Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

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Boots and shoes 165,303.38

Cold storage supplies 1,348,376.57

Furniture 11,918.59

Tobacco 153.986.84

Raw material 325.453.42

Paper, twine, stationery, etc 51,025.90

The chief imports during the year under the
classification of "groceries," and a compari-
son in a number of instances with the amounts
imported during the preceding year, were as
follows:



ARTICLE.


1909.


1910.




Pounds.


Pounds.
39,922






364,982






412.429




126.468
295,120
203,587


109,504




597,516




*319,697




188,319




4,809,124
193.586
438.360
437.842

1,576,880
474,192


5,363,574


Jams, jellies and preserves. . . .


195,199
420,110




675,852


Milk, evap. and condensed . . .


2,221.052

524.069

1,128,792


Peas and beans in tins


340.234


471.452
27,250






169.460




53,388


77.586
766.623






1,629,558




222,192


162,960




3,612,768




64.400
506,080


80,965




677,278



♦Amount of green coffee roasted at coffee plant.

In meats and dairy products the following
quantities were received: Fresh meats, 5,229,-
306 pounds; cured and pickled meats, 1,046,-
029 pounds; cheese, 114,192 pounds; eggs,
502,950 dozen; butter, 471,551 pounds; poul-
try, 429,575 pounds; fresh milk, 41,901 gal-
lons; fresh cream, 22,900 gallons.

Fresh vegetables were imported in the fol-
lowing amounts: White potatoes, 4,586,967
pounds; sweet potatoes, 638,584 pounds;
onions, 717,557 pounds; turnips, 122,632
pounds; beets, 26,059 pounds; carrots, 91,830
pounds; cabbage, 656,905 pounds; yams,
424,789 pounds; other vegetables, including
celery, tomatoes, squash, etc., 622,484 pounds.

Fresh fruits were purchased abroad as fol-
lows: Apples, 526,472 pounds; peaches, 63,944
pounds; pears, 21.7SO pounds; plums, 17,706
pounds; grapes, 54,066 pounds; oranges, 236,-
854 dozen; lemons, 13,574 dozen; grapefruit,
11,837 dozen; limes, 5,493 dozen; 59,724 can-
teloupes, 10,845 watermelons; other fruits
26,276 pounds.

With few exceptions, there was an increased
consumption during the year in all articles
under the head of groceries, provisions, fresh
vegetables and fruits. The sales and issues
to all departments were as follows:

Sales to Isthmian Canal Commission. . . $1,664,873.66

Sales to United States Government. . . . 135,068.36

Sales to others for cash 100.901.78

Sales to others for coupons 3,083,064.13

Issued to departments of the railroad
and used in operation of the commis-
sary 229.328.02

Issued to Panamarailroadsteamships 9.501.84
Condemned and damaged goods, shrink-
age, etc 108.779.02

Total $5,331,516.81

Average sales and issues per month $444,293.07

The stock on hand on June 30, 1910, aggre-



gated $1,391,342.33, in value, as compared
with S810, 696.94 on June 30, 1909.

The annual report of commissary opera-
tions for 1909-10 includes a statement of the
comparative selling prices of fresh meats,
poultry and game, cured and pickled meats,
dairy products, vegetables, fruits and grocer-
ies at stated periods, viz., April, 1907, 1908,
1909, 1910, and June, 1910. This statement
shows that in the face of a constantly ad-
vancing wholesale market, goods of the above
classes were being sold cheaper in the first
half of 1910 than during any previous period
of operations covered by the table, with the
exception of pork products, on which the
advance in price within the last year has been
unusual.

Twenty-one commissary stores were in
operation on June 30, 1910, and an additional
store will shortly be opened at Miraflores.
Fourteen of the stores are provided with ice
boxes of sufficient size to store meats and
other perishable goods. Butchers are em-
ployed in eight of the commissaries.

MANUFACTURING PLANTS.

Laundry — During the fiscal year, 2,993,761
pieces were laundered. The average number
of employes served monthly was 7,265, and
the value of the work performed was $90,797.-
56.

