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and sundries for Sanitary Department; and a miscel-
laneous cargo, the whole consisting of 411 packages,
weighing 50 tons

Prim August Wilhtlm. August 7. New York, with
949 pieces and 451 bundles galvanized pipe for stock;
276 rolls mesh reinforcement for Pacific Division; 100
bags creosoted pins for Panama Railroad Company.

Santa Maria. August 10. from New York, with 5



cases carbon paper for stock; 38 barrels insulators for
Panama Railroad Company.

Atenas, August 10, from New Orleans, with 1.348
bales prairie hay, 250 bales alfalfa hay. 100 rolls
roofing paper, 598 bundles lumber (ceiling), 1 ,763 pieces
lumber (yellow pine), 5,252 pieces lumber (siding),
60 pieces lumber (white oak), for stock; 1,125 pieces
lumber (white oak) and 388 tons iron pigs for Mechan-
inal Division; 6 pieces castings for Pacific Division.

Stanley Dollar, August 11, from Hoquiam, Wash.,
with 16.907 pieces Douglas fir lumber for stock.

Allianca, August 11. from New York, with 50 pieces
steel bars. 174 pieces steel beams and angles. 12
bundles steel bars, 10 barrels alum, 40 barrels sulphate
aluminum, 12 kegs castings, 11 rolls harness leather,
434 bundles shovels, 2.540 bundles iron pipe. 10 cases
stationery, for stock; 376 bundles steel bars, 6 crates
steel plates, 19 cases copper rail bonds, 9 packages
capstan, for Atlantic Division; 37 pieces castings for
Central Division; 14 cases copper rail bonds, 12 crates
pump parts, 4 cases electrical material, for Pacific
Division: 150 bundles galvanized bars. 18 bundles
creosoted pins, for Panama Railroad Company; 14
cases glass globes and 13 crates pins for Mechanical
Division; and a miscellaneous cargo, the whole con-
sisting of 4,075 packages, weighing 203 tons.



Family Quarters.

Applications for married quarters were on file on
August 1. as follows:



District.


List

No. 1.


List

No. 2.




2


37 (3)




32 (7)






17 (1)




3

1

1


(1)


31 (1)




101 (1)




6




63 (21)




1

1


123 (42)




87(41)




21 (6)






48(11)




1


9 (3)




14






7 (2)










Total


10


(1)


596(139)



Note. — The figures in parentheses show the number
of applicants already occupying regular or nonhouse-
keeping family quarters at stations other than those
at which applications are filed.



Pacific Division Sand Service.

A report of sand cars loaded and shipped from Bal-
boa during the month of July, 1911. follows:



Destination.



Number Cubic
Cars. Yards.



Pacific Division

Central Division

Atlantic Division

Mechanical Division

Quartermaster's Department

Panama railroad

Miscellaneous

Total



2.156

37

6

111
8
17
18



32.340
579
146
250
190
425
310



2.252 34.240



Band Concert.

A concert will be given by the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission Band at Culebra. C. Z., on Sunday. August 20.
1911, at 5.45 p. m. The program follows:

1. March — Ideal Reeves

2. Selection — The Girl of My Dreams Hoscbna

3. Sextet from Lucia Donizetti

4. Waltz — Casino Tanze Gung'l

5. Overture — Fesl Leuter

6. (o) Medley March — Kiss Me. Honey.

Kiss Me Snyder

(6) Two Step — Casey Jones Newton

7. Nautical Fantasia Tobani

8. Popular Selection — Remick's Hits Lampe

9. March — The Arbitrator Bagley

Charles E. Jennings. Musical Director.
The next concert will be given at Corozal, C. Z.,
on August 27. at 7.30 p. m.



Married.

MILLER-MacKA\ r — At Cleveland. Ohio, on
August 3. Jean MaclCay of that city to Charles I.
Miller. Canal Zone residence, Gorgona.

CAMERON-BELL. — At Ancon, on August 9,
Florence E. Bell to Alexander J. Cameron, the Rev.
Father Bicknell officiating. Canal Zone residence,
Corozal.



408



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 51.



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT.

Special Bargain Sale.

