Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

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I. C. C. team captained by Chambers is in the Lead.

The second team from Gorgona took two out of
three games from the local second team on Saturday
evening. September 24. Following are the scores:

Gorgona.

Stoehr 139 152 153

Stewart 152 160 190



Bordh 157 166 145

Varenkamp.. 160 165 162
Haldeman... 212 156 170



Cristobal.

Barrett 154 157 1SS

Grover. . . ISO 162 154

Weston. . . 157 176 158

T. Burns. . 177 197 173

Blackburn. 20S 162 135



Total S20 799 820 I Total. . . 876 S54 778

On Saturday night of this week the Marine Band

from Camp Elliott will play at the Cristobal clubhouse.

On the same night the Gatun basketball team will play

the Cristobal team at Cristobal.



Supplies for Canal Work.

The following steamers with supplies for the Isthmian
Canal Commission arrived at the ports of Cristobal.
Colon and Balboa during the week ending September
24, 1910:

Atlam, September 19, from New York, with 2S.680
barrels cement for Atlantic Division; 85,520 bags
cement for Pacific Division.

City of Para, September 20, from San Francisco, with
5 tons calfalfa meal for stock.

Abangarez, September 22, from New Orleans, with
146 rolls cotton duck, 2,582 bales hay, 2,747 pieces
yellow pine lumber, 38 pieces oak lumber for stock; 44
pieces oak lumber for Mechanical Division; 20 sacks
corn, 13 sacks wheat for Superintendent. Ancon Hospi-
tal; 348 tons dump car parts for Cristobal shops (fo
erection).

Zacapa. September 23. from New York, with 11
bundles wire for stock; 1 locomotive crane for Atlantic
Division.

Colon, September 23, from New York, with 11 cases
injectors. 25 cases paper napkins. 15 bundles wire, 50
cases paint. 12 kegs hardware, 30 bundles straw-board
27 barrels rock alt, 50 pieces switches. 12 rolls leather.
435 pieces steel castings, 9 barrels cable grease, 17 bar-
rels non-fluid oil, 85 cases lanterns, 10 coils lead pipe,
11 cases torpedoes for stock; 12 cases stoves, 7 cases
electrical material. 1 earth spreader for Atlantic Divi-
sion; 13 pieces machinery. 7 cases machinery for Pacific
Division; 29 bundles castings, 791 pieces castings, 150
pieces car springs for Mechanical Division; 10 pieces
iron forgings. 63 pieces steel castings for Central Divi-
sion: and a miscellaneous cargo, the whole consisting of
2,127 packages, weighing 285 tons.



Stages of the Chagres.

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week
ending midnight, Saturday. September 24, 1910. A'l
heights are in feet above mean sea level.





Station


Day and Date




a!


n









Vigia


'm


a


6

2


3 V


















<





a


OJ


Sun. Sept. 18...


129.0


95.4


49.2


17.5


17.0


Mon. Sept. 19. .


129.8


95.6


48.1


17.1


16.8


Tues. Sept. 20..


134.0


vs. 5


52.8


18.1


17.1


Wed. Sept. 21 . .


132.3


97.6


52.6


IS. 7


17.5


Thurs. Sept. 22.


129.5


95.5


49.8


1S.7


17.6


Fri. Sept. 23...


129.1


95.3


49.4


18.1


17 6


Sat. Sept. 24. . .


130.9


96.5


50.5


17.8


17.4


Height of low














125.0


92.0


46.0


'









The following is a list ol the sailings of the Panama
Railroad Steamship Company, of the Royal Mail Steam
Packet Company, of the Hamburg-American Line, .ind
of the United Fruit Company's Lins. the Panama Rail
r>ad Company's dates being subtect to change:

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.

Advance P. R. R. Friday Sept. 23

Panama P. R. R. Thursday Sept. 29

Ailianca P. R. R. Wednesday. Oct. 5

Colon P. R R. Tuesday. . . . Oct. 11

Advance P. R. R. Monday Oct. 17

Panama P. R. R. Saturday Oct. 22

Ailianca P. R. R. Friday Oct. 28

Colon P. R. R, Friday Nov. 4

Advance P. R. R. Thursday Nov. 10

Panama P. R. R. Wednesday . . . Nov. 16

Ailianca P. R. R. Tuesday Nov. 22

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.