Bakery — The bakery used 15,631 barrels
of flour, and produced 4,892,401 loaves of
bread, 504,003 rolls, 130,667 pounds of cake,
and 32,243 pies during 1909-10. The making
of pies was discontinued in January, as it was
found after about a year's experience that it is
almost impossible to ship pies in this climate
and deliver them to customers in a fresh and
palatable condition. A new blender and
elevator, equipped with an automatic scale
attachment and tempering device for water,
was installed during the year. The total val-
ue of the bakery product was $219,370.16.

Coffee Roasting Plant — During the year,
319,697 pounds of green coffee were roasted,
valued at $77,905.43. Three grades are pro-
duced, one a pure Santos of the highest grade,
which is sold roasted and ground for 171 cents
a pound; second, a blend made of a Santos
base mixed with mild South American grades
and Mocha and Java, sold for 25 cents a
pound, and third, a pure Mocha and Java
coffee, sold for 35 cents a pound. A new 100-
pound roaster and a 50-pound grinder were
installed.

Ice Plant — Twenty-seven thousand, nine
hundred and twenty-eight tons of ice were
manufactured during the year, valued at
$187,446.95. During the months of April
and May, and a part of June, 1910, the ice
supply became so short that ice had to be
hauled from New York, in addition to buying
all the excess ice the local private plants could
produce. A tank capable of turning out an
additional 25 tons daily was installed on
June 17, which relieved the shortage.

Ice Cream Plant — The demand for ice cream
was steady, and 91,321 gallons, valued at
$62,379.93, were manufactured. The product
is carefully packed in standard tubs and
shipped out to hotels and stores. Flavors
are changed from four to six times a week to
insure variety. Only fresh cream and milk,
shipped in refrigeration from the United
States, crushed fruits and the highest classes
of flavoring are used. A building, designed
especially for the manufacture of this article,
and by which it is expected that its sale can be



increased at least 50 per cent, has been con-
structed.

Automatic Weighing and Packing — A com-
plete automatic weighing and packing depart-
ment was installed during the year. By this
method, flour, beans, peas, rice, coffee, etc. ,
are weighed and packed ready for delivery
to customer, thereby saving the waste attend-
ant upon careless weighing, and enabling the
storekeeper to sell goods in original packages.
During the period from January 1 to June 30,
1910, inclusive, goods to the amount of 2,470,-
960 pounds were packed in this manner.

Power Plant — A 300-ton compressor, having
a capacity for running the entire refriger-
ating and ice-making plant and affording an
opportunity to shut down the other com-
pressors when necessary to repair them, was
purchased and is being installed.

Cold Storage Plant — During the year, a load-
ing corridor 21 feet by 136 feet 5 inches
was completed, which makes it possible to
load all goods requiring refrigeration in a tem-
perature not above 58 degrees Fahrenheit,
thus insuring the arrival of this class of goods
at destination in a fresh condition. It also
provides space for the storage of smoked
and pickled meats. A two-story iron and
concrete warehouse 50 by 200 feet, made
necessary by the enlargement of the bakery
in 1909, was erected during the year.



Shooting at Culebra.

J. A. Schaberle, a white American employed
in the office of the Chief Engineer, was shot
in the bowels while in his quarters at Culebra
about 2 o'clock on the morning of October 10,
by J. R. Johnson, also an employe of the
Chief Engineer's office. Mr. Schaberle was
taken to Ancon Hospital where his condition
is regarded as critical. Johnson was arrested
and will be held pending the result of the in-
juries to Schaberle. The cause of the shoot-
ing is not known further than that Johnson
was intoxicated.



Burglar Shot at Corozal.

A demented negro, Alfred Brooks, was shot
and killed by E. N. Knapp while leaving the
quarters of Mr. Knapp at Corozal at 2 o'clock
in the morning of October 7. A coroner's
jury returned a verdict of justifiable homicide.
Brooks was indicted for the murder of Corne-
lius McKenzie and Ella Williams near Empire
on January 20, 1910, and having been de-
clared insane by a board of three experts, was
committed to the asylum for the insane at
Ancon Hospital on March 29. He escaped
from the asylum on the night of October 6,
and probably walked to Corozal.



Missing Men.

