Isthmian Canal Commission (U.S.).

Canal Record (Volume 4 no.1-52) online

. (page 28 of 168)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook

prepared in the drafting office of the^railroad
at Colon.



Canal Record Index.
The index to Vol. Ill of The Canal Rec-
ord, in form suitable for binding with the
year's issues of the paper, will be ready for
distribution shortly. It will be sent free, on
application, to such persons, institutions,
libraries, etc. as desire to preserve their
copies of The Canal Record in book form.



High Water in the Chagres.

High water in the Chagres River during the
week ending October 22 made it necessary
for the steam shovels which are excavating
in the Canal prism at Gorgona and Mamei
to cease work on October 20, 21, and 22.
The water rose above the fire boxes of the
shovels and inundated the construction tracks,
making a continuation of work impossible.
These floods are expected and the procedure
is to merely wait until the water subsides and
then start work again. Meanwhile the river
dumps are cleaned by the high water.

A statement of the stages of the river,
during the week referred to, follows, all eleva-
tions being above mean sea level:





Station.


Day and Date


Vigia.


J5

3
'(?

.a
<


o
£
O


6

o
S3


c .
- -.


Sunday, Oct. 16
Mon. Oct. 17. ..
Tues. Oct. 18...
Wed. Oct. 19...
Thurs. Oct.20. .
Friday. Oct. 21.
Sat. Oct. 22


129.4
127.6
135.4
136.6
137.8
136.3
131.1


95.5
94.0
99.5
100.1
101.0
101.0
96.5


49.4
47.4
52.3
53.8
55.3
56.1
53.5


16.9
16.4
16.5
19.1
20.7
23.2
22.4


16.4
16.3
16.0
17.1
17.1
20.1
20.3


Height of low

water ' 125.0

1


92.0


46.0







Further Economies in the Shops.

An order has been placed for three sand-
blast machines, with flexible hose and nozzles,
to be used in removing scale from steel cars
when they are brought into the shops at
Gorgona for repairs.

A washer machine has also been ordered.
It will be capable of punching washers from
3-16 of an inch to two inches in diameter.
Scrap metal will be used for the washers, thus
giving it a greater value than it has as scrap,
and at the same time making it unnecessary to



buy in the States the large amount of washers
required by the mechanical work.

The Taylor-Barth system of caring for
leather belts is to be installed at the Gorgona
shops. It consists of two parts, the first
being a card index by which accurate account
of the condition of the belts is kept, and the
second a belt-cutting machine. By the use
of this machine a belt can be cut to its proper
length under tension, so that when the ends
are united with wire lacing it will be at the
tension proper for the transmission of power.
A record will be kept of the dates on which
each belt may need adjustment, and on that
day, the inspector will restretch and recut it.
Thus the belts will always be in condition, so
that no machine need be stopped for relacing
and replacing them. The readjustment will
be done during the noon hour and between
5 and 7 o'clock in the evening, after the day
shift has quit work and before the night
shift has begun.



Excavation in Empire District.

On October 12, twenty steam shovels of the
100-ton class working in the Empire construc-
tion district of the Central Division, excavated
25,623 cubic yards in an 8-hour day, an average
of 1,281 cubic yards for every shovel in the
district on that date. During this period,
the shovels were under steam 160 hours; were
actually at work 116 hours and 25 minutes;
were waiting for cars 23 hours and thirty-
minutes, the rest of the time being lost in
moving back, repairing shovels, cleaning
track, etc.



Adjustment of Land Claims.

An agreement has been reached between
the Isthmian Canal Commission and the
Panama Railroad Company, through their
Counsel and Chief Attorney, and Hinckley
and Ganson of Panama, representing 58
claimants, whereby claims for improvements
on lands to be inundated by the waters of
Gatun Lake will be adjusted for $21,559.
The claimants' estimate of the value of the
improvements was §66,000. Originally, 116
claims were presented, but only 58 of these
were adjusted, some were rejected, and about
thirty remain to be settled.

Agents of the Panama Railroad Company
were sent into the Trinidad valley to locate
the claims on blue prints showing the situation
and elevation of each holding, and to deter-
mine the character of the improvements.
The Counsel and Chief Attorney will arrange
for the identification of the claimants at the
time the payments are to be made, and thus a
double check will be obtained on the land and
the claimants. No allowance was made for
clearing or for yearly crops, but the occupants
may remain on the land to gather the crops
at their own risk until the land is flooded.
Improvements may be moved.

Outside of the Canal Zone and in the Trini-
dad valley 34 claimants were found on



66



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV., No. 9.



NOTES OF PROGRESS,



{Continued.)



