Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

Canal Record (Volume 4 no.1-52) online

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During my absence from the Isthmus, Lieutenant-
Colonel H. F. Hodges will be in charge of the work as
Acting Chairman and Chief Engineer, effective Septem-
ber 29, 1910. Geo. W. Goethals,

Chairman and Chief Engineer.



Luggerman in Commissary Department.

Culebra, C. Z., September 30, 1910.
Circular No. 229-m:

The following additional designation and rate of pay
is authorized for the Commissary Department only:
Designation. Unit. Rate of Pay.

Luggerman Mo. $40.00

H. F. Hodges,
Acting Chairman, Isthmian Canal Commission.
Second Vice-President, Panama Railroad Company.

Misdirected Letters.

Ancon, C. Z, October 5. 1910.
The following insufficiently addressed letters origi-
nating in the United States and its possessions have been
received in the office of the Director of Posts, and may
be secured upon request of the addressee:



Austen. Alfred R.
Baker, Edward L.
Barbour, Jno. H.
Barrett, Fred
Barton. Robt. C.
Bray, Mrs. Walter
Breen, Mrs. W.
Briggs, Ray M.
Brown, Mrs. Henry A.
Coe, G. S.
Cole, Harry O.
Chamberlain, Mrs. Chs.
Clark, Frank
Cullen, James
Depuswa. Joseph
Duncan, B. B.
Ellis. H. Neil
Ferguson, John L.
Gibbs. Win.
Griessinger, Charles



Haber, Miss Jennie
Hammell, Otto
Hull, J. B. (4th class)
Joyce, James W.
Lichly, Mrs. Theodore
Lvon, Willis E.
Mallory. Bob
McCulium. C. S.
McGann. John T.
McNeill, Allie H.
Nicolo, U. Piras
O'Sullivan. Michaell
Sawtelle, Harrie W.I
Simpson, Mrs. Elizabeth
Thorpe, Mrs. G. D.
Waindrift. F. R.
Weiss, John
Wilson. John
Winford B.
Wonson, Miss Katherine



Tide Table.

The following table shows the time of high and low
tides at Panama for the week ending October 12. 1910,
(75th meridian time):





Low.


High.


Low.


High.


Low.




A. M.


A. M.
5:27

5.SS
6.24
6.54
7.28
8.12
9.10


A. M.

11.43

P. M.

12.17

12.52

1.27

2.08

2.58

4.03


P. M.
5.47

6.17
6.47
7.20
8.01
8.54
10.05


P. M.
11.56








October 8

October 9

October 10

October 11

October 12


12.28
1.02
1.38
2.21
3.22





Stages of the Chagres.

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week
ending midnight, Saturday, October 1, 1910. All
heights are in feet above mean sea level.





Station.


Day and Date




JO


a








Vigia




JO

a


o


3 V
















<


o


m




Sun. Sept. 25 .. .


13S.5


100.7


50.5


17.9


17.3


Mon. Sept. 26. .


137.8


101.0


54.9


19.7


17.9


Tues. Sept. 27. .


138.9


100.4


50.3


18.3


17.8


Wed. Sept. 28. .


139.2


101.6


55.8


21.ll


19.0


Thurs. Sept. 29.


129.6


95.9


51.1


20. 'l


19.2


Fri. Sept. 30. . .


129.7


95.6


49.2


19.3


19.0


Sat. Oct. 1


128.7


95.1


49.0


18.7


18.4


Height of low












water


125.0


92.0


46.0







The following vessels arrived at, and departed from,
the port of Balboa during the week ending October 1 :

Arrivals — September 25, Quito, from Buenaventura;
Newport, from San Francisco; September 27, Trinculo,
from Port Harford; Cavalier (yacht) from Guayaquil;
September 29, Vicksburg, from Corinto; Arica, from
Guayaquil; September 30. Hornelen, from Puget Sound;
Aysen, from south ports.

Departures — September 25. Ecuador, to Guayaquil;
Mexico, to south ports; September 29. City of Para, to
San Francisco; Trinculo. to Port Harford; September
30, Quito, to Buenaventura and Tumaco.



Launch Service to Taboga.

The steamer Sanidad leaves the dredge landing at
Balboa at 9 o'clock Tuesday. Thursday and Saturday
mornings. On the return trip it arrives at Balboa
about 4.30 p.m. in time to make connections for the
5.30 train at Panama.