Colon P. R. R. Thursday Sept. 29

Advance P. R. R. Wednesday. . . Oct. 5

Panama P. R. R. Tuesday Oct. 1 1

Ailianca P. R. R. Monday Oct. 17

Colon P. R. R. Sunday Oct. 23

Advance P. R. R. Saturday Oct. 29

Panama P. R. R. Friday Nov. 4

Ailianca P. R. R Thursday Nov. 10

Colon P. R. R. Wednesday . . . Nov. 16

Advance P. R. R. Tuesda/ Nov. 22

Panama P R. R. Monday Nov. 28

A fortnightly service of the Cristobal and Anton will
be maintained as nearly as possihle. leaving Cristobal
on or about the 4th and 25th of each month. Due
notice of the sailings of these ships from the Isthmus
will be given. On the outward voyage these ships sail
from the pier at the foot of 12th street, Hoboken. N. J.

NEW YORK TO COLON.

Almirante U. F. C.Thmsday Sept. 22

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. ...H.-A. . .Saturday Sept. 24

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday Sept. 29

Atrato R.-M . . Saturday Oct. 1

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 6

Prinz Joachim H.- A.. . . Saturday Oct. 8

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 13

Tagus R.-M. . . Saturday Oct. 15

Almirante U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 20

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. . .H.-A Saturday Oct. 22

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 27

Oruba R.-M. . .Saturday Oct. 29

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday Nov. 3

Prinz Joachim H.-A.. . .Saturday Nov. 5

COLON TO NEW YORK.

Zacapa U. F. C.Friday Sept. 30

Tagus R.-M. . .Monday Oct. 3

Almirante U. F. C. Friday Oct. 7

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm ... H.-A Tuesday Oct. 1 1

Santa Marta U. F. C. Friday Oct. 14

Oruba R.-M. . .Monday Oct. 17

Metapan U. F. C. Friday Oct. 21

Prinz Joachim H.-A. . . .Tuesday Oct. 25

Zacapa U. F. C. Friday Oct. 28

Magdalena R.-M Monday Oct. 31

Almirante U. F. C. Friday Nov. 4

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.

Atenas U. F. C. Saturday Sept. 24

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 1

Abangarez U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 8

Atenas U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 15

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 22

Abangarez U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 29

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.

Abangarez U. F. C. Thursday Sept. 29

Atenas U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 6

Turialba U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 13

Abangarez U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 20

Atenas U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 27

Turrialba U. F. C. Thursday Nov. 3

COLON TO BARBADOS. CALLING AT TRINIDAD.

Atrato R.-M. . .Tuesday Oct. 11

Tagus R.-M... Tuesday Oct. 25

The next sailing of the Leyland Line will be as fol-
lows: Jamaican on or about October 14, for New
Orleans, via K npnon, Ja.

Hamburg-Amer can steamers leave for New York at
10 a. m.. and for P *rt Limon every Tuesday or Wednes-
day.

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alter-
nate Wednesdays at 10 a. m.; for Southampton on
alternate Tuesdays at 10 a. m.

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans leave
on Thursday at 3 p. m., and for New York on Friday
at 10 a. m.

Sailings of the French Line (Cie Generale Trana-
atlantlauel for Venezuelan ports, Martinique and Guad-
eloupe on the 3d and 20th of each month.



CANAL




RECORD



Volume IV.



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1910.



No. 6.



The Canal Record

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of
the Isthmian Canal Commission.



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five
cents each.

Address all Communications

THE CANAL RECORD

Ancon, Canal Zone,

Isthmus of Panama.

No communication, either for publication or requesting
information, will receive attention unless signed with the
full name and address of the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS.



Central Division Excavation in September.