Information is wanted concerning the
whereabouts of Frank L. Karrer of St. Louis,
Mo., who is supposed to be working on the
Isthmus of Panama. Any one having knowl-
edge of him is requested to communicate with
his mother, Mrs. Marian Karrer, 2926 Oliver
street, St. Louis, Mo.

Any one having knowledge of the where-
abouts of Granville Harper, a Barbadian,
check No. 70958, who was discharged from
Ancon Hospital on August 22, is requested
to communicate it to The Canal Record.

Information is requested regarding the
whereabouts of Edward O'Neil, who left the
Canal service in 1906. Address Mrs. Philip
Deubel, 2723 East Allegheny avenue, Philadel-
phia, Pa.



54



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 7.



COLON IMPROVEMENTS.



Plan Approved by Panama and the United States.

The so-called "pyramid plan" for the fill
and drainage of Colon, under the special
appropriation of SHOO, 000 for sanitary work
in Panama and Colon, has been approved by
the Government of Panama and by the Acting
Chairman of the Isthmian Canal Commission
for the United States Government.

Under the approved plan the area to be
improved will be drained in four directions
from a summit at the intersection of Ninth and
E streets, where the elevation of the curb will
be SV'2 feet above sea level. The elevation of
the curb at Ninth and D streets will be 2Vz
feet above sea level, and the streets between
Front and E street will drain into the D street
storm sewer. The curb at Second and E
streets will be at 2.8 feet above sea level, and
at 16th and E streets at 3.88 feet. The plan
provides for future extensions of the city to the
edge of Manzanillo Bay, beyond the part in-
cluded in the improvements now under way.
At Ninth street and Manzanillo Bay the curb
elevation will be 4.61 feet above sea level.

The improvements authorized include the
area from Second street to Ninth, between
and including D and G streets; and from
Ninth to 14th streets, between and including
D and E streets.

The allotment for the improvements in
Colon is $493,016.22, and of this amount,
$127,016.22 has already been expended. The
estimated cost of work to be carried on under
the approved plan is as follows:



Class of Work.



Sewer system .
Water system
Street imp'v'
Street fill ... .
Extension sewer

force main . . .
D street storm

sewer

G street storm

sewer



Total.



S6.534.80
20,963.18
99,101.69



Labor.



$16,957.18
9,438.53
99,212.50



Total.



S23.491.98
30,401.71

198.314.19
63,000.00

13,950.00

136,232.89

17.000.00



S482.390.77



The estimate for a storm sewer in G street
does not contemplate the immediate con-
struction of that sewer, but is included, be-
cause such a sewer will be necessary if the area
east of G street is filled at some future time.
The estimate for several items is lower than
that published heretofore, because the con-
tingencies for labor have been reduced from
25 per cent to 10 per cent, and the cost of the
hydraulic fill has been estimated at 30 cents,
instead of 33 cents, as previously given.

The amount of fill in the 22 blocks in-
cluded within the limits of the present
improvement is estimated at 348,180 cubic
yards, and the street fill at 2 10,000 cubic yards,
a total fill of 558,180 cubic yards at a cost of
$167,454. The fill within the blocks will be
paid for by the owners of the property, and
streets and land filled at the request of the
Panama Railroad Company will be paid for
by that company.



Opening of Schools.

The Canal Zone schools for white children
opened on October 3 with over 700 pupils in
attendance. This number does not include
Empire, where the schools will not open until
Thursday of this week. The opening of the
Empire school will probably raise the total
attendance to over 850. This is much larger
than the enrollment of last year. There are
ten of these schools, situated at Ancon, Pedro



Miguel, Paraiso, Culebra, Empire, Las Casca-
das, Gorgona, Tabernilla, Gatun, and Cristo-
bal.

As usual, the attendance for the first week
in the schools for colored children was low,
the enrollment being about 600. There are
thirteen of these schools, situated at Balboa,
Paraiso, Culebra, Empire, Las Cascadas,
Matachin, Gorgona, San Pablo, Tabernilla,
Gatun, Mount Hope, Cristobal, and Pleya
del Flor.

A manual has been issued for the public
schools containing regulations, information,
and the course of study at present pursued.
A copy of this book will be found at each Com-
mission clubhouse, and parents and others
interested in the work of the schools can con-
sult it there.