Panama railroad land and their claims were
allowed at S14.799; inside the Canal Zone on
railroad lands there were 13 claimants whose
claims were adjusted at $6,210. All this land
is owned by the Panama Railroad Company
on grant from the Colombian Government.
Eleven claimants on land owned by the United
States Government at Guarapo, near Gatun,
title having been acquired from the French
canal company, were allowed $550.

High Tides at Pacific Entrance.

High tides accompanied by high winds at
the Pacific entrance to the Canal last week
drove the water at times over the breakwater
which is being built from the shoreline toward
Naos Island. On October 16, the amplitude,
the difference between high and low tide, was
10.8 feet, on October 20, the amplitude was
greatest, 20.6 feet, and on October 22 it had
fallen to 17.2 feet. On October 20, the lowest
low tide was 9.6 feet below mean sea level,
and the highest high tide was 11 feet
above mean sea level. The maximum alti-
tude recorded since December 23, 1905, was
that of April 11, 1910—20.8 feet, and the
maximum amplitude last week was only
two-tenths of a foot less than this. The
maximum amplitude each year since 1905, as
compared with that of October 20, is shown
in the following statement:

1906. May 9 and November 18 20.1 feet

1907. January 16 19.0 feet

1908. October 11 20.1 feet

1909. October 2 20.6 feet

1910. April 11 20.8 feet

1910, October 20 20.6 feet



Concrete in Gatun Locks.

The concrete work in Gatun Locks is about
39 per cent completed, 822,668 cubic yards
out of a total of 2,095,000, having been placed
at the close of work on October 22. The
record of concrete placed each day last week,
and the total up to and including October 22,
is shown in the following statement:



DATE.


Concrete


Large


Hours


No. of


Total.




placed.


stone.


worked.


mixers






Cu. Yds.


Cu. Yds.






Cu. Yds.


Oct. 17.


3,000


323


90:16


8


3.323


Oct. 18.


3,434


326?


87:27


8


3.760J


Oct. 19.


3,304


3495


95:52


10


3.653J


Oct. 20.


2,734


340!


87:20


10


3.074J


Oct. 21.


3,072


358


92:28


8


3,430


Oct. 22.


2.873


249


90:42


8


3,122


Total.


18,417


1,'Mr,;






20,363}


Previ-












ously






















802.305}












Grand




total .










822.668J




'









Miraflores Locks.



The output of concrete with the temporary
plant in the upper lock at Miraflores is now
averaging over 800 cubic yards for each 8-
hour day. The work is done by six mixers,
two of which are of two cubic yards capacity,
and the others of one-half cubic yard capacity
each. There are two other small mixers as-
signed In these locks, but they are undergoing
a general overhauling having been in com-
mission almost continuously for nearly a year
and a half.

The lateral culverts in both 400-foot cham-
bers and six in the east and five in the west
600-foot chambers of the lock have been fin-
ished, the foundation of the east side wall has



been extended for about one-half of its total
length, and work on the north head walls has
made headway. The output of the trestle mix-
ers is entirely utilized in the construction of the
east side wall, it being desired to build it as rap-
idlyaspossiblein order to curtailinconvenience
from slides which occur in the earth bank after
heavy rains. The work of removing the
remaining excavation in the west chamber by
steam shovel is in progress. The west berm
crane will be completed in a few days, but
will probably not be used to any extent until
the west wall excavation is finished.

The record of concrete placed at these locks
during the six 8-hour working days of the week
ending October 22, and of the total laid to
that date, follows:



the effect that there is no swell and very little
tide in the harbor, and that ships can lie at
anchor and swing in any direction without
touching bottom.



Lock Work at Pedro Miguel.

A statement of the concrete laid in the locks
at Pedro Miguel during the six 8-hour work-
ing days of the week ending October 22, and
of the total laid to that date, follows:



CUBIC YARDS.





AUXILIARY PLANT.


Date.


2. Cubic

yard

mixers.


54-Cubic
yard
mixers.


Large
stone.


Total.


October 17....
October 18. . . .
October 19. . . .
October 20 ... .
October 21 ... .
October 22. . . .


Cu. Yds.
381
434
444
288
340
318


Cu. Yds.
495
485
442
428
524.5
270


Cm. Yds.
18
10
5

5

5


Cm. Yds.
894
929
891
716
869.5
593


Total

Previously


2,205


2,644.5


43
920


4,892.5
39,884












963


44,776.5











Date.


Con-


Auxil-








struction


iary


Large


Total.




plant.


plant.


stone.




October 17. . . .


1,984


272


18


2,274


October 18 ... .


1,646


182


14


1,842


October 19. . . .