The cross section estimate of excavation in
the Central Division for the month of Septem-
ber is as follows:

Cubic Yards.

Chagres district 234,290

Empire district 612.904

Culebra district 665.032

Pedro Miguel district 62.012

Total 1.574.238

All of this material was removed from the
Canal prism, no excavation having been done
outside of the prism during the month. With
the exception of August, 1910, the preceding
month, this is the largest aggregate amount
of material removed from the Canal prism
within the limits of the Central Division dur-
ing any month of the rainy season. The
average amount excavated per day (62,969
cubic yards) during the entire month of
September, 1910, is the greatest daily average
ever made in the Central Division during an
entire month in the rainy season. The next
highest daily average for an entire month
during the rainy season was that made in
August, 1910 — 59,718 cubic yards. There
were 25 working days in September, 1910, as
against 27 in August, 1910.

Of the total shown above there was exca-
vated in Culebra Cut, 1,339,948 cubic yards,
and in the Gatun Lake region, or Chagres
district, 234,290 cubic yards. The total ex-
cavation in the Central Division to October
1, and remaining to be accomplished on that
date, are as follows:

Accomplished. Remaining.
Cu. Yds. Cu. Yds.

Culebra Cut 53.166.538 31.020.186

Chagres district 10.155.277 2,783.017

Total 63.321.815 33.803.203

Footbridges Across Spillway Dams.

Plans for the footbridges across the tops of
the concrete dams of Gatun and Miraflores
spillways have been approved. These bridges
will be built of steel girders and will weigh
about 215 tons. The largest pieces will weigh
about 4,300 pounds and will therefore be
easily removable. The purpose of the bridges



is to give easy access to the regulating gates
and the piers which support them, and to
provide a convenient means of crossing the
spillways.

Vacation in Guatemala.

Guatemala City has been included in the
places where employes of the Commission and
Panama Railroad Company may spend their
annual leave. The city is 4,878 feet above
sea level, and no quarantine exists against
any of the ports in Guatemala.



Panama Street Work Nearly Completed.

Street improvements in Panama, author-
ized under the Congressional appropriation
of SS00.0OO for sanitarj- improvements in the
cities of Panama and Colon, are approaching
completion. A small amount of work re-
mains to be done on Lyons street, along which
the new intercepting sewer extends, and also
on Thirty-second and Thirty-fourth streets.
The short street, known as La Neveria,
branching off from Caledonia road to the left
just before the road turns toward the Sabanas,
will be improved for a distance of about 450
feet, which will bring it to the end of the
built-up section. La Independencia street,
which parallels the Panama railroad in the
district of Santa Cruz, will be joined to the
Caledonia road near the viaduct. This is
closed territory at present, and to open a road
through it will necessitate the removal of a
two-story wooden tenement.

Excavation for the new storm sewer cross-
ing Central avenue at Lyons street has been
completed, and concreting around the sewer
is well advanced. It will form a junction
near the railroad yard with an old masonry
sewer extending to the sea. The walls of
the old sewer were found to be in good con-
dition, but it has been necessary to deepen
the opening all the way through to conform
with the size of the new sewer. On account
of the close quarters, only five or six men can
be employed on this work at one time.

An application has been made, by a local
real estate firm, for the opening of two ad-
ditional streets in that section of Panama
lying near Nineteenth street, west of Ancon
boulevard.



Concrete in Culebra Cut.

Before the work of placing concrete in the
sides of Culebra Cut is begun the question of
what parts, if any, should be so protected will
be investigated. A board consisting of Com-
missioners Hodges, Gaillard and Rousseau
has been appointed for this purpose.



Culvert Forms at Miraflores Locks.

Steel forms of a different type from those
used in the side wall culverts at Pedro Miguel
Locks, will be employed in the construction
of the side culverts at Miraflores Locks.
They will be a modification of the type suc-
cessfully used at Gatun, and will resemble a
horseshoe when in position. At Miraflores, the



forms will be moved entire as the work pro-
ceeds, two sections at a time, by means of a
traveler operated on the inside. The upper
sections of the forms employed in the Pedro
Miguel operations can be utilized for the new
ones at Miraflores, but the lower sections
were constructed for the purpose at Gorgona
shops.

