Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

Canal Record (Volume 4 no.1-52) online

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by the Commission in the reerection of



buildings elsewhere. It is thought that there
will be but a few Commission buildings left
in the lake area after January 1, 1912.

At Bohio, Mamei, San Pablo, and Tabernilla,
25 or 30 buildings have already been sold or
dismantled. The schoolhouse at Bohio has
been torn down, because, in view of the
approaching abandonment of the town on
account of the filling of Gatun Lake, it has



been decided not to continue the school there.
Arrangements will be made for the instruction
of the children elsewhere. Practically all
quarters at Mamei have been taken down,
in order to avoid the further expend-
iture of money for sanitary work at that point.
There were only five white families in the
place, and these were transferred to other
localities.



CONCRETE WORK IN THE LOCKS.



About 61 per cent of the concrete for all the locks is in place, the amount at the close of
the work on August 19, being 2,607,839j cubic yards, out of a total of approximately 4,284,400.
A total of 32,332 cubic yards of concrete was laid in the locks during the week ending August 19.

GATUN LOCKS.

A statement of the amount of concrete placed in the locks each working day for the week
ending August 19, and of the total, follows; and a similar statement for the work in the Spill-
way of Gatun Dam is published elsewhere in this issue. The construction plant works 12
hours daily, and the auxiliary plant 9 hours.



Date.



Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.



Concrete! Hours No. of
placed. I worked. ' mixers



Auxiliary Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers



Concrete
placed.



Hours ! No. of
worked, mixers



Large
stone.



Total.



August 14

August 15

August 16

August 17

August 18

August 19

*Portable mixers .



Total

Previously reported.



Cm. Yds.
1,540
1.436
1,198
1,082
1,708
1,668



8,632



32.10
26.40
20.04
18.14
29.46
28.40



Grand total 1,542,407



Cm. Yds.
592
292
396
522
732
606
491



8.40
5.40
6.30
8.40
9.40
8.40



47.50



Cm. Yds.
150

92
172

40
130
168



Cm. Yds.
2.282
1.820
1,766
1.644
2,570
2,442
491



13,015
1, 529,392 i



*The 491 yards shown for the portable mixers are reinforced concrete, and were placed on the following days:
August 14th, 90; August 15th, 105; August 16th, 48; August 17th, 81; August 18th, 71 i; August 19th, 95J.



PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS.

Concrete work in the locks at Pedro Miguel is over 84 per cent completed, 707,371 cubic
yards, out of a total of 837,400, having been placed at the close of work on August 19.
record for each of the six 8-hour working days of last week, follows:



The





Auxiliary Plant.


Large

stone.




Date.


2-cubic yard mixers.


$-cubi

Concrete
placed.


c yard mi

Hours
worked .


xer.

No. of
mixers


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours
worked.


No. of
mixers






Cm. Yds.
756
876
612
530
438
626


20.00
23.00
15.00
15.00
12.00
16.00


3

3
3
3
3
3


Cu. Yds.
249
185
146
249
250
184


15.00
11.33
8.17
16.50
16.50
10.00


3

2
3
2
3
2


Cm. Yds.


Cu. Yds.
1.005




1,061




758




779




688




810








3,838


101.00


3


1,263


77.50


2.5


4,441


5,101




702.270






























4,441


707,371



















MIRAFLORES LOCKS.

Over 26 per cent of the concrete for the system of two twin locks at Miraflores was in
place on August 19 the total amount on that date being 35S.061 cubic yards, out of a total of
approximately 1,362,000. The record for each of the six S-hour working days of la^t week,
follows:





Construction Plant.
2-cubic yard mixers.


Auxiliary Plant.




Date.


2-cubic yard mixers. i-cubic yard mixer.

1


Total.




Concrete
placed.


Hours INo. ol
worked. 1 mixers


Concrete, Hours JNo. of Concrete
placed, i worked. 1 mixers placed.


Hours No. of Large
worked, i mixersl stone.