48



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 6.



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT.



The hours during which commissaries are open are
as follows:

Cristobal and Culebra, 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m.; 2 p. m.
to 7 p. m.

All other commissaries, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 3 p. m. to
7 p. m.

Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week
beginning October 4,

FRESH MEATS.

Price.

Mutton — Stewing, per pound 7

Shoulder, neck trimmed off, (4 lbs. and

over), pei pound

Entire forequarters (not trimmed) 10

pounds and over, per pound

Legs, (8 to 10 pounds), per pound . . .

Cutlets, per pound

Short cut chops, per pound

Lamb — Stewing, p r pound

Entire fore-waiters, neck trimmed off,

per pound

Legs (5 to 8 pounds), per pound

Chora, per pound

Cutiets per pound

Veal — Stewing, per pound

Shoulder for roasting (not under 4

pounds) , per pound

Loin for roasting, per pound

'"'hops, per pound

Cutlets, per pound

Pork cuts, per pound

Beef — Suet, per pound

Soup, per pound

Stew, per pound

Corned, per pound 12, 14. 16

Chuck roast, (3 pounds and over), per

pound

Pot roast, per pound

Rib-roast, second cut (not under 3%

pounds) , per pound

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds,

per pound 20

Sirloin roast, per pound 21

Rump roast, per pound 21

Porterhouse roast, per pound 21

Steak, Chuck, per pound 14

Round, per pound 15

Rib, per pound 20

Sirloin, per pound 21

Porterhouse, per pound 21

Rump, per pound 21

Tenderloin, per pound 24



18



MISCELLANEOUS.



Livers — Beef, per pound

Calf, each

Half, each

Sausage — Pork, per pound

Bologna, per pound

Frankfurter, per pound

Leberwurst, per pound

Sweet bread — Veal, per pound

Beef, per pound

Eggs, fresh, dozen

Eggs, fresh, !< dozen only

Bluef.sh, fresh, per pound

Cod, fresh, per pound

Halibut, fresh, per pound

POULTRY AND GAME.

Chickens — Fancy Roasting, large, each

medium each

Fowls, each 70,82,93, 1.04,

Ducks, large, each

medium, each

Broilers, each

Turkeys, per pound

Squabs, each

Capons, each

Geese, fatted, each

Pheasants, each 70,

Partridges, each

Grouse, each

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS.

Ham — English York Cut, per pound

German, Westphalia, per pound

Sugar cured, per pound

Sugar cured, sliced, per pound

Half, for boiling, per pound

Boiled, per pound

Hocks, per pound

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound

Breakfast, sliced, per pound

Beef, salt, family, per pound

Pork, salt, family, per pound

Ox tongues, each

Pigs' feet, per pound

tongues, per pound

Mutton, mess, per pound

DAIRY PRODUCTS.

Butter — Creamery special, per pound

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound

Philadelphia Cream, cake

Young America, per pound

Swiss, per pound

Edam, each

Camembert, in 2-pound tins, tin

Camembert, in 'i-pound tins, tin

Neufchatel, each

Gouda, per pound

Parmesan, per pound

Milk. Brlarcliff. bottle



10
60
30

17

14

14

14

1.20

25

f32

t»8

16

10

13



1.50
1.30
1.15

1.50

1.30

75

30

35

2.50

2.60

1.00

50

85



30
36
24
27
25
32
18
30
31
12
16
80
10
16
7



40
38
10
22
26

1.00
38
14
6
34
35

**25



Buttermilk, bottle

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS.

Beets, per pound

Celery, per head

Carrots, per pound

Cabbage, per pound

Cucumbers, per pouud ...

Lettuce, per head . . 5

Onions, per pound

Potatoes, white, per pound

sweet, per pound

Squash, per pound

Tomatoes, per pound

Tui nips, per pound

Yams, per pound „

Apples, per pound

Grapes, per pound

Lemon3, dozen

Limes, per 100

Oranges, per dozen

Peaches, per pound

Pears, per pound

Plums, per pound



Price.
**15

3K
6

3%

5

, 7. 10

3V 2

3%

2%

4

8

3

3%

5

8

24

80

12

8, 10

8

10



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS.



indicates reduction from last list.
♦♦Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle,
flndicates advance on last list.

tSold only fiom Commissaries; no orders taken for
delivery.