Rock Slide at Bas Obispo.

A slide has developed in the east bank of
Culebra Cut at Bas Obispo, where a quantity
of rock estimated at 75,000 cubic yards is
moving towards the Canal prism. This slide
is on the berm at 95 feet above sea level, and
the break follows the lines of a fault in the
rock.

Zone Roads Aid Agricultural Development.

There has been considerable increase in the
agricultural development of the Canal Zone,
wherever roads have been built giving acces-
sibility to a market. This development is
especially marked in the vicinity of Empire,
where several modern roads converge. In the
valley of the Masambi River, through which
a macadamized road has been built as far as
the Las Cascadas plantation, a number of
West Indians have begun farming in a small
way. Their principal crops are yucca, yams
and yampe, the latter a vegetable of a reddish
color resembling the yucca root in appearance,
and all three articles are said to yield well in
this section, when under proper cultivation.
The land in the valley appears to be especially
suited to the raising of yucca and many flour-
ishing patches of this tuber may be seen along
the road.

A small quantity of sugar cane, together
with bananas, papayas and other fruits, is
grown, and in common with the other pro-
ducts, finds ready sale at Empire and Culebra,
the nearest markets. Practically all the
produce raised in this section is brought to
town on pack animals, which cross the Cut at
Empire on the suspension bridge. As show-
; ng the extent of this traffic, in one hour on a
recent weekday morning, 29 pack animals
passed over the bridge into Empire.

West of Empire and in its immediate vicin-
ity the country is being settled rapidly. There
is a fairly good road as far as the rock quarry,
and two or three short roads running in other
directions. The roads from Chorrera join
the macadamized highway near the rock quar-
ry, but it is a mere trail and of little value as a
means of communication during the rainy
season, and on this account the development
along it is proceeding slowly.

The Panama-Corozal road has aided to a
large degree the development of the land
near by. When the road was first completed
there were only a few scattered houses along
the route. Today, 25 or 30 may be counted.
The most of them are tenanted by West
Indians who cultivate small patches of ground
on which they grow sugar cane, corn and yams
for their own use.and also for sale in the Pan-



42



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 6.



NOTES OF PROGRESS



{Continued.)



ama market. Here and there will be found
a European laborer from Spain who has set-
tled down to farming on his own account, but
the greater part of those who are living on
bush clearings in the Zone are West Indians,
principally Jamaicans, Barbadians and Mar-
tiniquans.

A similar development has taken place
along the Mount Hope-Gatun road, small
tracts of land having been cleared and put
under cultivation since the highway was built.



Fish Survey of Canal Zone Waters.

A letter from the Field Museum of Natural
History at Chicago announces the intention
of that institution to make a study of the fresh
water, brackish, and salt water shore fish of
the Canal Zone during the coming dry season.
The study will be made before the completion
of the Canal, in order that the fish may be
taken before they have had a chance to cross
the divide and undergo the changes incident
to a new environment.



Concrete in Gatun Locks.

The record of concrete laid in Gatun Locks
by the construction plant of eight mixers and
four cableways, and the auxiliary plant of two
mixers, during the week ending October 1,
and the grand total to that date, follow:



Date.


Concrete


Large


Hours


No. of


Total.




placed.


stone.


worked.


mixers






Cm. Yds.


Cm. Yds.






Cu. Yds.


Sept. 26


2,557


264J


89:24


8


2,821j


Sept. 27


2,764


346i


94:36


8


3,110i


Sept. 28


2,700


264


91:45


10


2,964


Sept. 29


2,694


229}


94:15


8


2,923}


Sept. 30


2,918


365 J


96:30


8


3,283}


Oct. 1 . .


2,772


315


90:57


8


3,087


Total.


16,405


1,785






18.190


Previ-












ously






















745.235}












Grand




total . .