Aug. 14. .
Aug. 15. .
Aug. 16 . .
Aug. 17 . .
Aug. 18. .
Aug. 19 . .


Cm. Yds.
1,058
1,394
996
1,216
1.686
1,574


24.25
27.67
22.67
25.90
32.87
37.33


5
5
4
5
5
5


Cm. Yds.
606
636
968
972
1,044
972


9.00
12.00
16.00
14.17
14.00
14.00


I

2
2
2
2


Cm. Yds.
171
157
193
209
214
150


16.00
13.00
16.50
16.50
16.00
10.00


2
2
2
2
2
2


Cm. Yds.


Cu. Yds.
1,835
2,187
2,157
2,397
2,944
2.696


Total . .
Previously
reported .


7,924


170.69


4.83


5.108


79.17


2


1.094


88.00


2


3,693


14,216
343,845






















Grand


3,693


358,061








-

















August 23, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



411



HOSPITAL POULTRY FARM.



Production of Eggs During the First Eighteen
Months of Operation — Squab Raising.

The Ancon Hospital poultry farm has been
in existence since January, 1910, starting
with 200 Brown Leghorn hens and 15 cocks.
In the following April, 100 hens and 10 cocks
of the Rhode Island Red variety were added
to the yard; one month later, a consignment
of 230 Plymouth Rock hens and cocks was
received, and in April, 1911, an addition of
100 fowls, imported from the States, was
made to the Brown Leghorn family.

During the first 18 months of operation,
namely, from January 1, 1910, to July 1, 1911,
a total of 53,465 eggs, equivalent to about
4,445 dozen, was produced at the farm, of
which the Leghorns laid 29,329 eggs, the
Reds, 9,094, and the Plymouth Rocks, 15,042.
The monthly average per hen for the same
period — 18 months — divided in their classes
was, as follows: Brown Leghorns, 8.2 eggs;
Rhode Island Reds, 7.7 eggs; Plymouth
Rocks, 6.5 eggs. The monthly averages have
ranged among the Leghorns from 2.8 eggs
in September, 1910, to 14.5 in March,
1910; among the Reds, from 6.3 eggs in June,
1911, to 10.5 in April, 1910; among the Ply-
mouth Rocks, from 4.8 eggs in December,
1910, to 9 in June, 1910. Nearly all the high
averages were made shortly after the arrival
of the fowls from the States, and upon their
freedom from the confinement consequent
to their trip. The Brown Leghorn family has
proved a shade the best as egg producers.

In the 18 months ending June 30, 1911,
seventy-two Brown Leghorns, 46 Reds, and 72
Plymouth Rocks died from various causes,
leaving on hand at the end of June, 2S3
Leghorns, 78 Reds, and 146 Plymouth Rocks,
a total of 507 hens and cocks. This includes
40 pullets of the Leghorn family raised on the
farm, and now in the egg producing class. In
addition, about 50 fowls have, at various
times, been delivered to the hospital kitchen.
Chicken pox, dysentery, a diptheritic affec-
tion of the throat, and swellings over the eye,
have been the cause of considerable mortality
among the poultry, and inroads from these,
and other diseases, must be constantly guarded
against. The raising of young chicks after
they are hatched has been attended with
difficulties, and this feature of the poultry
farm work is being given less attention. The
incubators, introduced last year, could not
be used with any degree of success.

The following table shows the number of
dozen of eggs produced, the cost of running
the poultry farm, and the approximate cost
of the eggs per dozen, by months, for the
seven months ending July 31, 1911:



January.
February
March . .
April.. . .
May. . . .
June. . . .
July....



No. of
Dozen.



Total
Cost.



287
243
247
281
299
235
223



$36.97
28.33
28.81
29.16
29.94
32.34
25.15



Cost per

dozen.

Approx.



$0.13
111
11}
10$
10
13J

Hi



The average cost per dozen for the whole
period mentioned has been about 11 j cents.
The prevailing price of eggs at the commissary
is 27 cents per dozen, indicating, on the basis
of that figure, a saving of about 15j cents per
dozen, or about $280 for the seven months'
period.