Supplies for Canal Work.

The following steamers with supplies for the Isthmian
Canal Commission arr ,-e-i at the ports of Cristobal.
Colon and Balboa during he week ending October 1,
1910:

Sibiria, September 26, rom New York, with 53 kegs
bolts, 184 cases fuzes for stock.

Atenas, September 29, from New Orleans, with 30
bundles pusli carts, 6 barrels wire rope clips, 523 pieces
oak lumber, 687 pieces yellow pine lumber, 3,318 bales
hay for stock; 89 pieces oak lumber, 672 pieces yellow
pine lumber for Mechanical Division; 133 tons dump
car parts for Cristobal shops (for erection).

Haakon VII, September 29, from Baltimore with
16,240 cases dynamite, 15,000 bundles tie plates, 180
pieces frogs, 50 crates wicker chairs, 21 cases steel bars,
1,250 cases bricks, 3,334 pieces sewer pipe, 1,580 kegs
wire nails, 431 pieces black pipe for stock; 48 cases
castings, 5 bundles castings, 4,223 pieces steel bars for
Pacific Division; 174 pieces castings, 425 car wheels,
490 pieces steel plate for Mechanical Division; 16
pieces castings, 26 bundles castings, 4 cases castings,
263 pieces pipe for Atlantic Division.

Almiranle, September 30, from New York, with 210
coils rope, 500 cases linseed oil for stock.

Hornden. September 30, from Seattle, with 24,370
pieces Douglas fir lumber, 16,031 cross-ties. 4,092
switch ties, 13 cases blasting caps for stock; 473 pieces
piles, 6,714 pieces Douglas fir lumber, 12 pieces spuds
for Atlantic Division.

Advance, September 30, from New York, with 24
cases ground levers, 24 crates stoves, 30 sets rims, 25
cases air brake material, 100 drums welding compound,
1,009 kegs and 94 cases bolts, 192 drums calcium car-
bide, 26 cases iron unions, 10 cases sheet brass, 14 cases
paper, 25 bundles rail tongs, 38 cases valves for stock;
25 packages machinery, 10 coils electrical supplies, 24
cases boots for Atlantic Division; 50 cases incandescent
lamps, 99 pieces steel castings for Mechanical Division;
60 pieces steel castings for Central Division; and a mis-
cellaneous cargo, the whole consisting of 2,046 packages,
weighing 300 tons.



Rainfall from September 1 to 30, Inclusive.

MIDNIGHT TO MIDNIGHT.



Pacific Section —

Chorrera

Ancon

Balboa

Miraflores

Pedro Miguel

Rio Grande

Central Section —

Culebra

Camacho

Empire

Gamboa

Alhajuela

El Vigia

Gorgona

San Pablo

Tabernilla

Bohio

Mi mte Lirio

Atlantic Section —

Gatun

Brazos Brook

Cristobal

Porto Bello

Nombre de Dios.



.3




I*




ri o


ftj


s


Q


Ins.




2.50


20


1.09


4


2.17


4


2.35


5


2.36


4


2.16


22


1.72


25


2.10


26


1.91


25


2.37


4


3.18


24


2.60


1


3.00


4


3.80


4


6.19


4


3.73


4


4.4S


5


2.71


4


3.43


5


2.19


18


2.18


27


1.25


17



£1



Ins.
8.12
4.84
5.18
9.56
7.68

10.20

10.09
11.73
8.99
12.24
IX. 44
17.86
13.31
15.92
19.17
16.82
22.22

12.72
12.21
1 : 1)5
13.15
6.90



The following is a list of the sailings of the Panama
Railroad Steamship Company, of the Royal Mail Steam
Packet Company, of the Hamburg-American Line, and
of the United Fruit Company's Line, the Panama Rail-
road Company's dates being subject to change:

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.

Ailianca P. R. R. Wednesday.. Oct. 5

Colon P. R. R. Tuesday Oct. 11

Advance P. R. R. Monday Oct. 17

Panama P. R. R. Saturday Oct. 22

Ailianca P. R. R. Friday .Oct. 28

Colon P. R. R, Friday Nov. 4

Advance P. R. R. Thursday Nov. 10

Panama P. R. R. Wednesday. . .Nov. 16

Ailianca P. R. R. Tuesday ... . Nov. 22

Colon P. R. R. Monday Nov. 28

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.