Attention is called to the special bargain sale to
start at the commissary stores at Culebra, Empire, and
Gatun, on August 18.

The open hours at Culebra commissary are from

8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and from p. m. 3 to 7 p. m.

All other commissaries are open from 8 a. m. to 1

p. m. ( and 3 p rn. to 7 p. m. with the exception of tne

Cristobal commissary, which is open from 8 a. m. to
12.30 p. m., and from 2 p. m. to 7 p. m.

Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week
beginning August 12.

fresh meats. Price.

Mutton — Stewing per pound 6

Shoulder, neck trimmed off, (4 pounds

and over), per pound 9

Entire forequarter (not trimmed) 10

pounds and over, per pound 8

Leg (8 to 10 pounds,), per pound 17

Cutlets, per pound 18

Short cut chops, per pound 20

Lamb — Stewing, per pound 6

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed off,

per pound °

Leg (5 to 8 pounds), per pound 20

Chops, per pound 24

Cutlets, per pound 24

Veal — Stewing, per pound 10

Shoulder, for roasting (not under 4

pounds), per pound 12}

Chops, shoulder, per pound 16

Chops, per pound 24

Loin , for roasting, per pound 24

Cutlets, per pound 28

Pork — Loin chops or roast, per pound 14

Beef — Suet, per pound 2

Soup, per pound 5

Stew, per pound 8

Corned, No. 1, per pound 12

Corned, No, 2, per pound 10

Chuck roast (3 pounds and over), per

pound 12

Pot roast, per pound 12$

Rib roast, second cut (not under $\

pounds), per pound 16

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds),

per pound 18

Sirloin roast, per pound 19

Rump roast, per pound 19

Porterhouse roast, per pound 20

Steak, chuck, per pound 12i

Round, per pound 13

Rib, per pound 18

Sirloin, per pound 19

Rump, per pound 19

Porterhouse (not less than \\

pounds) , per pound 20

Tenderloin (Western), per pound. 24

MISCELLANEOUS.

Caviare, Russian per tin 47, 89

Livers — Beef, per pound 7

Calf, each 60

Half, each 30

Steak, Hamburger, pkg 13

Sausage — Bologna, per pound 10

Frankfurter, per pound 12

Lieberwurst. per pound 10

Devonshire Farm 17

Sweetbread— Veal, per pound 1.20

Beet, per pound 25

Eggs, fresh, dozen f t28

one-half dozen only t* 5

Bluefish, fresh, per pound 14

Halibut, fresh, per pound 15

Shads, fresh, each 70

Shad roes, fresh, per pair 35

POULTRY AND GAME.

Chickens — Fancy roasting, milk fed. large, each 1.25

Fancy roasting, milk fed, med., each 1.00
Fancy roasting, corn fed, about 4£

pounds, each 90

Fowls, each 60. 70, 80, 90, 1.00

Ducks, Western, about 4} pounds, each 1.00

Broilers, milk fed, each 60

corn fed. each 55

Turkeys, per pound 26

Squabs, each 35

Capons 2.10

Fryers, corn fed 60

Partridges, each 50

Grouse, each 50

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS.

Ham — German, Westphalia, per pound 36

Sugar cured, per pound 18

Sliced, per pound 20

Half, for boiling, per pound 19

Boiled, per pound 26

Hocks, per pound J8

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound 22

Breakfast, sliced, per pound 23

Pork salt family, per pound 14

Ox Tongues each 1 .00

Pig's feot, per pound 9

Tongues, per pound 14

Sliced bacon in 1 -pound tins, per tin 30

In 1-pound jars, per jar 30

DAIRY PRODUCTS.

Butter — Creamery special, per pound 30



Price*

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound 38

Philadelphia cream, cake 18

Young America, per pound 18

Swiss, per pound 26

Edam, each 1-00

Edam, in tins, tin 25

Neufchatel, cake 6

OnnHa ppr poiinH 34

Milk (Certified) . per bottle **25

Buttermilk, bottle **15

ice cream, quart t25

i-gallon 150

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS.