Last year, 48 pairs of pigeons were intro-
duced at the poultry farm for the raising of



squabs, and five more pairs were received
from the Ancon Hospital laboratory, where
they had been held for experimental purposes.
They suffer less from disease than do the
hens, and the original number remains
practically intact. Fourteen squabs have
been marked for raising. The birds are mainly
of the Plymouth Rock Homer variety. The
results from squab raising during the seven
months ending July 31, 1911, are shown in
the following table:



EXECUTIVE ORDER





Number.


Total
Cost.


Approx.

Cost per

Squab.




2

10
12

5
13
33

4


$2.92
1.70
1.70
1.70
3.12
3.12
2.85


$1.46




.17
.14




.34




.24




.09$


July


.71






Total


79


$17.11


$0.21$







The prevailing price for squabs is about 35
cents apiece.

PERSONAL.



Mr. H. H. Rousseau will sail for the States
on his annual leave of absence, on the
Panama, on August 24.

Mr. Tom M. Cooke will sail on Thursday,
August 24, on the Panama, on his annual
leave of absence in the States.

Captain C. W. Barber, accompanied by
Mrs. Barber and their son, returned to the
Isthmus on the Panama, on August 18.



Free Lecture.



The fourth of the course of free lectures
for the people of Colon will be delivered by
Dr. M. E. Connor in the schoolroom of
Christ Church on Thursday evening, August
31. The lecture will be illustrated with
lantern slides. The series was begun in May,
and the subjects thus far dealt with are sani-
tation, tuberculosis, and the care of the teeth.
Following the lecture, there will be vocal and
instrumental music.



Chauffeurs.

The Board of Local Inspectors will hold
an examination for chauffeurs' licenses at the
Administration Building, Ancon, on Wednes-
day, August 30, at 2 p. m. All applicants are
required to have their application blanks
properly filled out and endorsed before enter-
ing the examination. For information, address
Board of Local Inspectors, Ancon, C. Z.



To All Masons.

The Pedro Miguel Masonic Club requests
your attendance at the funeral services of
the late brother John C. Blair, to be held
at Ancon on Sunday afternoon, August 27, at
2 o'clock. The Masonic burial rites will be
conferred by Sojourners' Lodge, No. 874, of
Cristobal. A special train will leave Colon at
11a m., and, returning, will leave Panama
at 5 p m., observing the regular passenger
schedule in transit. A committee will meet
the special train as an escort to the chapel.
Claud Hollick,
Secretary and Treasurer.

Paraiso, C.Z., August 21 1911.



Missing Man.

Any one having information regarding the
whereabouts of R. B. Winters, who is supposed
to have come to the Isthmus of Panama about
two years ago, is requested to communicate
with the American Legation, Panama.



Against the Promotion of Fights Between Bulls,
Dogs, or Cocks.

By virtue of the authority vested in me, I
hereby establish the following Order for the
Canal Zone:

Section 1. Any person who sets on foot,
instigates, promotes, or carries on any fights
between cocks or other birds, or any dog fight,
or bull fight, or fight between other animals;
or who does any act as assistant, umpire, or
principal in furtherance of any fight between
any such animals, shall be punished by a fine
not to exceed FIFTY DOLLARS, or by
imprisonment not to exceed THIRTY DAYS,
or by both such fine and imprisonment, in
the discretion of the court.

Section 2. This Order shall take effect
thirty davs from this date.



Wm. H. Taft.



The White House,
August 4, 1911.

[No. 1392.]



Ancon Crusher.

A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon

quarry during the week ending August 19,

follows:

Cubic
Yards.



Date

August 14

August 15

August 16

August 17

August 18

August 19

Total




2.146
2,317
1.972
2.221
2.582
2.010



13,248



Obituary.

