September 15 . . .
September 16. . .
September 17. . .

Total

Date

September 19. . .
September 20. . .
September 21...
September 22 . . .
September 23 . . .
September 24. . .

Total



Hours
worked.



8.45
7:30
6:55
5:10
8:00
7:45



44:05



Hours
worked.



8:00
8:25
7:15
8:25
7:30
8:00



47:35



Cubic
Yards.



2,730
3,305
2.055
1.785
2.280
2.695



14.850



Cubic
Yards



2.790
2.545
2.815
3.01S
2,970
2,805



16.940



No action has yet been taken on the report
of the committee appointed to consider the
advisability of requesting the Y. M. C. A. to
take over the Washington reading room in
the Lincoln House at Colon. The committee
reported favorably, but additional informa-
tion bearing on the subject has been asked for
by the superintendent of the Panama railroad,
under whose management the room is con-
ducted.

Launch Service to Taboga.

The steamer Samdad leaves the dredge landing at
Balboa at 9 o'clock Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday
mornings. On the return trip it arrives at Balboa
about 4.30 p.m. in time to make connections for the
5.30 train at Panama.



MIRAFLORES SPILLWAY.

Plans for Controlling the Water Level of Mira-
Hores Lake.

Plans have been approved for the spillway
by means of which the water in Miraflores
Lake, between the locks at Pedro Miguel and
Miraflores, will be regulated. The spillway
will consist of a straight concrete dam con-
necting the east wall of Miraflores Locks with
the side hill, as indicated in the location plan
on this page, with regulating gates of steel
mounted on the crest of the dam. The dam
will be 432 feet long on the crest and will con-
tain approximately 75,000 cubic yards of con-
crete. Further details are contained in the
drawings reproduced herewith, and in the fol-
lowing abstract of the report accompanying
the approved plans:

Proper control of Miraflores Lake involves
not only passing the insignificant flow of the
tributary streams — Rio Grande, Rio Pedro
Miguel, Rio Cocoli, and Rio Caimitillo — but
the disposal of the large amount of water
which would reach the lake from the higher




Location Plan

OF MIRAFLORES SPILLWAY.

Scale 1 : 12000

level of Gatun Lake through Culebra Cut,
should an accident permit an unobstructed
flow to take place through one of the twin
locks at Pedro Miguel.

Careful studies have been made of the
quantity which may reasonable be expected
to flow into Miraflores Lake if this contin-
gency should arise, and the spillway pro-
posed, with a capacity at maximum permis-
sible lake level of about 92,000 second feet
will dispose of the probable discharge with-
out damage to the earth dams. The quantity
flowing into the lake is not susceptible to
precise determination, results ranging from
75,000 second feet to 116,000 second feet being
obtained, with the true value probably be-
tween 90,000 and 100,000 second feet, but if
it is found that the flow is greater than can be
passed by the spillway without raising the
lake to an undesirable level, the culverts of the
Miraflores Locks can be utilized. As it is
improbable that they would be called on to
carry more than 8,000 second feet, and as
their capacity will be about 25,000 second
feet, no damage should result from such
emergency use. The discharge would have
to pass the spillway for only the short time



September 2S, 1910.



THE CANAL RECORD



37



occupied in closing the emergency dam at
Pedro Miguel. The flow would begin to di-
minish as soon as the first wicket of the dam
should be dropped, and would cease when the
closure should be completed.

The maximum level to which Miraflores
Lake may be permitted to rise is determined
by the lock walls with copings at elevation
5S.67 feet above sea level. Allowing a free-
board of 1.5 feet gives a maximum lake level
at elevation 57.17.

The spillway consists of approach walls,
connecting the dam with the lock on one side
and the natural rock hill on the other, the
spillway dam, and the discharge channel.
The spillway dam will be a straight concrete
dam of ogee section with its crest at elevation
38.67 feet above mean sea level, 16 feet below
the ordinary level of Miraflores Lake. The
crest will be divided into eight bays, each 45
feet wide, by the end abutments and seven in-
termediate piers and the bays will be closed
by rising gates of the Stoney type, in all
respects like those designed for the spillway
at Gatun. The piers will be so designed that
the caissons for closing of gate openings may
be used interchangeably at both spillways.