Advance P. R. R. Wednesday . . . Oct. 5

Cristobal P. R. R. Monday Oct 10

Panama P. R. R. Tuesday Oct. 11

Ailianca P. R. R. Monday Oct. 17

Colon P. R. R. Sunday Oct. 23

Advance P. R. R. Saturday Oct. 29

Panama P. R. R. Friday Nov. 4

Ailianca P. R. R Thursday Nov. 10

Colon P. R. R. Wednesday. . .Nov. 16

Advance P. R. R. Tuesday Nov. 22

Panama P. R. R. Monday Nov. 28

Ailianca P. R. R. Sunday Dec. 4

A fortnightly service of the Cristobal and .4«con will
be maintained as nearly as possible, leaving Cristobal
on or about the 4th and 25th of each month. Due
notice of the sailings of these ships from the Isthmus
will be given. On the outward voyage these ships sail
from the pier at the foot of 12th street, Hoboken, N. J.

NEW YORK TO COLON.

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday Sept. 29

Atrato R.-M. . .Saturday Oct. 1

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 6

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday Oct. 8

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 13

Tagus R.-M. . . Saturday Oct. 15

Almirante U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 20

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. . .H.-A. . . .Saturday Oct. 22

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 27

Oruba R.-M . . . Pai urday Oct. 29

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday Nov. 3

Prinz Joachim H.-A.. . .Saturday Nov. 5

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday Nov. 10

Magdalena R.-M . . . Saturday Nov. 12

COLON TO NEW YORK.

Almirante U. F. C. Friday Oct. 7

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm. . .H.-A Tuesday Oct. 11

Santa Marta U. F. C. Friday Oct. 14

Oruba R.-M. . .Monday Oct. 17

Metapan U. F. C. Friday Oct. 21

Prinz Joachim H.-A.. . .Tuesday Oct. 25

Zacapa U. F. C. Friday Oct. 28

Magdalena R.-M Monday Oct. 31

Almirante U. F. C. Friday Nov. 4

Prinz Aug. Wilhelm . . . H.-A . . .Tuesday Nov. 8

Santa Marta U. F. C. Friday Nov. 11

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON.

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 1

Abangarez U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 8

Atenas U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 15

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 22

Abangarez U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 29

Atenas U. F. C. Saturday Nov. 5

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS.

Atenas U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 6

Turrialba U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 13

Abangarez U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 20

Atenas U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 27

Turrialba U. F. C. Thursday Nov. 3

Abangarez U. F. C. Thuisday Nov. 10

COLON TO BARBADOS. CALLING AT TRINIDAD.

Atrato R.-M. . .Tuesday Oct. 11

Tagus R.-M. . .Tuesday Oct. 25

The next sailing of the Leyland Line will be as fol-
lows: Jamaican on or about October 14, for New
Orleans, via Kingston. Ja.

Hamburg-American steamers leave for New York at
10 a. m., and for Port Limon every Tuesday or Wednes-
day.

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alternate
Mondays at 10 a. m.; for Southampton on alternate
Tuesdays at 10 a. m.

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans leave
on Thursday at 3 p. m.. and for New York on Friday
at 10 a. m.

Sailings of the French line (Cie Generale Trans-
atlantique) for Venezuelan ports, Martinique and Guad-
eloupe on the 3rd and. 20th of each month.



CANAL




RECORD



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1910. No. 7.



Volume IV.



The Canal Record

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of
the Isthmian Canal Commission.



The Canal Record is issued free of charge, one copy
each, to all employes of the Commission and Panama
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll.
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five
cents each.

Address all Communications

THE CANAL RECORD

Ancon, Canal Zone,

Isthmus of Panama.

No communication, either for publication or requesting
information, will receive attention unless signed with the
full name and address of the writer,

NOTES OF PROGRESS.



Land to be Leased in Cristobal.

The plot of ground back of the commissary
in Cristobal will be leased by the Panama
Railroad Company on condition that only fire-
proof buildings be erected on it in compli-
ance with plans approved by the proper au-
thorities. There are 27 lots 30 by 100 feet,
and three smaller lots. The Masons of Colon
expect to erect a Masonic temple on one end
of the plot.