Red Cross Finances.

A statement of the financial condition of
the Canal Zone Chapter of the American
National Red Cross for the month of Sep-
tember, 1910, follows:



RECEIPTS.

September 1. Balance on hand . $1,962.57



Sl.962.57



DISBURSEMENTS.

September 23. Relief of Cuban

who was deported S40.00



S40.00

September 30. Balance on hand Sl.922.57

John L. Phillips,
Treasurer.
Approved: C. A. Devol,

Chairman.



Masonic Banquet.
A banquet for Masons will be given in the
Washington Hotel, Colon, on Saturday even-
ing, October 15, by the Masons on the Isth-
mus of Panama. Masons who are not affili-
ated with any Masonic organization on the
Isthmus are cordially welcomed. Speeches
will be made by several prominent Masons.
A special tVain will leave Panama at 6.30 p.
m., and will return after the banquet.



Masonic Club Election.

At the meeting of the Corozal Masonic
Club held on Wednesday evening, October 5,
officers were elected as follows: President,
Eli Sims, first vice-president, Frank Cotton;
second vice-president, J. C. Keller; secretary,
C. H. R. Howe; treasurer, F. E. Hamlin.



Historic Find at Nombre de Dios.

The hull of an old vessel, which has every
appearance of having been buried in the sand
for several centuries was encountered during
the latter part of September by suction dredge
No. 4, working in the sand deposits at Nom-
bre de Dios. The wreck was lying in the middle
of the sand zone, about 300 feet distant from
the beach line, and at from 18 to 20 feet below
the surface of the ground. The dredge un-
earthed the old hulk for its entire length of
about 60 feet, and has now worked past it.
The wood of which the ship was built resem-
bles oak and was put together with wooden
pins.

During the time the dredge has been oper-
ating in the vicinity of the wreck, its suction
pipe has drawn in several hundred pounds of
iron, some pieces weighing as much as 40
pounds. The cutter of the dredge also en-
countered a great many pieces of hard mortar,
severing, instead of breaking the pieces, when
it came in direct contact with them. The
mortar is practically the same as that seen in
the ruins of buildings on the Isthmus con-
structed by the early Spaniards, and possesses



remarkable adhesive power. Much of it was
found set in and around the ship's iron work,
including the hollow parts of a series of iron
posts. Another find was that of a quantity
of old slugs, bullets, etc., which may have be-
longed to the ship's magazine.



Tide Table.

The following table shows the time of high and low
tides at Panama for the week ending October 19, 1910,
(75th meridian time) :



Date.


High.


Low.


High.


Low.


High.




A.M.


A. M.
4.40
5.55
6.57
7.50
8.38
9.23

10.07


A. M.
10.30
11.54
1.03
1.58
2.45
3.30
4.12


P. M.
5.15
6.23
7.21
8.12
8.57
9.42

10.25


P. M.
11.25








October 15

October 17

October 18

October 19


12.35
1.32
2.20
3.05
3.47





Misdirected Letters.

Ancon, C. Z., October 19, 1910.
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi-
nating in the United States and its possessions have been
received in the office of the Director of Posts, and may
be secured upon request of the addressee:



Baker, D. T.
Borden, W.
Carter, Robt. H.
Clinton, G. P.
Conner, Lee J.
Duncan, Charles G.
Hoffman, Max



Janney, P. H.
Kefauver, Miss Christine
O'Garro, Edward
Patterson, Cunningham
Sloane, Hugh
Weiser, Wm. M.
Whitsel, F. H.



Rainfall from October 1 to 8, Inclusive.

MIDNIGHT TO MIDNIGHT.



Stations.



Pacific Section —

Ancon

Balboa

Miraflores

Pedro Miguel. . .

Rio Grande. . . .
Central Section —

Culebra

Camacho

Empire

Gamboa

Alhajuela

El Vigia

Gorgona

San Pablo

Tabernilla

Bohio

Monte Lirio. . . .
Atlantic Section —

Gatun

Brazos Brook...

Cristobal

Nombre"de Dios



a








B £

1"°




fC o




s


Q


Ins.