John C. Blair, an American, employed as a
carpenter in the Pacific Division, fell from
the center wall at the Pedro Miguel Locks to
the lock floor, a distance of about 30 feet, at
noon, Wednesday, August 16, sustaining
injuries which resulted in his death at Ancon
Hospital on the following day. He was about
45 years of age, was married, and had been
on the Isthmus one year and four months.
His wife, living at present at Head Wallace
Bay. Nova Scotia, and a son, who is in the
employ of the Panama Railroad Company,
with residence at Colon, survive him. He
was a member of a Scranton (Pa.) lodge of
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and
also of the Masonic fraternity.

Semore McArthur, an American, employed
in the Mechanical Division, with residence
at Tabernilla, died at Ancon Hospital on
Monday, August 14, of chronic nephritis and
organic disease of the heart. He was 49 years
of age, had been in the Cana' service for about
five 5'ears, and is survived by his wife, now
on the Isthmus.

The death of James Monroe Kreiter. who
was employed in the printing office of the
Quartermaster's Department on the Isthmus,
1908-1910, occurred at his home in Wash-
ington, D. C, on August 6, aged 55 years.
He was a native of Pennsylvania, and re-
moved from that state to Washington about
17 years ago, procuring employfnent — first
with the Washington Times, and later with
the Washington Post. He was a member of
Columbia Typographical Union, and, in
August, 1901, represented the Philadelphia
union at the international convention held in
Birmingham. Ala. Two sons, Robert E. P.,
and James M., Jr., survive him. The death
of his wife occurred a few months ago.



412



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 52.



CANAL WORK IN JULY.



Monthly Report of the Chairman and Chief
Engineer to the Secretary of War.

CULEBRA, C. Z., August IS, 1911.
The Honorable the Secretary of War,

Washington, D. C.

Sir: I have the honor to submit the fol-
lowing report of operations on the Isthmus
for the month of July, 1911:
Department of Construction and Engineering.

The following table summarizes the prin-
cipal items of construction work accomplished
by the Atlantic, Central, and Pacific Divi-
sions during the month:



and a few of the intercostal frames; and sheath-
ing has made good progress. The other leaf in
the same gate has been erected six panels
high, including sheathing, while the corres-
ponding leaves in the twin lock have been
erected to the height of four panels and
partially sheathed.

Progress has also been made in adjusting
the bearing plates in the hollow quoins
which are babbitted in place in the reaction
castings which transmit the thrust to the
masonry. The adjustment, in general, has
been very good.



Item.


Unit.


Atlantic.


Central.


Pacific.


Total.






65.022

425.195


1,343,189

16,928


147.956
520.692


1,556.167
962.815








490,217


1.360,117


668.648


2,518 982




































■ ■■
















Cubic yards

Cubic yards

Tons (Gross)...
Feet


526,943

76.981

74.13

59.923




94.237

52,746

47.62

88,701


621,180








204 64

375,374
7.06
13.89


326.39

523,998
7.06
20.96

104.714
131,864












2.39

43.352
75.090


4.68

61.362
59,453








321










3,3M

1 9S9

3S.227

7.020

10.62


150


80

27

13.537

4.434

6.74


3,554

2,016

32,764

19,021

6.87 .








Feet


i.ono

7,567
5.96















First Division, Office of the Chief Engineer.

MASONRY AND LOCK STRUCTURES.

The contracts for work under this sub-
division are to be inspected by the force of
the General Purchasing Officer in the United
States. The erection has, up to the present
time, been done by the division engineers.
The field work consisted of supervision of
tests of rising stem valves at Gatun, and
inspecting and checking the position of fixed
irons in the masonry of the different locks.

LOCK GATES AND PROTECTIVE DEVICES.