Panama-David Railroad Survey.

Two of the five Panama railroad engineer-
ing parties engaged in the survey of the pro-
posed railroad to David in the province of
Chiriqui, and of two projected branch lines,
have completed their work in the field, and it is
expected that the remaining parties will finish
by the middle of November. The completed
surveys comprise the section from Empire
to Santiago, and the branch line through the
province of Los Santos as far as the town of
Pedasi. The length of this proposed branch
line is approximately 65 miles.



New P. R. R. Pilot Boat.

A new pilot boat has been received by the
Panama Railroad Company for use about the
harbor at Colon and Cristobal. It is capable
of making IS miles an hour in comparatively
smooth water and will accommodate five pas-
sengers. It is 35 feet in length (32 feet 9
inches at the water line), has a beam of 7 feet
6 inches, and is equipped with a 40-horse-
power gasoline motor situated well amidship
and enclosed. The vessel is provided with
a melon folding hood of canvas mounted on a
folding brass frame.

Canal Work in September.

The grand total of Canal excavation in
September was 2,687,088 cubic yards, of which
2,621,731 cubic yards were charged to "work
excavation" and 65,357 cubic yards to
"plant." The dry excavation amounted to
1,717,9S6 cubic yards and was principally by
steam shovels. The dredges removed 969,-
102 cubic yards in addition to the amount



pumped into Gatun Dam by suction dredges.
The progress on the locks at Gatun, Pedro
Miguel and Miraflores is referred to else-
where in this issue.

In the Atlantic Division, the total excava-
tion was 603,070 cubic yards. Of this total,
124,753 cubic yards were dry excavation and
the remainder was removed by the dredges
in the Atlantic entrance.

The total excavation in the Central Divi-
sion was 1 ,574,238 cubic yards, all of which was
chargeable to work excavation. All records
for excavation in any previous September were
surpassed.

In the Pacific Division the total excavation
was 509,780 cubic yards, all but 18,995 cubic
yards of which was taken out by the dredges
at the Pacific entrance.

A detailed statement of the excavation and
a summary of the work on the locks and dams
follow:

ATLANTIC DIVISION.



Locality.


"Work."
Excava-
tion.


"Plant."
Excava-
tion.


Total
excava-
tion


Dry excavation —
Locks. Dam and Spill-


Cu. Yds.
103.040


Cu. Yds.
21,713


Cu. Yds.

124,753














Total


103.040


21,713


124 753














Locks. Dam and Spill-


451,873


26,444


478.317










Total


451,873


26,444


478,317










Total wet and dry


554.913


48.157


603.070


CENTRAL DIVISION.



All dry excavation—
Culebra Cut ! 1,339,948



Chagres section..
Obispo Diversion.



Total.



234.290



1374.238



1,339,948
234,290



1.574.238



PACIFIC DIVISION.



Dry excavation—
Locks, Dams and Spill-


18,995












Prism, south of Pedro
















Total


18.995




. 18,995


Wet excavation —


473,585


17,200


490,785


















Total


473,585


17,200


490.785




Total wet and dry


492.580


17.200


509.780



TOTAL


CANAL EXCAVATION.




Dry excavation .
Wet excavation .




1,696,273
925.458


21.713
43,644


1.717.9S6
969.102


Total


2.621.731


65,357


2. 687. OSS



Mean rainfall along Canal (eleven statious) 12.03
inches.

By "Work" Excavation is meant excavation actu-
ally made for one of the constituent parts of the Canal,
such as Prism. Diversions, or Locks, etc.: that is. it
represents material taken from the area to be occu-
pied by the Canal, and constitutes excavation useful
for the completed Canal.

By "Plant" Excavation is meant excavation outside
of any of the constituent parts of the Canal, such as



Prism. Diversions, or Locks, etc. It includes mate-
rial necessary to be excavated for construction pur-
poses only and is chargeable against the particular
plant item for which it is performed, such as Prism.
Diversions. Locks, etc.

DAM AND LOCK CONSTRUCTION.



Material.



Fill placed in dams . . .

Concrete laid in locks

Concrete laid in dams

and spillways



Atlantic.



Cu. Yds.

686.275

76.721



Pacific.



Cu. Yds.
11.220
63,835



Total.



Cu. Yds.