763,425}













Concrete in Gatun Spil lway.
The amount of concrete placed in the Spill-
way of Gatun Dam during the week ending
October 1, and the total placed to that date,
are shown in the following statement:





Cubic Yards.


Date.


Concrete


Large
rock.


Total.




138
230
210
168
122
168


10
12
18
4


138
240
222
186
126
168














Total


1.036


44


1,080
94.230












95,310









Canal Zone Rifles.
The Canal Zone Rifle Club will hold a
meeting at Pedro Miguel on Sunday, Octo-
ber 9, at 2.30 p. m. All members and others
interested are requested to attend.
H. L. Bridges,

Secretary, C. Z. R. C.
Pedro Miguel, C. Z., October 2, 1910.

Emanuel Estiva, a Panamanian employed on
the Canal work, check No. 80375, stepped in
front of a spoil train at San Pablo on the
morning of October 3, and was instantly
killed.



ESTIMATES FOR 1912.

Summary of Appropriations Needed in 1912—
Comparison With Previous Years.

The estimates of appropriations necessary
to continue the construction of the Canal in
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1912, have been
sent to the Secretary of War for transmission
to Congress. They call for an appropriation
of $47,920,847.69, classified as follows:

1. Salaries of officers and employes in

the United States $157,576.66

2. Incidental expenses, rents, supplies.

etc. in the United States 70,000.00

3. Pay of members of the Commission,
and officers and employes other than
skilled and unskilled labor, all on the
Isthmus, in the Departments of Con-
struction and Engineering, Quarter-
master, Subsistence, Disbursements,

and Examination of Accounts 4,580,669.00

4. Skilled and unskilled labor on the
Isthmus in the Departments of Con-
struction and Engineering, Quarter-
master, Subsistence, Disbursements,

and Examination of Accounts 19,211,305.70

5. Purchase and delivery of materials,
supplies, and equipment for the De-
partments of Construction and Engi-
neering, Quartermaster, Subsistence,
Disbursements, and Examination of

Accounts 19,186.751.22

6. Miscellaneous expenditures, supplies,
labor recruiting, and all incidental ex-
penses not otherwise provided for in
the Departments of Construction
and Engineering, Quartermaster, Sub-
sistence. Disbursements, and Exami-
nation of Accounts 1,015,300.00

7. Salaries, officers and employes. De-
partment of Civil Administration. . . 594,892.00

8. Skilled and unskilled labor. Depart-
ment of Civil Administration 22,831.20

9. Materials, supplies, and contingent
expenses, Department of Civil Ad-
ministration 140,230.00

10. Salaries, officers and employes, De-
partment of Sanitation 758,710.00

11. Skilled and unskilled labor. Depart-
ment of Sanitation 231,008.00

12. Materials, supplies, and equipment,
buildings, contingent expenses, De-
partment of Sanitation, and medical
aid and care of insane and indigent
persons permanently disabled in the

line of duty 951,573.91

13. Relocation of Panama railroad,
salaries, wages, materials, and all

other expenses 1 ,000,000.00

Total $47,920,847.69

Classified by divisions and the purposes
for which the amounts estimated are to be
expended, the estimates are as follows:
Department of Construction and Engi-
neering:

Office of Chairman and Chief Engi-
neer —

Officers and employes $376,650.00

Skilled and unskilled labor 67,407.60

Materials, supplies, equipment and

plant 43.135.00

Total $487,192.60

Atlantic Division —

Officers and employes $1,374,680.00

Skilled and unskilled labor 6,377,907.02

Materials, supplies, equipment and

plant 7,548,085.22

Total $15,300,672.24

Central Division —

Officers and employes $942,010.00

Skilled and unskilled labor 5,115.945.76

Materials, supplies, etc 3,430,794.00

Total $9,488,749.76

Pacific Division —

Officers and employes $963,725.00

Skilled and unskilled labor 5.535.126.00

Materials, supplies, etc 6.149.847.00

Total $12,648,698.00

Mechanical Division —

Officers and employes $200,520.00

Skilled and^unskilled labor 1,480,155.32



Materials, supplies, etc.
Total



1,464,380.00
$3,145,055.32



$461,554.00
633,924.00
475,000.00



Total $1,570,478.00



Quartermaster's Department —

Officers and employes

Skilled and unskilled labor. . .
Materials, supplies, etc



Subsistence Department —
Materials, supplies, etc.