1,984


150


6


2,140


October 20. . . .


1,982


154


10


2,146


October 21. . . .


2,052


298


14


2,364


October 22. . . .


2,058


262




2,320


Total


11,706


1,318


62


13,086


Previously
















3,352


341,447












3,414


354,533











Knights of Columbus.

All members of the Knights of Columbus
on the Isthmus, who are not affiliated with
Panama Council, No. 1371, are requested to
send their names, council number, and loca-
tion to the undersigned for insertion in the
directory.

Wm. J. Ergenzinger, Grand Knight.

Empire, C. Z. October 23 1910.



Obituary.

James Lynch, a white American, employed
by the Pacific Division, died at Ancon Hos-
pital on October 13, aged 38 years. His home
was in New York where his brother lives at
340 State street. He had been on the Isthmus
six months.



In case the harbor at Colon is too rough
during the visit of President Taft, November
being one of the months when "northers" are
frequent, the cruiser on which he comes and
its convoy can be coaled in the bay at Porto
Bello. An inquiry as to the conditions for
coaling at Porto Bello has been answered to



Notice to Shriners.

All members of the Ancient Arabic Order,
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, please send your
name, name of temple, and Isthmian address
to the undersigned at your earliest conven-
ience, also indicating whether or not you
have your "fez" on the Isthmus. Shriners
not having a "fez" are advised to send for
one at once. Gerald D. Bliss.

Pedro Miguel, C. Z., October 21, 1910.



Sailing of the Ancon.

The sailing of the steamship Ancon has been
fixed for 3 p. m., Thursday, October 27, from
pier No. 11, Cristobal.



LABOR FORCE AND QUARTERS IN SEPTEMBER.

On September 28, there were 35,369 employes actually at work on the Canal and the Pan-
ama railroad, and of the number, 29,688 were Canal employes. The gold force on the Canal
work, composed almost entirely of white Americans, was 4,459.

The report of the Chief Quartermaster for September shows that the number of family
quarters occupied by "gold" employes was 1,704, which is 4 less than in August, and the
occupants numbered 5,221, an increase of 41. Of this number, 1,765 were women, and 1,755
children. Bachelor quarters occupied by "gold" employes numbered 1,899 and the occu-
pants numbered 3,336, of whom 121 were women. The family quarters occupied by
European laborers numbered 291, and the occupants, 920: bachelor quarters, 116, and the
number of occupants, 5,362. The family quarters occupied by West Indians numbered
1,077, and the occupants, 3,519: bachelor quarters, 266, and the number of occupants, 4,885,

A statement of the force actually at work on September 28, follows:





>.

5

c




Artisans.


European
Laborers.


West Indian
Laborers.


Total
Silver.


2
o

O

3




s


Eh

■o
a

CO


Depari mknt.


P
u
3


a

u

CM


a

p

u

CM


2

a
u
u

o

CM


ui
u


in

C

u

o

CM


n


V
V


n

e
y



o

CM


a

o


m
c
u


2

a

V

u

o


Cft

a
u


Const'ct'n andEiKT'fnff .
Civil Administration


4,346

160

692

1.009

605

8

4


16
3


25

"2


275

2

2

82

1


656

3


2.617
18


3,171


1,658


114


554


3,307


3.684

5

378

894


283

"8'
11


20.706

188

1,094

2.622

607

8

4


3.386
301
372
227
61
21
91


24,092
489


3 2


2

238


4
17






3
10


1.466


179
1


lt3


14




2,849




668




















29


Examinat'u of Accounts.


























95




11
























Total


6,824


19


362


842


2.800


3.411


1.679


128


554


3,320


4,961


302


25.229


3.459


29,688











Panama railroad force. 3,030; Panama railroad relocation force. 1,593; Panama railroad commissary force.
1.008. Total, 5,681. I. C. C. force. 29,688. Grand total. 35,369.



October 26, 1910.



THE CANAL RECORD



67



POLITICAL ACTIVITY.



Government Employes May Not Take an Active
Part in Political Movements.

At the request of the Civil Service Commis-
sion, the portion of the circular warning
against activity in politics by federal officers
and employes, which is applicable to I. C. C.
employes, is published for the information
of all concerned.

The Isthmian Canal Commission will co-
operate with the Civil Service Commission
in punishing violations of the rules and laws
specified.

WARNING AGAINST ACTIVITY IN POLITICS BY FEDERAL
OFFICERS AND EMPLOYES.