697,4<-5
145,556



Corozal Recreation Hall.

Favorable action has been taken upon the
application of the residents of Corozal for the
placing of the recreation hall in that settle-
ment under the direction of the Y. M. C. A.
An estimate is being prepared for the addi-
tional room and equipment that will be re-
quired. It calls for the enlargement of the
present building by the addition of two rooms,
one, a reading room, and the other, a pool and
billiard room. The reading room, which now
occupies the front part of the hall, will be
converted into an office, and a place for serv-
ing light refreshments.



Shovel Work in Chagres District.

On October 4, seven shovels, working in the
Chagres construction district of the Central
Division, excavated 9,870 cubic yards of ma-
terial in the working day of eight hours, an
average of 1,410 cubic yards per shovel for
the day. During this time the shovels were
under steam 56 hours and actually digging 44
hours and 30 minutes; waiting for cars, 5 hours
and 10 minutes; clearing track, one hour;
mining, 40 minutes; cleaning dipper, 4 hours
and 30 minutes, and repairing shovel, 10
minutes. These shovels are all of the 65 and
70-ton class, and are digging in very stiff red
clay.

Slides in Culebra Cut.

A small slide developed in the west bank of
Culebra Cut at Cunette, near Empire, on
October 6, and part of an old dump, made by
the French and used by the Americans in 1905,
moved into the Canal. The break in the
bank had been widening for several days and
in anticipation of the slide the water main
along the west bank had been moved, and the
air main securely anchored to the more stable
portion of the bank. Several small buildings,
forming part of the labor camp, were included
in the limits of the slide and were removed.
The construction track along the bank from
Empire to Las Cascadas was broken, and
communication between the Empire and
Whitehouse yard by this line is temporarily
interrupted. This track serves as the lead to
the Whitehouse incline into the Cut, but the
part used for this purpose was not injured by
the slide.

A portion of the slide at Cucaracha, accel-
erated by the heavy rains and excavation at
the toe of the slope, brokelrom the main slide



50



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 7.



NOTES OF PROGRESS



( Coniin tied. )



on October 4, and two steam shovels were
put out of service for two or three days.

On account of the movement in the west
bank of the Canal at Culebra, the houses of the
Chief Quartermaster, and of the Constructing
Quartermaster, have been taken down and are
being erected on the west slope of the hill at
Culebra, back of the administration building.

The dumping of rock in the slide in the east
bank of the Cut at Las Cascadas has been
suspended, as the rock slope is no longer
moving, and it is proposed to drive a line of
sheet piling to hold the bank temporarily in
case of future trouble and thus prevent
another break in the Obispo diversion at
this point.

All the material in motion in the slides is
included in the estimate of excavation to be
done in Culebra Cut, and forms about 15 per
cent of the total remaining to be excavated.



Rain and Wind Storm at Cristobal.

On the afternoon of October 5, a heavy rain
and wind storm visited Cristobal, and in 45
minutes beginning at 3.30 o'clock, 2.27 inches
of rain fell. The wind attained a maximum
velocity of 36 miles an hour blowing from the
southwest.

Telephone Service Improvements.

The new main exchange telephone switch-
board at Empire, through which all the sta-
tions at Paraiso, Culebra, Empire, Las Cas-
cadas and Bas Obispo will hereafter be served,
was put in operation on Sunday, October 9.
The old exchanges at Culebra and Paraiso were
abandoned some time ago, but pending the
installation of the new apparatus, the Culebra
switchboard was temporarily placed in oper-
ation in the Empire exchange building. The
private branch exchange switchboards in the
offices of the Chief Engineer and Chief Quar-
termaster at Culebra will continue to be oper-
ated. A new 100-pair aerial cable has been
strung from Empire to Culebra to take care of
the Culebra and Paraiso stations, and a 30-
pair aerial cable, extending to Las Cacadas,
serves the Las Cascadas and Bas Obispo
stations. The new switchboard at Empire is
of the common battery, lamp signal type, and
consists of two sections, wired for a total of
400 subscribers, each section being attended
by two operators. It is planned to place an
additional cross-arm on the pole line between
Las Cascadas and Bas Obispo to provide
additional facilities at the latter settlement.

The plan of laying an underground cable to
provide permanent telephone facilities along
the Panama railroad relocation has been
abandoned. A requisition was placed some