1.31


4


1.45


4


.95


2


.60


2


.82


4


.62


2


.55


2


.50


2


.71


7


.60


S


1.04


6


.40


7


.65


8


.62


4


.82


4


.95


4


1.75


5


.79


4


2.94


5


.17


5






Ins.
2.40
2.82
2.64
1.50
2.02

1.32
1.47

.97
1.41

.75
1.86
1.03
1.12
1.95
1.84
2.16

2.93

1.98

3.83

.35



September Rainfall for Three Years.











4>


•o


o












o


^


Station.


1908


1909


1910


>

<

C
O


*o


m










(7)


>


Pacific Section-


Ins.


Ins.


Ins.


Ins.








5.93


3.86


4.84


7.49


14


18




5.93


4.11


5.18


6.36


12


18






11.85
10.22


9.56
7.68


10.70
8.49


2
3


?(>


Pedro Miguel


7.56


23


Rio Grande..


15.32


11.23


10.20


11.29


6


24


Central Seclion-
















13.74


8.40


10.09


11.35


20


22


Camacho ....


12.35


13.01


11.73


11.33


5


24




9.76


7.22


8.99


7.93


7


25


Gamboa. . . .


6.28


7.90


12.24


10.61


28


24


Alhajuela. . .


13.45


7.50


18.44


12.00


12


24


El Vigia ....


17.39


10.91


17.86


15.39


3


25


Gorgona ....




8.84


13.31


13.17


8


21


San Pablo...


9.42


12.17


15.92


12.72


4


26


Tabernilla. . .


12.85


13.10


19.17


14.41


4


25


Bohio


8.74


10.43


16.82


14.02


17


27


Monte Lirio.


7.88


9.87


22.22


13.32


3


30


AtlanticSeclitm-














Gatun


8.52


10.86


12.72


10.91


6


28


Brazos Brook


12.05


9.66


12.21


12.31


5


26


Cristobal. . . .


11.57


16.33


12.05


12.56


40


25


Porto Bello..


8.59


13.99


13.15


11.91


3


25


Nombre de D




7.72


6.90


7.31


2


22



October 12, 1910.



THE CANAL RECORD



55



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE.



Women's Clubs and Other Features.

An election of officers for the ensuing six
months was held in the Gatun Woman's
Club on Friday afternoon, October 7, the
following being chosen: President, Mrs. J.
H. Stevenson; vice-president, Mrs. A. L.
Kerr; secretary, Mrs. A. P. McCulloch;
treasurer, Mrs. C. H. Stoddard. A change
in the schedule is contemplated by which
meetings will be held semimonthly, instead of
weekly, as heretofore. The club meets in a
room assigned to its use on the second floor
of the Commission clubhouse.

An outline plan of the work of the Paraiso
Woman's Club was presented at the meeting
on Wednesday afternoon, October 5. The
program includes papers on topics of current
interest, an exhibit of the Federation collec-
tion of pictures, a reception to the president
of the Canal Zone Federation, a Christmas
bazaar, evening entertainments monthly, and
a general meeting in December, when Mr.
Maurice H. Thatcher will deliver an address.
Much interest is taken in the playground
movement and the proceeds of the Hallowe'en
dance to be held on October 29, will be de-
voted to that purpose.

An entertainment of moving pictures was
held in the social hall, Paraiso, on Wednesday
evening, October 5.

The call for the resuming of the sessions of
the Gorgona Woman's Club as issued last
week was headed "A Better Gorgona" and
the efforts of the organization will be directed
toward the development of social and civic
interests in the village. Under the auspices
of the club a farewell reception was tendered
to Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Sweet at the Commission
clubhouse on Friday evening, October 6. The
guests of honor were welcomed by the presi-
dent of the club, Mrs. Harry Otis, who also
presented gifts on behalf of the club and citi-
zens. There was a short program consisting
of musical numbers by Miss Elizabeth La
Croix, Miss Ethel Otis, and Mr. Earle Buford,
and recitations by Miss Jane Calvit and Mr.
Wallace Wright. Refreshments were served
and the evening closed with an informal re-
ception. Mr. and Mrs. Sweet have been
active in club and public life in Gorgona during
the past two years; they are leaving for their
home in the States.