2. Political Assessments or Contributions — The Civil
Service Act provides that "no person in the public
service is for that reason under any obligations to con-
tribute to any political fund, or to render any political
service, and ***** he will not be removed or otherwise
prejudiced for refusing to do so." Section 118 of the
Criminal Code provides that no Federal officer or em-
ploye shall, directly or indirectly, solicit or receive, or
be in any manner concerned in soliciting or receiving
any political assessment, subscription, or contribution
from any other Federal officer or employe. Section 120
of the Criminal Code prohibits the discharge, promo-
tion, or degrading of any officer or employe for giving
or failing to make any political contribution. Section
121 of the Criminal Code prohibits any Federal officer
or employe from making any such political contribution
to another Federal officer or employe, and Section 1 19
prohibits the solicitation or receipt of any political con-
tribution in any room or building occupied in the dis-
charge of official duties by any officer or employe of the
United States, or on other Federal premises, by any per-
son whatsoever, whether in the public service or not.
In connection with this latter provision the United
States Supreme Court has held that a solicitation by
letter or circular addressed and delivered by mail or
otherwise to an officer or an employe of the United
States at the office or building in which he is employed
in the discharge of his official duties, is a solicitation
within the meaning of the law, the solicitation taking
place where the letter was received. Section 122 of the
Criminal Code provides that whoever shall violate any
provision of the four sections above mentioned shall be
fined not more than S5.000. or imprisoned not more
than three years, or both.

It is the duty of the Civil Service Commission to see
that the Civil Service Act and Rules and the above
mentioned sections of the Criminal Code, which were
originally enacted as a part of the Civil Service Act, are
strictly enforced and it will employ every legitimate
and available means to secure the prosecution and pun-
ishment of persons who may violate them. The Com-
mission requests any person having knowledge of any
such violation to lay the facts before it that it may at
once take action thereon.



Electrical Workers.

Local Lodge, Xo. 214, International Broth-
erhood of Electrical Workers, was instituted
at Ancon lodge hall on October 9, by Past
President H. C. Martell, with 41 charter
members. The following officers were elected
and installed: President, Charles Potter;
vice-president, Wells H. Hall; treasurer, Wal-
ter B. Smith; recording and financial secre-
tary, J. L. Harding; press secretary, James
H. O Connell; foreman, Rudolph Oetter, Jr.;
trustees, John Boland, William A. Kelly, H.
E. Weitzel; inspectors, J. S. Marsh, R. M.
McDonald. Committees from the Inter-
national Brotherhood of Steam Shovelmen
and Dredgemen, and the Brotherhood of
Railway Trainmen were present. The insti-
tution of the local lodge, the charter for which
was granted in July, was largely due to the
fact that electrical workers, on account of
prohibitive rates, are practically barred from
insurance benefits. The Brotherhood now
pays a death benefit of $100, but it is pro-
posed to increase the amount to $2,500 as soon
as possible after the first of the year, and in
addition, there will be disability and total
disability payments of SI, 000 and $1,500,
respectively. The regular meetings will be



held at Ancon lodge hall at 1.30 p. m., on the
second and fourth Sundays of each month.



Local Union, No. 677, International Broth-
erhood of Electrical Workers, will hold meet-
ings in Gatun lodge hall on Wednesday night,
October 26, at 8 o clock, and on Sunday after-
noon, October 30, at 2.30 o clock. Applica-
tions for charter membership must be made
before 2.30 p. m., October 30. All electrical
workers are invited to attend these meetings.
J. W. Smith, Recording Secretary.

Gatun, C. Z., October 21, 1910.



An open meeting of Local Lodge, No. 214,
of the International Brotherhood of Electrical
Workers will be held at Ancon lodge hall on
Sunday, October 30, 1910, at 1.30 p. m.

John L. Harding, F. S. and R. S.

Balboa, C. Z., October 22, 1910.



Steam Shovel Records on P. R. R. Relocation.

The performance of steam shovels on the
Panama railroad relocated line during Sep-
tember, as compared with other months, was
as follows:







Aver-


No. of


Output per shovel.








work-






Month.


Output.


of


ing










shovels


days.


Per day.


Per
month.




Cu. Yds.






Cm Yds.


Cu. Yds.


January .


206,334


8.24


25


1,002


25,040


February


214,411


791


23


1,179


27,106


March...


234,571


7.31


26


1,234


32,089


April ....


212,097


7.15


26


1.140


29,648


May ....


212,135


7.88


25


1,077


26,921


June. . . .


236,689


8.00


26


1 138


29,586


July


197,069


7.44


25


1,060


26.488


August. .


250,341


7.04


27


1.318


35.575


Sept


194,371


5.62


25


1,281


34,585



The best records for September were made
as follows:



Shovel No.


Cubic Yards.


Earth.


Rock.


Total.