Beets, per pound 6

Corn, green, per doz 24

Cabbage, per pound 4£

Cucumbers, per pound '. • . • 10

Lettuce, per pound 12

Onions, per pound 5

Potatoes, white, per pound 4£

sweet, per pound 2

Pears. Alligator, each 6

Peppers, green, per lb 7

Rhubarb, per pound 3

Yams, per pound

Cantaloupes, each 10

Grapefruit, each 4

Lemons, dozen 24

Limes, per 100 80

Oranges, California, per dozen t42

Watermelons, each 30

♦Indicates reduction from last list.
♦♦Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle,
flndicates advance on last list.

tSold only from commissaries: no orders taken for
delivery.

Misdirected Letters.

Ancon, C. Z.. August 15. 1911.
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi-
nating in the United States and its possessions, have
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, and
may be secured upon request of the addressee:
Allaire, Maj. W. H. McKenzie. John N.

Atherley, Arnold Meeks, Nancy

Bach, Fritz Milford, Mrs. J. D. (pkg.)

Clark, Bernard Morrow, J. E.

Curry, Larry Nelson, Ernest B. (pkg.)

Dagley, F. H. Peterson. Mr.

Grayhom, W. Sargent, Don C.

Hamel, Richard Spence, Author

Hamer, John L. Sweeney, Mrs. Anna

Hanson, Mrs. Louise Fanger Tromhaltz, R.
Joyce, Pat Valpy. Miss E.

Kelley. W. E. Weishofer, J.

Lenrett, Hugh (2) Witmer, Jennie

Materials for Sale.

There is on hand at the storehouse for obsolete
material, at Mount Hope, C. Z„ an assortment of va-
rious classes of material. Sales have been effected, from
time to time, of articles that would be serviceable for
use on plantations and roadbuilding projects by parties
living in the Republic of Panama. The articles on
hand can be grouped under the following general
classes:

Hand tools — carpenter, blacksmith, and tinner's.

Fittings and plumber's supplies.

Light and heavy hardware.

Track material.

Shop tools.

Stationery and printer's supplies.

Office, hotel, and household furniture.

Oils.

Marine supplies.

Surveyor's supplies.
Also, the following plant and equipment stock:

Hand blowers.

Rock channelers.

McCully rock crushers.

Air cylinders.

Rivet heaters.

Hot water heater.

Fanning mill.

Unloader ballast plows.

Hay rake.

Wheel scrapers.

French locomotives.

Types of engines from 12 to 75 horse power.

Numerous old French boilers, representing six
different types.

Work of Unloaders in Central Division.

The following statement shows the number of Lid-
gerwood cars unloaded by the Central Division during
the month of July, 1911:



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.



Location.


No. of
unloaders.


No. of
trains.


No. of
cars.




3


1.000

735

1,029


20.000




3

4


14.700
21.590










10


2.764


56,290



The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line; the
Panama Railroad Company's dates being subject to
changes

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.

Ancon P. R. R... Thursday . .Aug. 10

Panama P. R. R.. . Saturday . . .Aug. 12

Advance P. R. R... Friday Aug. 18

Colon P. R. R... Thursday.. .Aug. 24

Allianca P. R. R... Wednesday. Aug. 30

Panama P. R. R... Tuesday. . . .Sept 5

Advance P. R. R.. . Monday. . . . Sept. 1 1

Colon P. R. R... Monday Sept. IS

Allianca P. R. R.. .Saturday. . .Sept. 23

Panama P. R. R... Friday Sept. 29

Advance P. R. R.. Thursday. . . Oct. 5

Colon P. R. R... Thursday. . .Oct. 12

Allianca P. R. R... Wednesday. Oct. 18

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.

Allianca P. R. R... Friday Aug. 18

Panama P. R. R... Thursday.. .Aug. 24

Advance P. R. R.. .Wednesday. Aug. 30

Colon P. R. R.. . Tuesday Sept. 5

Allianca P. R. R... Monday Sept. 11

Panama P. R. R... Sunday . . . .Sept. 17

Advance P. R. R.. . Saturday . . . Sept. 23

Colon P. R. R... Saturday. . .Sept. 30

Allianca P. R. R... Friday Oct. 6

Panama P. R. R... Thursday.. .Oct. 12

Advance P. R. R... Tuesday Oct. 17

Colon P. R. R... Tuesday Oct. 24

Allianca P. R. R... Monday. . . .Oct. 30

NEW YORK TO COLON.