The Marine Dramatic Club of Camp Elliott
will give a performance at Pedro Miguel on
Saturday evening, October 15, for the benefit
of the Marine Band.

The Empire Woman's Club has elected
Mrs. Mary Westberg and Miss Jessie Smith
as officers for the ensuing year.

A masked ball was held at Empire by the
local organization of Kangaroos on Tuesday
evening, October 4, the entertainment being
managed by the Tuesday night committee.
A special train brought guests from Gorgona



and there was a large attendance. Two
prizes were awarded for the best costumes,
the lady's prize being won by Mrs. Joseph
Kirk for her representation of "night", and
the gentleman's prize by Mr. Rath for a
"hobble" skirt costume. The Tuesday night
committee is a regularly organized branch of
local work which has in charge arrangements
for dances and other entertainments held in
the lodge hall weekly.



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS.



PERSONAL.



Lieut. -Col. John L. Phillips sailed on the
steamship Panama for New York on October
11, on his annual leave of absence.

Capt. Courtland Nixon sailed on the United
Fruit Company's steamer Atenas for New
Orleans on Thursday, October 6, on his annual
leave of absence.

Mr. W. G. Comber arrived at Cristobal on
the Allianca on October 11.



Dramatic Entertainment.

The Empire Dramatic and Musical Society
will hold an entertainment at the Commission
clubhouse, Empire, on Tuesday evening,
October 18, when the following program will
be given:

Part I.

1 Piano quartet.

Mrs. Shivers, Miss Moulton, Mrs. Dickson, Mr.
McAnelly.

2 Hawaiian Melody La Meda

Glee Club.

3 Spring Song Pinsuti

Mrs. Ludwig, Mrs. Faure, Mr. Ross, Mr. Conner.

4 Havana

Messrs. Ross and Dickson.

5 Scene from "The Tales of Hoffman". . . .Offenbach

Mrs. Faure and mbced quartet.

6 "O. That We Two Were Maying" Smith

Mrs. Ludwig and Mr. Dickson.

7 Aria

Mrs. Faure.

8 Archer's Marching Song Thayer

Glee Club.

9 Prison Scene from "II Trovatore" Verdi

Mrs. Ludwig, Mr. Ross, and chorus.
Part.II.

"Freezing a Mother-in-Law," a farce in one act.
Cast.

Mrs. Watmuff Mrs. G. W. K. Newbold

Emily Watmuff Miss Lucy Clark

Mr. Watmuff Mr. Perry Brown

Ferdinand Swift Mr. W. A. Evans. Jr.

Walter Litherland Mr. C. H. Brodsky

Members: Soprano — Mrs. A. O. Ludwig; contralto —
Mrs. L. L. Faure; pianists — Mrs. Mary G. Shivers,
Miss Bessie Moulton, Mrs. Alfred Dickson, Mr. H. H.
McAnelly; tenors — Messrs. C. H. Brodsky, Mr. H.
W. Dohrmann. Alfred Dickson, T. H. Campbell, S. H.
Kirkpatrick, W. G. Ross. F. B. Young; basses — Messrs.
Perry Brown, H. Bartholomew, F. W. Conner, Oscar
King, Keith Kelley, James F. Mackey, A. D. Moore,
T. H. Smallwood; dramatic section — Mrs. G. W. K.
Newbold, Miss Lucy Clark, Messrs. Perry Brown. W.
A. Evans, Jr., C. H. Brodsky. Musical director. Mr.
Alfred Dickson.

The society, which is composed of twenty-
six members, is divided into two sections,
dramatic and musical, with Mr. Alfred Dick-
son as musical director.

Arrangements will probably be made later to
repeat the performance at the clubhouses at
Gorgona, Gatun, and Cristobal.



One end of the station shed at Corozal has
been fitted up for a freight and baggage room.



WEATHER CONDITIONS, CANAL ZONE, SEPTEMBER, 1910.





"y ■*

3 CM

<u o
w a

* r> O

^ S j=


Temperature.


S .

a >.

31

3 3

v X.


Precipitin tion.


Wind.


Stations.


c

V

s

78.6
78.7