121


31,160
9,365
2,725


9,330
24,280
37,030


40,490


123. .


33.645


257


39,755







Gatun Dam Spillway.

The progress of concrete laying in the
spillway of Gatun Dam during the weeek
ending October 22 is shown in the following
statement:





Cubic Yards.


Date.


Concrete


Large
rock.


Total.




254
284
244


10
10
12


264




294




256




268


268




308
330




308




330






Total


1,688


32


1.720
98.846












100,566











New Steamship Service Begun.

The steamer Pennsylvania, one of the two
vessels which the Pacific Mail Steamship
Company have transferred from its coast
service to the fast freight service between
San Francisco and the Isthmus, arrived at
the port of Balboa on the first trip, under
the new schedule on Friday, October 14, one
day late. The steamer sails on its return
trip on October 23.

The Stanley Dollar, one of the three vessels
in the new services of the California-Atlantic



Steamship Company, between San Francisco
and Balboa, arrived in Panama Bay on Mon-
day, October 17, also a little behind its
schedule. The boats of this service make
one stop en route, calling at San Pedro, t he-
port of Los Angeles. The Stanley Dollar
left San Francisco, October 1 ; the Mackinaw,
which is provided with cold storage space, left
there on October 15, and the C. W. Femwick
is scheduled to leave on October 31.



Clothing for District Prisoners.

District prisoners will be supplied with two-
piece uniforms of khaki, in which to work, as
soon as some cloth owned by the Zone Govern-
ment can be made into clothing at the tailor
shop in Culebra penitentiary. Heretofore,
the district prisoners have been obliged to
work in clothing worn by them when arrested,
and the result has been that many men have
lived in wet clothing day after day. The new
uniforms will be used by the men while at
work, and they will then be able to put on
dry clothing after their return to the jails at
night. District prisoners are short term men
who are confined at the district jails and not
sent to the penitentiary. The long term
prisoners will continue to use striped suits
while at work.



Ancon Rock Crusher.

A statement of the rock crushed at Ancon
quarry in the weeks ending October 15, and
22, respectively, follows:



DATE.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
Yards.




8:10
8:05
7:15
7:45
7:05
7:25
6:45


3.345




3.405




2.575




3.375




2.550




2,540




2,300






Total


52:30


20.090


Date.


Hours
worked.


Cubic
Yards.




7:15
7:40
7:55
7:45
7:10
6:25


2,420


October 18


2,625




2,120




2,845




2,200




1.975








44:10


14,185







University Club Election.

At its annual election on the evening of
October 15, the University Club of Panama
chose the following officers for the ensuing
year: President, T. C. Hinckley; vice-pres-
ident, W. H. May; second vice-president,
A. L. Robinson; secretary, J. E. Marsh;
treasurer, A. E. Cornwell; board of governors,
J. K. Baxter, W. G. Comber, F. B. Fearon,
J. St.C.Hunt, O. E. Malsbury, C. C. Metcalf,
A. C. Parke.



Edwin Warner, a Jamaican, check Xo.
102,393, an employe of the Atlantic Divi-
sion at Gatun, was run over and instantly
killed about 7 p. m., Tuesday, October 25,
as the Gatun shuttle train was entering the
yard at the Colon station. The accident oc-
curred as he was alighting from the train.



Dr. S. T. Darling of the Ancon Hospital
laboratory and J.J. McGuigan of the Panama
Health Office left on Monday, October 24,
for the province of Los Santos to investigate
the reported appearance of smallpox in that
section.



68



THE CANAL RECORD



Vol. IV.. No. 0.



YEAR WITH THE CLUBHOUSES.



Field Enlarged During 1909-10, and a Material
Gain In Membership Was Made.

During the fiscal year 1909-10, two new
clubhouses, a large one at Gatun on March 5,
and a smaller one at Porto Bello on April 12,
were opened by the Isthmian Canal Commis-
sion, increasing the number of such buildings
to six. The largest membership for any month
of the fiscal year was 1,643 in June, 1910, and
the smallest was 1,075 in November, 1909.
The membership on June 30, 1910, was 1,222.
About 2,479 different men availed themselves
of the membership privilege, as compared
with 2,140 during the preceding year. The
gross receipts amounted to $64,973.12, an
average of $5,414.42 a month, which was
$615.56 a month greater than the year before,
and $933.55 a month greater than two years
ago. The net balance above estimated liabil-
ities was $8,156.54, which was $6,987.11
greater than the net balance on June 30, 1909.
Collections on account of dues alone aggre-
gated $13,493. The total receipts of the re-
freshment counters were $25,025.54, a daily
average of $68.67, and a gain over the year
before of $2,795.14. These are operated as