Metapan U. F. C. .Thursday.. .Aug. 10

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday. . . Aug. 12

Zacapa U. F. C. .Thursday.. .Aug. 17

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. . . H.-A Friday Aug. 18

Trent R. M Saturday. . .Aug. 10

Almirante U. F. C. .Thursday.. .Aug. 24

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm.. . .H.-A Saturday. . .Aug. 26

Oruba R. M Saturday. . .Sept. 2

Santa Marta U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Aug. 31

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Friday Sept. 1

Metapan U. F. C . .Thursday. . . Sept. 7

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday. . .Sept. 9

Zacapa U. F. C. .Thursday.. .Sept. 14

Prinz Eitel Friedrich. . . H.-A Friday Sept. 15

Almirante U. F. C. .Thursday . ..Sept. 21

COLON TO NEW YORK.

Santa Marta U. F. C . .Thursday. . .Aug. 17

Prinz Sigismund H.-A Saturday. . .Aug. 19

Oruba R. M Tuesday Aug. 22

Metapan U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Aug. 24

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday.. . .Aug. 29

Zacapa U. F. C. .Thursday.. .Aug. 31

Prinz Eitel Friedrich.. .H.-A Saturday .. .Sept. 2

Clyde R. M Tuesday Sept. 5

Almirante U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Sept. 7

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. . . . H.-A Tuesday Sept. 1 2

Santa Marta U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Sept. 14

Prinz Sigismund H. A Saturday. . .Sept. 16

Metapan U. F. C. .Thursday. ..Sept. 21

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.

Turrialba U. F. C . .Saturday. . .Aug. 12

Abangarez U. F. C . .Saturday. . .Aug. 19

Atenas U. F. C . .Saturday. . .Aug. 26

Turrialba TJ. F. C . .Saturday. . .Sept. 2

Abangarez U. F. C . .Saturday. . .Sept. 9

Atenas U. F. C . .Saturday. . .Sept. 16

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.

Atenas U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Aug. 17

Turrialba U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Aug. 24

Abangarez U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Aug. 31

Atenas U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Sept. 7

Turrialba U. F. C . .Thursday.. .Sept. 14

Abangarez U. F. C . .Thursday. . .Sept. 21

Hamburg-American steamers leave Colon for New
York via Kingston at 10 a. m. on sailing dates The
Prinz August Wilhelm and Prim Joachim call at
Santiago de Cuba, on both outward and homeward
voyages.

The Leyland line steamer Etonian sails for Port
Limon and New Orleans on, or about, August 26.

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alter-
nate Tuesdays, at 10 a. m.; for Southampton on alter-
nate Tuesdays at 10 a. m.

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans
direct leave on Thursdays at 3 p. m.; ships for New
York via Kingston on Thursdays at 11 a. m.; for
Bocas del Toro on Mondays at 6 p. m.



CANAL




RECORD



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 23, 1911. No. 52.



Volume IV.



The Canal Record

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of
the Isthmian Canal Commission.



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five
cents each.

Address all Communications

THE CANAL RECORD,

Ancon, Canal Zone,

Isthmus of Panama.

No communication, either for publication or requesting
information, will receive attention unless signed with the
full name and address of the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.



Chairman's Report.

The report of the Chairman of the Isthmian
Canal Commission for the month of July is
published in full in other columns of this issue
of The Canal Record. It gives a detailed
account of the progress of Canal work in all
departments and divisions.



Removal of Native Town of Old Balboa.

The native town, known as Old Balboa,
near the Pacific entrance to the Canal, will
soon have entirely disappeared, the site
being required for dock improvements. All
the leases of building lots in the settlement,
made by the Canal Commission, have been
cancelled, and the work of tearing down and
removing the buildings has begun. The
former holders of lot leases have been offered
land in other localities, notably, West Culebra,
Golden Green, near Empire, and Cowpens,
upon which to rebuild, and where the offers
are accepted, the Canal Commission under-
takes to transport their building materials
free. Originally, there were about 66 houses in
the settlement, all privately owned, but not
more than 25 per cent of the owners were
actual residents. Of the residents, some had
lived in the village for 25 years, or more.