Under the contract with the McClintic-
Marshall Construction Company, the mill
and shop inspection has been in progress in
the United States, the technical work being
in charge of a force organized directly under
this office. The shop work has made good
progress, up to July IS a total of 28,000 tons
of structural material having been accepted.
The first eight leaves for Gatun and Pedro
Miguel, namely, the upper guard gates,
54 feet 8 inches high, have been practically
completed in the shop and shipped. Eight of
the 77-foot leaves for the upper and middle
gates of Gatun upper lock have been practi-
cally completed in the shop, and the greater
part of the material has been accepted. For
the safety gates and lower gates of Gatun
upper lock, 85 per cent of the shop work was
completed, and more than half accepted. Of
the upper and middle gates at Pedro Miguel,
79 feet high, 30 per cent of the shop work
was done. Up to July 15, eight thousand
four hundred and eighty-six tons of material
had been shipped to the Isthmus.

In the field no work has yet been done
toward erecting the gates at Pedro Miguel.
At Gatun upper lock, the erection of one leaf
of the upper guard gate has reached its full
height, with the exception of the top girder,



OPERATING MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL IN-
STALLATION.

The inspection force reporting directly to
this office has cared for the technical matters
relating to the inspection, as follows:

(1) For the rising stem valve and cylin-
drical valve machinery purchased under circu-
lar No. 614: The machine work is progressing
rapidly, and it is anticipated that the two
sample machines will be given factory test
some time during August. Certain of the
motors and limit switches to go with these
machines have been received on the Isthmus,
and will be tested as soon as all are available
for the purpose.

(2) For the rack railway material purchased
under circular No. 619: The manufacture of
material for the different classes under this
circular has been in progress, with the excep-
tion of Classes 5 and 6, for which award has
not yet been made.

(3) For the gate operating and miter
forcing machines purchased under circular
No. 627: The first of these has not yet reached
a stage at which inspection is necessary.
Inspection has begun on the sample machines
of the second class.

(4) For the gates and girder hoisting
machines for the emergency dams: The or-
ganization will be expanded to include this
inspection so soon as need shall arise. As
yet, no manufacture of material has begun.

EMERGENCY DAMS.

A skeleton organization for the inspection,
in the United States, of the material for the
emergency dams to be purchased under
circular No. 616 has been organized in the
United States, reporting in technical matters
directly to this office. As yet, the work has



consisted in checking shop drawings made
by the contractor.

AIDS TO NAVIGATION.

During the month, 146 acres of land have
been cleared near Frijoles and Mamei for
sites for beacons and references for buoys;
50,720 lineal feet of trochas have been cut,
and the necessary surveys and profile taken.
The average cost of clearing for the month
has been about S13.50 per acre. The con-
struction of the steel concrete forms for the
range towers for the Atlantic and Pacific
Divisions is under way at the Gorgona shops.
Atlantic Division.
GATUN LOCKS.

Excavation — Crane excavation in the lower
lock, and shovel excavation for obtaining clay
for back fill, were continued. A total of
5,994 cubic yards was removed by crane, and
13,383 cubic yards by shovel. On July 31,
the total excavation amounted to 5,888,648
cubic yards, of which 5.035,328 cubic yards
were removed from the prism. The excavation
in the locks was 99.75 per cent completed.

Back fill — Back filling behind the side walls
of the upper, middle, and lower locks, and in
the center wall of the upper lock, was con-
tinued. The quantity placed during July
aggregated 63,041 cubic yards, increasing the
total to 606,617 cubic yards. On July 31, the
back filling was 37.56 per cent completed.

Receiving and Issuing Material — The con-
sumption of rock during the month exceeded
the receipts by 19,813 cubic yards, and the
consumption of sand exceeded the receipts
by 8,655 cubic yards. The receipts of cement
exceeded the consumption by 5,713 barrels.

Mixing and Placing Plants — Both plants,
and all portable mixers, were kept in satis-
factory operation during the month.

Power Plant and Pumps — The operation
of the power plant and pumps was satisfactory.

Iron and Steel Work — During the month,
218.4 tons of fixed steel, 83.7 tons of rein-
forcing rails, and 36,889 feet of reinforcing
rods were placed, and 420 linear feet of elec-
trical track were laid.