Total .



Examination of Accounts — .

Officers and employes

Skilled and unskilled labor.
Materials, supplies, etc



Total.



Disbursements — ■

Officers and employes . .
Materials, supplies, etc.



Total .



Department of Sanitation —

Officers and employes

Skilled and unskilled labor.
Materials and expenses. . . .



$62,000.00
$62,000.00



$193,560.00

840.00

6,650.00

$201,050.00



$67,770.00
6.860.00



$74,630.00



$758,710.00
231,008.00
951,573.91



Total $1,941,291.91



Department of Civil Administration-
Officers and employes

Skilled and unskilled labor

Materials and expenses



Total.



Relocation of Panama railroad-
Officers and employes

Skilled and Unkilled labor. . .
Materials, supplies, etc



$594,892.00

22,831.20

140,230.00

$757,953.20



$144,450.00
428,250.00
427,300.00



Total $1,000,000.00



Incidental expenses on the Isthmus.
Washington office



Total'

Grand total.



$1,015,300.00
$227,576.66



$1,242,876.66
$47,920,847.69



A comparison with the estimates and ap-
propriations for previous years follows:

Estimates. Appropriations.

1902 $10,000,000.00

1904 (a) 40,000,000.00

1904 (d) 10.000,000.00

1906 (c)l 1.000,000.00

1906 (c)5.990.786.00

1907 $26,648,281.40 25.456,415.08

1908 25.406,258.73 27,161,367.50

1908 (c) 12, 17 8, 900. 00

1909 33,183,143.60 29.187,000.00

1909 W5.458.000.00

1910 35.886.190.58 33,638.000.00

1910 (c)76,000.O0

1911 48.063.524.70 37,856.200.00

1912 47,920,847.69



Total appropriated $248,002,668.58



(a) French canal rights.
tb) Paid to Panama.
(c) Deficiency.



Electrical Workers.
The Canal Record:

A general meeting of all electrical workers
on the Isthmus is called for Sunday, October
9, at 9.30 a.m., at the Ancon lodge hall for the
purpose of installing Local Lodge No. 214 of
the International Brotherhood of Electrical
Workers. This local holds jurisdiction over
the Canal Zone.

It is desired that all electrical workers
attend this meeting as all are eligible to be-
come charter members. The charter will
close very shortly. All the charter members
must attend in order to be obligated, and im-
mediately after the open meeting election of
officers will take place.

H. C. Martell, Secretary, pro tern.

Balboa, C. Z., September 30, 1910.



A negro laborer was killed in a premature
explosion of dynamite on the relocation of
the Panama railroad between Monte Lirio
and Camp Totten on the afternoon of Octo-
ber 3.



October 5, 1910.



THE CANAL RECORD



43



CANAL ZONE REVENUES.



Increases Shown In Various Departments of Pos-
tal and Customs Service During 1909-10.

The revenue derived from the sale of post-
age stamps and postal cards at the seventeen
post-offices in the Canal Zone during the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1910 amounted to
$83,475.60. In addition, the sum of $92.13
was collected for second class mail matter,
making the total income from this source
$83,567.73, as compared with $74,241.87 for
the preceding fiscal year, an increase of $9,-
325.86.

Registered letters and parcels to the number
of 151,622 were handled, consisting of 29,082
domestic letters, 5,766 domestic parcels,
41,114 foreign letters, 1,598 foreign parcels,
71,971 official letters and parcels registered
free, and 2,091 letters and parcels reregistered
free. Approximately 45 per cent of the regis-
tered matter went under official frank. In
the post-offices at Ancon and Cristobal
113,429 pieces of foreign registered mail were
handled. Of this number, 8,778 pieces
passed through the Ancon post-office for