The land on which the native town of
Old Balboa stands was formerly part of a
rural property aggregating 57 hectares,
belonging jointly to Jos^ Isabel Cano and
Buenaventura Correoso. It was sold to the
first French Canal Company on March 19,
1883, for 15,000 Colombian pesos, but there
was a reservation made of 2,500 square
meters, the designation of which was left
to the French company. A part of this tract,
which is represented, more or less, by the
site of the native village, has been acquired
by the Canal Commission, and negotiations
are in progress for the purchase of the re-
mainder.

After the French began work at the Pacific
entrance, they imported a number of Colom-
bian laborers from Cartagena, who settled
the place under the name of Cartagenita



(Little Cartagena.) The place, however, was
officially designated La Boca (the mouth)
from its proximity to the southern entrance
to the Canal, and it was so known up to
April 30, 1909, when, by direction of the
President of the United States, it was changed
to Balboa. Since that time, it has been locally
called "Old Balboa," to distinguish it from
the American settlement known as "East
Balboa," which has been built up about
midway between Old Balboa and Panama.
From a commercial standpoint, the native
town of Old Balboa never had any import-
ance, its trade being limited to a few Chinese
stores and native shops, which supplied the
Canal laborers and others living there, as well
as a few squatters in the bush on the west
side of the Canal.



Cement as an Iron Preservative.

Tests are to be made by the Commission
to determine the value of cement mortar,
applied to iron plates by the "cement gun,"
as a preservative of iron. Twelve plates,
63-8 by 14 inches, have been coated with a
1 to 3 mortar of cement and sand, after
they were cleaned to grey metal by the
sand blast process Six of these have been
covered with a j-inch coating, and the
remaining six with a one-inch coat on one
side, and a li-inch coat on the other.
Three plates of each kind have been sent to
Balboa, and three to Cristobal, where they
will be kept immersed in salt water to test
the mortar method of preventing corrosion.
Two plates of each kind will be taken from
the salt water bath at the end of three months,
and one-half of the coating will be removed
to determine the condition of the metal.
The duration of the test for the balance of
the plates will be determined later.



Construction of North Guide Wall at Miraflores
Locks.

Preparations are under way for the con-
struction of the north guide wall at the Mira-
flores Locks. There is a small amount of
excavation remaining to be done before the
concrete work can proceed, particularly near
the south end, but its removal will be only
a matter of a few days. The first steps in the
wall construction will be the building of a
series of concrete piers, which will be sunk to
bed rock at depths varying from 30 to 50 feet.
The piers will be removed three in a row,
similar to the bents of a trestle, and will be
spaced 27 feet from center to center, with a
total width of wall of 58 feet. The rows will
be 15 feet apart, and, as the total length of
the guide wall is 1,200 feet, about 250 piers
will be required. Each cylinder will have a
diameter of 7i feet, and will be built by sinking
6-foot vertical, hollow, reinforced concrete
sections, one on top of the other, in practically
the same manner as the foundation piers for
the new Panama railroad dock at Balboa are
being construe ted. The ground within the



cylinders will be removed by bucket and
shovel, and, as fast as the earth is taken out,
the piers will progress downwards. When
completed, the interior of the cylinders will be
filled with concrete, making solid columns.
Each length is notched, forming a shoulder,
so that when placed on its fellow, there must
be an exact fit. The piers will be tied to-
gether, both longtitudinally and crosswise,
with reinforced concrete girders, having a
depth of seven feet, and width of 2 5 and 3
feet, respectively.

The girders will support a reinforced con-
crete cellular structure, composed of chambers
54 feet wide and 13J feet long in the clear,
the walls ranging in thickness from 14 to 27
inches. The cells will be filled with loose
rock and will be provided with two 18-inch
openings in the sides of the panels and two
other openings in the cross walls, all situated
near the bottom, so that the water which
has collected may be permitted to flow out
in case the lake is emptied. The entire struc-
ture will be covered over and will support
the tracks for the electric towing apparatus.