Concrete Work — There was an increase of
15,740j cubic yards in the amount of concrete
laid, as compared with the figures for the
preceding month. The daily average for the
25 working days was 2,842 cubic yards, as

OPERATION OF THE PERMANENT AND AUXILIARY CON-
CRETE CONSTRUCTION PLANTS.





Permanent


Auxiliary




Plant.


Plant.


Length of working day (hours). .


11.34


8.50


Average number of hours per






day worked, per strand of






cableway laying concrete and






large stone (actual working








6.23




Average number of mixers per








7.00


2.00


Average hourly output per mixer






(actual working time) cu. yds.


60.78


75.76


Average amount of concrete and






large stone laid per hour, per






strand of cableway (actual








30.19






2.894|


2,476


Concrete laid , cableways, cu.yds.


35,684




Concrete laid, through chute in-








12,172








2,030


Concrete laid, dump cars, cu. yds




14,838




1,476*








Total amount of concrete and








50,750}


20,820*



compared with a daily average during June
of 2,127 cubic yards. The total amount of
concrete placed during the month was
71,045^ cubic yards, including 5,370§ cubic
yards of large stone. The bucket measure-



August 23, 1911.



THE CANAL RECORD



413



ment exceeded the place measurement by
525j cubic yards. Of the total concrete,
8,611 J cubic yards were placed in the upper
lock, 20,214 cubic yards in the middle lock,
and 42,220 cubic yards in the lower lock.
The concrete work for the entire lock system
was 71.72 per cent completed at the end of
July.

GATUN DAM.

Construction during the month increased
the total fill, as determined by cross sections
of the material in place, by 526.943 cubic
yards. An arbitrary reduction of 40,000 cubic
yards was made for shrinkage in the low
sections of the Dam not covered by monthly
cross section. One-third of this was charged
against dry fill, and two-thirds against wet
fill. At the end of the month, the net yardage
in place was 14 819,977 cubic yards.

Hydraulic Fill — The dredges increased the
hydraulic fill by 324,947 cubic yards. The
total hydraulic fill in place July 31 was
7,736,939 cubic yards.

Dry Fill — Material received from the
Central Division, the Locks, Mindi, and steam
shovel No. 134, amounting to 201,996 cubic
yards, was placed on the north and south toes
of the Dam, east and west of the Spillway,
making the total dry fill in place, 7,083,038
cubic yards.

GATUN SPILLWAY.

Excavation — In preparing foundations of
the Spillway dam, 903 cubic yards of rock
were removed by hand. On July 31, the total
Spillway excavtion amounted to 1,584,866
cubic yards.

Concrete — The work of placing concrete
was continued, the amount placed during
the month aggregating 5,935 cubic yards,
which increased the total to 149,681 cubic
yards. The concrete work for the Spillway
was 66.5 per cent completed.

HARBOR AND CHANNEL SECTION.

Excavation Below Sea Level at Mindi —
During the month, two steam shovels removed
3,190 cubic yards of earth and 54,935 cubic
yards of rock from the Canal prism. In
addition, 1,000 cubic yards of earth were
sluiced by the pumping plant.

Dredging from the Ocean to Mindi — Four
dredges removed 399,470 cubic yards of earth
and 24,725 cubic yards of rock from the
Canal prism. In addition, dredge No. 86
placed 124,949 cubic yards in the Colon fill.
On July 31, forty feet of water could be carried
from zero to zero plus 2,000 feet; 35 feet to
mile 3 plus 3,600 feet; 30 feet to mile 4 plus
750 feet; 20 feet to mile 5 plus 2,438.9 feet,
at the junction with the French canal.

PORTO BELLO.
PERFORMANCE OF ROCK CRUSHER PLANT.

Length of working days — hours 8.00

Average number of hours worked per day. . 4.70

Average number of cubic yards per hour of

working day 216.80

Average number of cubic yards per working

hour 369.20

Maximum day 'soutput, (6 hours 13 minutes)

cu. yds 2,437.00

Average day's output (25 days) cu. yds 1 ,73+. 00