The downstream or ogee face of the dam
will be formed by a parabolic curve convex
upward, and a circular arc concave up-
ward. The parabolic part is exactly like
the corresponding part of the Gatun spillway
dam except that the curve is carried a little
further. (An article on the dam of the Gatun
spillway was published in The Canal Record
of September 8, 1909) The overflowing
water, will, therefore, adhere whenever the
gates are opened six feet or more. The cir-
cular part forming the toe, which turns the
overfalling stream back to horizontal direction.



ning through the dam from end to end, the
machines and the tunnel to be like those in
Gatun spillway dam, and the water which
may seep in, or leak in at the ends, to be
drained out on the downstream side. The
best location for the controlling devices has
not been determined but can be left for future
study.

It is believed that it will be better to regu-



level at the rate of about 0.1 foot per minute,
it is evident that the spillway gates must be
opened promptly after the occurrence of such
an accident in order to prevent damage to the
earth dam. Automatic self-starters, actuated
by float switches, giving thoroughly depend-
able automatic control, are recommended to
be installed at the Miraflores spillway to
operate the gates in the event of such a flood.




i^g6fS5S^'<4>^ ®!SfeSte , #®^^B



SEO-nON

SHOWING OGEE DAM, WITH PIER AND CHANNEL WALL IN DISTANCE.

Scale 1 : 1000.



late the lake ordinarily by means of the crest
gates on the spillway dam, either by opening
several gates for only a few inches so as to
discharge thin streams, which can do no harm
even though they do not adhere to the mason-
ry, or by opening a single gate wide at such
intervals and for such lengths of time as may
be necessary to hold the lake within the per-
missible limits. The latter method is per-



Such apparatus is not, however, to interfere
with the ordinary manual control of the mo-
tors by which the gates may be moved sepa-
rately.




Death of a French Canal Chaplain.
The Rev. Father Pius Massi, a Jesuit priest,
who was a chaplain in the service of the first
French canal company, died at St. Francis
Hospital in New York on September 8, at the
age of 77. He was born in the Vatican, his
father having been chamberlain at the papal
court during the incumbency of Pope Gregory
XVI, and received his early education at the
Roman College. His first mission was in
Quito, Ecuador, and from there he came to
Panama. During the ensuing four years he
acted as a nurse in yellow fever cases among
French canal employes, and officiated at
funerals. He was a close friend of Count
DeLesseps. In 1883, he went to the United
States and after a year of teaching in Boston,
joined the Jesuit College at Georgetown
University, remaining there until 1890, when
he became identified with the work of the
church of St. Ignatius Loyola in New York
City.

Hebrew Benevolent Society — New Year 5671.
The Ca^jal Record:

Divine service will be conducted at the
Sojourners' lodge room, Colon, on Monday
evening, October 3, at 6.30 o'clock, and on
Tuesday morning, October 4, beginning at
S.30. All Jewish residents of the Canal Zon«
are cordially invited.

By order,
J. Julius Sasso, Secretary.



GENERAL PLAN— MIRAELORES SPILLWAY.
Scale 1 : 125.



is of shorter radius than that at Gatun, since
this dam is of less height and the presence of a
deep pool of water eliminates the necessity of
the more gradual return adopted in the former
design.

It is proposed to install the machinery for
operating the crest gates within a tunnel run-



haps to be preferred as it gives the operators
experience in working and caring for their
machinery and furnishes an opportunity to
examine the upstream faces of the gates.

As the flood which would be thrown into
Miraflores Lajce by the breaking down of a
lock at Pedro Miguel would raise the lake



The use of old cross-ties will be resorted to by
the Quartermaster's Department in Ancon for
maintaining the supply of kindling to married
quarters. Up to recently there had been
enough old boxes, and odds and ends from
building operations to fill the demand. The
ties to be cut up are brought in from the line,
and are worthless, having been relaid several
times until they have become full of spike
holes.



38



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. TV., No. 5.



ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCHES.



Religious Work by Commission Chaplains and
Other Priests.

The Roman Catholic churches in the Canal
Zone are in the diocese of Panama, and all
the property owned by the church is held in
the name of the Right Rev. Bishop Junguito.