A Transportation Record in Culebra Cut.

On August 14, nine 35-car small dump
trains, and twelve 27-car large dump trains
were handled to Gatun; fifty-one 21-car
Lidgerwood trains were handled to Chagres
district dumps, making a total of 72 trains,
1,710 cars, and 57,357 cubic yards handled
out of the north end of Culebra Cut on that
date, which is the largest number of trains
ever handled in one day out of that end of
the Cut.

Work of Steam Shovel 257, P. R. R. Relocation.

For five consecutive months, February to
June, 1911, inclusive, steam shovel No. 257,
working in borrow pits on the Gatun ridge,
Panama railroad relocation, made the best
record for excavation on the Isthmus. In
July, 1911, it was beaten by steam shovel
No. 262 at work in the borrow pit at Monte
Lirio on the relocation, which excavated
60,790 cubic yards in 25 days, of which 10,000
yards were earth, and the remainder rock.
This shovel was run by F. H. Meisner, as
engineer, with F. Cressey as craneman for
a part of the month, and C. A. Wolfe, Jr.,
as craneman for the remainder.

The record of steam shovel No. 257 for the
six months ending July 31 was, as follows:



Month.




Total
by car

record.

Cu. yds.


Cu. Yds. by Cross Sec.




Earth.


Rock. ' Total.


February. . .

March

April

July


23
27
24
26
26
25


60.210
67,900
61.100
72.030
65.260
62,540


1.345
5.400


57.550
64.200
62.540
70,030
58.850
57.270


58.895

69,600
62,540
70.030
58.850

57,270


Total ....


151


389.0401 6.745


370,440


377,185



The average per day for 151 days is 2,498
cubic yards, cross section measurement.



410



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 52.



NOTES OF PROGRESS.



{Continued.)



During the six months noted, the shovel was
run by J. H. LaRowc, and E. E. Austin was
craneman. To make such a record, a steam
shovel must be well served by cars, because
"waiting for cars" is one of the elements of
loss in the operation of a shovel. In this case,
steam shovel No. 257 was served by three
25-car trains. These dump cars were 12-yard
Olivers, but were figured as 10 cubic yards
to secure daily car measurement report.



Sale of French "Scrap."
Representatives of several dealers in scrap
metal are on the Isthmus, making investi-
gations preparatory to bidding for the pur-
chase of French "scrap" still remaining
along the line of the Canal. Bids will be
opened at the Washington office on Septem-
ber 5, and will be for the whole amount of
"scrap" notalready taken upon the property
papers of the Commission, and credited to
the French scrap account. It includes
abandoned locomotives, dump cars, tanks,
barges, boilers, girders, dredges, sheet iron,
parts of old machinery, and miscellaneous
junk. This material will be sold as it lies, all
the expense of removal and transportation
to be borne by the contractor, the rate per
ton to be charged by the Panama railroad
for transportaion to the seaports being
$2.25 per ton of 2,000 pounds. Three years
will be allowed in which to remove it.



Gatun Dam Spillway.

The concrete work in the Spillway of Gatun
Dam is about 68 per cent completed, 151,700
cubic yards, out of a total of 225,000, having
been placed at the close of the work on August
19. A statement of the amount laid each
working day last week, and of the total in
place, follows:



Date.


Concrete
Laid.


Hours
worked.


No.
Mixers.




120
152
180
100
172
224


12.00
14.00
14.00
9.00
10.30
15.00


2




2




2




2




2




2






Total


948
150,752


74.30


2


Previously reported. . .






151.700









Porto Bello Crusher.

A statement of the rock crushed at Porto
Bello quarry during the week ending August
19, follows:



Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
Yards.




3.05
3.00
2.38
2.55
2.35
3.15


1.317




1,294




1,089




1,217




1.078




1,233






Total


17.28


7,228



Sailing of the Ancon.

The sailing date of the Ancon has been set
for Friday, August 25, 1911, at 3 p. m.



Removal of Houses in Gatun Lake Region.

Vacant Commission quarters and labor
barracks in the Gatun lake region are being
dismantled as rapidly as the material in them
is disposed of by private sale, or can be used